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A. KIRK GRAYSON 



ASSYRIAN RULERS 
OF THE EARLY FIRST MILLENNIUM BC 

I (1114-859 BC) 



THE ROYAL INSCRIPTIONS OF MESOPOTAMIA 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



A. Kirk Grayson (Toronto) 

Director and Editor-in-Charge of Assyrian Periods 

Ronald F.G. Sweet (Toronto) 
Editor-in-Chief 

Dietz (X Edzard (Munich) 
Editor-in-Charge of Early Periods 

John A. Brinkman (Chicago) 
Editor-in-Charge of Babylonian Periods 

Grant Frame (Toronto) 
Assistant Director 



Louis D. Levine (Toronto) 
Technical Adviser 

Veysel Donbaz (Istanbul) 

Paul Garelli (Paris) 

Fawzi Rashid (Baghdad) 

Liane Jakob-Rost (Berlin) 



Volumes Published 

ASSYRIAN PERIODS 

1 Assyrian Rulers of the Third and Second Millennia BC (TO ins BC) 

A. KIRK GRAYSON 

2 Assyrian Rulers of the Early First Millennium BC I (1114-859 BC) 

A. KIRK GRAYSON 

EARLY PERIODS 

4 Old Babylonian Period (2003-1595 BC) 

DOUGLAS FRAYNE 



SUPPLEMENTS 

1 Royal Inscriptions on Clay Cones from Ashur now in Istanbul 

V. DONBAZ and A. KIRK GRAYSON 



THE ROYAL INSCRIPTIONS OF MESOPOTAMIA 
ASSYRIAN PERIODS / VOLUME 2 



Assyrian Rulers 

of the Early 
First Millennium BC 

I (1114-859 BC) 



A. KIRK GRAYSON 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PRESS 
Toronto Buffalo London 



University of Toronto Press 1991 
Toronto Buffalo London 
Printed in Canada 

Reprinted 2002 

ISBN 0-8020-5965-1 



Printed on acid- free paper 



Canadian Cataloguing in Publication Data 

Grayson, A. Kirk (Albert Kirk), 1935- 

Assyrian rulers of the early first millennium BC 

I (1114-859 BC) 

(The Royal inscriptions of Mesopotamia. Assyrian periods; v. 2) 

Scores of inscriptions on microfiche (5) in pocket. 

ISBN 0-8020-5965-1 

1. Assyria - Kings and rulers - Sources, 

2, Assyria -History -Sources. 3. Akkadian language -Texls. 

4. Sumerian language - Texts. 5. Cuneiform inscriptions. Akkadian. 

6. Cuneiform inscriptions, Sumerian. 

I. Title. II. Series. 

PJ3815.G73 1991 935 C91-094395-8 



The research and publication of this volume 

have been supported by 

the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada 

and the University of Toronto. 



To 
Ronald Morton Smith 



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Contents 



Foreword / ix 

Preface / xi 

Editorial Notes / xiii 

Bibliographical Abbreviations / xv 

Other Abbreviations / xx 

Object Signatures / xxi 

Introduction / 3 

Tiglath-pileser I (1114-1076 BC) A.0.87 / 5 

Asared-apil-Ekur (1075-1074 BC) A.0.88 / 85 

Assur-bel-kala (1073-1056 BC) A.0.89 / 86 

Ertba-Adad II (1055-1054 BC) A. 0.90 / 113 

Samsl-Adad IV (1053-1050 BC) A. 0.91 / 117 

Ashurnasirpal I (1049-1031 BC) A.0.92 / 122 

Shalmaneser n (1030-1019 BC) A. 0.93 / 124 

As§ur-narafi IV (1018-1013 BC) A.0.94 / 125 

Assur-rabi II (1012-972 BC) A. 0.95 / 125 

Assur-resa-isi II (971-967 BC) A. 0.96 / 126 

Tiglath-pileser u (966-935 BC) A. 0.97 / 129 

Assur-dan II (934-912 BC) A. 0.98 / 131 

Adad-nSrSrl H (911-891 BC) A.0.99 / 142 

Tukulti-Ninurta H (890-884 BC) A. 0.100 / 163 

Ashurnasirpal II (883-859 BC) A.0.101 / 189 

Unidentified Fragments A.O.O.1013-1018 / 394 

Clay Cone Fragments from Nineveh A. 0.0. 1019-1026 / 396 

Minor Variants and Comments / 399 

Index of Museum Numbers / 411 

Index of Excavation Numbers / 421 

Concordances of Selected Publications / 423 

Scores of Inscriptions (microfiches) / 1-457 

(the microfiches are in an envelope at the back of the book) 



This page intentionally left blank 



Foreword 



The ancient kings of Mesopotamia ruled one of the two great literate civilizations that set the course of 
the earliest history of the ancient Near East. Their temples and tombs do not waken vivid images in the 
minds of the modern reader or television viewer, as do those of the other great centre of early Near 
Eastern civilization, Egypt. But their cities, some with such familiar names as Babylon, Nineveh, and Ur, 
have been excavated over the past century and a half, according to the standards of the time, and have 
yielded an abundance of records of the boasted accomplishments of these kings. These are the Royal In- 
scriptions of Mesopotamia, mostly telling of building projects and battles, all done ad maiorem gloriam 
deorum. 

The inscriptions, in a cuneiform script, are found on objects of various kinds including tablets, prisms, 
and vases of clay or steles, doorpost sockets, and sculpted wall panels of stone. Inscribed bricks are very 
common. A tiny cylinder seal, often known only from its impression on a clay tablet, or an engraved gem 
may give the name and titles of a king. The languages are Sumerian and Akkadian, the latter usually in 
its Babylonian dialect but with varying admixtures of the Assyrian dialect in documents from the north, 
in the region around modern Mosul. 

The objects on which the inscriptions are found are now for the most part scattered around the world 
in various museums, although inscriptions cut on the face of rocks or on stone building blocks are often 
still in situ. The principal museums with collections of these kinds of antiquities are in Baghdad, Istanbul, 
Berlin, Paris, London, Philadelphia, and Chicago. The dispersal of the inscribed objects around the 
world makes their systematic study difficult, and the difficulty is compounded by the practical in- 
accessibility of many of the journals and monographs in which studies of the inscriptions have been pub- 
lished over the past century and more. 

The purpose of the Royal Inscriptions of Mesopotamia Project is to make these texts available to lay- 
man and specialist alike by publishing standard editions, with English translations, in a series of volumes. 
To carry out this purpose an international editorial board has been formed and a staff of researchers and 
support staff assembled. This process began in the late 1970s with funding from the University of 
Toronto. In 1981 the Project was awarded full funding by the Negotiated Grants Section of the Social 
Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. 

The unique features of these editions are: 

1. Complete corpora of inscriptions are edited, not just selections. 

2. Every inscription is collated against the original when humanly possible. 

3. In the case of texts conflated from several exemplars, a full transliteration 
(in the 'score' format) is published on microfiches included with the volume. 

4. To ensure accuracy the camera-ready copy is prepared by Project staff. 

Toronto R.F.G. SWEET 

September 1990 Editor-in-Chief 



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Preface 



In the preface to RIMA 1 I have already indicated in detail those who assisted in the creation and con- 
tinuing support of the Royal Inscriptions of Mesopotamia Project. For the present volume, I wish to 
thank Douglas Frayne for preparing preliminary editions of some of the texts of Tiglath-pileser i. Grant 
Frame was also good enough to assist here and Hannes Gaiter read and made some astute observations 
on these early texts. Regarding collations, while I have collated most of the texts myself over the years, 
more recently fresh collations were done by Grant Frame, Douglas Frayne, and Hannes Gaiter, and to 
these scholars I express my gratitude. I wish to thank Samuel Paley for useful information on the texts of 
Ashurnasirpal from Calah, in particular the Standard Inscription (A.0. 101.23). 

The RIM team provided invaluable support for the research and publication of this book and I wish to 
express my appreciation to all of them. {Catherine Glaser, Project Manager, watched the procedure with 
concern and in particular at the final stage carefully checked the entire manuscript. Hope Grau initially 
entered the early texts in the computer with her usual exactitude. Linda Wilding entered the remaining 
texts, proofed the printouts, and added corrections at several stages throughout the preparation of the 
book. Ronald Westerby prepared the list of abbreviations and indexes, in the process discovering incon- 
sistencies which needed correction. The computer system was designed by Louis Levine in co-operation 
with Mario Ruggiero. Part-time assistance has been provided by Lynne George. 

Acknowledgment of professional advice and help on the style and format must go to Lorraine Ourom 
of the University of Toronto Press. 

A penultimate manuscript was read by Wilfred Lambert, who made numerous astute comments, partic- 
ularly on the transliterations and translations which have been used. Mario Fales read the manuscript at 
the same stage and also offered detailed criticisms and improvements. To both these scholars I am grate- 
ful for the time and care they have taken. 

I wish to thank the various museums and authorities who have co-operated in the research for this 
book. First I am grateful to the Trustees of the British Museum for permission to publish various texts in 
this volume. Specifically I wish to thank the staff of the Department of Western Asiatic Antiquities in that 
museum, especially Christopher Walker, Julian Reade, Terence Mitchell, Irving Finkel, and John Curtis, 
whose continuing co-operation has been invaluable. To the director of the Archaeological Museum in 
Istanbul I express my thanks for full co-operation, and I thank Veysel Donbaz for the generosity with 
which he has assisted us in the preparation of this volume. In Berlin the staff of the Vorderasiatisches 
Museum, in particular its director Liane Jakob-Rost as well as Evelyn Klengel-Brandt and Joachim Mar- 
zahn, have been extremely helpful to all of the RIM staff and extended to us every courtesy and assis- 
tance, for which we are grateful. I am also indebted to the Directorate of Antiquities and Heritage of the 
Republic of Iraq, its president, Muayad Said Damerji, and his staff, specifically Bahijah Khalil Ismail, 
Fawzi Rashid, and Rasmiya Rashid Jassim, for their assistance. 

For permission to collate texts in their museums we are grateful to the Musee du Louvre in Paris, the 
Yale Babylonian Collection under William Hallo, the University Museum Tablet Collection in Philadel- 
phia under Erie Leichty, the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford (specifically Roger Moorey), the Birmingham 
City Museum, and the Tablet Collection of the Oriental Institute, University of Chicago, under 
John A. Brinkman. 

My appreciation goes out once again to the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of 
Canada and the University of Toronto for providing the funding necessary to conduct the research and to 
publish this volume. 



xii Preface 

Last, but by no means least, I wish yet again to record my gratitude for the ongoing support and en- 
couragement of my family: Eunice, my wife, Vera and Sally, my two daughters, and now Rachel Anne 
Mariek, my granddaughter. 

Toronto 

July 1990 A.K.G. 



Editorial Notes 



A detailed presentation of the principles, policies, and procedures of the Project will be found in the Edi- 
torial Manual (Toronto, 1983). However, the following summary should prove sufficient for the immedi- 
ate needs of most readers of the present volume. The corpus of inscriptions has been divided into three 
sub-series: Assyrian Periods, Babylonian Periods, and Early Periods. The following description applies to 
all three. The purpose of the publication is to present complete groups of texts in reliable editions. It is 
not intended to provide analytical or synthetic studies, but rather to lay the foundation for such studies. 
Thus the heart of each volume is the edition of the texts; extensive discussions of the contents of the text 
are excluded. If such studies are developed by individuals in the course of editing the texts, it is intended 
that they be published elsewhere. Hand-copies and photographs are not included; if such are thought 
necessary by an editor, they will be published outside the main series. To a certain extent the Royal In- 
scriptions of Mesopotamia: Supplements series may be able to accommodate such publications. 

The term 'exemplar' is used in these editions to refer to a single inscription found on one object. The 
term 'text' refers to an inscription that existed in antiquity and may be represented in a number of more 
or less duplicate exemplars. In these editions exemplars of one text are edited together as a 'master text,' 
with a single transliteration and translation. Variants and other details about the exemplars are provided 
in two apparatus critici. Further information about these is given below. When there is difficulty in decid- 
ing on the grouping of inscriptions under specific texts, more information is given in the editions. The edi- 
torial principle is that, regardless of how inscriptions are arranged and published, the reader must be pro- 
vided with full information on what each exemplar contains. 

The Project employs the resources of modern computer technology. A text is entered on the computer 
at the earliest stage when the preliminary edition is prepared. Thereafter a series of editing and proofing 
stages occur until the material is transferred directly onto the photocompositor to produce camera-ready 
copy for publication. The fact that the material is entered on the computer only once, and is regularly 
corrected and improved thereafter, greatly reduces the possibility of typographical errors. During the edit- 
ing process the computer is used for a variety of other purposes, such as preparing concordances of words 
to assist in the identification of fragments. 

The system of numbering the texts throughout the series requires some explanation. The first letter 
stands for the general period: A ™ Assyrian Periods, B = Babylonian Periods, and E = Early Periods. 
The number following this stands for the dynasty. In Assyrian Periods this is always (zero) since the 
question of dynasty number is inapplicable. Details regarding the dynasty numbers for the other two sub- 
series will be found in the relevant volumes. In the third position appears the ruler number; once again, 
the details for each period will be found in the relevant sub-series. In the fourth position is the text 
number. Texts are arranged and numbered according to principles stated in each volume. In the fifth posi- 
tion is the exemplar number, where applicable. Thus A. 0.77. 1.13 is to be interpreted as follows: A = 
Assyrian Periods; = Dynasty Inapplicable; 77 = Shalmaneser i; 1 = Text 1; 13 = Exemplar 13. 

Texts which cannot be assigned definitely to a particular ruler are given text numbers beginning at 1001 
(thus clearly distinguishing them from identified texts) and placed under a ruler according to the following 
principles. If at all possible, such a text is placed under the most probable ruler. In cases where a text can 
only be placed in a general period of several rulers, it is assigned to the ruler who is numerically in the 
middle. Fragments which cannot be identified at all are placed at the end of the book and given a ruler 
number of zero. Some private inscriptions which give information relevant for establishing royal names 
and titles — e.g. 'servant seals' — are included and have been given numbers beginning at 2001. 

Each text edition is normally supplied with a brief introduction containing general information. This is 
followed, if there is more than one exemplar, by a catalogue containing basic information about all 



xiv Editorial Notes 

exemplars. This includes museum and excavation numbers, provenance, dimensions of the object (in the 
case of broken objects the symbol + is added), lines preserved, and indication of whether or not the in- 
scription has been collated (c = collated with the original, p = collated with a photo, and n = not col- 
lated; a column with this information has cpn at its head). The next section is normally a commentary 
containing further technical information and notes. The bibliography then follows. Items are arranged 
chronologically, earliest to latest, with notes in parentheses after each item. These notes indicate the ex- 
emplars with which the item is concerned and the nature of the publication, using the following key 
words: provenance, photo, copy, edition, translation, and study. Some standard reference works are not 
normally cited, although they are fundamental in the collecting and editing of these texts, viz. the bib- 
liographies by R. Caplice et aL, entitled Keilschriftbibliographie and published in Orientalia; the anno- 
tated bibliography by Borger, HKL 1-3; the dictionaries von Soden, AHw and CAD; and the study of ep- 
ithets by Seux, ERAS. 

In the editions proper, each page gives all the information the vast majority of readers will need in 
order to understand the text transliterated on that page. In the left-hand column is the transliteration, in 
the right-hand column the English translation, and at the bottom of the page an apparatus criticus of ma- 
jor variants found in the different exemplars of the text. In some volumes a distinction is made between 
major and minor variants, the major variants being placed at the bottom of the page and the minor vari- 
ants at the back of the book. Major and minor variants are essentially non-orthographic and orthographic 
variants respectively. An exception is proper nouns, orthographic variants of which can be particularly 
significant; these are normally included on the page as major variants, In the apparatus criticus, the text 
line numbers are in bold face, followed after a period by the exemplar number(s) in normal typeface. 
Complete transliterations of all exemplars in the style of musical scores will be found on microfiches ac- 
companying the volume. There the reader who finds the notes on variants insufficient may check the full 
reading of any exemplar. Such scores are not normally given, however, for bricks and seal inscriptions. 

Lines are numbered in succession, and no indication of reverse or column numbers is normally given 
except 1) in a summary form in a commentary, 2) if a text is broken, or 3) in the case of multi-column in- 
scriptions, if there are several hundreds of lines. If a text is divided into sections by horizontal lines, such 
lines are drawn across the transliterations and translations. 

In the transliterations, lower case Roman is used for Sumerian and lower case italics for Akkadian. 
Logograms in Akkadian texts appear in small capitals. Italics in the translation indicate either an uncer- 
tain translation or a w r ord in the original language. The system of sign values in Borger, Zeichenliste, is 
followed. Akkadian is usually left in transliteration with logograms uninterpreted. When, however, it is 
transcribed and logograms are interpreted, the system of von Soden, AHw, is followed. This happens, for 
example, in restorations. Further technical details about the system of transliteration are given in the Edi- 
torial Manual. 

Toronto R.F.G. SWEET 

July 1990 Editor-in-Chief 



Bibliographical Abbreviations 



AAA 




AAAS 




AfK 




AfO 




AfO Bei 


h. 


AHw 




AJSL 




Andrae, 


AAT 


Andrae, 


Coloured Ceramics 


Andrae, 


Festungswerke 


Andrae, 


Stelenreihen 


Andrae, 


WEA 2 


ANEP 2 





A NET-* 

AnOr 
AnSt 
AOAT 

Arch, 

Arch, Anz, 
Arnaud, Emar 6/3 

Aro, Innnitiv 

ARRIM 

Asher-Greve, Genlen und Krieger 

ATAT^ 

Bagh. For. 

Bagh. Mitt. 

Barnett, Assyrian Sculpture 

Barnett and Falkner, Tigl. 



BASOR 

Bezold, Cat. 

Bezold, HKA 

BiOr 

BM Guide 

Bohl, Leiden Coll. 

Borker-Klahn, Bildstelen 



Borger, Asarh. 
Borger, BAL 1 



Annals of Archaeology and Anthropology. Liverpool, 1908-48 

Les annales archeologiques arabes syriennes. Damascus, 195 1 — 

Archiv fur Keilschriftforschung, vols. 1-2. Berlin, 1923-25 

Archiv fur Orientforschung, vol. 3- (vol. 1-2 = AfK). Berlin, Graz, and Horn, 1926- 

Archiv fur Orientforschung, Beiheft. Berlin, Graz, and Horn, 1933- 

W. von Soden, Akkadisches Handworterbuch, 3 vols. Wiesbaden, 1965-81 

American Journal of Semitic Languages and Literatures. Chicago, 1884-1941 

W. Andrae, Der Anu-Adad Tempel in Assur ( = WVDOG 10). Leipzig, 1922 

W. Andrae, Coloured Ceramics from Ashur and Earlier Ancient Assyrian Wail-Paintings. 

London, 1925 

W. Andrae, Die Festungswerke von Assur ( = WVDOG 23). Leipzig, 1913 

W. Andrae, Die Stelenreihen in Assur ( = WVDOG 24). Leipzig, 1913 

W. Andrae, Das wiedererstandene Assur, 2. Auflage. Munich, 1977 

J.B. Pritchard (ed.), The Ancient Near East in Pictures Relating to the Old Testament, 2nd 

edition. Princeton, 1969 

J.B. Pritchard (ed.), Ancient Near Eastern Texts Relating to the Old Testament, 3rd edition. 

Princeton, 1969 

Analecta Orientalia. Rome, 1931- 

Anatolian Studies. London, 1951 — 

Alter Orient und Altes Testament. Neukirchen-Vluyn, 1968- 

Archaeologia. London, 1888-1966 

Archaologischer Arizeiger. Berlin, 1888-1981 

D. Arnaud, Textes sumeriens et accadiens, tome 3: texte ( = Recherches au pays d'Astata, Emar 

6). Paris, 1986 

J. Aro, Die akkadischen Infinitiv-konstruktionen ( = Studia Orientalia 26). Helsinki, 1961 

Annual Review of the Royal Inscriptions of Mesopotamia Project. Toronto, 1983- 

J.M. Asher-Greve and G.J. Selz, Genien und Krieger aus Nimrud: Neuassyrische Reliefs 

Assurnasirpals n. und Tiglat-Pilesars in. Zurich, 1980 

H. Gressmann (ed.), Altorientalische Texte zum Alten Testament, 2. Auflage. Berlin and 

Leipzig, 1926 

Baghdader Forschungen. Mainz am Rhein, 1979- 

Baghdader Mitteilungen. Berlin, 1960- 

R.D. Barnett, Assyrian Sculpture in the British Museum. Toronto, 1975 

R.D. Barnett and M. Falkner, The Sculptures of Assur-nasir-apli n (883-859 B.C.) Tiglath- 

pileser in (745-727 B.C.) Esarhaddon (681-669 B.C.) from the Central and South-West Palaces 

at Nimrud. London, 1962 

Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research. New Haven, 1919- 

C. Bezold, Catalogue of the Cuneiform Tablets in the Kouyunjik Collection of the British 

Museum, 5 vols. London, 1889-99 

C. Bezold, Historische Keilschrifttexte aus Assur ( = Sitzungsberichte der Heidelberger Aka- 

demie der Wissenschaften, philosophisch-historische Klasse, 8. Abhandlung). Heidelberg, 1915 

Bibliotheca Orientalis. Leiden, 1943- 

British Museum. A Guide to the Babylonian and Assyrian Antiquities, 3rd edition. London, 

1922 

F.M.T. Bohl, Medeelingen uit de Lcidischc Vcrzameling van spijkerschrift-Inscripties, 3 vols. 

Amsterdam, 1933-36 

Borker-Klahn, Altvorderasiatische Bildstelen und vergleichbare Felsreliefs (-Bagh. For. 4). 

Mainz am Rhein, 1982 

R. Borger, Die Inschriften Asarhaddons, Konigs von Assyrien ( = AfO Beih. 9). Graz, 1956 

R. Borger, Babylonisch-assyrische Lesestucke, 3 vols. Rome, 1963 



XVI 

Borger, EAK 1 

Borger, HKL 
Borger, Zeichenliste 

Brinkman, PKB 



Budge, 


Rise and Progress 


Budge, 


Sculptures 


CAD 




CAH 




Collon, 


First Impressions 


CRAIB 




CRRA 




CT 




Damas. 


Mitt. 


Deimel Festschrift 


Delaporte, Louvre 2 



DLZ 

Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA 

van Driel, Assur 
DV 

Ebeling, KAR 

Ebeling, LKA 

Ebeling, SVAT 

Ellis, Foundation Deposits 
Engel, Damoncn 
Fales, ARIN 

Fales, Censimenti 

Fales, Cento Lettere Neo-Assire 1 

Frankena, Takultu 

Frankfort, Cylinder Seals 

FuB 

Gadd, Stones 

Goldziher Memorial 
Grayson, ARI 
Grayson, Chronicles 

Grayson, RIMA 1 

Grayson and Redford, 
Papyrus and Tablet 
Gregoire, MVN 10 
Hall, Sculpture 
Haller, Graber 
Haller, Heiligtiimer 

HUCA 



Bibliographical Abbreviations 

R, Borger, Einleitung in die assyrischen Konigsinschriften, Erster Teil: Das zweite Jahrtausend 

v. Chr. ( = Handbueh der Orientalistik Erganzungsband 5/1/1). Leiden, 1961 

R. Borger, Handbuch der Keilschriftliteratur, 3 vols. Berlin, 1967-75 

R. Borger, Assyrisch-Babylonische Zeichenliste, 2. Auflage (-AOAT 33/33A). Neukirchen- 

Vluyn, 1981 

J. A. Brinkman, A Political History of Post-Kassite Babylonia 1158-722 B.C. ( = AnOr 43). 

Rome, 1968 

E.A.W. Budge, The Rise and Progress of Assyriology. London, 1925 

E.A.W. Budge, Assyrian Sculptures in the British Museum, Reign of Ashur-nasir-pal, 885-860 

B.C. London, 1914 

The Assyrian Dictionary of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago. Chicago, 

1956- 

I.E.S. Edwards, C.J. Gadd, N.G.L. Hammond, et al. (eds.)» The Cambridge Ancient History, 

2nd and 3rd editions. Cambridge, 1970- 

D. Collon, First Impressions: Cylinder Seals in the Ancient Near East. London, 1987 
Comptes-rendus des seances de l'academie des inscriptions et belles-lettres. Paris, 1857- 
Compte Rendu de la Rencontre Assyriologique Internationale, [various locations], 1950- 
Cuneiform Texts from Babylonian Tablets in the British Museum. London, 1896- 
Damaszener Mitteilungen. Mainz am Rhein, 1983- 

Miscellanea Orientalia Dedicata A. Deimel Annos lxx Complenti ( = AnOr 12). Rome, 1935 

L. Delaporte, Musee du Louvre. Catalogue des cylindres, cachets et pierres gravees de style 

oriental, tome II: Aquisitions. Paris, 1923 

Deutsche Literaturzeitung. Berlin, 1880- 

V. Donbaz and A.K, Grayson, Royal Inscriptions on Clay Cones from Ashur Now in Istanbul 

(-RIMS 1). Toronto, 1984 

G. van Driel, The Cult of Assur. Assen, 1969 

Drevnosti Vostochnyja, Trudy Vostochnoi Kommissii Imperatorskago Moskovskago Arkheo- 

logicheskago Obshchestva, 5 vols. Moscow, 1891-1915 

E. Ebeling, Keilschrifttexte aus Assur religiosen Inhalts, 2 vols. ( = WVDOG 28 and 34). 
Leipzig, 1919/23 

E. Ebeling, Literarische Keilschrifttexte aus Assur. Berlin, 1953 

E. Ebeling, Stiftungen und Vorschriften fur assyrische Tempel ( = Deutsche Akademie der 

Wissenschaften zu Berlin, Institut fur Orientforschung, Verbffentlichung 23). Berlin, 1954 

R.S. Ellis, Foundation Deposits in Ancient Mesopotamia ( = YNER 2). New Haven and 

London, 1968 

BJ. Engel, Darstellungen von Damonen und Tieren in assyrischen Palasten und Ternpeln nach 

den schriftlichen Quellen. Monchengladbach, 1987 

F.M. Fales (ed.), Assyrian Royal Inscriptions; New Horizons in Literary, Ideological, and 

Historical Analysis. Rome, 1981 

F.M. Fales, Censimenti e Catasti di Epoca Neo-Assira ( = Studi Economici e Technologici 2). 

Rome, 1973 

F.M. Fales, Cento Lettere Neo-Assire traslitterazione e traduzione, commento e note, I: nn. 

1-45. Venice, 1983 

R. Frankena, Takultu. De sacrale maaltijd in het Assyrische riteel met een over-zicht over dc in 

Assur vereerde goden. Leiden, 1954 

H. Frankfort, Cylinder Seals: A Documentary Essay on the Art and Religion of the Ancient 

Near East. London, 1939 

Forschungen und Berichte. Berlin, 1957- 

C.J. Gadd, The Stones of Assyria: the Surviving Remains of Assyrian Sculpture, their 

Recovery and their Original Positions. London, 1936 

S. Lowinger and J. Somogyi, Ignace Goldziher Memorial Volume. Budapest, 1948-58 

A.K. Grayson, Assyrian Royal Inscriptions, 2 vols. Wiesbaden, 1972-76 

A.K. Grayson, Assyrian and Babylonian Chronicles (-Texts from Cuneiform Sources 5). 

Locust Valley, 1975 

A.K. Grayson, Assyrian Rulers of the Third and Second Millennia BC (to 1115 BC). Toronto, 

1987 

A.K. Grayson and D.B. Redford (eds.), Papyrus and Tablet. Englewood Cliffs, 1973 

J. -P. Gregoire, Inscriptions et archives administratives cuneiformes, l e partie. Rome, 1981 

H.R. Hall, Babylonian and Assyrian Sculpture in the British Museum. Paris and Brussels, 1928 

A. Haller, Die Graber und Grufte von Assur ( = WVDOG 65). Berlin, 1954 

A. Haller, Die Heiligtiimer des Gottes Assur und der Sin-Samas-Tempel in Assur ( = WVDOG 

67), Berlin, 1955 

Hebrew Union College Annual. Cincinnati, 1924- 



Bibliographical Abbreviations 



xvn 



JANES 

JAOS 

JCS 

Jeremias, HAOG 

JESHO 

JHS 

JNES 

Johns, ADD 



JRAS 
JSOR 

JSS 
KB 



Kessler, Nordmesopotamien 



King, AKA 

King, Bronze Reliefs 

King, Cat. 

Koldewey, Tempel 
Koldewey, WEB 

Kupper, Nomades 

Lambert, BWL 

Lambert and Millard, Cat. 

Landsberger, Fauna 



Landsberger, Sam'al 
Langdon, OECT 1 
Layard, Discoveries 
Layard, ICC 
Le Gac, Asn. 

Lehmann-Haupt, Mat. 

Lenormant, Choix 

Luckenbill, ARAB 

Mallowan, Nimrud 

MAOG 

Marzahn and Rost, Ziegeln 1 

MDOG 

Meissner, IAK 

Meltzer, Concluding Formulae 

Messerschmidt, KAH 1 

de Meyer (ed.), Tell 

ed-Der 3 
Millard, Fekherye 



Journal of the Ancient Near Eastern Society of Columbia University. New York, 1968- 

Journal of the American Oriental Society. New Haven, 1893- 

Journal of Cuneiform Studies. New Haven and Cambridge, Mass., 1947- 

A. Jeremias, Handbuch der altorientalischen Geisteskultur. Leipzig, 1929 
Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient. Leiden, 1957- 
Journal of Hellenic Studies. London, 1880- 

Journal of Near Eastern Studies. Chicago, 1942- 

C.H.W. Johns, Assyrian Deeds and Documents, Recording the Transfer of Property, Includ- 
ing the So-called Private Contracts, Legal Decisions and Proclamations, Preserved in the 
Kouyunjik Collections of the British Museum, Chiefly of the Seventh Century B.C., 4 vols. 
Cambridge, 1898-1923 

Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society. London, 1834- 

Journal of the Society of Oriental Research, vols. 1-16. Chicago and Toronto, 1917-32 
Journal of Semitic Studies. Manchester, 1956- 

Keilinschriftliche Bibliothek, Sammlung von assyrischen und babylonischen Texten in 
Umschrift und Ubersetzung, vols. 1-6. Berlin, 1889-1915 

K. Kessler, Untersuchungen zur historischen Topographie Nordmcsopotamicns nach keilschrift- 
liche Quellen des 1. Jahrtausends v, Chr. (^Beihcfte zum Tiibinger Atlas des Vorderen 
Orients, Reihe B, Nr. 26). Wiesbaden, 1980 

E.A. Budge and L.W. King, The Annals of the Kings of Assyria, vol. 1. London, 1902 
L.W. King (ed.), Bronze Reliefs from the Gates of Shalmaneser, King of Assyria B.C. 
860-825. London, 1915 

L.W. King, Catalogue of the Cuneiform Tablets in the Kouyunjik Collection of the British 
Museum, Supplement. London, 1914 

R. Koldewey, Die Tempel von Babylon und Borsippa (- WVDOG 15). Leipzig, 1911 
R. Koldewey, Das wieder erstehende Babylon, Die bisherigen Ergebnisse der deutschen Ausgra- 
bungen. Leipzig, 1914 

J.-R. Kupper, Les nomades en Mesopotamie au temps des rois de Man. Paris, 1957 
W.G. Lambert, Babylonian Wisdom Literature. Oxford, 1960 

W.G. Lambert and A.R. Millard, Catalogue of the Cuneiform Tablets in the Kouyunjik Col- 
lection of the British Museum, Second Supplement. London, 1968 

B. Landsberger, Die Fauna des alten Mesopotamien nach der 14. Tafel der Serie HAR-ra = 
hubullu ( = Abhandlungen der Sachsischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, philologisch- 
historische Klasse 42/6). Leipzig, 1934 

B. Landsberger, SanVal, Studien zur Entdeckung der Ruinenstatte Karatepe ( = TTKY 7/16). 

Ankara, 1948 

S. Langdon, The H. Weld-Blundell Collection in the Ashmolean Museum, vol. 1: Sumerian 

and Semitic Religious and Historical Texts. Oxford, 1923 

A.H. Layard, Discoveries among the Ruins of Nineveh and Babylon, with Travels in Armenia, 

Kurdistan and the Desert. London, 1853 

A.H. Layard, Inscriptions in the Cuneiform Character from Assyrian Monuments. London, 

1851 

Y. Le Gac, Les inscriptions d'A§Sur-nasir~aplu in, roi d'Assyrie (885-860 av. 

edition des textes originaux, d'apres les estampages du British Museum ct 

Paris, 1907 

C.F. Lehmann-Haupt, Materialien zur alteren Geschichte Armeniens und Mesopotamiens. 

Berlin, 1907 

F. Lenormant, Choix de textes cuneiformes inedits ou incomplctement publies 

D.D. Luckenbill, Ancient Records of Assyria and Babylonia, 2 vols. Chicago, 

M.E.L. Mallowan, Nimrud and Its Remains, 2 vols. London, 1966 

Mitteilungen der Altorientalischen Gesellschaft. Leipzig, 1925-43 

J. Marzahn and L. Rost, Die Inschriften der assyrischen Konige auf Ziegeln aus Assur, Teil 1, 

Berlin, 1984 

Mitteilungen der Deutschen Orient-Gesellschaft. Berlin, 1898- 

E. Ebeling, B. Meissner, and E. Weidner, Die Inschriften der altassyrischen Konige ( = Alt- 

orientalische Bibliothek 1). Leipzig, 1926 

CD. Meltzer, Concluding Formulae in Ancient Mesopotamian Royal Inscriptions: The 

Assyrian Sources, 2 vols. University of Toronto PhD Dissertation, 1983 

L. Messerschmidt, Keilschrifttexte aus Assur historischen Inhalts, Erstes Heft ( = WVDOG 16). 

Leipzig, 1911 

L. de Meyer (ed.), Tell ed-Der: Soundings at Abu Habbah (Sippar). Louvain, 1980 

A. Abou-Assaf, P. Bordreuil, and A.R. Millard, La Statue de Tell Fekherye. Paris, 1982 



J.-C), nouvelle 
les monuments. 



. Paris, 1873- 

1926-27 



75 



xvm 



Bibliographical Abbreviations 



Moortgat, VAR 

MSL 

Muscarella, Ladders 

MVAG 

MVN 

NABU 

Nassouhi, MAOG 3/1-2 

OECT 

OLZ 

Studies Oppenheim 

Paley, Ashur-nasir-pal 
Parpola, Toponyms 
Pedersen, Archives 

Place, Ninive et l'Assyrie 
Porada and Hare, Great King 

Postgate, Fifty Documents 
Postgate, Governor's Palace 

Pottier, Antiquites assyriennes 
Preusser, Palaste 
PSBA 
1 R 

3R 

RA 

Rassam, Asshur 

RHA 

RIM 

RIMA 

RIMS 

RLA 

Rost, FuB 22 

Rost, Tigl. 

Rost and Marzahn, VAS 23 

RSO 

RT 

Salvini, Nairi 

Salvini, Tell Barri/Kahat 

Saporetti, Eponimi 
Scheil, Tn. 

Schott, Vorarbeiten 



Schrader, Sebeneh-su 
Schramm, EAK 2 

Schroeder, KAH 2 

Schroeder, KAV 
Seux, ERAS 

Sigrist and Vuk, Franciscanum 

G. Smith, Assyrian Disc. 



A. Moortgat, Vorderasiatische Rollsiegel: tin Beitrag zur Geschichte der Steinschneidekunst. 
Berlin, 1940 

B. Landsberger, et al. (eds.), Materials for the Sumerian Lexicon, Rome, 1937- 

O.W. Muscarella (ed.), Ladders to Heaven: Art Treasures from Lands of the Bible. Toronto, 
1981 

Mitteilungen der Vorderasiatisch-Aegyptischen Gesellschaft, vols. 1-44. Berlin and Leipzig, 
1896-1939 

Materiali per ii vocabolario neosumerico. Rome, 1974- 
Nouvelles assyriologiques breves et utilitaires. Paris, 1987- 

E. Nassouhi, Textes divers relatifs a l'histoire de l'Assyrie (-MAOG 3/1-2). Leipzig, 1927 
Oxford Editions of Cuneiform Texts. Oxford, London, and Paris, 1923- 
Orientalistische Literaturzeitung. Berlin and Leipzig, 1898- 

R.D. Biggs and J. A. Brinkman (eds.), Studies Presented to A.L. Oppenheim, June 7, 1964. 
Chicago, 1964 

S.M. Paley, King of the World: Ashur-nasir-pal n of Assyria 883-859 B.C. Brooklyn, 1976 
S. Parpola, Neo-Assyrian Toponyms ( = AOAT 6). Neukirchen-Vluyn, 1970 
O. Pedersen, Archives and Libraries in the City of Assur: A Survey of the Material from the 
German Excavations, 2 parts ( = Studia Semitica Upsaliensia 6 and 8). Uppsala, 1985/86 
V. Place, Ninive et l'Assyrie, 3 vols. Paris, 1867 

E. Porada and S. Hare, The Great King ... King of Assyria: Assyrian Reliefs in the Metropoli- 
tan Museum of Art. New York, 1945 

J.N. Postgate, Fifty Neo-Assyrian Legal Documents. Warminster, 1976 

J.N. Postgate, The Governor's Palace Archive ( = Cuneiform Texts from Nimrud 2). London, 
1973 
E. Pottier, Catalogue des antiquites assyriennes. Paris, 1924 

C. Preusser, Die Palaste in Assur ( = WVDOG 66). Berlin, 1955 

Proceedings of the Society of Biblical Archaeology, vols 1-40. London, 1878-1918 
H.C. Rawlinson and E. Norris, The Cuneiform Inscriptions of Western Asia, vol. 1: A Selec- 
tion from the Historical Inscriptions of Chaldaea, Assyria, and Babylonia. London, 1861 
H.C. Rawlinson and G. Smith, The Cuneiform Inscriptions of Western Asia, vol. 3: A Selec- 
tion from the Miscellaneous Inscriptions of Assyria. London, 1870 
Revue d'assyriologic el d'archeologie oricntale. Paris, 1886- 
H. Rassam, Asshur and the Land of Nimrod. New York, 1897 
Revue hittite ct asianiquc. Paris, 1930- 
The Royal Inscriptions of Mesopotamia Project. Toronto 
The Royal Inscriptions of Mesopotamia, Assyrian Periods. Toronto, 1987- 
The Royal Inscriptions of Mesopotamia, Supplements. Toronto, 1984- 
Reallexikon der Assyriologie. Berlin, 1932- 

L. Rost, Die Tonnagel-Inschriften aus Assur, FuB 22 (1982) pp. 137-77 

P. Rost, Die Keilschrifttexte Tiglat-Pilesers in. nach den Papierabklatschen und Originalen des 
Britischen Museums. Leipzig, 1893 

L. Rost and J. Marzahn, Assyrische Konigsinschriften auf Ziegeln aus Assur. Berlin, 1985 
Rivista degli studi orientali. Rome, 1907- 

Receuil de travaux relatifs a la philologie et a Farcheologie egyptiennes et assyriennes, vols. 
1-40. Paris, 1870-1923 

M. Salvini, Nairi e Ur(u)atri (^Incunabula Graeca 16). Rome, 1967 

[P.E. Pecorella and] M. Salvini, Tell Barri/Kahat 1: Relazione preliminare sulle campagne 
1980 e 1981 a Tell Barri/Kahat, nel bacino del Habur. Rome, 1982 
C. Saporetti, Gli eponimi medio-assiri ( = Bibliotheca Mesopotamia 9). Malibu, 1979 
V. Scheil, Annales de Tukulti Ninip n, roi d'Assyrie 889-884 ( = Bibliotheque de TExole des 
Hautes Etudes, 4 e section, Sciences historiques et philologiques 178). Paris, 1909 
A. Schott, Vorarbeiten zur Geschichte der Keilschriftliteratur 1: Die assyrischen 
Konigsinschriften vor 722, a) Der Schreibgebrauch ( = Bonner orientalistische Studien 13). 
Stuttgart, 1936 

E. Schrader, Die Keilinschriften am Eingange der Quellgrotte des Sebeneh-su. Berlin, 1885 
W. Schramm, Einleitung in die assyrischen Konigsinschriften, Zweiter Teil: 934-722 v. Chr. 
{ = Handbuch der Orientalistik Erganzungsband 5/1/2). Leiden, 1973 

O. Schroeder, Keilschrifttexte aus Assur historischen lnhalts, Zweites Heft ( = WVDOG 37). 
Leipzig, 1922 

O. Schroeder, Keilschrifttexte aus Assur verschiedenen lnhalts ( = WVDOG 35). Leipzig, 1920 
M.-J. Seux, Epithetes royales akkadiennes et sumeriennes. Paris, 1967 

M. Sigrist and T. Vuk, Inscriptions cuneiformes ( Studium Biblicum Franciscanum Museum 
4). Jerusalem, 1987 
G. Smith, Assyrian Discoveries. New York, 1875 



Bibliographical Abbreviations 



xix 



S. Smith, EHA 
von Soden, SAHG 

von Soden and Rollig, Syllabar 3 
Speleers, Recueil 

Stearns, AfO Beih. 15 

Stephens, YOS 9 

TCL 

Thompson, Century 

Thureau-Dangin, TCL 3 

TSBA 
TSTS 1 

TUAT 

VAS 

Wafler, AOAT 26 

Walker, CBI 



Weidner, IAK 

Weidner, Tn. 

Weissbach, Miscellen 
Winckler, AOF 
Winckler, Sammlung 1 

Winckler, Sar. 

WO 
WVDOG 

WZKM 

YNER 

YOS 

ZA 
ZK 



S. Smith, Early History of Assyria to 1000 B.C. London, 1928 

A. Falkenstein and W. von Soden, Sumerische und akkadische Hymnen und Gebete. Zurich 

and Stuttgart, 1953 

W. von Soden and W. Rollig, Das akkadische Syllabar, 3. Auflage ( = AnOr 42). Rome 1976 

L. Speleers, Recueil des inscriptions de TAsie anterieure des Musees Royaux du Cinquantenaire 

a Bruxelles. Textes sumeriens, babyloniens et assyriens. Brussels, 1925 

J.B. Stearns, Reliefs from the Palace of Ashurnasirpal n ( = AfO Beih. 15). Graz, 1961 

F.J. Stephens, Votive and Historical Texts from Babylonia and Assyria. New Haven, 1937 

Textes cuneiformes du Musee du Louvre, Departement des Antiquites Orientales. Paris, 1910- 

R.C. Thompson and R.W. Hutchinson, A Century of Exploration at Nineveh. London, 1929 

F. Thureau-Dangin, Une relation de la huitieme campagne de Sargon (714 av. J.-C.) ( = Textes 

cuneiformes du Musee du Louvre), Paris, 1912 

Transactions of the Society of Biblical Archaeology. London, 1872-93 

J.W. Wevers and D.B. Redford (eds.), Essays on the Ancient Semitic World ( = Toronto 

Semitic Texts and Studies 1). Toronto, 1970 

O. Kaiser (ed.), Texte aus der Umwelt des Alten Testaments. Gutersloh, 1982- 

Vorderasiatische Schriftdenkmaler der Konigliehen Museen zu Berlin. Leipzig and Berlin, 

1907- 

M. Wafler, Nicht-assyrer neuassyrischer Darstellungen (= AOAT 26). Neukirchen-Vluyn, 1975 

C.B.F. Walker, Cuneiform Brick Inscriptions in the British Museum, the Ashmolean Museum, 

Oxford, the City of Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery, the City of Bristol Museum and 

Art Gallery. London, 1981 

E. Ebeling, B. Meissner, and E. Weidner, Die Inschriften der altassyrischen Konige ( = Alt- 

orientalische Bibliothek 1). Leipzig, 1926 

E. Weidner, Die Inschriften Tukulti-Ninurtas I und seiner Nachfolger ( = AfO Beih. 12). Graz, 

1959 

F.H. Weissbach, Babylonische Miscellen ( = WVDOG 4). Leipzig, 1903 

H. Winckler, Altorientalische Forschungen, 3 vols. Leipzig, 1893-1905 

H. Winckler, Sammlung von Keilschrifttexten 1: Die Inschriften Tiglath-Pilesers i. Leipzig, 

1893 

H. Winckler, Die Keilschrifttexte Sargons nach den Papierabklatschen und Originalen, neu 

herausgegeben, 2 vols. Leipzig, 1889 

Die Welt des Orients. Wuppertal, Stuttgart, and Gottingen, 1947- 

Wissenschaftliche Veroffentlichungen der Deutschen Orient-Gesellschaft. Leipzig and Berlin, 

1901- 

Wiener Zeitschrift fur die Kunde des Morgenlandes. Vienna, 1887- 

Yale Near Eastern Researches. New Haven and London, 1967- 

Yale Oriental Series, Babylonian Texts. New Haven, 1915- 

Zeitschrift fur Assyriologie und verwandte Gebiete. Berlin, 1886- 

Zeitschrift fur Keilschriftforschung und verwandte Gebiete, vols. 1-2. Leipzig, 1884-85 



Other Abbreviations 



Adn. 


Adad-narari 


Asb. 


Ashurbanipal 


Asn. 


Ashurnasirpal 


c 


collated 


c. 


circa 


cm 


centimetre(s) 


col(s). 


column(s) 


DN 


divine name 


dupl. 


duplicate 


ed(s). 


editor(s) 


ex(s). 


exemplar(s) 


%(s). 


figure(s) 


frgm. 


fragment 


GN 


geographical name 


masc. 


masculine 


n 


not collated 


n(n). 


note(s) 


no(s). 


number(s) 


NS 


New Series 


obv. 


obverse 


P 


collated from photo 


P(P)- 


page(s) 


pl(s). 


plate(s) 


PN 


personal name 


reg. 


registration 


rev. 


reverse 


RN 


royal name 


Sar. 


Sargon 


Senn 


Sennacherib 


Shalm 


Shalmaneser 


§A. 


SamsT-Adad 


Tigl. 


Tiglath-pilcscr 


TN. 


TukultT-Ninurta 


var(s). 


variant(s) 


vol(s). 


volume(s) 



+ 1) Between object numbers indicates physical join 
2) After dimensions indicates part of object missing 
( + ) Indicates fragments from same object but no physical join 



Object Signatures 



When the same signature is used for more than one group, the first group in this list is 
meant unless otherwise indicated. For example, 'A' always means the Istanbul collection 
unless stated otherwise. 



A 1) Assur collection of the Arkeoloji Muzeleri, Istanbul 

2) Asiatic collection of the Oriental Institute, Chicago 

AO Collection of Antiquites Orientales of the Musee du Louvre, Paris 

Ash Collection of the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford 

Ass Prefix of excavation numbers from the German excavations at ASSur 

Ass ph Prefix of excavation photos from the German excavations at Assur 

Bab ph Prefix of excavation photos from the German excavations at Babylon 

B Collection of the Rijksmuseum van Oudheden, Leiden 

BCM Birmingham City Museum 

BM British Museum, London 

Bu E.A.W. Budge collection of the British Museum, London 

DT Daily Telegraph collection of the British Museum, London 

ES Eski Sark Eserleri Miizesi of the Arkeoloji Muzeleri, Istanbul 

FM Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge 

GE Gosudarstvviennyj Ermitage, Leningrad 

IM Iraq Museum, Baghdad 

K Kuyunjik collection of the British Museum, London 

Ki L.W. King collection of the British Museum, London 

L 1) Lycklama Collection (now in Musee de la Castre, Cannes) 

2) Cincinnati Art Museum 

LA County Museum of Art, Los Angeles 

LBAF Lands of the Bible Archaeology Foundation 

LKA Prefix of inventory numbers of the Rijksmuseum van Oudheden, Leiden 

MFAB Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 

MMA Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York 

N III Musee Napoleon in, Musee du Louvre, Paris 

ND Prefix of excavation numbers from the British excavations at Nimrud, Iraq 

O Objects in the Section du Proche Orient of the Musees Royaux d'Art et d'Histoire, Brussels 

Rm H. Rassam collection of the British Museum, London 

ROM Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto 

SF Museum Studium Biblicum Franciscanum, Jerusalem 

Sm G, Smith collection of the British Museum, London 

Th R.C. Thompson collection of the British Museum, London 

UM University Museum, Philadelphia 

VA Vorderasiatische Museum, Berlin 

VA Ass As*Sur collection of the Vorderasiatische Museum, Berlin 

VA Bab Babylon collection of the Vorderasiatische Museum, Berlin 

VAT Tablets in the collection of the Vorderasiatische Museum, Berlin 

WAG Walters Art Gallery, Baltimore 

YBC Babylonian collection of the Yale University Library, New Haven 



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ASSYRIAN RULERS 
OF THE EARLY FIRST MILLENNIUM BC 

I (1114-859 BC) 



This page intentionally left blank 



Introduction 



With the royal inscriptions published in this volume we step upon the threshold of Assyrian invasion of 
the biblical and classical worlds, the periods of intense interest to the nineteenth-century explorers and de- 
cipherers and still of great interest today. The first king included here, Tiglath-pileser i, led his triumphant 
armies to the Mediterranean and thus prepared the way in the first millennium for contacts with Palestine, 
Egypt, Anatolia, and points farther west. 1 

The fortunes of Assyria during this time went from one extreme to another, ranging from the peaks of 
military might under Tiglath-pileser i at the beginning and Ashurnasirpal n at the end, to the valley of 
despair during a long period between these kings. Among the numerous protagonists a leading role was 
played by the semi-nomadic Aramaeans, a people familiar from the Bible, and much of the armed conflict 
narrated in these texts concerns the prolonged clash between Assyrians and Aramaeans from the twelfth 
to ninth centuries BC. A fitting conclusion to Assyria's struggle for mastery over south-western Asia in 
these early days of the Neo-Assyrian empire is the creation of a new capital, Calah (Nimrud), by Ashur- 
nasirpal ii who celebrated his triumph with a gigantic banquet to which thousands of subjects from all 
corners of the empire were invited. 2 Ironically, the more powerful Assyria became in the military, polit- 
ical, and economic realms, the more she came under the influence of Babylonian culture. 3 

The relative and absolute chronology of Assyrian kings for this period is well known and the numbers 
assigned to them in this volume follow their order in the Assyrian King List. 4 The quantity of royal in- 
scriptions increases significantly during the centuries spanned in this volume and the detail provided by 
them increases in proportion; but there are still other sources of importance, not least of which are the 
chronicles, king lists, and eponym lists. 

A general description of Assyrian royal inscriptions, including their literary form and the types of ob- 
jects upon which they were inscribed, has already been provided in the first volume of this series. 5 There 
it was observed that there were three basic types, commemorative texts, dedicatory texts, and labels, and 
that beginning with the reign of Tiglath-pileser i, true annals, a form of commemorative text, appeared. 6 
By the end of the epoch covered in the following pages some annals have become so lengthy that they 
were inscribed on a sequence of monumental sculptured stones erected in palaces and temples. 7 

The evolution of Assyrian military strategy, political organization, and imperial administration is mani- 
fest throughout the pages in this volume. The reconstruction and prosperity of Assyrian land and people 
and the addition of new land and people are recurring themes. 8 Gradually Assyrian monarchs became so 
confident of control over some of their expanded holdings that they only led 'show of strength' campaigns 
through them from time to time. 9 The seeds of imperial rule through division into provinces were sown in 
the reign of Adad-narart n and were sprouting by the time of Ashurnasirpal n. Indeed, the ideology of 
the military campaign itself was transformed from a sporadic razzia to an annual event for which a cause 
or purpose was stated. 10 But with these signs of growing power and territorial control appear also the be- 
ginnings of an inner cancer, states and rulers which are nominally under the Assyrian king's authority but 



1 For a history of the period see Grayson, CAH 3/1 pp, 7 On the 'annals series', see the introduction to the reign of 
238-81. Ashurnasirpal n (A.0.101). 

2 Sec A. 0.101,30. 8 See the introduction to the reign of Tiglath-pileser I (A. 0.87), 

3 Sec the introduction to the reign of Tiglath-pileser i (A. 0,87). 9 See the introductions to the reigns of Adad-nararT n, 

4 See Grayson, RIM A 1 p. 3 and nn. 2-3. Tukulti-Ninurta n, and Ashurnasirpal ii (A.0.99-101). 

5 See RIMA 1 pp. 3-4, 10 See the introduction to the reign of Tukultl-Ninurta ii 

6 For further details see the introduction to the reign of (A.0J00), 
Tiglath-pileser i (A. 0.87). 



4 Introduction 

regard themselves as independent. 11 The Assyrian passion for hunting wild animals, either to kill or to 
round up to form herds in Assyria, comes to the fore in this period. 12 

The texts edited in this volume, unlike portions of those in the first volume of this series, have never 
been edited together in a systematic manner. Indeed, for most of the texts no edition since the early 1900s 
has been published at all. Weidner edited and commented upon many of the earlier texts and Borger and 
Schramm between them have provided excellent bibliographies and studies of the corpus as a whole. 
Some years ago I published translations of most of the texts in Assyrian Royal Inscriptions 2 (1976). Re- 
cent research on the Assur texts by Pedersen, Archives 1 and 2 (1985-86), has shed light on the prove- 
nance of some of the royal inscriptions. This scholar has more data on the Assur material, based on his 
research using the Assur excavation records. Unfortunately attempts to collaborate with him in the 
preparation of RIM A 1 and 2 have not come to fruition and these data have been unavailable to us. 

The editorial procedures for the RIM series are outlined in the Editorial Notes by R.F.G. Sweet, and 
their special application to the volumes of the Assyrian Periods has been noted in RIMA 1 p. 4 (bottom 
of page). Two points made there must be stressed. First, provenances of texts are quoted more or less ver- 
batim from published sources and I take no responsibility for their accuracy or consistency; I have had no 
access to unpublished excavation records. Second, inscriptions on bricks and seals are given abbreviated 
catalogues and bibliographies; in some cases the number of exemplars can be endless and common sense 
must prevail. Problems of translation into English have been noted in ibid. p. 5 (top of page). The texts 
in this volume are essentially in the Babylonian dialect (so-called Standard Babylonian), although often 
with Assyrianisms. Thus, when there is a choice of reading either as a Babylonian or an Assyrian form, 
the former has been chosen. The usefulness of the computer in such a large editorial project has already 
been emphasized (see RIMA 1 pp. 5-6), and it has continued to be of great assistance in identifying many 
fragments in this volume. Details will be found in the appropriate editions. The lack of palaeographical 
studies for Assyrian royal inscriptions has been observed before (RIMA 1 p. 6), and a new element is a 
special type of script and clay tablet texture for some tablets from this period. 13 

As in volume 1, the bibliographies provide complete references to works directly relevant to the inscrip- 
tions. I have not attempted to cite the many histories and related studies by various scholars which form 
the necessary background to such an undertaking. 



11 Cf. A.0.96.2001 and A.0. 101.2004-2007. 13 See the Introduction to the reign of Tiglath-pileser i 

12 See the introduction to the reign of Tiglath-pileser i (A.0.87). 
(A.0.87). 



Tiglath-pileser i 



A. 0.87 



The reign of Tiglath-pileser i (1114-1076 BC) marks a new rise in 
Assyria's political and military fortunes, with Assyrian armies march- 
ing farther afield than ever before, from Babylonia in the south-east to 
Lebanon in the west. Not since the time of TukuitT-Ninurta i has there 
been such a powerful and influential monarch on the throne. These 
warlike achievements were accompanied, as usual in Assyria, by 
economic and cultural advances, and indeed the cultural transforma- 
tions during Tiglath-pileser i's reign were both profound and pro- 
longed, having permanent effect on Assyrian culture in the first 
millennium. 

The extent of Tiglath-pileser's conquests and political control has 
been studied in detail recently by J.N. Postgate (AfO 32 [1985] 
pp. 95-101). Among the most dangerous opponents of Assyria in the 
epoch were the Aramaeans, and in the royal inscriptions edited here 
they play a prominent role as arch-enemies of the Assyrian monarch. 
The major conflicts took place in the earlier part of the reign, a period 
to which most of the royal inscriptions date (see the introduction to 
A. 0.87.1). Later on Tiglath-pileser began to lose ground to the 
Aramaeans, a fact not recorded in his royal texts but briefly noted in 
an Assyrian chronicle fragment (Grayson, Chronicles p. 189), where 
we read that Assyria was captured and its people fled to the mountains 
to save their lives. 

As to the cultural developments, considerable scribal activity took 
place at Assur, with much influence evident from Babylonia. Serious 
attention was devoted to collecting, copying, and editing libraries of 
cuneiform documents. The diverse nature of the texts (lexical, divina- 
tory, literary, etc.) found in these libraries seems to have been as 
comprehensive as that of the texts found in later Assyrian libraries, 
although the precise extent of these collections still remains to be 
established (see Weidner, AfO 16 [1952-53] pp. 197-215 and more re- 
cently Pedersen, Archives [1985-86]). Among the various categories of 
texts are collections of palace edicts (Weidner, AfO 17 [1954-56] 
pp. 257-93 and Grayson, ARI 1 §§304-306), Middle Assyrian laws 
(Meek in Pritchard, ANET 3 pp. 180-88, and Weidner, AfO 12 
[1937-39] pp. 46-54), and Assyrian chronicles (Grayson, Chronicles 
pp. 184-89). There is a passage in the Synchronistic History regarding 
Tiglath-pileser's relations with Babylonia (Grayson, Chronicles 
pp. 164-65 ii 14'-24'); he appears in several king lists (Grayson, RLA 6 
pp. 86-135); and fragments of an eponym list for his reign have been 
preserved (Grayson, ARI 2 p. 44 §194). There is also a psalm in praise 
of the king (Ebeling, LKA no. 63) and a statue of a Tiglath-pileser, 
probably the first, is listed in the Address Book of the Gods at Assur 
(Schroeder, KAV 42 i 12 and see Frankena, Takultu pp. 112 and 123). 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87 

Many cuneiform tablets from the time of Tiglath-pileser i and the 
early part of the first millennium have certain features which immedi- 
ately show that they are of this period. The surface of such a tablet is 
ivory in colour while the inner core is red, so that the red shows 
through in the wedges where a stylus penetrates the surface (cf. 
A.0.87. 1001). Or conversely some tablets have a white core with a red 
slip (cf. A. 0.87. 7). The overall effect is aesthetically attractive. The 
other feature is that some cuneiform signs have forms which are pecu- 
liar to these tablets. For details see Weidner, AfO 16 (1952-53) pp. 
201-206 and Lambert, AfO 18 (1957-58) pp. 38-40. Tablets with these 
features have sometimes been loosely called Tiglath-pileser i library 
texts', but any time between c. 1200-850 BC is possible. 

Turning to the royal inscriptions, which are our concern here, there 
is also a major development: the first appearance of real annals. A 
gradual emergence of forerunners to this text genre began much ear- 
lier, as scribes added more and more military details to commemora- 
tive texts (see RIMA 1 p. 4), and by the time of Tiglath-pileser full- 
fledged annals began to be written. For details see the introduction to 
A.0.87. 1 and for a thorough analysis of the royal inscriptions as a 
whole see Borger, EAK 1 pp. 112-34. 

The building enterprises of Tiglath-pileser i were concentrated on 
the cities of Assur and Nineveh (see Reade in Fales, ARIN pp. 145-49 
for a study of this king's monumental works). At Assur he undertook 
major restoration and expansion of both the Anu-Adad temple 
(A.0.87. 1, 22, and 23) and the royal palace (A.0.87. 4-5, 8, 18-20, and 
29). He also repaired the wall of New City at Assur (A.0.87.3). As to 
Nineveh, his main concerns were the Istar temple (A.0.87. 12) and the 
royal palace (A. 0.87. 2 and 10-11). He also worked on the city wall 
and a garden and canal leading from the River Husir (A.0.87. 10), the 
latter activity involving construction of a quay wall (A.0.87. 24-27). 

Some new and significant themes appear in the annals of Tiglath- 
pileser i and these are repeated, sometimes verbatim, in the annals of 
the subsequent major monarchs whose texts are edited in this volume. 
These themes are the king's concern for the reconstruction and pros- 
perity of his land and people; the addition of new lands and people to 
Assyria; the expansion of cultivated land; the importation and plant- 
ing of exotic trees; the gathering of flocks and herds of wild animals 
which are brought to Assyria; the hunting and killing of wild animals; 
and the increase in the number of chariots and horses. Details on 
these matters are given in the introduction to A.0.87. 1. 

Technical details about a few texts and fragments require comment. 
Some texts on bricks (Rost and Marzahn, VAS 23 nos, 88-92 = 
Marzahn and Rost, Ziegeln 1 nos. 264-67 and 341) mentioning 
Tiglath-pileser should be ascribed to the third king of that name; see 
Weidner, AfO 3 (1926) p. 5 n. 6 and Gaiter, ZA 76 (1986) p. 304. 
Some fragmentary inscriptions on pieces of clay cone have been in- 
cluded tentatively under Assur-resa-isi i rather than Tiglath-pileser i 
(see RIMA 1 pp. 324-25 A.0.86.1004 and 1006). Following is a list of 
fragments on pieces of clay tablets which probably come from this 
general time period but do not seem to be royal: BM 98534 (Th 
1905-4-9,40); Nougayrol, RA 60 (1966) pp. 72-74; K 13840 (Bezold, 
Cat. 3 p. 1343; Winckler, OLZ 1 [1898] 73; King, AKA pp. 125-26 
n. 3; and Grayson, ARI 2 p. 1 n. 8); and 79-7-8,5 (Bezold, Cat. 4 
p. 1699; Winckler, OLZ 1 [1898] 75). 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1 



This text, on numerous clay octagonal prisms and fragments (mainly 
from AsSur), is famous as the inscription used in the 'test case* by the 
Royal Asiatic Society to prove that Babylonian-Assyrian cuneiform 
had truly been deciphered. Since that time (1857) major advances have 
been made in the understanding of cuneiform inscriptions and 
numerous further exemplars have been discovered. All of the exem- 
plars come from Assur with one apparent exception (exemplar 20, for 
which the building section is not preserved). The text itself is the first 
real example of Assyrian 'annals' in that military events are narrated 
in chronological order with a clear division between years, although 
the campaigns are not yet dated or even numbered. The gradual 
development towards this form of royal inscription can be noted in 
the reigns of Adad-nararT i (cf. RIMA 1 p. 128), Shalmaneser i (cf. 
RIMA 1 p. 180), and Tukultl-Ninurta i (cf. RIMA 1 p. 231). The divi- 
sion of the campaigns is clearly marked by inserting the name of the 
king with some epithets between the previous and following campaigns 
and, further, by drawing horizontal lines (paragraph divisions) across 
the clay at the beginning and end of these insertions. Annals now be- 
come a common form of Assyrian royal inscription. This text is (as 
are all annals), in effect, a collection of individual campaign reports 
and it can be assumed that such separate accounts existed, although 
none have been discovered before the reign of Ashurnasirpal n 
(A.0.101. 18-20). 

The text begins (i 1-14) with an invocation to various deities, a new 
motif which reappears in identical words in A. 0.87.2. Similar invoca- 
tions begin inscriptions of Assur-bel-kala (A. 0.89.7), Adad-nararT n 
(A.0.99.2), TukultT-Ninurta n (A.0. 100.1), Ashurnasirpal n (A.0.101. 8, 
17, 19-20, and 47), and Shalmaneser in (see RIMA 3, forthcoming). 
This is followed by a lengthy passage (i 15-61) describing the prowess 
of the king, a forerunner of the much more succinct passages intro- 
ducing each new campaign as mentioned earlier. The military narrative 
takes up the bulk of the text (i 62 - vi 54) and describes several cam- 
paigns. This is followed by another new motif, a passage describing 
hunting (vi 55-84). Such passages reappear in later texts, often with 
verbatim agreement (A.0.89.1 rev. 7-11', A. 0.89.3 lines 7'-9\ A.0.89.7 
iv 1-33, A.0.98.1 lines 68-72, A.0.99.2 lines 122-27, A.0. 100.5 lines 
134-35, A.0.101. 1 hi 48-49, A.0. 101.2 lines 31-37, and A.0,101.30 
lines 84-101). 

The next passage (vi 85 - vii 35) is yet another innovation for it 
describes in detail the king's concern for the reconstruction and pros- 
perity of his land and people. Echoes of this same theme reappear in 
later texts in this volume. Ashurnasirpal n (A. 0.101. 28 v 7-12, 
A.0.101.29 lines 9'-17, and A.0. 101. 30 lines 53-77) summarizes his 
work on temples and palaces at Calah (Nimrud) in a manner similar 
to Tiglath-pileser's general description of his work on the temples at 
Assur. Construction of palaces and fortifications throughout the land 
is also recorded in the texts of Assur-dan n (A.0.98.1 lines 60-64), 
Adad-nararlii (A.0.99.2 line 120), Tukultl-Ninurta n (A.0. 100.5 line 
132), and Ashurnasirpal n (A. 0.101.30 lines 78-83). The ploughing 
of fields is also mentioned in texts of Assur-dan n (A.0.98.1 lines 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1 

64-67), Adad-nararl n (A.0.99.2 lines 120-21), and TukultT-Ninurta n 
(A.0. 100.5 lines 132-33). The gathering of flocks and herds of wild 
beasts is similarly a motif in the inscriptions of Assur-bel-kala 
(A.0.89.7 iv 1-33), Adad-naran n (A.0.99.2 lines 122-27), and 
Ashurnasirpal n (A.0.101.2 lines 31-37, 30 lines 84-101). The importa- 
tion and planting of exotic trees is also described by Ashurnasirpal n 
(A. 0.101. 30 lines 36-52). Tiglath-pileser's claim that he increased the 
number of chariots and horses is echoed by Assur-dan n (A. 0.98.1 
lines 66-67), Adad-naran n (A.0.99.2 line 121), and TukultT-Ninurta n 
(A.0. 100,5 lines 130-31), Tiglath-pileser concludes this passage by 
boasting of adding lands and people to Assyria, a boast repeated on 
their own behalf by Tukultl-Ninurta n (A, 0.100.5 line 133) and 
Ashurnasirpal n (A.0.101.30 lines 100-101). 

Curiously, it is at this late point in the text that the king's genealogy 
appears (vii 36-59), just before the building section. This is a re- 
flection of an older, much clumsier text format from the time of 
Shalmaneser i (RIMA 1 pp. 184-85 lines 107-111). 

The building passage concerns work on the Anu-Adad temple at 
Assur (vii 60 - viii 49). The text notes that SamsT-Adad in had earlier 
worked on the same structure (cf. RIMA 1 pp. 80-81 A.0.59.1001- 
1002). It also informs us that Assur-dan i tore it down and that it was 
never rebuilt until Tiglath-pileser's reign. It is odd that he does not 
mention the fact that Assur-resa-isi i rebuilt the Anu-Adad temple 
(RIMA 1 pp. 316-18 A.0.86.7-8). Other references to Tiglath-pileser's 
work on the Anu-Adad temple are found in A. 0.87.3 lines 16-18, 
A.0.87.4 lines 24-26 and 59-66, A.0.87.10 lines 28-31, A.0.87.13 lines 
10'-11', A.0.87.22 lines 3-4, A.0.87.23 lines 3-4, and A.0.87.1011 lines 
l'-4\ 

As to date, A.0.87.1 is probably the earliest preserved version of the 
annals and A.0.87,2-4 are successively later. 



CATALOGUE 





Museum 


Registration 


Ass 


Ass ph 


AlSur 


Lines 




Ex, 


number 


number 


number 


number 


provenance 


preserved 


cpn 


1 


V/\ 8255 




22980 


6905 09 


South corner of west 
ziqqurrat of Anu-Adad 
temple, eA5v 


i 1-94 

ii 1-102 
iii 1-103 
iv 1-101 
v 1-100 
vi 1-105 
vii 1-114 
viii 1-90 


c 


2 


IM no number 


_ 


- 


- 


Anu-Adad temple 


As ex. 1 


c 


3 


BM 91033 


K 1621a+ 13871 + 
16923 


— 


— 


— 


As ex, 1 


c 


4 


BM 91034 


K 1619a+1633 


- 


- 


- 


As ex. 1 


c 


5 


- 


K 1620+13714 + 


_ 


- 


- 


As ex. 1 


c 



13781 + 13788, 
K 1740 + 6711 + 

13715 + 13716 + 
13717+13836 + 
13844+13869 + 
14153, 

K 1803, K 1804, 
K 2749+ 14204, 
K 6706, K 13882, 
K 13883, K 14212 
K 1622+1623 + 
1624+1627 + 



i 82-94 

ii 1-3, 20-30, 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1 



Museum 
Ex. number 



Registration 
number 



Ass 
number 



Ass ph 

number 



As§ur 
provenance 



Lines 
preserved 



cpn 



10 



19 



20 



ES7890 + 
VAT 11242 



Unlocated 



Istanbul 
no number 



12 


Istanbul 




no number 


13 


A 78 +101 


14 


Istanbul 




no number 



15 A 91 



16 A 102 



17 A 109 



Istanbul 
no number 



Istanbul 
no number 



BM 9905 1 



21 A 89 



22 A 103 



Rm 4, K 1625, 

K 1626, 

K 1628 + 1632, 

K 1629 + 6707, 

K 1630, 

K6363 + Sm 1889, 

K 6709, K 6710, 

K 13646 + 81-7-27,79, 

Sm785 + Rm 2,93, 

Rm576, 79-7-8,11, 

K 17665 



1000 



7428 



1123 



5807 + 6847 3297 



6816 



1112, 3296 



13181 


3406 


7378a + b + c 


1112, 3299 


7564b 


2019 (S,), 




2020 (S 2 ), 




3299 


7429 


1123, 3298 


7588 


2019 (S,), 




2020 (S 3 ), 




3302 


6236 


875, 3295 



6702 



3295 



Ki 1904-10-9,80 



7565 



13265 



1123, 3303, 3304 



3461 



Southern prothyse 
of Ami-Adad 
temple, iC5i 



Recent fill over 
Shalm. floor in 
room Ki, SE, 
Anu-Adad temple 
Front of outer 
front of SW 
court wing in 
fill over rock 
surface, near S» 
Anu-Adad temple 
Clay fill over 
middle corridor 
near Q, Anu- 
Adad temple 
Private house, 
eC7n 
As ex. 9 

South corner of 
N 2 4, on rock 
surface, Anu- 
Adad temple 

As ex, 9 



NW front of old 
ziqqurrat, on 
rock surface, 
Anu-Adad temple 
South corner of 
Shalm. court at 
floor level, 
Anu-Adad temple 
SE slope of old 
west ziqqurrat, 
Anu-Adad temple 



Nineveh(!?) 



South corner of 
N 2 , on rock 
surface, Anu- 
Adad temple, eB5m 
Private house, 
eC7i 



91-102 

iii 1-2, 23-83, 

88-103 

iv 1-4, 23-29, 

32-46,52-81, 

90-100 

v 19-33, 87-98 

vi 10-22, 76-95 

vii 51-56, 76-80, 

95-114 

viii 17-29, 58-63, 

78-88 

i 44-94 

ii 1-6, 58-102 

iii 1-9 

vii 66-114 

viii 51-90 

iv 99-101 

v 1-31 

vi 4-17 

vii 2-45 

viii 5-27 

i 53-70 

ii 56-87 

iii 55-81 

iv 64-83 

i 3-18 

ii 18-67 

iii 23-51 



iii 5-23, 102-103 
iv 1-23 
v3-21 



i 57-84 
ii 68-95 
iv 48-70 
v 56-79 
iii 30-29 
iv 13-28 



vi 22-37 

vii 31-48 

viii ?-? 

vi 104-105, 

vii 1-13, 94-110 



iv 22-30 
v 24-46 



i 27-45 
ii 36-50 

i 74-94 
ii 1-4 
viii 85-90 
iii 94-103 
iv 1-7 
v 1-10 
i 54-68 
ii 63-75 



vi 53-66 
vii 60-68 



10 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1 



Museum 
Ex. number 



Registration 
number 



Ass 
number 



Ass ph 
number 



Assur 
provenance 



Lines 

preserved 



cpn 



23 A 90 



24 A 106 



25 VA 7515 



26 Unlocated 

27 A 684 



28 



40 



Unlocated 



29 


A 104 


30 


VAT 9616 


31 


Unlocated 


32 


Unlocated 


33 


Unlocated 


34 


A 98 



35 


Unlocated 


36 


Istanbul 




no number 


37 


Unlocated 


38 


A 638 


39 


Unlocated 



42 



Unlocated 



Istanbul 

no number 



A 3572 



7470a + b 


1123, 3298 


Recent fill 
over Pi, 
Anu-Adad temple 


i 75-88 
ii 2-11 


c 


7502 


1123, 3299 


Middle of old 
north ziqqurrat, 

on rock surface, 
Anu-Adad temple 


v 31-42 
vi 29-40 


c 


1793 




Under west wall of 
Parthian gate room, 
Anu-Adad temple, 
iC5i 


iii 79-94 
iv 78-90 


c 


7564a 


1123, 2019, 2020, 
3299, 3301 


As ex. 14 


iv 33-43 
v 37 42 


p 


5462 


875, 3294, 5462 


S W slope of new 
west ziqqurrat, on 
ruins of old, 
Anu-Adad temple 


iii 22-41 


c 


18431 


6461 


Top layer of 

breach in easi 
tomb, Anu-Adad 
temple, iD4iv 


iii 48-63 

Illegible traces of 
another coh on left 


p 


5423 


696, 875(?), 3294 


North corner of 
new west ziqqurrat 


iii 50-61 


c 


7599a 


1145, 3302 


On libben, Anu- 
Adad temple, eCSii 


iii 55-67 


c 


7553, 7553a, 


1123,3298,3301 


As ex. 24 


iii 62-81 


p 


7553b 






iv 63-73 
vii 49-53 




7599b 


1123,3302 


As ex. 16 


iii 73-78 


p 


7567 


1123, 3299 


As ex. 24 


iv 91-99 


p 


7278 


3302 


Old north ziqqurrat, 
upper beginning of 
ravine, Anu-Adad 
temple 


v 90-100 


c 


18435a 


5716 


SW corner of east 
tomb, Anu-Adad 
temple, iD4iv 


vi 24-58 
vii 8-49 


p 


7579 


1123, 3301 


As ex. 24 


viii 35-44 


c 


7558 


1123, 3302 


_ 


viii 50-52 


p 


7547 


1123, 3299 


As ex, 24 


viii 52-59 


c 


842b 




In plaster strip 
of pillar room in 
Parthian temple 
A, iB5i 


iv 101 
v 1 22 
vi 3-26 
vii 33-42 


p 


7562 


3301 


South comer of 
N2, on rock 
surface, Anu-Adad 
temple, eB5m 


See commentary 


p 


7574 


3300 


NW edge of middle 
corridor in fill, 
Anu-Adad temple 


See commentary 


c 



15241 



4541 



v 43-55 



COMMENTARY 



The master text Is a conflation of exs. 1 and 2. These 
are two well-preserved exs., virtually identical in text 
with each other, and bearing the same date. The few 
breaks in one ex. can usually be restored from the 
other. Ex. 3 is also a well-preserved ex. but it has ma- 
jor variations, often erroneous, from exs. 1 and 2 as 
well as from the other exs. Ex. 3 was written a day 
later than exs. 1 and 2. The line numbering of this edi- 
tion follows that of King (who used ex. 3 as his main 



text since he did not have exs. 1 and 2) in order to 
avoid unnecessary confusion. Unfortunately, this results 
in iii 2 being an excessively long line since most of the 
line was omitted by ex. 3. 

The sign sag = rem *head, top, beginning* is in- 
scribed at the top of the first col. and separated from 
the first line of text by a horizontal line in all preserved 
exs. (1-5). This is, of course, to help the scribe to find 
quickly the beginning of the text. 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1 



11 



There are many special problems with the numerous 
exs. which require comment. Ex. 2, although used with 
ex. 1 as the master text, is very worn in two places 
(v 40 to about v 70, and vi 58-75) and much of its text 
here can be read only with the help of the other exs. As 
stated earlier, ex. 3 was the main text used by King and 
recently Lambert joined the tiny fragment K 16923 
( = hi 38-47) to this prism. We are grateful to him for 
this information. 

Exs. 4-5 have at least parts of virtually every line, 
and ex. 6 has major portions of most lines. But all of 
these three exs. have major lacunae within lines. The 
three exs. were in fact put together with plaster in the 
early days in the British Museum from numerous frag- 
ments and the reconstruction and positioning of the 
fragments is not always reliable. In the case of ex. 4, 
only the numbers K 1619a + 1633 (BM 91034) are given 
but in fact there are several unnumbered fragments em- 
bedded in the plaster. Some of these fragments are cer- 
tainly in the wrong position and a few probably did not 
ever belong to this prism. Particularly uncertain is the 
position of the various fragments for v 78-91. On the 
other hand, although many of the fragments used to 
reconstruct ex. 5 do not physically join, they probably 
all came from the same prism and this reconstruction is 
therefore probably reliable. Turning to the last of the 
reconstructed prisms in the British Museum, ex. 6, the 
case is rather different again. Many of the fragments do 
not physically join but, unlike ex. 5, it is not as certain 
that they all really belong to the same prism. They are, 
however, used in this edition as though they did. 
Lambert suggested that the tiny piece K 17665 
(iv 52-55) might belong to this prism and we have in- 
cluded it. We are grateful to him for this information. 

Ex. 7 consists of two fragments, one in Istanbul and 
one in East Berlin (definitely a prism, not a tablet, frag- 
ment despite the 'VAT* signature), which almost cer- 
tainly join. Gaiter originally made this proposal on the 
basis of notes made by Frayne, and Frame subsequently 
examined both fragments with Gaiter's proposal in 
mind and confirmed it. 

Several prism fragments (exs. 9-18, 21-24, 26-27, 29, 
31-34, and 36-41) were published only in a summary 
fashion, frequently with photographs, by Andrae, 
AAT. Andrae suggested, in some cases, which frag- 
ments might belong together (there are no physical 
joins). But such suggestions are always uncertain unless 
one can examine each piece in detail and since the origi- 
nals are now in various locations, and some cannot 
even be located, we have treated each fragment as a 
separate ex. 

According to Andrae, AAT, ex. 9 preserves the lines 
indicated in our catalogue. However, we have been un- 
able to locate the original and in the photo (Ass ph 
1123) only portions of the inscription can be read. The 
col. equivalent to i 53-70 is not visible at all ('...' in our 
scores). The col. equivalent to ii 56-87 is partially legi- 
ble but in doubtful points we have put '...' in the 
scores. The col. equivalent to hi 55-81 is almost fully 
legible. The col. equivalent to iv 64-83 is in shadow 



and illegible (*...' in our scores). 

Ex. 10 has been collated both from the original in 
Istanbul and from the excavation photo. In a few 
places more is visible on the photo than is now 
preserved on the original. In such cases we have fol- 
lowed the photo. After ii 61 there are illegible traces of 
several more lines. 

On ex. 13 the equivalent of col. v that is preserved is 
largely illegible and there are several illegible lines be- 
fore v 56. Despite the statement in Andrae, AAT p. 34 
about the lines preserved on ex. 14 (Ass 7564b), our 
catalogue gives the correct lines preserved. Ex. 15 is 
badly worn and difficult to read. Only the coL 
equivalent to vi 22-37 is relatively legible. The col. 
equivalent to vii 31-48 is often illegible and the final 
coL, which must be part of viii, cannot be read 
sufficiently for any precise identification. 

What is called 'ex. 25* in this edition is a real prob- 
lem. This designation in fact covers several tiny frag- 
ments, only one of which is large enough to decipher 
and use in a meaningful way. This is what appears in 
our scores. The others are just broken bits with odd 
signs and they probably represent more than one prism 
Schroeder referred to these as *C and numbered them 
'C 1 ', <C 2 \ 'C 3 ', etc. These are cited in the vars. as 'C n ' 
but are not included in the scores. 

Ex. 30 is a prism, not a tablet, fragment despite the 
*VAT' signature and Schroeder 's (KAH 2 no. 160E) la- 
bel as a TontafeF. 

Ex. 31 presents problems. Originally there seem to 
have been three separate prism fragments. None of the 
originals has been located. Ass 7553a is on Ass ph 1123 
and 3298, and a photo of it is also published in 
Andrae, AAT pi. xrv. Ass 7553b is on Ass ph 3301 and 
a photo of it is also published in Andrae, AAT pi. xv. 
No photo of Ass 7553, published or unpublished, has 
been found. Andrae, AAT p. 34 lists ( Ass 7553* as hav- 
ing the following lines: iii 67-83, iv 63-73, and 
vii 49-53. From the photos it is clear that Ass 7553a 
has iii 62-81 and these have been entered in the scores. 
The photos of Ass 7553b, both published and unpub- 
lished, are virtually illegible but the fragment clearly 
has parts of eleven lines. Therefore, this is presumably 
iv 63-73 and three dots ('...') have been entered in the 
scores for this ex. in these lines. Thus, a third frag- 
ment, Ass 7553, must have existed with the lines 
vii 49-53 and three dots ('...') have been entered in the 
scores for this ex. in these lines. 

The original of ex. 33 could not be located but the 
photos published in Andrae, AAT are quite legible. 
Ex. 39 has not been located, nor has an excavation 
photo been found. It is not on Ass ph 3293 or 3299. 
Thus, it could be collated only from the photo, par- 
tially illegible, published by Andrae, AAT pi. xv. The 
line numbers given in our catalogue are from Andrae, 
AAT p. 34 but for the portions that cannot be read 
from the photo, three dots (*...') are given in the scores 
More precisely, the col. equivalent to iv 101 - v 22 is 
virtually illegible. The col. equivalent to vi 3-26 is al- 
most completely legible. The col. equivalent to 



12 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1 



vii 33-42 is partially legible. 

Ex. 40 has not been located. Since the traces in the 
photo published in Andrae, AAT pi. xv are virtually il- 
legible and the fragment is insignificant, it has not been 
used in this edition. Ex. 41 has been collated from the 
original and a photo but it is far too worn to read or 
identify. 

The text is divided by horizontal lines into para- 
graphs and all exs., where preserved, agree upon these 



divisions with a few exceptions. In exs. 2 and 4-5 a line 
has been drawn between ii 57 and 58. In exs. 1-2, 4, 
and 6 a line is drawn after umassersu in v 29. 

Borger (Zeichenliste p. 119 no. 280) has noted a 
gradual change in the form of the sign for tag/k/q in 
the inscriptions of Tigl. i. In A. 0,87.1 tag/k/q is used, 
but in some of his other texts a var. form he designates 
tag/k/q appears. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1853 Layard, Discoveries p. 581 (ex. 3, 4, 5, or 6, provenance) 

1861 1 R pis. 9-16 (exs, 3-6, copy) 

1861 Fox Talbot, et ah, JRAS 18 pp. 150-219 (exs. 3-6, trans- 
lation) 

1893 Winckler, Sammlung 1 pp. 1-25 (exs, 3-4, copy) 

1897 Rassam, Asshur p. 20 (exs. 3-6, provenance) 

1902 King, AKA pp. 27-108 (exs. 3-6, copy, edition), xliii (ex. 
3, photo), and xlvii (ex. 4, photo) (for other early trans- 
lations see King, AKA p. 27 n. 1) 

1904-1906 Streck, ZA 18 pp. 162-82 and ZA 19 p. 260 (exs. 
3-6, study) 

1909 Andrae, AAT pp. 32-34 (exs. 9-18, 21-24, 26-27, 29-34, 
36-41, provenance), pis. xra-xv (exs. 9-18, 21-24, 26-27, 
29-34, 36-41, photo) and xvi (exs. 3-4, photo) 

1914 King, Cat. p. 20 no. 116 (ex. 20, study) 

1921 Unger, Babylonisches Schrifttum (Leipzig) p. 18 fig. 30 
(ex. 1, photo) 

1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 no. 160 (exs. 8, 25, 28, 30, 35, study) 

1925 Budge, Rise and Progress pi. after p. 100 (ex. 3, photo) 

1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§216-67 (exs. 3-6, translation) 
1939 Andrae, Handbuch der Archaologie 6/1 pi. 151 3 (ex. 1, 

photo) 



1955 von Soden, Orientalia ns 24 p. 384 and n. 1 (study) 
1957-58 Weidner, AfO 18 p. 342 n. 6 (study) 
1959 Weidner, Tn. nos. 47, 52, 59, and 69 (partial edition) 
1961 Borger, EAK 1 pp. 108-34 (study) 

1967 Borger, HKL 1 pp. 217-18 (study) 

1967Salvini, Nairi pp. 29 (iv 7-10), 32 (v 29-32), 51-52 (iv 
71-83, 96-101, v 22-32), and 81-82 (iv 8-17, 22) (edition) 

1968 Ellis, Foundation Deposits pp. 109-10, 113, and 138 
(study) 

1974-77 Borger, AfO 25 pp. 161-65 (ex. 1, study) 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxvii 1 (exs. 1, 3-6, 8-18, 20-41, 
translation) 

1977 Andrae, WEA 2 p. 187 (ex. 1, photo) 

1980 Millard, JAOS 100 p. 369 (ex. 20, provenance) 

1981 Anonymous, Iraq 43 pp. 172-73 (ex. 2, provenance) 

1982 Behijah Ismail, AfO Beih. 19 p. 199 (ex. 2, provenance) 

1984 Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA no. 300 (ex. 42, copy) 

1985 Miglus, MDOG 117 p. 29 (ex. 1, provenance) 

1985 Russell, Iraq 47 p. 71 (v 44-50, edition) 

1986 Pedersen, Archives 2 p. 13 n. 9 (exs. 8, 25, provenance) 
1988 Pedersen, OLZ 83 548 (ex. 42, study) 



TEXT 



Col. i 

1) d a-$ur en gax mus-te-sir kis-§at dingir.mes 

2) na-din gis.gidru u a-ge-e mu-kin man-?/ 

3) d en-lil be-lu man gi-mir d a-nun~na-ki 

4) Q-bu DINGIR.MES EN KUR.KUR 

5) d 30 er-su en a-ge-e 

6) Sa-qu-u d MA.GUR 8 

7) d UTU di.kud an Ki-// ha-a-if 

8) sa-al-pat a-a-be mu-se-eb-ru se-ni 

9) d i§KUR ur-Sa-nu ra-hi-is kib-rat kur.mes 

10) KUR.MES AB.MES-tl 

1 1) d nin-urta qar-du sd-gis lem-ni u a-a-bi 

12) mu-sem-su-u mal Bb-bi 

13) d iNANNA SAG-ti dingir.mes be-lit te-se-e 

14) mu-sar-h-hat murub 4 .mes-^ 



i 1—14) God ASSur, great lord, who properly ad- 
ministers all the gods, grantor of sceptre and 
crown, sustainer of sovereignty; god Enlil, lord, 
king of all the Anunnaku gods, father of the 
gods, lord of the lands; (i 5) god Sin, wise one, 
lord of the lunar disk, lofty divine crescent; god 
Samas, judge of heaven (and) underworld, who 
espies the enemy's treachery, who exposes the 
wicked; god Adad, hero, who storms over hostile 
regions, (i 10) mountains, (and) seas; god 
Ninurta, valiant one, slayer of criminal and foe, 
fulfiller of hearts' desires; goddess Istar, foremost 
among the gods, mistress of tumult, who adorns 
battles; 



i 5.3-5 The number 30 is written ftbfr* rather than 
4^ . Cf. Postgate, Oriens Antiquus 13 (1974) p. 66. 



i 10 See Borger, EAK 1 pp. 121-22. 



Tiglath-pileser i A. 0.87.1 



13 



15) dingir.meS gal.mes mu-ut-tab-bi-lu-ut AN-e 

sa ti-bu-su-nu gis.lal u M-ds-mu 
mu-ser-bu-u sar-ru-ut 
m Gis.tukui-ti-imLA-e-sdr-ra nun na-ra-rne 
bi-bil lib-bi-ku-un siPA-ia na-a-di 
sa i-na ke-e-ni lib-bi-ku-un tu-ta-a-su 
a-ga-a si-i-ra tu-up-pi-ra-su a-na man-u( 
kur d en-lil GAL-es tu-kin-na-su 
a-Sa-re-du-ta si-ru-ta qar-du-ta 
ta-qi-sa-su si-ma-at E^-ti-su 
a-na kis-su-te u numun $ANGA-ti-su 
a-na man-za-az e-hur-sag-kur-kur~ra 
a-na da-ris tas-qu-ra 



m GisJukuI-ti-iBiLA-e-sdr-ra lugal dan-nu 
lugal kis la-a sd-na-an lugal kib-rat 4-i 

LUGAL DU mal-kl.MES EN EN.MES UTUL MAN 
MAN.MES 

i-sip-pu na-a?-du sd i-na si-qir d UTU 

gis.gidru K\j-tu na-ad-na-ta-su-ma un.mes 

ba-^u-lat d en-hl ul-tas-pi-ru 

gi-mir-ta sipa-/w ke-e-nu sa si-qir-su 

ugu ma-li-ki. mes ne-bu-u 

sa-tam-mu si-ru sa d a-sur gis.ttjkul.mes-sw 

u-sd-hi-lu-ma a-na mu- J u-ru-ut kib-rat 4-i 

mu-su a-na da-ris is-qu-ru §a-bit 

pu-lu-gi ne-su-te sa zag.zag 

e- lis u sap-Iis u 4 -mu n e-par$ -du-u 

sa me-lam-mu-su ub.mes u-sah-ha-pu 

nab-iu sur-ru-hu sd ki-ma ti-ik 

ri-ih-si a-na kur nu-kur-te suz(*)-nu-nu-ma 

i-na si-qir d en-lfl ma-hi-ra la-a i-su-u 

u-sam-qi-tu gi-ir d a-sur 



d a-sur dingir.mes gal.mes mu-ser-bu-u 

LUGAL-ti-ia 

sa kis-su-ia u da-na-na a-na is-qi-ia 
is-ru-ku-ni mi-sir KUR-ti-su-nu 
ru-up-pu-sa iq-bu-ni Gis.TUKUL.MEs-sw-rtw 
dan-nu-ti a-bu-ub tam-ha-ri 
qa-ti lu-Mt-me-hu kur. kur. mes kur. mes 
ma-ha-zi u mal-ki.MES kur.mes-w? d a-§ur 
a-pel-ma mi-is-ri-te-$u-nu 
u-ke-ni-is it-ti 1 su-si lugal. mes-a/ 
su-ut tug.sagsu al-ta-na-an-ma 
li-i-ta sit-nun-ta vGv-su-nu 
al-ta-ka-an gaba.ri-# i-na murub 4 
u sa-ni-na i-na me la-a i-sa-a-ku 



i 15-27) Great gods, managers of heaven (and) 
underworld, whose attack means conflict and 
strife, who make great the sovereignty of Tiglath- 
pileser, beloved prince, your select one, attentive 
shepherd, (i 20) whom you chose in the steadfast- 
ness of your hearts; upon him you set the exalted 
crown, you grandly established him for sov- 
ereignty over the land of the god Enlil, to him 
you granted leadership, supremacy, (and) valour, 
you pronounced forever his destiny of dominion 
(i 25) as powerful and (the destiny) of his priestly 
progeny for service in Ehursagkurkurra; 



i 28-45) Tiglath-pileser, strong king, unrivalled 
king of the universe, king of the four quarters, 
(i 30) king of all princes, lord of lords, chief 
herdsman, king of kings, attentive purification 
priest, to whom by command of the god SamaS 
the holy sceptre was given and who had complete 
authority over the people, subjects of the god 
Enlil, faithful shepherd, whose name (i 35) was 
called over the princes, exalted bishop, whose 
weapons the god Assur has sharpened and whose 
name he has pronounced eternally for control of 
the four quarters, capturer of distant districts to 
borders (i 40) above and below, radiant day 
whose brilliance overwhelms the regions, splendid 
flame which covers the hostile land like a rain 
storm and, by the command of the god Enlil, 
having no rival defeats the enemy of the god 
A§§ur; 



i 46-61) The god AsSur (and) the great gods who 
magnify my sovereignty, who granted as my lot 
power and strength, commanded me to extend the 
border of their land. They placed in my hands 
their (i 50) mighty weapons, deluge in battle. I 
gained control over lands, mountains, towns, and 
princes who were hostile to Assur and I subdued 
their districts, (i 55) I vied with 60 crowned heads 
and achieved victory over them in battle. I have 
neither rival in strife nor equal in conflict. I added 
territory to Assyria (and) people to its population. 
I extended the border of my land and ruled over 
all their lands. 



i 20 Where is the end of this relative clause? 1 have assumed, 
with Borger (EAK 1 p. 122), that the main clause resumes in 
i 21 but Luckenbill thought in i 23. i 34-38.5, 18 Both exs. 
are very fragmentary but it is clear that they omit much of this 
passage, probably sipaw'w ... isquru 'faithful shepherd ... of 



the four quarters*, inclusive, i 34.3 omits sa si-qir-su. i 37 u- 
sd-hi-lu-ma for usa^iluma: see the note to iv 47. i 43 suz-: the 
sign is sud. For the reading see von Soden and Rollig, 
Syllabar no. 215. 



14 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1 



59 

6o: 

61 



62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 

7o; 

71 

12 

73; 

74 

75 

76: 

77 

78; 

79 

so: 

81 
82 

83 
84 

85 

86; 

87 
88 



89 



ugu kur d a-sur ma-a-ta ugu un.mes-&7 
un.meS iu-rad-di mi-sir KVR-ti-ia 
u-re-pis-ma gi-mir KUR.K\jR-su-nu a-pel 



90 
91 
92 
93 
94 



2) 
3) 
4) 
5) 
6) 
7) 
8) 



i-na sur-ru LUGAL-ti-ia 20 lim lu.mes 

kur mus-ka-a-ia, mes it 5 lugal. mes-w-sw-to 

sa 50 mu.meS kur al-zi 

it kur pu-ru-lum-zi na-a-ds gun 

it ma-da-at-te sa d a-sur en-/# is-ba-w-m 

lugal ia-um-ma i-na tam-ha-ri gaba-su-hu 

la-a u-ne-hu a-na da-na-ni-su-nu 

it-ka-lu-ma ur-du-ni kur kat-mu-hi 

is-ba-tu i-na gi§ Jukul-ti d a-sur en-mi 

gis.gigir.mes it qu-ra-di-ia .mes lul-te-sir 

EGiR-a ul it-qi kur ka-si-ia-ra 

a.sa nam-ra-si lu-u ab-bal-kit 

it-ti 20 lim eeun.mes muq-tab-li-su-nu 

it 5 lugal. MES-su-nu i-na kur kat-mu-hi 

lu al-ta-na-an a-bi-ik-ta-su-nu 

lu ds-kun sal-ma-at qu-ra-di-su-nu 

i-na mit-hu-us tu-sa-ri ki-ma ra-hi-si 

lu-ke-mir us.MES-su-nu hur-ri 

it ba-ma-a-te sa kur-/ lu ii-ser-di 

SAG.DU.MES-5«-rm lu~na-ki-sa i-da-at 

URu.MES-iw-A/w ki-ma ka-re-e lu-se-pi-ik 

sal-la-su-nu bu-sa-su-nu nam-kur-su-nu 

a-na la-a mi-na u-se-sa-a 6 lim 

si-te-et um-ma-na-te-su-nu sa i-na pa-an 

GIS.TUKUL.MES-/a ip-pdr-Shdu GIR.MES-/tf 

is-ba-tu al-qa-su-nu-ti-ma 

a-na un.mes KUR-ti-ia am-nu-su-nu-ti 



i-na UA-mi-su-ma a-na kur kat-mu-hi la ma- 

gi-ri 

sa gun it ma-da-ta a-na d a-sur en-ih 

ik-lu-u lu al-lik kur kat-mu-hi 

a-na si-hir-ti-sa ak-sud 

sal-la-su-nu bu-sa-su-nu nam-kur-su-nu 

u-se-sa-a uru.mes-sw-hw i-na izi.mes 

Col. ii 

1) ds-ru-up ap-pul aq-qur si-te-et 

kur kat-mu-hi sa i-na pa-an Gis.TUKUL.MES-/a 

ip-pdr-si-du a-na uru se-re-se 

sa gir am-ma-te sa id.idigna 

lu e-be-ru uru a-na dan-nu-ti-su-nu 

lu is-ku-nu gis.gigir.mes u qu-ra-di-ia. mes 

lu al-qe kur-# mar-sa it gir-re-te-su-nu 

pa-ds-qa-a-te i-na aq-qul-lat urudu.mes 



i 62-88) In my accession year: 20,000 Musku with 
their five kings, who had held for 50 years the 
lands Alzu (i 65) and Purulumzu — bearers of 
tribute and tithe to the god Assur, my lord — 
(the Musku), whom no king had ever repelled in 
battle, being confident of their strength they came 
down (and) (i 70) captured the land Katmuhu. 
With the support of the god Assur, my lord, I put 
my chariotry and army in readiness (and), not 
waiting for my rear guard, I traversed the rough 
terrain of Mount Kasiiari. I fought with their 
20,000 men-at-arms (i 75) and five kings in the 
land Katmuhu. I brought about their defeat. Like 
a storm demon I piled up the corpses of their 
warriors on the battlefield (and) made their blood 
flow into the hollows (i 80) and plains of the 
mountains. I cut off their heads (and) stacked 
them like grain piles around their cities. I brought 
out their booty, property, (and) possessions 
without number. 1 took (i 85) the remaining 6,000 
of their troops who had fled from my weapons 
(and) submitted to me and regarded them as peo- 
ple of my land. 



i 89 - ii 35) At that time I marched to the insub- 
missive land Katmuhu which had withheld tribute 
and impost from the god Assur, my lord. I con- 
quered the entire land of Katmuhu. I brought out 
their booty, property, (and) possessions. Their cit- 
ies (ii 1) I burnt, razed, (and) destroyed. The 
remainder of the (inhabitants of the) land 
Katmuhu, who had fled from my weapons (and) 
(ii 5) crossed over to the city Seressu which is on 
the opposite bank of the Tigris, made that city 
their stronghold. Taking my chariots and warriors 
I hacked through the rough mountain range and 
difficult paths with copper picks and made a good 
way for the passage of (ii 10) my chariots and 
troops. I crossed the Tigris (and) conquered their 
fortified city, Seressu. I spread out like grain 



i 62 i-na Sur-ru LuaxL-ti-ia 'In my accession year': see RIMA 1 
p. 5 and n, 5. i 63 w 5 lugal. MES-ni-su-nu 'with their five 
kings' appears only in ex. 3, It is omitted by all other pre- 
served exs. i 68 u-ne-hu: see the note to iv 47. i 71 and Hi 41 
lul-te-fir: SuWsuru is a root commonly used of weapons and 



people. See CAD 4 (E) pp. 359-63 sub eseru v 12 and AHw p. 
255. i 72 ark& ul ttqi: cf. Borger, Asarh, p. 44 note to line 64. 
i 80 kur-/ can be plural. See ii 41. ii 2.7 um-ma-na-te-Su-nu 
'their troops* for kur kat-mu-hi 'the land Katmuhu'. ii 3.3 Se- 
re-es-se. 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1 



15 



9) lu ah-si hu-u-la a-na me-te-eq 

10) Gis.GiGiR.MES-/fl u um-ma-na-te-ia lu-ti-ib 

1 1) id.idigna lu e-bir uru se-re-se 

12) uru dan-nu-ti-su-nu ak-sud 

13) erin.mes muq-tab-li-su-nu i-na qe-reb tarn- 
ha-ri 

14) ki-ma ser-ma-si lu-me-si 

15) tis.MES-su-nu hur-ri u ba-ma-a-te sa kur-i 

16) lu-ser-di i-na u^-mi-su-ma um-ma-na-at 

17) kur pap-he-e sa a-na su-zu-ub 

18) it ne-ra-ru-ut-te sa kur kat-mu-hi 

19) il-li-ku-u-ni it-ti um-ma-na-at 

20) kur kat-mu-hi-ma ki-ma su-u-be us-na-il 

21) pa-gar muq-tab-li-su-nu a-na gu-ru-na-a-te 

22) i-na gi-sal-lat kur-/ lu-qe-ri-in 

23) sal-ma-at qu-ra-di-su-nu id na-a-me 

24) a-na id.idigna lu u-se-si 

25) m ki-li- d te-sub dumu ka-U- d te-$ub 

26) sa m er-ru-pi hsa-si-u-Su-m 

27) LUGAL-sw-nw i-na qe-reb tam-ha-ri qa-ti 

28) ik-SUd DAM.MES-5W DUMU.MES 

29) nab-ni-it Ub-bi-su el-la-su 3 .sw-^/ 

30) ruq~qi urudu.mes 5 nar-ma-ak zabar 

31) it-ti DINGIR.MES-SW-WW KU.GI KU.BABBAR.MES 

32) u du-muq nam-kur-ri-su-nu ds-sa-a 

33) sal-la-su-nu u-se-sa-a 

34) uru su-a-tu u e.gal-su i-na izi.mes 

35) ds-ru-up ap-pul aq-qur 

36) uru ur-ra-ti-na-ds uru dan-nu-ti-su-nu 

37) sa i-na kur pa-na-ri na-du-u 

38) pu-ul-hu a-di-ru me-lam 6 a-sur EN-/a 

39) is-hup-su-nu-ti-ma a-na su-zu-ub 

40) nap-sa-te-su-nu dingir.mes-sw-/?« bu-sa-su-nu 
is-su-u 

41) a-/za gi-sal-lat kur-/ Sa-qu-ti 

42) A:/-ma musen ip-pdr-§u gis.gigir.mes 

43) w um-ma-na-te-ia. mes lu al-qe Id.idigna /w 
e-&/r 

44) m sa-di- d te-sub dumu ha-at-tu-hi lugal 

45) .&? uru ur-ra-ti-na-ds 

46) /-/m/ KUR'Su-ma GiR.MES-ia is~bat 

47) dumu.meS nab-ni-it llb-bi-su u kim-ti-su 

48) #-/?«? U-tu-ut-te a$-bat 



heaps (the corpses of) their men-at-arms in the 
battle. I made (ii 15) their blood flow in the hol- 
lows and plains of the mountains. At that time I 
laid low like sheep, with the army of (ii 20) the 
land Katmuhu, the army of the Paphu which had 
come to the aid and assistance of the land 
Katmuhu. I built up mounds with the corpses of 
their men-at-arms on mountain ledges. I allowed 
the River Name to carry the bodies of their warri- 
ors out to the Tigris. I captured in battle their 
king, (ii 25) Kili-Teshub, son of Kali-Teshub, who 
is called Errupi. I carried off his wives, his natural 
sons, his clan, 180 (ii 30) copper kettles, five 
bronze bath-tubs, together with their gods, gold 
and silver, the best of their property. I brought 
out their booty. I burnt, razed, (and) destroyed 
that city and its palace. 



ii 36-57) With regard to the city Urratinas, their 
stronghold situated in the land Panaru, the terror, 
fear, (and) splendour of the god ASsur, my lord, 
overwhelmed them. To save (ii 40) their lives they 
took their gods (and) possessions and flew like 
birds to ledges on high mountains. Taking my 
chariotry and army I crossed the Tigris. Sadi- 
Tesub, son of Hattuhu, king (ii 45) of the city 
Urratinas, submitted to me in his own land. I 
took his natural sons and his family as hostages. 
He brought to me as tribute and tax 60 copper 
kettles, bronze vats, (ii 50) and large bronze 
bath-tubs, together with 120 men, cattle, and 
sheep. I accepted his (tribute), spared him (and) 
preserved his life, (ii 55) I imposed upon him 



ii 13.3, 5 hur-Sd/Sa-ni 'mountains' for tam-ha-ri 'battle'. 
ii 15.3 tD.iDiGNA Tigris' for hur-ri 'gullies', ii 15 kur-i can be 
plural. See ii 41. ii 20 subu seems to be a kind of sheep. Note 
su-W-u = im-me-ru, MSL 8/2 p. 73 line 32; udu su-be-e, 
Johns, ADD 4 p. 384b (several citations); and see von Soden, 
AHw p. 1255a sub sum in. The other references in MA royal 
inscriptions are: RIMA 1 p. 192 line 13 (correct the trans- 
lation); A.0.87.1 ii 20, 80, v 94, and vi 5. Less probable 
translations are: 'grain', Marcus, Orientalia ns 46 (1977) 
pp. 101-102; 'reed(?)'> CAD 11/1 (N) pp. 205-206. 



Ii 21-23.2, 4, 6 omit ana gurunate ... quradisunu 'I built up 
... ledges', ii 22 kur-/ can be plural. See ii 41. ii 33 After 
sallassunu ex. 3 inserts bu-§a-a-s\u-n]u, ex. 10 bu-sa-su-nu 
*their (booty and) possessions', ii 40.3 omits bu-sa-su-nu 'their 
possessions'. There seems to be room in the break in ex. 5 for 
bu-sa-su-nu. ii 45.3 adds at the end of the line a-na la fc[a(?)- 
...] and ex. 10 has urratinas [...]-&. Should one restore a-na la 
k[a-sa-di\-su 'to avoid (my) conquering him'? ii 46.10 KUR-e- 
su-ma '(in) his own mountains' rather than '(in) his own land'. 



16 



Tiglath-pileser i A.O.87.1 



1 su-si ruq-qi urudu,me§ nam-har zabar 
u nar-ma-ak zabar gal.meS-^ 
it-ti 2 su~si a-mi-lu-te .mes gu 4 .mes 
se-ni gun u ma-da-at-ta 
i$-sa-a am-hur-su e-ti-ir-su 
na-pis-ta-su ag-mil ni-ir EN-ti-ia 

DUGUD VGV-SU d-Itd Sd-dt UD.MES U-kin 

kur kat-mu-hi DAGAL-ta a-na si-hir-ti-sa 
ak-sud a-na GiR.MES-/a u-se-ek-ni-is 
i-na Ut-mi-su-ma 1 nam-har zabar 1 nar- 
ma-ak 

zabar Sa ki-sit-ti u ma-da-at-ti 
sa kur kat-mu-hi a-na d a-sur en-/'g a-qis 
1 su-si ruq-qi urudu.mes it-ti dingir.mes-^w- 
nu 
a-na d i§KUR kox-ia ds-ruk 



forever the heavy yoke of my dominion. I com- 
pletely conquered the extensive land Katmuhu and 
subdued it. 



i-na su-mur Gis.TUKUL.MES-/a ez-zu-te sa a- 

surEN 

da-na-na u me-tel-lu-ta is-ru-ka 

i-na 30 Gis.GiGiR.MEs-/tf a-li-kat i-di 

ga-mar-ri-ia er-hu-te qu-ra-di-ia.MES 

sa mit-hu-us ddb-de-e li-tam-du 

lu al-qe a-na kur iS-dis Sap-su-te 

la-a ma-gi-ri lu al-lik kur.me§ 

dan-nu-ti a.sa nam~ra-$i 

dug.ga i-na gis.gigir.mes-/^ u mar-sa i-na 

GIR.MES-/a 

lu e-te-tiq i-na kur a-ru-ma 

a.sa pa-ds-qi sa a-na me-teq gi£.gigir.mes-/<z 

la na-tu-u gis.gigir.mes lu e-zib 

pa-an qu-ra-di-ia as-bat 

ki-ma sib-be er-he-ku-ma i-na gi-sal-lat kur-/ 

pa-dS-qa-a-te sal-ti-is e-te-ti-iq 

kur is-dis ki-ma du 6 a-bu-be ds-hu-up 

iRiN.MES muq-tab-li-su-nu i-na qe-reb tam- 

ha-ri 

ki-ma su-be us-na-il sal-la-su-nu 

bu-sa-a-su-nu nam-kur-su-nu ds-lul 

nap-har VKV-su-nu i-na izi.mes aq-mu 

li-i-tf,MES gun it ma-da-ta 

vGV-su-nu u-kin 



m GisJukul-ti-miLA-e-sdr-ra et-lu qar-du 
mu-pe-ti du-rug kur.mes-w 
mu-sek-nis la-a ma-gi-ri sa-pi-nu 
gi-mir al-tu-ti 



ii 58-62) At that time I donated to the god Assur 
one bronze vat (and) one bronze bath-tub from 
the booty and tribute of the land Katmuhu. I 
gave to the god Adad, who loves me, 60 copper 
kettles together with their gods. 



ii 63-84) With the onslaught of my fierce weapons 
by means of which the god Asiur, the lord, gave 
me strength and excellence I took my warriors 
trained for successful combat (ii 65) with thirty of 
my chariots escorting my aggressive shock troops. 
I marched to the land Isdis (where) rebellious 
(and) insubmissive people (lived), (ii 70) Riding in 
my chariot when the way was smooth and going 
by foot when the way was rough, I passed 
through the rough terrain of mighty mountains. 
In Mount Aruma, a difficult area which was im- 
passable for my chariots, I abandoned my 
chariotry. (ii 75) Taking the lead of my warriors I 
slithered victoriously with the aggressiveness of a 
viper over the perilous mountain ledges. I des- 
troyed the land Isdis (so that it looked) like ruin 
hills (created by) the deluge. Their warriors (ii 80) 
I laid low in battle like sheep. I carried off their 
booty, possessions, and property. I burned all 
their cities. I imposed upon them (the obligation 
to provide) hostages, tribute, and taxes. 



ii 85-88) Tiglath-pileser, valiant man, opener of 
remote regions in the mountains, subduer of the 
insubmissive, overwhelmer of all fierce (enemies): 



II 53.2, 4 omit etirsu 'spared him', ii 57-58.2 has a horizontal 
line between these lines, ii 66 gamarnia is attested in all pre- 
served exs. (1-5, 7, 21) and is therefore not an error. It seems 
to refer to an elite group of troops and perhaps should be 
connected with kimarru in Thureau-Dangin, TCL 3 line 230. 



Cf. von Soden, AHw p. 276a and CAD 8 (K) pp. 371-72, 
ii 79-81.1-2, 4, 7, 12 omit these lines Their warriors ... 
property,' The master text is a conflation of exs, 3 and 5, the 
only exs. preserved for these lines, ii 80 Su-be: see the note to 
ii 20. 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1 



17 



89) 

90) 

91) 

92) 

93) 

94) 

95) 

96) 

97) 

98) 

99) 

100) 

101) 

102) 

Col. 

1) 

2) 



3) 
4) 
5) 
6) 



kur Su-ba-ri-i Sap-su-te la-a ma-gi-ri 
ak-Sud kur al-zi 

it kur pu-ru-lum~zi sa gun-su-mm 
u ma-da-ta-Su-nu u-sam-si-ku-ni 
ni-ir EN-ti-ia dugud vGv-su-nu 
ti-kin uv-sam-ma gun u ma-da-ta 
a-na VRV-ia d a-sur a-na mah-ri-ia 
li-tar-ru-u-ni ki-ma Sa i-na qar-du-ii-ia-ma 
sa d a-Sur en gis.tukul dan-na mu-sek-nis 
la-a ma-gi-ri qa-ti u-sat-me-hu-ma 
mi-sir KUR-ti-Su a-na ru-pu-si 
iq-ba~a 4 lim kur kas-ka-ia.MEs 
kur u-ru-ma-ia.MES erin.mes kur ha-at-te-e 
la-a ma-gi-ri Sa i-na da-na-ni-su-nu 
iii 

URU.MES-w sa kur Su-bar-te da-gil 
pa-an d a-sur EN-ia is-ba-tu a-la-ki a-na kur 
su-bar-te lu IS-mu-u me-lam qar-du-ti-ia u- 
se-hi-ip-su-nu-ti-ma me e-du-ru GiR.MEs-/a is- 
ba-tu 

a-di nam-kur-ri-Su-nu u 2 su-si 
gis.gigir.meS si-mit-ti ni-ri-su-mu 
al-qa-Su-nu-ti-ma a-na un.mes 
KVR-ti-ia am-nu-Su-nu-ti 



i-na Sit-mur qar-du-ti-ia 2-te-ia 

a-na kur kat-mu-hi lu-u al-lik nap-har 

uru.mes-£«-/zw ak-Sud sal-la-su-nu 

bu-Sa-Su-nu nam-kur-su-nu a-na la-a mi-na 

dS-lul 

uRu.MES-Su-nu i-na izi.mes dS-ru-up 

12) ap-ptil aq-qur si-te-et 

13) um-ma-na-te-Su-nu sa i-na pa-an 

GIS.TUKUL. MES-Ztf 

ez-zu-te ip-la-hu-ma ti-ib wk-ia 
dan-na e-du-ru a-na su-zu-ub 
nap-Sd-te-Su-nu gab-^a-a-ni dan-nu-te 
Sa KUR-e a.SA mar-sa lu-u is-ba-tu 
a-na Sik-kat hur-sa-ni Sa-qu-ti 
u gi-saNat kur-/ pa-dS-qa-a~te 
Sa a-na ki-bi-is lu la-a na-tu-u 

EGIR-SW-rtW lu e-U GI&.TUKUL MURUB 4 

u m£ it-ti-ia lu-u e-pu-Su 
a-bi-ik-ta-su-nu lu-u dS-kun sal-ma-at 

24) qu-ra-di-Su-nu i-na gi-sal-lat kur-/ 

25) ki-ma ra-hi-si lu-ke-mir us.mes-sh-wm 

26) hur-ri u ba-ma-a-te sa kur-I 

27) lu-ser-di Sal-la-su-nu bu-sa-a-Su-nu 

28) nam-kur-Su-nu it-ti gab-^a-a-ni 

29) Sa KUR-e dan-nu-te lu-Se-ri-da 



1) 
8) 
9) 
10) 

11) 



14) 
15) 
16) 
17) 
18) 
19) 
20) 
21) 
22) 
23) 



ii 89 - iii 6) I conquered the rebellious and in- 
submissive Subaru. I imposed the heavy yoke of 
my dominion upon the lands Alzu and Purulumzu 
which had abandoned (the practice of paying) 
tribute and tax so that annually they send tribute 
and tax (ii 95) into my presence at my city Assur. 
As soon as with my valour, by means of which 
the god Assur, my lord, had placed in my hand 
the strong weapon which subdues the insubmis- 
sive, (ii 100) he commanded me to extend the 
border of his land, 4,000 Kasku (and) Urumu, in- 
submissive troops of |Jatti — who had seized by 
force (iii 1) the cities of the land Subartu which 
were vassals of the god ASSur, my lord — heard 
of my coming to the land Subartu. The splendour 
of my valour overwhelmed them and, fearing bat- 
tle, they submitted to me. I took them, together 
with their property and 120 chariots (and) har- 
nessed horses, and regarded them as people of my 
land. 



iii 7-31) With my valorous onslaught I marched a 
second time to the land Katmuhu. I conquered all 
their cities (and) (iii 10) carried off their booty, 
possessions, (and) property without number. I 
burnt, razed, (and) destroyed their cities. The 
remainder of their troops, which had taken fright 
at my fierce weapons and (iii 15) had been 
cowered by my strong and belligerent attack, took 
to secure heights in rough mountainous terrain in 
order to save their lives. I climbed up after them 
to the peaks of high mountains and perilous 
mountain ledges (iii 20) where a man could not 
walk. They waged war, combat, and battle with 
me (and) I brought about their defeat, (iii 25) 
Like a storm demon I piled up the corpses of 
their warriors on mountain ledges (and) made 
their blood flow into the hollows and plains of the 
mountains. I brought down their booty, posses- 
sions, (and) property from the heights of the 
mighty mountains. (Thus) I became lord of the 
entire land of Katmuhu and added (it) to the 
borders of my land. 



ii 90.3, 5 u-sek-nis *l subdued' for ak-Sud 'I conquered 1 . 
ii 101.4 u-ru-ia.MEs. iii 2 This long line is actually inscribed 
on about three lines in most exs. See the commentary. 



iii 2.3 omits a-la-ki ... is-ba-tu 'heard of my coming ... 
submitted to me', iii 10.3 omits ana la mina ' without number*. 
iii 29.3 [dan-n]u-ti sa kur-/ for sa KUR-e dan-nu-te '(from the) 



18 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1 



kur kat-mu-hi a-na pat gim-ri-sa a-pel-ma 
a-na mi-sir KUR-ti-ia u-te-er 



m Gis.tukul-ti-iBiLA-e-sdr-ra lugal dan-nu 
su-us-kal la-a ma-gi-ri sa-pi-nu 
qa-bal tar-gn-gi^ 



i-na e-mu-qi si-ra-te sa d a-sur EN-ia 

a-na kur ha-ri-a u um-ma-na-at. mes 

kur pap-he-e.MEs dagaW/ hur-sa-ni 

sa-qu-ti sa a-sar-su-nu lugal ia-um-ma 

la i-ba-^a d a-sur en a-na a-la-ki 

iq-ba-a gis.gigir.mes it um-ma-na-te-ia 

lul-te-sir bir-ti kur et-ni 

u kur a-ia a.sA nam-ra-si lu as-bat 

kur. mes §a-qu-ti sa ki-ma zi-qip Gfe 

sam-tu sa a-na me-ti-iq gis.gigir.mes- ia 

la-a na-tu-u gis.gigir.mes i-na la-ba-ni 

lu-ii e-mi-id kur.mes pa-ds-qu-te 

lu e-te-ti-iq kul-lat kur pap-he-e.MES 

um-ma-na-te-su-nu dagal.mes-^ lul-tdk-si- 

ru-ma 

a-na e-pes giS.tukul.mes murub 4 u me 

Una kur a-zu da-ap-ni-is lu iz-zi-zu-ni-ma 

i-na KUR-e a.§a nam-ra-si it-te-su-nu 

am-da-hi-is ddb-da-su-nu ds-kun 

saUma-at qu-ra-di-Su-nu i-na ba-ma-at kur-/ 

a-na gu-ru-na-a-te lu-qe-ri-in 

us.mes qu-ra-di-su-nu hur-ri u ba-ma-a-te 

sa kur-/ lu-ser-di a-na uru.mes-/*/ 

sa i-na gi-sal-lat kur-/ sa-ak-nu sam-ris 

lu-u as-ni-iq 25 uru.mes-w sa kur ha-ri-a 

sa i-na gir kur a-ia kur su4-ra kur et-ni 

kur se-ez-zu kur se-el-gu kur ar-za-ni-bi-u 

kur u-ru-su u kur a-ni-it-ku 

sa-al-^u-ni ak-sud sal-la-su-nu 

bu-§a-su-nu nam-kur-su-nu ds-lul 

uru.mes-5m-/2w i-na izi.mes ds-ru-up 

ap-pul aq-qur 



kur a-da-us ti-ib ta-ha-zi-ia dan-na 

lu-u e-du-ru-ma a-sar-§u-nu lu u-mas-se-m 

a-na gi-sal-lat kur-/ sa-qu-ti 

ki-ma musen ip-pdr-su me-lam d a-sur en-/<7 

is-hup-su-nu-ti-ma 

ur-du-ni GlR.MES-/tf is-ba-tu 

gun it ma-da-ta jjgu-Su-hu u-kin 



iii 32-34) Tiglath-pileser, strong king, snare for 
the insubmissive, overwhelmer in battle with crim- 
inals: 

iii 35-65) With the exalted strength of the god 
As§ur, my lord, the god Assur, (my) lord, (iii 40) 
commanded me to march to the land Haria and 
the army of the extensive Paphu in high moun- 
tains where no other king had ever gone. Putting 
my chariotry and army in readiness I took a 
rugged route between Mount Etnu and Mount 
Aia. In the high mountains, which thrust up like 
pointed daggers and which (iii 45) were impass- 
able for my chariots, I put the chariots on (the 
soldiers') necks (and thereby) passed through the 
difficult mountain range. All of the Paphu, their 
extensive army, joined together and aggressively 
(iii 50) they took up a position to wage war, com- 
bat, and battle in Mount Azu. I fought with them 
in rough mountainous terrain (and) brought about 
their defeat. I built up mounds with the bodies of 
their warriors in the plains of the mountain (and) 
made (iii 55) the blood of their warriors flow into 
the hollows and plains of the mountain. I stormed 
the cities which were on mountain ledges (and) 
conquered 25 cities of the land Haria which lies at 
the foot of Mounts Aia, Suira, Etnu, (iii 60) 
Sezzu, Selgu, Arzanibiu, Urusu, and Anitku. I 
carried off their booty, possessions, (and) prop- 
erty. I burnt, razed, (and) destroyed their cities. 



kur sa-ra-uS kur am-ma-uS 
sa is-tu UA-um sa-a-te ka-na-sa 
la-a i-du-u ki-ma du 6 a-bu-be 



iii 66-72) (The people of) the land Adaus were 
frightened by my strong belligerent attack and 
abandoned their territory. They flew like birds to 
ledges on high mountains. (But) the splendour of 
the god Assur, my lord, overwhelmed them and 
they came back down and submitted to me. I im- 
posed upon them tribute and impost. 

iii 73-87) 1 destroyed the lands Saraus (and) 
Ammaug, which from ancient times (iii 75) had 
not known submission, (so that they looked) like 



secure (heights) of the mountains', iii 37b-39a dagal-u' ... la 
i-ba^a 'in high mountains ... gone* appears only in exs. 3, 5, 



and 10. It is omitted by all other preserved exs. iii 41 lul-te- 
fin see the note to i 71. iii 60.2-6, 9, 28-30 Se~e-zu. 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1 



19 



16) ds-hu-up it-ti um-ma-na-te-su-nu dagal.mes- 

te 

11) i-na kur a-ru-ma al-ta-na-an-ma 

78) ddb-da-$u-nu dS-kun sal-ma-at 

79) muq-tab-li-8u-nu i-na gi-saNat kur-/ ki-ma 
ser-ma-Se 

80) lu u-me-si UKVMES-su-nu ak-sud 

8 1 ) dingir. MEl-su-n u ds-sa-a sal-la-su-nu 

82) bu-sa-su-nu nam-kur-su-nu u-se-sa-a 

83) uru,mes-5«-/2« i-na izi.mes ds-ru-up 

84) ap-pul aq-qur a-na DUe u kar-me 

85) u-ter ni-ir EN-ti-ia dugud 

86) VGV-su-nu u-kin pa-an d a-sur EN-/a 

87) u-sad-gil-su-nu-ti 

88) kur i-su-a kur da-ri-a sap-su-te 

89) la-a ma-gi-ri ak-sud gun 

90) it ma-da-ta VGV-su-nu u-kin 

91) pa-an d a-sur EN-ia u-sad-gil-su-nu-ti 



92) 
93) 

94) 

95) 

96) 

97) 

98) 

99) 

100) 

101) 

102) 

103) 

Col. 

1) 

2) 
3) 
4) 
5) 
6) 



i-na a-sa-re-du-ti-ia-ma sa KUR.MES-/a 

ak-su-du gis.gigir.mes it um-ma-na-te-ia. meI 

lu al-qe id za-ban su-pa-la-a 

lu e-bir kur mu-rat-tas kur sa-ra-da-us 

sa qe-reb kur a-sa-ni-u u kur a-tu-ma 

a.sa nam-ra-si ak-sud 

um-ma-na-te-su-nu ki-ma ze-er-qe 

u-n&ki-is uru mu-rat-taS 

uru dan-nu-ti-Su-nu a-di sanabi-// u 4 -me 

Sa d UTu na-pa-hi ak-sud 

dingir. MES-su-nu bu-sa-su-nu nam-kur-su-nu 

2 su-si ruq-qi urudu.mes 

iv 

30 gun urudu.mes sa-bar-ta bu-se ta-tur 

E.GAL-li-su-nu it sal-la-su-nu 

u-se-sa-a uru su-a-tu i-na izi.mes 

ds-ru-up ap-pul aq-qur 

i-na Ut-mi-su-ma urudu.mes sa-a-tu 



a-na iskur ra->i-mi-ia a-qis 



I) i-na e-mu-qi si-ra-te sa a-sur EN-ia 

8) a-na kur su-gi sa kur hab-hi la-a ka-ni-su-ut 

9) d a-sur EN-ia lu al-lik it-ti 6 lim 

10) um-ma-na-te-su-nu kur hi-me kur lu-hi 

II) kur ar-ri-ir-gi kur a-la-mu-un 

12) kur nim-ni it kul-lat kur pap-he-e 

13) dagal.mes-// i-na kur hi-ri-hi 



ruin hills (created by) the deluge. I fought with 
their extensive army in Mount Aruma and 
brought about their defeat, (iii 80) I spread out 
like grain heaps the corpses of their men-at-arms 
on mountain ledges. I conquered their cities, took 
their gods, and brought out their booty, posses- 
sions, (and) property. I burnt, razed, (and) des- 
troyed their cities (and) (iii 85) turned them into 
ruin hills. I imposed the heavy yoke of my domin- 
ion upon them (and) made them vassals of the 
god Assur, my lord. 



iii 88-91) I conquered the rebellious and insubmis- 
sive lands of Isua (and) Daria. I imposed upon 
them tribute and impost (and) made them vassals 
of the god Assur, my lord. 

Iii 92 - iv 4) With my prowess, with which I con- 
quered enemies, I took my chariot ry and army 
(and) (iii 95) crossed the Lower Zab. I conquered 
the lands MurattaS (and) Saradaus which are 
within the rough terrain of Mounts Asaniu (and) 
Atuma. I butchered their troops like sheep. I con- 
quered (iii 100) their fortified city Murattas within 
the first third of the day after sunrise. I brought 
out their gods, their possessions, their property, 
120 copper kettles, (iv 1) 30 talents of copper 
bars, the outstanding property of their palace, 
their booty. I burnt, razed, (and) destroyed that 
city. 



iv 5-6) At that time I gave that copper to the god 
Adad, who loves me. 

iv 7-31) With the exalted power of the god Assur, 
my lord, I marched to the land Sugu of the land 
Habhu, (people) insubmissive to the god Assur, 
my lord. I fought on foot with 6,000 of (iv 10) 
their troops from the lands Himu, Luhu, Arrirgu, 
Alamun, Nimnu, and all of the extensive Paphu. 
(1 fought) (iv 15) with all those lands in Mount 



iii 76.3 omits DAGAL.MES-fe '(their) extensive (army)'. 
iii 79.3 omits i-na gi-sal-lat kur-/ 'on mountain ledges'. 
iii 94.3-5 za-ha. iii 103.3 1 su-si '60' instead of 2 su-si '120\ 
iv 4-5 One would expect a horizontal line between these lines 
to denote the beginning of a new paragraph. Cf. ii 57-58, 
ex, 2 (in note), See Borger, EAK 1 p. 114. However, no such 
line appears in any of the preserved exs. iv 6.3 after u iskur 



inserts en gal dingir '(Adad), the great lord, the god (who 
loves me)', iv 6.4 after d isKUR inserts en-w '(Adad) my lord' 
and omits ra-^i-mi-ia 'who loves me 1 , iv 7.3 i-na gi-pis e-mu-qi 
Sa d a~sur en-kz 'With the mighty power of the god ASSur, my 
lord', iv 10.11 lu-u-hi, iv 13b-15.1-2 omit i-na kur hi-ri-hi 
... KUR.KUR-5i/-/w %1 fought) with all those lands ... daggers. 1 



20 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1 



14; 

15; 
16; 
17 

is; 
19; 

20 
21 

22 
23 
24; 

25 

26; 

27 
28; 
29 

3o; 

31 



32; 

33 
34; 
35 

36; 

37 
38 
39 



40 

41 
42 



43 
44; 
45 
46; 
47 
48 



a.sa nam-ra-si Sa ki-ma zi-gip gir 
Sam-tu it-ti kul-lat kur.kur-5w-/w 
i-na GiR.MES-/tf lu-u am-da-hi-is 
a-bi-ik-ta-su-nu lu dS-kun 
erin.mes muq-tab-li-Su-nu i-na gi-sal-lat 

KUR-/ 

a-na gu-ru-na-a-te lu-qe-ri-in 

US.MES-5W-/2W kur hi-ri-ha 

ki-ma na-ba-si lu as-ru-up 

kur su-gi a-na si-hir-ti-Sa ak-sud 

25 dingir.mes-5w-«w sal-la-su-nu 

bu-Sa-Su-nu nam-kur-Su-nu xi-se-sa-a 

nap-har vmj«wml-Su-nu i-na izi.mes 

dS-ru-up ap-pul aq-qur 

si-te-et um-ma-na-te-Su-nu GiR.MES-/a 

is-ba-tu a-re-em-Su-nu-ti 

gun u ma-da-ta uGu-Su-nu 

it-kin it-ti da-gii pa-an 

d a-Sur EN-/a am-nu-Su-nu-ti 



i-na u^-mi-Su-ma 25 dingir.mes-hi Sa 

KUR.KUR.MES 

Si-na-ti-na ki-Sit-ti qa-ti-ia 
sa al-qa-a a-na u-tu-^u-ut e d NiN,iiL 
hi-ir-te GAL-te na-mad-di d a-Sur Em-ia 
d a-nim d isKUR d iNANNA as-su-ri-te 
e.kur.mes-^ URV-ia d a-Sur 

U d INANNA.MES KUK-ti-ia 

lu-u dS-ru-uk 



m Gis. tukul-ti-miLA-e-sdr-ra man dan-nu 
ka-sid kib-rat kur.mes sa-ni-nu 
gi-mir du man.mes 



i-na Ut-mi-su i-na e-mu-qi si-ra-te 

Sa d a-Sur en- /a i-na an-ni ke-e-ni 

Sa d UTU qu-ra-di i-na GilJukul-ti 

Sd dingir.mes gal,mes Sa i-na kib-rat A-i 

mi-Se-riS ul-tal-li~tu-ma mu-ne-ha 

i-na MURUB4 it Sa-ni-na i-na me la-a i-Su-ii 



Hirihu, rough terrain which thrust up like pointed 
daggers. I brought about their defeat. I built up 
mounds with the (corpses of) their men-at-arms 
on mountain ledges (and) with (iv 20) their blood 
I dyed Mount Hirihu red like wool. I conquered 
the entire land of Sugu. I brought out 25 of their 
gods, their booty, their possessions, (and) their 
property. I burnt, razed, (and) destroyed (iv 25) 
all of their cities. The remainder of their troops 
submitted to me (and) I had mercy on them. I im- 
posed upon them tribute and impost (and) re- 
garded them as vassals of the god Assur, my lord. 



iv 32-39) At that time I donated the 25 gods of 
those lands, my own booty which I had taken, to 
be door-keepers of the temple of the goddess 
Ninlil, beloved chief spouse of the god Assur, my 
lord, (the temple of) the gods Anu (and) Adad, 
(the temple of) the Assyrian Istar, the temples of 
my city, ASsur, and the goddesses of my land. 



iv 40-42) Tiglath-pileser, strong king, conqueror 
of enemy regions, rival of all kings: 



iv 43 - v 21) At that time, with the exalted might 
of the god Assur, my lord, with the firm approval 
(through divination) (iv 45) of the god Samas, the 
warrior, with the support of the great gods with 
which I have ruled properly in the four quarters 
and have no rival in battle nor equal in conflict, 



iv 20.3, 5, 11, 14 uS.meS qu-ra-di-su-nu 'the blood of their 
warriors*, iv 23.1-2, 4 omit SaNa-su-nu 'their booty'. 
iv 25.1-2, 4 omit nap-har 'all', iv 36.1-2, 4, 6, and probably 
26 omit this line '(the temple of) the gods Anu ... Iltar'. It is 
preserved only in exs. 3 and 5. iv 40-42.1-2, 4 omit this 
paragraph, iv 47 mu-ne-ha: the derivation and reading of 
munehha is uncertain. In addition to this reference, it occurs 
in the following Assyrian royal inscriptions (written either 
mu-ne-ha or mu-ne-eh-ha): RIMA 1 p. 247 line 14 (correct to 
mu-ne-ha); p. 266 line 18; RIMA 2 A.0.99.2 line 18; 1 R 31 
iv 23; AfO 9 p. 93 iii 27; 1 R 30 iii 29; and several times in 
texts of Sargon n (see the dictionaries for references). Note w- 
ne-hu in A.0.87.1 i 68 which clearly must derive from ne y u 'to 
turn away' and nu-u[h-h]u in A. 0.89. 4 obv. 4 which surely 
must come from the same root. In light of these latter two 



references, I think that munehhu must also derive from nt j u. 
This is the view of von Soden, AHw p. 673a (sub munehhu), 
and cf. p. 784a (sub n&u) and p. 806b (sub nu^u). Also note 
Seux, ERAS pp. 118-19 and 345. Borger, BAL 1 pp. 130-31 
and Zeichenliste p. 225 has objected to creating aleph readings 
for the h signs (e.g. e 3 for eh, 5 a for ha, etc.) in MA and NA 
texts and I agree with him. (Cf. u-sa-hi-lu-ma for usa^iluma in 
i 37.) But a derivation from nahu 'to be appeased, etc' given 
in the CAD is, to my mind, unconvincing. In CAD 10/2 (M) 
p. 203 sub munihhu it is stated that the consistent writings 
with £ 'suggest that the word derives from nahu and not from 
ne>u\ in spite of AKA p. 35 i 68 (= A.0.87.1 i 68) u-ne-hu 
which they (CAD 11/2 [N] p. 200a) derive from n&u. The 
CAD (11/2 [N] p. 317) does not know what to do with AfO 6 
p. 80:4 (= A.0.89.4 obv. 4) and calls it 'uncert.' 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1 



21 



49) a-na kur.kur na-i-ri man.mes-/!/ ne-su-te 

50) sa a-ah a.ab.ba e-le-ni-ti set sa-la-mu d sam-si 

51) set ka-na-sa la-a i-du-u 

52) d a-sur en u-ma-H-ra-ni-ma al-lik 

53) tu-ud-di mar-su-ti u ne-re-be-ti 

54) sup-su-qa-a-te sa i-na mah-ra 

55) lugal ia-um-ma lib-ba-Su-nu la-a i-du-u 

56) ar-hi ed-lu-te du-ur-gi 

57) la-a pe-tu-te u-se-ti-iq 

58) kur e-la-ma kur a-ma-da-na kur el-hi-is 

59) kur se-ra-be-li kur tar-hu-na 

60) kur ter-ka-hu-li kur ki-is-ra 

61) kur tar-ha-na-be kur e-lu-la 

62) kur ha-ds-ta-ra-e kur sa-hi-sa-ra 

63) kur u-be-ra kur mi-li-ad-ru-ni 

64) kur su-li-an-zi kur nu-ba-na-a-se 

65) « kur se-e-se 16 KUR.MES-m dan-nu-ie 

66) a.sa dug.ga /-/ia Gis.GiGiR.ME&-/a w mar-sa 

67) /-/war aq-qul-lat urudu.mes /w a/*-s/ 

68) u-ru-mi giS.mes kur-/ /w ak-ki-is 

69) ti-tur-ra-a-te.MEl a-na me-ti-iq gts.gigir.mes- 

70) um-ma-na-te-ia lu u-ti-ib 

71) id pu-rat-ta lu-ii e-bir lugal kur tum 4 -me 

72) lugal kur tu-nu-be lugal kur fc-a-tf 

73) lugal kur dar-da-ri LUGAL kur u-zu-la 

74) lugal kur un-za-mu-ni lugal kur an-di-a-bi 

75) lugal kur pi-la-dar-ni lugal kur a-dur-gi-ni 

76) lugal kur ku-li-bar-zi-ni lugal kur si-m- 
bir-ni 

11) lugal kur hi-mu-a lugal kur pa-i-te-H 

78) lugal kur u-i-ra-am lugal kur su-ru-ri-a 

79) lugal kur a-ba-e-m lugal kur a-da-e-ni 

80) lugal kur kUri~ni lugal kur al-ba-ia 

81) LUGAL KUR U-gl-Tia LUGAL KUR na-ZQ-bl-Q 

82) lugal kur a-bar-si-u-ni lugal kur da-ie-e-ni 

83) pap 23 LUGAL.MES-rttt kur.kur na-i-ri 

84) /-/za qe-reb KUR.KUR-su-nu-ma gis.gigir.me§- 

85) w um-ma-na-te-su-nu ul-tdk-si-ru-ma 

86) a-rta e-/?e? gis.tukul murub 4 w me 

87) /« it-bu-ni i-na su-mur Gis.TUKUL.MES-/a 

88) ez-zu-te as-ni-qa-su-nu-ti 

89) sa-gal-ti um-ma-na-te-su-nu dagal.mes 

90) /a-ma ri-hi-il-ti d i§KUR 

91) /w dS-kun sal-ma~at qu-ra-di-Su-nu 

92) /-Aia 5e-n ba-ma-at kur-/ w i-da-at 

93) URU.MES-.sw-m/ ki-ma ser-ma-se 

94) lu-me-si 2 su~si gis.gigir.mes-^w-^m 

95) ha-lup(*)-ta i-na qe-reb tam-ha~ri 



at the command of the god ASsur, (my) lord, I 
marched to the lands Nairi whose distant kings, 
(iv 50) on the shore of the Upper Sea in the west, 
had not known submission. I pushed through 
rugged paths and perilous passes, the interior of 
which (iv 55) no king had previously known, 
blocked trails (and) unopened remote regions. 
Mounts Elama, Amadanu, Elhis, Serabeli, 
Tarhuna, (iv 60) Terkahuli, Kisra, Tarhanabe, 
Elula, Hastarae, Sahisara, Ubera, Miliadruni, 
Sulianzi, Nubamlse, (iv 65) and Sese, 16 mighty 
mountains — (I rode) my chariot over smooth 
terrain and I hacked out the rough terrain with 
copper picks. I cut down urumu-trees which grow 
in the mountains, (iv 70) (thereby) constructed 
good bridges for the passage of my chariots and 
army, (and) crossed the Euphrates. The king of 
the land Tummu, the king of the land Tunubu, 
the king of the land Tualu, the king of the land 
Dardaru, the king of the land Uzula, the king of 
the land Unzamunu, the king of the land 
Andiabu, (iv 75) the king of the land Piladarnu, 
the king of the land Adurginu, the king of the 
land Kulibarzinu, the king of the land Sinibirnu, 
the king of the land Himua, the king of the land 
Paiteru, the king of the land Uiram, the king of 
the land Sururia, the king of the land Abaenu, 
the king of the land Adaenu, (iv 80) the king of 
the land Kirinu, the king of the land Albaia, the 
king of the land Ugina, the king of the land 
Nazabia, the king of the land Abarsiunu, the king 
of the land Daienu, altogether 23 kings of the 
lands Nairi (iv 85) combined their chariotry and 
army in their lands (and) advanced to wage war, 
strife, and combat. With the onslaught of my 
fierce weapons I approached them (and) destroyed 
their extensive army (iv 90) like a storm of the 
god Adad. I laid out like grain heaps the corpses 
of their warriors in the open country, the plains 
of the mountains, and the environs of their cities. 
1 seized (iv 95) in battle 120 of their chariots with 
equipment (and) 60 kings of the lands Nairi, in- 
cluding those who had come to their aid, (iv 100) 
I chased at arrowpoint as far as the Upper Sea. I 
conquered their great towns (and) brought out 
(v 1) their booty, possessions, (and) property. I 
burnt, razed, (and) destroyed their cities (and) 
turned them into ruin hills. I brought back (v 5) 
extensive herds of horses, mules, (and) donkeys 
— the livestock of their pastures — without 



iv 49.3 omits na-i-ri. iv 50.3 omits Sa Sa-la-mu A sam-si 'in the 
west', iv 52.13 EN-r^n l my lord', iv 69.3, 5 omit 
gis.gigir.mes-w u 'my chariots and*, iv 83 pap 'altogether* 



appears only in ex. 3. It is omitted in all other preserved exs. 
(1-2, 4-5), iv 86.3 a-na e-pes murub 4 u ta-ha-zi (omits 

gis.tukul). 



22 



Tiglath-pileser i A.O.87.1 



96) lu-te-me-eh 1 su-si lugal.mes-h/ 

97) kur.kur na-i-ri a-di sa a-na 

98) ne-ra-ru-te-su-nu il-li-ku-ni 

99) i-na zi-qft mul-mul-li-ia a-di a.ab.ba 

100) e-le-ni-te lu ar-di-su-nu-ti 

101) ma-ha-zi-su~nu gal.mes ak-sud 
Col. v 

1) sal-la-su-nu bu-sa-a-su-nu nam-kur-Su-nu 

2) ii-se-$a-a x3Bjj t Mm-§u~nu i-na izi.meS 

3) ds-ru-up ap'piil aq-qur 

4) a-na du 6 w kar-mi li-ter 

5) SU-glil-lat ANSE.KUR.RA.MES DAGAL.MES 

6) pa-re-e a-ga-li u mar-sit 

7) qer-be-te-su-nu a-na la-a ma-ne-e 

8) u-ter-ra nap-har lugal.mes-/?/ 

9) KUR.KUR na-i-ri bal-tu-su-nu qa-ti 

10) ik-sud a-na lugal.mes-«/ sa-a-tu-nu 

1 1 ) re-e-ma ar-sa-su-nu-ti-ma 

12) na-pis-ta-su-nu e-ti-ir sal-lu-su-nu 

13) m ka-mu-su-nu i-na ma-har d UTU en-/# 

14) ap-tu-ur ma-mi-it DiNGiR.MES-/a 

15) gal.mes a-«a ar-£a* tjd.mes a-na u^-um 

16) sa-a-te a-na m-ut-te u-tam-mi-su-nu-ti 

17) dumu.mes nab-ni-it uuGAL-ti-su-nu 

18) a-«a li-tu-te as-bat 

19) 1 LIM 2 ME ANSE.KUR.RA.MES 2 LIM GU4.MES 

20) ma-da-at-ta vGu-su-nu u-kin 

21) tf-w kur.kur. MES-su-nu u-mas-se-er-su-nu-ti 



22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29; 
30 
31 
32' 



33 
34; 
35 
36 

37 
38 



m se-e-ni lugal kur daAe-e-ni 
sa a-na d a-sur EN-/Y? la-a ka-an-su 
sal-Iu-su u ka-mu-su a-na uRU-ia 
d a-sur ub-la-su re-e-ma 
ar-sa-su-ma is-tu VRV-ia d a-sur 
da-lil dinger. me§ gal.meS 
a-na da-la-a-li a-na na-pi-is-ti 
u-mas-se-er-su kur.kur na-i-ri 
dagal.mes-^ a-na pat gim-ri-si-na a-pel 
u nap-har LVGAL.MES-su-nu 
a-na GiR.MES-/a u-sek-nis 



i-na ta-lu-uk gir-ri-ma su-a-tu 

a-na uru mi-li-di-a sa kur ha-ni-gal-bat 

sap-su-te la-a ma-gi-ri al-lik 

ii-ib uk-ia dan-na e-du-ru-ma 

GiR.MES-/tf is-ba-tu a-re-em-su-nu-ti 

uru su-a-tu ul ak-sud li-i-ti-su-nu 



number. I captured all of the kings of the lands 
Nairi alive. I had mercy (v 10) on those kings and 
spared their lives. 1 released them from their 
bonds and fetters in the presence of the god 
Samas, my lord, and made them swear by my 
(v 15) great gods an oath of eternal vassaldom. I 
took their natural, royal, sons as hostages. I im- 
posed upon them a tribute of 1,200 horses (and) 
2,000 cattle. I allowed them to return to their 
lands. 



v 22-32) I brought Seni, king of the land Daienu, 
who had not been submissive to the god Assur, 
my lord, in bonds and fetters to my city ASSur. I 
had mercy on him and let him leave my city 
Assur alive in order to proclaim the glory of the 
great gods. (Thus) I became lord of the vast lands 
of Nairi in their entirety. Indeed all their kings I 
subdued. 



v 33-41) In the course of that campaign I 
marched to the rebellious and insubmissive city 
Milidia of the land Hanigalbat. Frightened by my 
strong belligerent attack they submitted to me and 
I had mercy on them. I did not storm that city 
(but) I took hostages, I imposed upon them as 



iv 97.2 omits kur.kur na-i-ri 'of the lands Nairi*. 

iv 98.2 erroneously omits il-li-ku-ni 'had come'. 

Iv 99.3-4 omit zi-qit t (arrow)point'. v 4.1-2, 4, 11, 20 omit 

this line '(and) turned them into ruin hills'. It is preserved in 

exs. 3,5, and 8. v 5.4 Although ex. 4 is broken, there is 

clearly not enough room to restore anse.kur.ra.meS Worses'. 

Scribal error, v 25-26 re-e-ma ar-sa-su-ma *I had mercy on 



him' appears only in ex. 3. It is omitted by all preserved exs. 
(1-2, 4, 8). v 29.1-2, 4, 6 have a horizontal line after 
uma$$ersu. v 34 'Milidia of the land IJanigalbaf: although all 
preserved exs. (1-5, 24) have *the land Hanigalbat' this must 
be an error for 'the great land Hatti* (see A. 0.87.4 line 31). See 
Goetze, MAOG 4 (1928-29) pp. 64-65; Weidner, Ugaritica 6 
p. 530; and Hawkins, RLA 4 p. 153 sub Hatti §3.1. 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1 



23 



as-bat 1 anse kur-ba-ni sa a-ba-ri 

ma-da-at-ta Mu-sdm-ma 

a-na la su-pdr-ke-e UGU-su-nu u-kin 



uninterrupted annual tribute one homer of lead 
ore. 



m Gis. tukul-ti-iEiLA-e-sdr-ra nab-lu ha-am-tu 
su-zu-zu a-bu-ub tam-ha-ri 



i-na gis. tukul-ti d a-sur EN-ia gis.gigir.mes 

it qu-ra-di-ia. mes lu-u al-qe mu-ud-ba-ra 

as-bat a-na sa ah-la-ml-i 

kur ar-ma-ia.UEs kur.mes-w/ d a-sur en-Iq 

lu-u al-lik iS-tu tar-si kur su-hi 

a-di uru kar-ga-miS sa kur ha-at-te 

i-na \-en u*-me ah-bu-ut 

di-ik-ta-su-nu a-duk sal-la-su-nu 

bu-sa-a-su-nu mar-Si-su-nu 

a-na la-a mi-na u-ter-ra 

si-te-et um-ma-na-te-su-nu 

sa i-na pa-an gis.tukul.mes sa d a-sur EN-ia 

ip-pdr-si-du id pu-rat-ta lu e-be-ru 

ar-ki-su-nu i-na gis.ma.mes kus.duh.si.a 

Id pu-rat-ta lu e-be-er 

6 URU.ME§-5z<-ftu Sa gIr kur be-es-ri 

ak-sud i-na izi.meS dS-ru-up 

ap-pul aq-qur sal-la-su-nu bu-sa-su-nu 

mar-si-su-nu a-na vvcu-ia d a-sur 

ub~la 



m Gi$Jukul-ti-iBiLA-e-sdr-ra ka-bi-is al-tu-te 
mu-sem-qit la ma-gi-ri mu-sar-bi-bu 
ka-lis mul-tar-hi 



a-na ka-Sad kur mu-us-ri d a-sur en 

u-ma-H-ra-ni-ma bir-ti kur e-la-mu-ni 

kur ta-la it kur ha-ru-sa lu as-bat 

kur mu-us-ri a-na si-hir-ti-Sa ak-sud 

qu-ra-di-su-nu u-sem-qit 

uRu.MES-iu-rtw i-na izi.mes dS-ru-up ap-pul 

aq-qur um-ma-na-at kur qu-ma-ne-e 

a-na re-su-ut kur mu-us-ri 

lu il-li-ku-ni i-na KUR-e it-te-su-nu 

lu am-da-hi-is a-bi-ik-ta-su-nu lu dS-kun 

a-na l-en uru uru a-ri-ni sa gir kur a-i-sa 

lu-u e-si-ir-su-nu-ti GiR.MES-/a 

is-ba-tu uru su-a-tu e-ti-ir 

thi-ti.MES gun u ma-da-at-ta 

UGU-su-nu u-kin 



v 42-43) Tiglath-pileser, 
flame, deluge in battle: 



darting (and) furious 



v 44-63) With the support of the god ASsur, my 
lord, I took my chariots and warriors (and) set off 
for the desert. I marched against the ahlamu- 
Aramaeans, enemies of the god Assur, my lord. 
(v 50) I plundered from the edge of the land Suhu 
to the city Carchemish of the land Hatti in a sin- 
gle day. I massacred them (and) carried back their 
booty, possessions, and goods without number. 
The rest of their troops, (v 55) who fled from the 
weapons of the god Assur, my lord, crossed the 
Euphrates. I crossed the Euphrates after them on 
rafts (made of inflated) goatskins, (v 60) I con- 
quered six of their cities at the foot of Mount 
Besri, burnt, razed, (and) destroyed (them, and) 
brought their booty, possessions, and goods to 
my city As§ur. 



v 64-66) Tiglath-pileser, who treads upon dan- 
gerous people, who lays low the insubmissive, 
pacifier of all the rebellious: 

v 67-81) The god Assur, the lord, commanded me 
to conquer the land Musri and I took the way 
between Mounts Elamuni, Tala, and Harusa. 
(v 70) I conquered all the land Musri (and) laid 
low their warriors. I burnt, razed, (and) destroyed 
their cities. The troops of the Qumanu (v 75) 
came to the aid of the land Musri. I fought with 
them in the mountains, (and) brought about their 
defeat. I confined them to one city, the city Arinu 
which is at the foot of Mount Aisa. They submit- 
ted to me (and) I spared that city. I imposed upon 
them hostages, tribute, (and) impost. 



v 45-46. 1 omits mu-ud-ba-ra as-bat '(and) set off for the 
desert*. It appears in all other preserved exs. (2-5). 
v 46 ahlamu is a word meaning 'nomad, barbarian* in 
Assyrian royal inscriptions of the twelfth to ninth centuries 
BC. Originally, of course, it was a gentilic but this is 
obviously not the case in our inscriptions where gentilics are 



always preceded by kur and generally followed by mes. 
Neither kur nor mes appears with ahlamu in texts of this 
volume with the following exceptions: A. 0.87. 4 line 34 (kur) 
and A.0.99.2 line 33 (kur). Cf. Brinkman, PKB p. 277 
n. 1799. v 55.3, 5 (gis.tukul.mes) ez-zu-te 'fierce weapons'. 
v 74.3 na-ra-ru-ut for re-su-ut. v 77.4 a-ri-in-ni. 



24 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1 



82' 
83 
84' 
85 
86 
87 

88; 
89; 
90; 

91 

92; 

93 

94 

95 
96 

97 
98 



i-na u^-mi-su-ma kul-lat kur qu-ma-ne-e 

Sa a-na re-su-ut kur mu-us-ri is-sa-ak-nu 

nap-har kur.kur.mes-^w-a/w lu id-ku-u-ni 

a-na e-pes giS.tukul.meS qab-li u me 

lu iz-zi-zu-ni i-na Su-mur giS.tukul.meS-io 

ez-zu-te it-ti 20 lim um-ma-na^te-Su-nu 

dagal.mes i-na kur ta-la lu am-da-hi-is-ma 

a-bi-ik-ta-su-nu lu ds-kun 

ki-sir-su-nu gap-sa lu-pe-ri-ir 

a-di kur ha-ru-sa sa pa-an kur mu-us-ri 

ab-ku-su-nu lu ar-du-ud sal-ma-at 

qu-ra-di-su-nu i-na gi-sal-lat kur-/ 

ki-ma Su-u-be us-na-il 

us.ME§-£w-nw hur-ri u ba-ma-a-te sa kur-/ 

lu-ser-di ma-ha-zi-su-nu gal.mes 

ak-sud i-na izi.meS ds-ru-up 

ap-pul aq-qur a-na DU6 u kar-me u-ter 



99) 

100) 

Col. 

1) 

2) 
3) 
4) 

5) 
6) 
7) 
8) 
9) 



io; 
n 
12; 

13 
14 
15 
16 

17 

is; 
19; 
20; 

21 



22' 
23 
24 



uru hu-nu-sa uru dan-nu-ti-su-nu 

ki-ma du 6 a-bu-be ds-hu-up 

vi 

it-ti um-ma-na-te-su-nu gap-sa-a-te 

i-na uru u kur-6 Sam-ris lu-u am-da-hi-is 

a-bi-ik-ta-su-nu lu ds-kun 

erin.mes muq-tab-li-su-nu i-na qe-reb hur- 

sa-a-ni 

ki-ma su-u-be lu us-na-il sag.du.mes-sw-/7w 

ki-ma ze-er-qe u-ne-ki-is 

us.mes-5w-«w hur-ri u ba-ma-a-te Sd kur-/ 

lu-Sir-di uru Su-a-tu ak-Sud 

i>mGiR.ME§-$u-nu ds-sa-a sal-la-su-nu bu-Sa- 

Su-nu nam-kur-su-nu 

u-Se-sa-a uru i-na izlmes ds-ru-up 

3 bAd.mes-su Sa i-na a-gur-ri 

ra-ds-bu u si-hir-ti uru-sw 

ap-pul aq-qur a-na du 6 it kar-me 

u-ter u NA4.MES si-pa i-na muh-hi-Su 

az-ru nim.gIr zabar e-pu-uS 

ki-Sit-ti kur.kur.mes sa i-na d a-sur en -ia 

ak-su-du uru su-a-tu a-na la-a sa-ba-te 

u Bko-su la-a ra-sa-pi i-na muh-hi 

al-tu-ur e sa a-gur-ri i-na muh-hi-su 

ar-sip nim.gIr zabar Sa-tu-nu 

i-na lib-bi it-se-si-ib 



v 82-98) At that time all the Qumanu, who had 
agreed to assist the land Musri, mustered their en- 
tire territories and took up a position (v 85) to do 
battle and conflict, With the onslaught of my 
fierce weapons I fought with their 20,000 exten- 
sive troops at Mount Tala (and) brought about 
their defeat, (v 90) I broke up their mighty force 
(and) pursued them in their retreat as far as 
Mount Harusa which is before the land Musri. I 
spread out the corpses of their warriors on moun- 
tain ledges like sheep (and) made (v 95) their 
blood flow into the hollows and plains of the 
mountains. I conquered their great towns, burnt, 
razed, (and) destroyed (them) and turned (them) 
into ruin hills. 



v 99 - vi 21) I overwhelmed the city Hunusu, 
their fortified city, (so that it looked) like a ruin 
hill (created by) the deluge. Violently I fought 
(vi 1) with their mighty army in city and moun- 
tain (and) brought about their defeat, (vi 5) I laid 
low their men-at-arms in the mountains like 
sheep. Like lambs I cut off their heads (and) made 
their blood flow into the hollows and plains of the 
mountains. (Thus) I conquered that city. I took 
their gods (and) (vi 10) brought out their booty, 
possessions, (and) property. I burnt the city. The 
three walls which were constructed with baked 
brick and the entire city I razed, destroyed, 
turned into a ruin hill and (vi 15) strewed sipu- 
stones over it. I made bronze lightning bolts (and) 
inscribed on them (a description of) the conquest 
of the lands which with the god Assur, my lord, I 
conquered (and a warning) not to occupy that city 
and not to rebuild its wall. On that (site) I built a 
house of baked brick and put inside those bronze 
lightning bolts. 



i-na gis Jukul-ti d a-sur EN-za gis.gigir.mes 
u qu-ra-di-ia.MES lu al-qe uru kip-su-na 
uru LVGAL-ti-su-nu lu al-mi lugal kur qu- 



vi 22-38) With the support of the god Assur, my 
lord, I took my chariotry and warriors (and) sur- 
rounded the city Kipsuna, their royal city. The 



v 82 i-na u^-mi-Su-ma 'At that time' appears only in ex. 3. It 
is omitted in exs. 1-2 and C 2 and, although exs. 4-5 are 

broken, for reasons of space it was probably omitted in those 
exs. as well, v 90 Although ex. 6 is broken at this point, the 
limited space suggests it omitted the entire line: *I broke up 
their mighty force', v 94 SQbu 'sheep*: see the note to ii 20. 



v 94.3 lu u-me-si for uS-na-it, vi 5 SUbu 'sheep': see the note 

to ii 20. vi 9.3, 5, 39 omit M-la-su-nu 'their booty 1 . 

vi 11.3, 5 3 bAd.mes-£u-/?m gal.mes 'their three great walls', 

vi 16 J rpiMGiiO~w 'my god' for A a-§ur 'the god ASSur'. 
vi 24.2-5 omit kur land of (the Qumanu)'. 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1 



25 



ma-ne-e 

25) ti-ib ME-ia dan-na e-du-ur-ma 

26) GiR.MES-/a is-bat uru su-a-tu e-ti-ir 

27) bad-su GAL-a u a-sa-ia-te-su 

28) sa a-gur-ri a-na na-pa-li aq-ba-su-ma 

29) is-tu us-se-su a-di gaba-dib-bUsu 

30) ip-pul a-na DUe u-ter 

31) u 5 su-si qi-in-na-a-te en.mes hi-i-ti 

32) sa lib-bi-su sa a-na d a-sur BN-ia la-a ka-an-su 

33) is-su-ha am-hur-su Ii-i-tLMES-su 

34) as-bat gun u ma-da-ta 

35) ugu sa pa-na ut-ter i-na muh-hi-su 

36) ds-kun kur qu-ma-ne-e dagal- ta 

37) a-na pat gim-ri-sa ak-sud a-na GiR.MES-/a 

38) u-sek-nis 

39) su.ni'gin 42 kur.kur.mes u mal-ki-si-na 

40) iS-tu e-ber-ta-an to za-ban su-pa-li-i 

41) Si-id-di hur-Sa-a-ni ne-su-te 

42) a-di e-ber-ta-an to pu-rat-te 

43) kur ha-at-te-e u a.ab.ba e-le-m-ti 

44) 5a sa-la-mu d sam-se is-tu ri-is WGAL-ti-ia 

45) a-d/ 5 BALA-/a qa-a-ti ik-sud 

46) /?a-a l-en u-se-es-kin-su-nu-ti 

47) H-tiMES-Su-nu as-bat gun 

48) w ma-da-ta VGV-su-nu u-kin 

49) e-zi-ib har-ra-na-at kur.mes ma-da-a-tu 

50) 5a a-/?tf Ihta-te-ia la-a qe-er-ba 

51) a.sa dug.ga i-na Gis.GiGiR.MES-/a u mar-sa 

52) i-na GiR.MES-/a ar-ki-su-nu 

53) /w at-tal-lak GiR.MES kur.mes 

54) i-na KVK-ti-ia lu-ii ap-ru-us 

55) m Gis. tukul-ti-iBiLA-e-sdr-ra et-lu qar-du 

56) ta-me-eh gis.ban la-a sd-na-an 

57) mu-gam-me-ru bu-^u-ur se-ri 

58) d nin-urta it d iGi.DU Gis.TUKUL.MZS-su-nu 

59) ez-zu-te w gis.ban-sm-hm s/r-ta 

60) a-wa /"-<// en- ti-ia is-ru-ku 

61) /-/*# si-qir d nin-urta ra-H-mi-ia 

62) 4 pu-fyal am.meS dan-nu-te su-tu-ru-te 

63) i-/ia hu-rib'te i-na kur mi-ta-ni 

64) w i-^a uru a-ra-zi-qi Sa pa-an 

65) kur ha-at-te i-na Gi§.BAN-/a dan-na-te 

66) su-ku-ud an. bar w mul-mul-li-ia 

67) zaq-tu-te na-pis-ta-su-nu u-seq-ti 



king of the land of the Qumanu (vi 25) was 
frightened of my strong and belligerent attack and 
submitted to me. I spared that city. I ordered him 
to destroy his great wall and towers of baked 
brick, (vi 30) He destroyed from top to bottom 
and turned it into a ruin hill. He deported (and) I 
received from him 300 families, rebels in his midst 
who were not submissive to the god Assur, my 
lord. I took hostages from him. I imposed upon 
him a tribute and impost (vi 35) which was larger 
than before. I conquered completely the extensive 
Qumanu (and) subdued (them). 



vi 39-48) Altogether I conquered 42 lands and 
their rulers from the other side of the Lower Zab 
in distant mountainous regions to the other side 
of the Euphrates, people of Hatti, and the Upper 
Sea in the west — from my accession year to my 
fifth regnal year. I subdued them to one author- 
ity, took hostages from them, (and) imposed 
upon them tribute and impost. 



vi 49-54) (This) is apart from the numerous 
foreign campaigns which do not appear in the (ac- 
count of) my victories (and) upon which I pur- 
sued my enemies by chariot in favourable terrain 
and on foot in rough terrain. I prevented the 
enemies from setting foot in my land. 

vi 55-57) Tiglath-pileser, valiant man, armed with 
the unrivalled bow, expert in the hunt: 



vi 58-69) The gods Ninurta and Nergal gave me 
their fierce weapons and their exalted bow for my 
lordly arms. By the command of the god Ninurta, 
who loves me, with my strong bow, iron arrow- 
heads, and sharp arrows, I slew four extraordi- 
narily strong wild virile bulls in the desert, in the 
land Mittani, and at the city Araziqu which is be- 
fore the land Hatti. I brought their hides and 
horns to my city Assur. 



vi 26.3, 5 na-pis-ta-su 'his life* for uru su-a-tu 'that city'. 
vi 32.24 omits Vib-bi-su sa 'in his midst', vi 37.3, 5 for pat 
gim-rhSa ak-sud have si-hi'r-ti-sa '(I) entirely (subdued the 
extensive Qumanu at my feet).' vi 40.3, 5, 35 za- be for za- 
ban. vi 46.1-2, 4-5, 35 omit this line 'I subdued them to one 
authority'. It is preserved only in ex. 3. All other exs. are 



broken here, vi 57 bu-^u-ur, all preserved exs. (1-2, 4, 22) 
clearly have bu- as one expects. King had only ex. 4 for this 
sign which he read as a broken mu. However, collation shows 
that the traces in ex. 4 can be read r& M n.. vi 63.2-4, 22 mi- 
ta-a-ni. 



26 



Tiglath-pileser i A. 0.87.1 



68 
69 



70 
71 

72 
73 

74; 

75 



76 

77 

78; 

79 
80 
81 
82; 
83 
84 



KVS.MES-Su-nU SI.MES-5W-/IW 

a-na uRv-ia d a-Sur ub-la 



10 am.si.mes pu-ha-li dan-nu-ti 
i-na kur.kaskal-w u Si-di id ha-bur 
lu a-duk 4 am.si.mes bal-tu-te 
lu-sa-bi-ta KUS.MES-Su-nu 
zt.uES-Su-nu it-ti AM.si.MEs-ma 
bal-tu-te a-na URU-ia d a-sur ub-la 



i-na si-qir nin-urta ra-H-mi-ia 

2 Su-Si ur.mah.meS i-na Ub-bi-ia ek~di 

i-na qit-ru-ub mi-it-lu-ti-ia 

i-na GlR t ME§-ia lu a-duk 

u 8 me ur.mah.mes i-na Gis.GiGiR-/a 

i-na pat-tu-te u-Sem-qtt 

bu-ul d Mkkan gi-mir-ta u musen AN-e 

mut-tap-ri-Sa e-em ni-sik glmeS-uz 

lu-u at-ta-di 



85) iS-tu kur. UEl-ut d a-Sur pat gim-ri-Su-nu 

86) a-pe-lu e d iNANNA ds-Su-ri-te 

87) NIN-/0 E d MAR.TU E d EN.LIBIR.RA 

88) £ d \0~te E.HI.A.MES DINGIR.MES- W 

89) an-hu-te Sa URU-ia d a-Sur e-pu-uS 

90) u-sek-lil te-ru-bat e.hi.a.mes-sw-ww 

91) ds-kun dingir.mes gal.mes en.mes-w 

92) a-na lib-bi u-Se-rib 

93) lib-bi uiNGm-ti-su-nu ii-ti-ib 

94) E.GAL.MES-te SU-bat LUGAL- tl 

95) sa ma-ha-za-ni gal.mes-/^ 

96) sa si-di KVR-ti-ia gab-be sa is-tu 

97) tar-si ad.mes-/# i-na mu.mes-^ 

98) dan-na-te um-da-Si-ra-ma e-na-ha-ma 

99) P-ab-ta r>u-us u-sek-lil 

100) bad.mes KVR-ti-ia an-su-te 

101) ak-se-er gis.apin.meS i-na nap-har kur d a-Sur 

102) gab-be u-ser-ki-is u ta-ab-ka 

103) Sa Se.im.mes a-na Sa AD.ME$-ia 

104) lu u-ter lu at-bu-uk 

105) su-gul-lat anse.kur.ra.mes gu 4 .mes anse.mes 
Col. vii 

1) sa i-na gis Jukul-ti d a-Sur EN-ia 

2) i-na kur.kur.mes Sa a-pe-lu-Si-na-ti 

3) ki-sit-ti qa-ti-ia 

4) Sd al-qa-a ak-sur u su-gul-lat 

5) na-a-li. mes dara.mas.mes ar-mi.ME$ 

6) tu-ra-hi.MES sa d a-sur it d MAS 

7) dingir.mes Aga.mes-/# e-peS bu-^u-ri 

8) i-qi-Su-ni i-na qe-reb hur-sd-ni 

9) sa-qu-ti u-tam-me-hu 



vi 70-75) I killed ten strong bull elephants in the 
land Harran and the region of the River Habur 
(and) four live elephants I captured. I brought the 
hides and tusks (of the dead elephants) with the 
live elephants to my city Assur. 



vi 76-84) By the command of the god Ninurta, 
who loves me, I killed on foot 120 lions with my 
wildly outstanding assault. In addition, 800 lions I 
felled from my light chariot. I have brought down 
every kind of wild beast and winged bird of the 
heavens whenever I have shot an arrow. 



vi 85 - vii 16) After I had gained complete domin- 
ion over the enemies of the god Assur, I rebuilt 
(and) (vi 90) completed the dilapidated (portions 
of) the temple of the Assyrian Istar, my mistress, 
the temple of the god Amurru, the temple of the 
god Bel-labira, the temple of the Ten Gods, the 
temples of the gods of my city Assur. I put in 
place the entrances to their temples (and) brought 
the great gods, my lords, inside. (Thus) did I 
please their divinity. I rebuilt (and) completed the 
palaces, the royal residences (vi 95) of the great 
towns in the (various) districts of my entire land 
which since the time of my forefathers during 
hard years had been abandoned and had fallen 
into ruin and decay. I repaired (vi 100) the weak- 
ened fortifications of my land. I caused plows to 
be hitched up all over Assyria and (thereby) piled 
up more grain than my forefathers. I formed 
(vi 105) herds of horses, oxen, (and) asses from 
the booty I took when I gained dominion over 
lands (vii 1) with the support of the god Assur, 
my lord. In addition I got control of (and) 
formed herds of (vii 5) w/a/w-deer, aialu-deer, 
gazelles, (and) ibex which the gods Assur and 
Ninurta, the gods who love me, had given me in 
the course of the hunt in high mountain ranges. I 
(vii 11) numbered them like flocks of sheep. I 
sacrificed yearly to the god Assur, my lord, the 
young born to them as voluntary offerings to- 
gether with my pure sacrifices. 



vi 93.3, 5 insert GAi-te after dingir-//-sw-/iw '(their) great 
(divinity)', vi 96.3 omits gab-be '(my) entire (land)'. 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1 



27 



10) su-gul-la-te-su-nu ak-sur 

11) mi-nu-su-nu ki-ma sa mar-sit 

12) se-ni.ME$-ma lu-u am-nu 

13) pu-ha-di e-lu*MES nab-ni-it 

14) Rb-bi-Su-nu a-na bi-ib-lat llb-bi-ia 

15) it-ti SISKUR.MES-Wf ku.meS 

16) uv-sdm-ma a-na d a-sur en-/# lu at-ta-qi 

1 7) giss e-re-na gis tas-ka-ri-na 

1 8) gis al-la-ka-ni-is i-na kur. kur. mes 

19) sa a-pe-lu-si-na-ti Gil. mes 

20) sa-tu-nu sa i-na lugal.mes-/?/ 

21) AD.MES-/fir mah-ru-te ma-am-ma 

22) la iz-qu-pu al-qa-am-ma 

23) i-na gis,kiri6.mes KUR-ti-ia 

24) az-qu-up u gurun gis.kiri 6 

25) aq-ra sa i-na KVR-ti-ia la-ds-su 

26) al-qa-a gis.kiri 6 .mes kur d a-sur 

27) lu-u us-me-li 

28) gis.gigir.mes si-im-da-at ni-ri 

29) a-na e-muq kur- ti-ia ugu sa pa-na 

30) lu u-ter lu u-ser-ki-is 

31) ugu kur d a-sur ma-a-ta 

32) ugu un.mes-w un. mes lu-rad-di 

33) UZU.MES UN.MES-/a w'-ft-/6 

34) sub-ta ne-eh-ta 

35) u-se-M-ib-su-nu-ti 

36) m Gi§ Jukul-ti-iBiLA-e-Sdr-ra nun 57- rw 

37) &? d a-Sur u d nin-urta a-na bi-ib-lat 

38) lib-bi-su it-tar-ru-su-ma 

39) ar-W kur.mes-w^ d a-swr 

40) pat gim-ri-su-nu it-tal-la-ku-ma 

41) ti-sek-ni-su gi-mir mul-tar-hi 

42) a d a-sur-SAG-i-si lugal dan-ni ka-sid 

43) kur. kur kur. mes mu-sek-ni-su 

44) gi-mir al-tu-ti 

45) a a ifr m mu-tdk-kil- d nusku sa d a-sur en gal 

46) /-/la u-tu-ut ku-un lib-bi-su 

47) ih-su-hu-su-ma a-na sipa-w/ 

48) kur d a-w ki-ni-is ib-bu-su 

49) ibila ke-e-nu sa md a-sur-da-a-an 

50) /*a-as gis.gidru Kti-te mul-tas-pi-ru 

51) te-ne-set d en-lil sa ep-set qa-ti-su 

52) w na-dan zi-bi-su 

53) ugu dingir.mes gal.mes i-ti-bu-ma 



vii 11-27) I took cedar, box-tree, Kanish oak 
from the lands over which I had gained dominion 
— such trees which none among previous kings, 
my forefathers, had ever planted — and I planted 
(them) in the orchards of my land. I took rare or- 
chard fruit which is not found in my land (and 
therewith) filled the orchards of Assyria. 



vii 28-35) I had in harness for the forces of my 
land more chariots and teams of horses than ever 
before. To Assyria I added land and to its people 
I added people. I brought contentment to my peo- 
ple (and) provided them with a secure abode. 



vii 36-41) Tiglath-pileser, exalted prince, the one 
whom the gods A§§ur and Ninurta have continu- 
ally guided wherever he wished (to go) and who 
pursued each and every one of the enemies of the 
god Assur and laid low all the rebellious; 



vii 42-44) Son of Assur-resa-isi (1), strong king, 
conqueror of enemy lands, subduer of all fierce 
(enemies); 

vii 45-48) Grandson of Mutakkil-Nusku, whom 
the god Assur, the great lord, chose through the 
selection of his steadfast heart and firmly ap- 
pointed to the shepherdship of Assyria; 

vii 49-54) Legitimate heir of Assur-dan (1), bearer 
of the holy sceptre, commander of the subjects of 
the god Enlil, the one whose deeds and offerings 
are pleasing to the great gods, and who lived to a 
ripe old age; 



vii 16.1, 4, 8, 35 omit uu-Sam-ma 'yearly'. It appears in exs. 3 
and 5 (all other exs, broken), vii 17^27.3, 5, 8 omit this 
paragraph, vii 24b-26a.35 does not omit this passage. 



Schroeder mistakenly omitted these lines in his copy. 

vii 41.2-4 u-Sam-qi-tu for u-S^k-ni-Su, 



28 



Tiglath-pileser i A .0.87.1 



54) se-bu-ta it la-be-ru-ta il-li-ku 



llb-lib-bi sa md nin-urta-iBiLA-e-kur 
lugal da-pi-ni na-mad d a-sur 
sa nu-ba-lu-su ki-ma u-ri-ni 
ugu KVK-ti-su su-pdr-ru-ru-ma 
um-ma-na-at kur d a-sur ki-ni-is ir-te-e -u 



i-na UA-mi-§u-ma £ d a-nim u d i$KUR 

DINGIR.MES GAL.MES EN.ME§-/a 

sa i-na pa-na m sam-si- d iSKVR £nsi d a-Sur 

dumu is-me- d da-gan £nsi d a-sur-ma 

e-pu-su 6 me 41 MU.MES 

il-lik e-na-ah 

md a~sur-da-a~an lugal kur a-sur 

dumu d MAS-iBiLA-e-A:w/* lugal kur a-sur-ma 

£ sa-a-tu ip-pu-ul ul e-pu-us 

1 Su-Si mu.me$-/<? us-Su-Su 

ul i-na-du-u 



i-na sur-ru LVGAt-ti-ia a-nu 

U d I§KUR DINGIR.MES GAL.MES EN.MES-10 
AGA-mW SANGA-fl-lfl 

e-pa-ds at-ma-ni-su-nu 

iq-bu-ni sig 4 .me§ al-bi-in 

qaq-qar-su u-me-si 

dan-na-su ak-sud u$-se-e-su 

i-na ugu ki-sir kur-/ dan-ni ad-di 

ds-ra sa-a-tu a-na si-hir-ti-su 

i-na SIG4.MES ki-ma ka-nu-ni ds-pu-uk 

50 ti-ib-ki a-na su-pa-li 

u-te-bi i-na muh-hi-su 

us-§e & d a-nim u d iSKUR dingir.mes gal.mes 

EN.MES-/a 

sa pu-li ad-di 

is-tu us-se-su a-di gaba-dib-bi-su 
e-pu-us ugu mah-re-e ut-ter 
2 si-qur-ra-a-te gal.mes-^ 
sa a-na si-mat mwGm-ti-su-nu GAL-te 
Su-lu-ka lu ab-ni 
e ku at-ma-na qu-su-da 
su-bat hi-da-te-su-nu 
mu-sab ta-si-il-ti-su-nu 
Sa ki-ma mul AN-e Su-pu-u 
u i-na Si-pdr iXj.iiTM-nu-ti 
ma-a?-dis nu-su-qu 
ak-pu-ud a-na-ah v>ti-us 
u-sek-lil qe-reb-su 
ki-ma lib-bi AN-e u-be-en-ni 
i-ga-ra-te-su ki-ma sa-ru-ur 
100) si-it mul.mes u-si-im 



vii 55-59) Offspring of Ninurta-apil-ekur, martial 
sovereign, loved one of the god Assur, whose 
wings were spread like an eagle's over his land 
and who faithfully tended the people of Assyria: 



vii 60-70) At that time the temple of the gods 
Anu and Adad, the great gods, my lords, which 
SamsT-Adad (in), vice-regent of Assur, son of 
Isme-Dagan (n) (who was) also vice-regent of the 
god Assur, had previously built, (after) 641 years 
had passed it had become dilapidated and Assur- 
dan (1), king of Assyria, son of Ninurta-apil-Ekur 
(who was) also king of Assyria, tore down this 
temple but did not rebuild (it) and for 60 years its 
foundation had not been relaid. 



vii 71-114) In my accession year the gods Anu 
and Adad, the great gods, my lords, who love my 
priesthood, (vii 75) commanded me to rebuild 
their shrine. I made bricks. I delineated this area, 
dug down to the bottom of its foundation pit, 
(and) laid its foundation upon bedrock, (vii 80) I 
piled up this entire area with bricks like an oven, 
making it 50 layers of brick deep. I laid thereon 
the limestone foundation of the temple of the 
gods Anu and Adad, the great gods, my lords, 
(vii 85) I rebuilt it from top to bottom and made 
it bigger than before. I constructed two large 
ziqqurrats which were appropriate for their great 
divinity. I planned (and) laboriously rebuilt (and) 
completed (vii 90) the pure temple, the holy 
shrine, their joyful abode, their happy dwelling 
which stands out like the stars of heaven and 
which represents the choicest skills of the building 
trade. Its interior I decorated like the interior of 
heaven, (vii 100) I decorated its walls as splen- 
didly as the brilliance of rising stars. I raised its 
towers and its ziqqurrats to the sky and made fast 
its parapets with baked brick. I installed inside 
(vii 105) a conduit (suitable for the conduct) of 
the rites of their great divinity. I brought the gods 
Anu and Adad, the great gods, my lords, (vii 110) 
inside (and) set them on their exalted thrones. 
(Thus) did I please their great divinity. 



vii 62-64 Cf. RIMA 1 pp. 80-81 A.0.59.100L vii 83.3 omits 
dingir.mes gal.mes EN.ME§-/fir 'the great gods, my lords'. 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1 



29 



101) ti-ser-rih na-me-re-e-Su 

102) it si-qur-ra-te-Su a-na AN-e 

103) u-se-qi-ma u gaba-dib-bi-su 

1 04) i-na a-gur-ri u-re-ki-is 

105) e-lal-la-a 

106) pa-ra-as BmGm-ti-Su-nu 

107) gal-// /-na qe-reb-su 

108) fld-rf/ 

109) d a-«« W d ISKUR DINGIR.MES GAL.MES EN,MES-/*a 

110) a-na lib-bi u-se-ri-ib 

111) i-na sub-ti-su-nu sir-ti 

112) ii-Se-Si-ib-Su-nu-ti 

113) //6-W DINGlR-ti-SU-nU GAL-ti 

114) ti-tf-ib 

Col. viii 

1) e ha-am-ri sa d i§KUR en-w 

2) &r m 5W/77-5/- d ISKUR ENSI d O-SUr 

3) dumu iS-me- d da-gan ensi d a-sur-ma 

4) e-pu-su e-na-ah-ma P-a-bit 

5) a-sar-su u-me-si iS-tu uS-Se-su 

6) a-rf* gaba-dib-bi-su i-na a-gur-ri 

7) ar-si-ip ugu mah-re-e 

8) u-si-im u-Ser-Sid 

9) /-/iff lib-bi-su siskur.mes-^ ku.mes-^ 

10) a-rta d iSKUR EN-/a /« at-ta-qi 



viii 1-10) The /*a/wrw-temple of the god Adad, my 
lord — which SamsT-Adad (m), vice-regent of 
Assur, son of Isme-Dagan (n) (who was) also 
vice-regent of the god Assur, had built — was di- 
lapidated and in ruins. I delineated its site (and) 
rebuilt it from top to bottom with baked brick. I 
adorned it and made it stronger than before. In- 
side I offered pure sacrifices to the god Adad, my 
lord. 



11 

12 
13 

14 
15 
16 



17 

18 

19; 
20: 

21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 

29; 
3o; 



i-na u*-mi-su-ma na 4 .zu na 4 hal-ta 

u NA4.KA.Gi.NA i-na kur.mes-/!/ 

Sa kur.kur na-i-ri sa i-na gis Jukul-ti d a-sur 

EN-ia 

ak-Su-du lu-u aS-Sa-a 

i-na e ha-am-ri sa d i§KUR EN-ia 

a-na sa-at u*-me u-kin 



ki-ma a-na-ku e ku at-ma-na si-i-ra 
a-na mu-sab d a-nim u d iSKUR dingir.mes 

GAL.MES 

EN.MEs-/ff ak-pu-du-ma la a-pdr-ku-u 
a-na e-pe-si a-hi la-a ad-du-u 
ha-an-tiS u-sek-li-lu-ma 
lib-bi TUNGiR-ti-Su-nu gal-// 
u-ti-bu d a-nu it d iSKUR 
ki-ni-is li-sah-ru-ni-ma 
ni-is qa-ti-ia li-ra-mu 
te-me-eq ik-ri-be-ia US-me-u 
zu-ni ta-ah-du-te Sa-na-at 
nu-uh-Se it maS-re-e a-na bala.mes-w 
lis-ru-ku i-na murub 4 u me 
sal-mis lit-tar-ru-u-ni 



viii 11-16) At that time I transported obsidian, 
haltu-stone, and haematite from the mountains of 
the lands Nairi, which I conquered with the sup- 
port of the god ASsur, my lord. I deposited 
(them) in the hamru-ttmple of the god Adad, my 
lord, forever. 



viii 17-38) Because I made plans without ceasing 
and (viii 20) was not slack in the work (but) 
quickly completed the pure temple, the exalted 
shrine, for the abode of the gods Anu and Adad, 
the great gods, my lords, and (thereby) pleased 
their great divinity: may the gods Anu and Adad 
faithfully have mercy upon me, (viii 25) may they 
love my prayers, may they heed my fervent peti- 
tions, may they grant abundant rain and extraor- 
dinarily rich years during my reign; (viii 30) may 
they lead me about safely in battle and strife; may 
they subdue under me all enemy lands, rebellious 
mountain regions, and rulers hostile to me; 
(viii 35) may they pronounce a favourable blessing 
over me and my priestly progeny; and may they 



vii 105-1083 omits i installed ... divinity.' vii 1093, 6 omit ku-un for 

EN.ME&-I& 'my lords*, viii 1,3 omits EN-ia 'my lord*. to me', 

viii 133, 5 omit giS. tukui-ti *the support of. viii 163, 5 dS- 



u-kin. viii 29-33.2, 4 omit 'may they lead ... hostile 



30 



Tiglath-pileser i A. 0.87 J 



nap-har kur.kur KUR.MEs-/a kur.mes 
sap-su-te u mal-ki.MES za-e-ri-ia 
a-na GiR.MES-/a iu-sek-ni-su 
a-na ia-a-si it numun SANGA-ti-ia 
ki-rib-ta ta-ab-ta lik-ru-bu-ni-ma 
sanga-// i-na ma-har a-sur u DiNGiR-ti-su-nu 
GAL-ti a-na ah-rat ud.mes 
ki-ma kur-/ ki~ni$ lu-Ser-§i-du 



firmly place my priesthood in the presence of the 
god Assur and their great divinity forever like a 
mountain. 



ii-ta-at gur-di'ia ir-nin-tu 
tam-har-ri-ia suk-nu-us kur.mes 
za-e-ru-ut d a-sur sa d a-nu u d i§KUR 
a-na si-rik-ti is-ru-ku-ii-ni 
i-na NA4.NA.RiJ.A.MES-/a it tem-me-ni-ia 
al-tu-ur i-na e d a-nim it d iSKUR 

DINGIR.MES GAL.MES EN.MES-W 

a-na sa-at ud.mes ds-kun 
u na 4 .na.ru.a.mes sa m sam-si- d isKUR 
a-bi-ia i.mes ap-su-us udu.siskur 
aq-qi a-na ds-ri-su-nu u-ter 



a-na ar-kat ud.mes a-na u 4 -um sa-a-te 

a-na ma-te-ma nun egir-w 

e-nu-ma e d a-nim it d isKUR dingir.mes 

gal.mes en.mes-k? it si-qur-ra-a-tu 

sa-ti-na u-sal-ba-ru-ma 

e-na-hu an-hu-su-nu iu-ud-dis 

NA 4 .NA.RU.A.MES-/a it tem-me-ni.MEs-ia 

i.mes lip-su-us udu.siskur li-iq-qi 

a-na ds-ri-su-nu lu-u-ter 

u uv-su it-ti Mv-ia lil-tu-ur 

ki-ma ia-a-ti-ma d a-nu it d iSKUR 

dingir*me§ gal.meS EN.ME§-/a i-na dug.ga 

lib-bi 

u ka-sad ir-nin-te dug.ga-/,? lit-tar-ru-su 



sa NA4,NA,RU.A.MES-/a it tem-me-ni.MEs-ia 

i-hap-pu-u i-sa-pa-nu 

a-na a.mes i-na-du-u 

i-na izi.mes i-qal-lu-u 

i-na sahar.mes i-ka-ta-mu i-na £ azag 

a-sar la-ma-ri pi-si-ris i-na-ki-mu 

mu sat-ra i-pa-si-tu-ma 

uv-su i-sa-ta-ru u mi-im-ma 

lem-na i-ha-sa-sa-ma 

a-na pa-an NA 4 .NA.RU.A.MEs-/a 

u-sap-ra-ku 



viii 39-49) 1 wrote on my monumental and clay 
inscriptions my heroic victories, my successful 
battles, (and) the suppression of the enemies (and) 
foes of the god Assur which the gods Anu and 
Adad granted me. I deposited (them) in the tem- 
ple of the gods Anu and Adad, (viii 45) the great 
gods, my lords, forever. In addition, the monu- 
mental inscriptions of Samsl-Adad (in) my fore- 
father I anointed with oil, made sacrifices, (and) 
returned them to their places. 



viii 50-62) In the future, in days to come, may a 
later prince, when the temple of the gods Anu 
and Adad, the great gods, my lords, and those 
ziqqurrats become old and (viii 55) dilapidated, 
restore their weakened (portions). May he anoint 
with oil my monumental and clay inscriptions, 
make sacrifices, (and) return (them) to their 
places. His name let him write with mine. (Then) 
like me may the gods Anu and Adad, the great 
gods, my lords, guide him well in joy and success. 



viii 63-73) He who breaks (or) erases my monu- 
mental or clay inscriptions, throws (them) into 
water, burns (them), covers (them) with earth, 
secretly stores (them) in a Taboo House where 
they cannot be seen, (who) erases my inscribed 
name and writes his (own) name, or (who) con- 
ceives of anything injurious and puts it into effect 
to the disadvantage of my monumental inscrip- 
tions; 



viii 31.1 omits nap-har 'all (enemy lands)*, viii 37.4 omits 
GAL-ti '(their) great (divinity)', viii 46.4 u-kin for d§-kun, 
viii 52 e-nu-ma 'when' appears only in ex. 3. It is omitted by 
all other preserved exs. (1-2, 4-5, and probably 37). 
viii 57.2 omits line, 'may he anoint with oil (my monumental 



and clay inscriptions), make sacrifices*, viii 59.1 omits line, 
'His name let him write with mine', viii 61.2, 4 omit 
dingir.mes gal.mes en.mes/0 'the great gods, my lords', 
viii 61.3, 5, 7 omit EN.MhS-ia 'my lords*, viii 73.4 mistakenly 

omits line. 



Tiglath-pileser i A. 0.87.1 



31 



74; 
75; 

76; 

77 
78 
79 
80 
81 

82; 

83 
84; 
85 
86; 

87; 

88 



89; 
90 



d Q-nU U d I§KUR DINGIR.ME§ GAL.ME§ EN.ME§-/ff 

ez-zi-iS li~kil-mu-$u~rna 
ar-ra-ta ma-ru-us-ta li-ru-ru-su 

LUGAL-5W Us-ki-pU 

SUHUS GIS.GU.ZA WGhL-U-SU U-SU-hu 

per-^e EN-ti-su li-bal-lu-u 
gis.tukul.mes-5w lu-u-sab-bi-ru 
a-bi-ik-ti um-ma-ni-su lis-ku-nu 
i-na pa-an kur.mes-sh ka-mis 
lu-se-si-bu-su d iSKUR i-na nim.gir 
HUL-fe kur-sw ii-ib-riq 
su-un-qa bu-bu-ta hu-sah-ha 
us.mes a-na kvr-H-su lid-di 
l-en u A -ma la ti-su liq-bi 

MXl-SU NUMUN-SW i-flQ KUR-fr' lu-U-hdl-Uq 



iti ku-zai-lu ud 28.KAM li-mu 
m i-na-umGm-ia-al-lak gal bi.lul.mes 



viii 74-88) May the gods Anu and Adad, the great 
gods, my lords, glare at him angrily and inflict 
upon him an evil curse. May they overthrow his 
sovereignty. May they tear out the foundations of 
his royal throne. May they terminate his noble 
line, (viii 80) May they smash his weapons, bring 
about the defeat of his army, and make him sit in 
bonds before his enemies. May the god Adad 
strike his land with terrible lightning (and) inflict 
his land with (viii 85) distress, famine, want, 
(and) plague. May he command that he not live 
one day longer. May he destroy his name (and) 
his seed from the land. 



viii 89-90) Month of Kuzallu, twenty-eighth day, 
eponymy of Ina-ilTia-allak, chief cup-bearer 
(rabshakeh). 



This annalistic text is preserved on several clay tablet fragments, some 
from Assur and some from Nineveh. The introductory and military 
narrative is parallel to but different from other texts of Tiglath- 
pileser 1 (A. 0.87.1 and 3-4). The building section is missing from all 
except one exemplar but obviously the Assur inscriptions would have 
described work at Assur, the Nineveh inscriptions work at Nineveh. 
The one exemplar which, although badly preserved, gives an indica- 
tion of the nature of the building is from Nineveh and it probably 
narrates work on the same palace described in A.0.87.10-11. This text 
was written after A.0.87.1. 



CATALOGUE 





Museum 


Excavation 


Photo 




Dimensions 


Lines 




Ex. 


number 


number 


number 


Provenance 


(cm) 


preserved 


cpn 


1 


K2804( + )2815 + 


- 


- 


Nineveh(?) 


K2804: 9x6.3 + 


K 2804: 25-34, l'-9' 


c 




81-2-4,220 








K2815 + : 13x8.9 + 


K2815 + : 1-11, r-10" 




2 


K2806 


- 


- 


Nineveh(?) 


12.8x18.2 + 


17-37, y-9 


c 


3 


VAT 9899( + ) 10332 


- 


— 


- 


VAT 9899: 13x11 + 
VAT 10332: 6x4.4 + 


VAT 9899: 1-22 
VAT 10332: 9-16 


c 


4 


A 662 


Ass 22251 


Ass ph S 6844 
K 156 


Assur 


9.5x6.5 + 


17-30 


c 


5 


K 12009 


- 


_ 


Nineveh(?) 


5.2x5.7 + 


5-7 


c 



viii 89.1-2, 4, 7, 19 ud 28.kam 'twenty-eighth day*. 
viii 89.3 ud 29.kAm 'twenty-ninth day'. 



viii 89.5 ud 26(?).kam 'twenty-sixth day*. 



32 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.2 
COMMENTARY 



The text is reconstructed from several fragments of clay 
tablets and there is no ex. which is complete. There can 
be little doubt, however, that all represent the same 
text, apart from the building narrative, since they have 
in common an inscription which is parallel to, but with 
unique vars. from, A. 0.87.1 (as well as A.0.87.3 and 
4). Because there is no complete ex. the master text is a 
conflation of all sources available for a given line. Vars. 
are, of course, noted in the usual manner and the 
reader who is interested in more details can check the 
scores. The line numbering is, inevitably, arbitrary. 

The parallels with other texts of Tigl. i are: 1-6 
(A.0.87.1 i 1-14); 7-10 (A.0.87.1 i 15-27); 11-16 
(A.0.87.1 128-45); 17 (A.0.87.3 line 5 and A.0.87.4 
lines 13-14); 18-20 (A.0.87.4 lines 18-19); 21-22 
(A.0.87.4 lines 20-21); 23-24 (A.0.87.4 lines 22-23); 
25-27 (A.0.87.3 lines 6-15 and A.0.87.4 lines 15-17); 
5'-7' (A.0.87.1 vi 40-48). 

Ex. 1 consists of two fragments (K 2804 and 
K 2815 + ) which do not physically join but may come 
from the same tablet, as observed by Borger and 
Wiseman, since they complement each other in lines 
preserved with no overlapping. However, the matter is 



very uncertain since the script size is different as is the 
thickness of each fragment. On the other hand, two 
other fragments (K 2806 = ex. 2 and K 12009 = ex. 5) 
represent distinct exs. Two fragments (VAT 9899 and 
VAT 10332) which do not physically join but almost 
certainly come from the same tablet make up ex. 3. 

The provenance of the fragments and the nature of 
the building enterprise described are puzzles. Ex. 4 
definitely comes from Assur and so, presumably, does 
ex. 3. The remaining fragments (exs. 1-2, and 5) all 
bear Kuyunjik signatures and therefore probably came 
from Nineveh, although this is never absolutely certain 
without independent confirmation. This being so, the 
building enterprise described should be different for the 
exs. from Assur and Nineveh. Unfortunately the narra- 
tive of the building work is totally missing from the 
ASsur fragments and only fragmentarily preserved in 
ex. J. The clue here is, I believe, in line 5", where a 
palace (or part thereof) is mentioned (not, perhaps, the 
Step Gate — see the note to that line) which indicates 
this text probably concerned the palace at Nineveh 
described in A. 0.87. 10-11. The mention in line 9 of the 
Temple of Istar is probably a passing reference. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1870 3 R pi. 5 nos, 2 and 5 (exs. 1-2, copy) 

1893 Winckler, Sammlung 1 pp. 27-28 (exs. 1-2, copy) 

1902 King, AKA pp. 116-20 (ex. 2, edition) and 125-26 (ex. 1, 

edition) 
1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 nos. 71a and 160 (ex. 3, vars.) 
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§317-22 (exs. 1-2, translation) 



1926-27 Luckenbill, AJSL 43 p, 222 (ex. 2, study) 

1957-58 Weidner and Kocher, AfO 18 pp. 359-60 and pi. 30 

(Text in') (exs. 1-4, copy, edition) 
1961 Borger, EAK 1 pp. 109-10 and 114-16 (Tontafel A') 

(exs. 1-5, study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxvii 2 (exs. 1-5, translation) 



TEXT 



1) [assur belu rabu mustesir kissat Hani nadin 
hat til r w n a-ge-e mu-kin LUGAL-f7fi 

2) [enlil bel(l)] kis-su-ti [sar gi-mi]r d a-[nunnaki 
abu dingir.me]s d EN kur.kur 

3) [sin ... p]u-qu-du dub NAM.MES-te [... sa]- 

qu-[u] d MA.GUR 8 

4) [samas daiian same erseti MHt] ^sa^-al-pat 
a-a-[bi\ mu-se-eb-ru se-ni [adad ursanu rahis 
kibrat] ktjr.mes kur.mes AB.ME&-te 

5) [ d nin-u]rta qar-du sa-gis Uem-nH [u] a-a-bi 
[mu\~sem-su-u mal lib-bi 

6) [istar sa\q-U dingir.mes [belli te-se]-e mu- 
ser-ri-hat MURUB 4 .MES-te 



1-6) [God Assur, great lord, who properly admin- 
isters all the gods, grantor of sceptre] and crown, 
sustainer of sovereignty; [god Enlil, lord] of the 
universe, [king] of all the A[nunnaku gods, father 
of the gods], lord of the lands; [god Sin, ...j, en- 
trusted with the Tablet of Destinies, [...] lofty 
divine crescent; [god Samas, judge of heaven and 
underworld, who espies] the enemy's treachery, 
who exposes the wicked; [god Adad, hero, who 
storms over] hostile [regions], mountains, (and) 
seas; [god Ninu]rta, valiant one, slayer of crimi- 
nal [and] foe, fulfiller of hearts' desires; [goddess 
Istar], foremost among the gods, [mistress of] 
tumult, who adorns battles; 



2 [hsi(l)] kiSSUti\ Borger, EAK 1 p. 114 plausibly suggests this 
reading. In A.0.87.1 i 3 it is just belu. 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.2 



33 



7) [Hani gal].Tmes mu-ut-tab-bP-[lu-ut same 
Ki-t]i sa ti-bu-s[u-n]u gis.lal u sd-ds-mu 

8) [muSerbu sarrut m GisJukul-ti]-t~imLA^-e-sdr-ra 
NUN-e na-r[a-m]e bi-bil lib-bi-ku-un 

9) siPA-/tf na-a-du [sa ina keni libbTku]-un tu- 
ta-a-su a-ga-a [si-r]a tu-up-pi-ra-su a-^na^ 
MAN-ut kur d en-lil GAL-e$ t[u-ki]n-na-su a- 
Sa-re^du^td^ qar-du-ta ta-qi-Sa-Su 

10) [Slmat biltttlSu ana kiS§Uti\ u numun sanga- 
ti-Su a-na man-za-az i-hur-sag-kur-kur-ra 
[ana dQris tas\-qu~ra 



1 1) m Gis. tukuI-ti-iBiLA-r&~i-[sdr-ra sarru dannu sar 
kissat la sanan] man kul-lat kib-rat A-i man 
du mal-k[LMES ...] 

12) i-sip-pu na-a>-[du sa ina siqir samas hattu 
elletu ri\a-ad-na-ta-sum-ma un.mes bu-^u^- 
[lat enlil ultaSpiru] 

13) gi-mir-ta sipa-/[w kenu eli ma-li-k]i ne-bu-u 
sa-tam-mu si-ru [sa assur kakkiSu] 

14) [u-s\a- r i(m)-lu-ma [ana mu^urut kibrat arbaH 
mu-5]w a-na da-ris is-fqiO-ru sa-b[it puluggl 
nesute] 

15) [sa za]g.zag e~li$ r w~ l [saplis umu neperdu sa 
me-l\am-mu-su ub.mes ^iD-[sah]-ha-p[u 
nablu surruhu] 

16) [sa ki-m]a ti-iq [rihsi ana mat nukurte 
suznunuma] i-na ^si~qif\ d ren~lfP [...] 

17) [. . . d a-s] ur a mu- [takkil-nusku . . . ] 



18) [...] ^a^-bi-ia i-na gis J tukuD-ti d a-i~sur en- 
/a"i 12 TlimT erin.hla.mes kur mus-ki.MEs 
dagal.mes 

19) [aksud (...) sitet erin.me]s-^-5w-/?w as-su-ha 
a-na ^qe-reb KVK^-ti-ia u-8e-ri-da 

20) [... a-p]el a-na r mi-sir KURi-ti-ia u-te-er 



21) [... la ma]-gi-ri u-sek-nis 4 lim Tkur u-ru^- 
ma-a-ia.UES 

22) i~kur~i a-be-es-la-a-ia.MES erin.mes kur ha- 
te-e [la kanise] al-qa-a a-na un.me[s matJ-i\a 
am-nu 



7-10) [Great gods], managers of [heaven and un- 
derworld], whose attack means conflict and strife, 
[who make great the sovereignty of Tiglath]- 
pileser, beloved prince, your select one, attentive 
shepherd, [whom] you chose [in the steadfastness 
of] your [hearts]; upon him you set the exalted 
crown, you grandly established him for sov- 
ereignty over the land of the god Enlil, to him 
you granted leadership (and) valour, [you] pro- 
nounced [forever his destiny of dominion as 
powerful] and (the destiny) of his priestly progeny 
for service in Ehursagkurkurra; 

11-16) Tiglath-pilefser, strong king, unrivalled 
king of the universe], king of all the four quar- 
ters, king of all princes, [...], attentive purifi- 
cation priest, [to whom by command of the god 
Sama§ the holy sceptre] was given and who [had] 
complete [authority over] the people, subjects [of 
the god Enlil, faithful] shepherd, whose name was 
called [over the princes], exalted bishop, [whose 
weapons the god Assur has] sharpened and whose 
[name] he has pronounced eternally [for control 
of the four quarters], capturer [of distant districts 
to] borders above and [below, radiant day] whose 
brilliance overwhelms the regions, [splendid flame 
which covers the hostile land] like a rain [storm 
and], by the command of the god Enlil, [(having 
no rival) defeats the enemy of the god Assur]; 

17) [Son of Assur-resa-isi (i), king of the universe, 
king of Ass]yria, son of Mu[takkil-Nusku who 
was also king of the universe and king of 
Assyria]: 

18-20) [...] my father, with the support of the 
god ASsur, my lord, [I defeated] 12,000 troops of 
the extensive Musku. [The remaining] troops I 
uprooted (and) brought down into my land. 
(Thus) I became lord of [the entire land of the 
Musku] (and) added (it) to the borders of my 
land. 

21-22) I subdued [the rebellious and] insubmissive 
[Subaru], I took 4,000 Urumu (and) Abeslu, [in- 
submissive] troops of Hatti, (and) regarded them 
as people of my [land]. 



9 It appears from the spacing in ex. 1 that this text, unlike 
A.0.87.1 i 23, omits struta 'supremacy'. 17 Restore from 
A.0.87.3 line 5 and A.0.87.4 lines 13-14. 18 Nothing certain 
can be restored at the beginning. Weidner's suggestion has no 



parallel as noted in Grayson, ARI 2 p. 20 n. 100. 19 Restored 
from A.0.87.1 i 85 as suggested by Weidner, AfO 18 p. 360 
n. 27. 22 la kanise: see A.0.87.4 lines 20-21. 



34 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.2 



23) kur lu-lu-mi-i a-na si-hir-ti-sa ^ak^-sud 25 
umGiR.UES-m-su-nu [ana ...] 

24) [istar assurT-t]e dingir.mes-«i" sa URU-/a d a~ 
sur u r d iiNANNA.MEs H&fi KVR-ti-fia^ a-qis 
nig.g[a-5w-/iu] a-na d iSKUR EN-ia ds-^ru^-uk 



25) [//iff tukulti assur] en-/# kur. kur na-i-ri 
dagal.mes /,?-/« kur tum^-me a-^dP kur 

26) r«"i a.ab.ba e-le-ni-te [sa salamu samsi(!) 
ak-s]ud 30 lugal.mes-w-5«-iw a-na 
Gi[R.MES-/]a u-sek-nis i-na ap-pi-su-nu 

27) A7-m# gu 4 se[r-r]e-ta at-ta-di a-na URU-ia 
[assur a\l-qa-su-nu l[i-tlsunu a]s-bat gun u 
ta-mar-ta ugu-su-uu u-kin 



23-24) I conquered the entire land of the 
Lullumu. I gave 25 of their gods [to the deities 
Ninlil, Anu, Adad, and the Assyrian Istar], the 
gods of my city Assur and the goddesses of my 
land. I gave [their] property to the god Adad, my 
lord. 

25-27) [With the support of the god Assur], my 
lord, I conquered the extensive lands Nairi from 
the land Tummu to the land Daienu and the 
Upper Sea [in the west], I subdued 30 of their 
kings. Like oxen I attached to their noses ropes 
(and) took them to my city [Assur]. I took [hos- 
tages from them]. I imposed upon them tribute 
and impost. 



28) [ahlami armaiia.M]E$ is-tu t\ar-si mat siihi] 
a-di uru kar-ga-mis sa kur ha-at-te i-na 1 
u 4 -me ah-bu-ut Eom-su-nu \~i-nd\ gis,ma.mes 

29) [sa ku]1duh.siJ~a id"* pu-rai-ta e-bir 6 
uRu.MEs-r#/i~[5«-ra sa s§pe kur bej-es-ri 
ak-sud sal-^la^-su-nu bu-sa-su-nu u mar-si- 
su-nu a-na URU-/a d a-sur ub-la 

30) [... qu-ma-n]i-i a-di kur me-eh-ri ak-sud 
|"uru~i hu-nu-sa 

31) [... ds\-hu-up a-na DU6 u kar-mi u-ter u 
na 4 .mes si-^pa i-na^ muh-hi-su a\z-ru) 

32) [... al M)AN-ti-su-nu GAL-a a-bu-fbP-i[s 
aba\l)] ^a-na Due 1 u kar-me u-ter-^ru(l)^ i- 
nu-a d l~INANNA fafi-[...] 

33) [...] x a-na URU-/a ^[assur .».](-)K.m-ma-u 
sa a-na si-ip-si u da-na-ni it-k[a-lu] 

34) [(.„) ina ..,] v iP ne-^pe^-se ak-su-su 2 lim 
sal-la-f su^-[nu] 

35) [...]-x-ik-rsu-nu-tP 20 i~LiM~t erin.hi.a.mes 
kur qu-m[a-ni-i] 

36) [... assuha ana qereb] ^KVR^-ti-^ia e^-lis u 
sap- 1 is ^u-se^ - [ri- da] 

37) [...HaH gu[n(?) ...] 
Lacuna 

1') [...]x[...] 

2') [... t]u d[a(l) -] 

3') [...]-/!« at-tal-la-rku(l)i [...] xax [...] 



28-29) I plundered [the <a?/i/a/77«-Aramaeans] from 
the edge [of the land Suhu] to the city 
Carchemish of the land Haiti in a single day. I 
crossed the Euphrates after them in rafts (made 
of inflated) goatskins. I conquered six of [their] 
cities [at the foot of Mount] Besri. I brought their 
booty, possessions, and goods to my city Assur. 

30-36) [... the Quman]u as far as the land Mehru 
I conquered. I overwhelmed the city Hunusu, 
[their fortified city], turned (it) into a ruin hill, 
and strewed sf/?w-stones over it. [...] their great 
royal [city] like a flood [/ passed through] (and) 
turned (it) into a ruin hill. When the goddess Istar 
[...] to my city [Assur ...] the A7rmau who relied 
upon force and violence [(...) with ...] and siege 
engines I conquered it. 2,000 of their captives [...] 
them. 20,000 troops of the [extensive] Qum[anu, 
which I had defeated, I uprooted] (and) brought 
down [into] my land, above and below. 



Lacuna 

1-4') No translation warranted. 



23-24 For the restoration see Borger, EAK 1 p. 115. 26 For 
the restoration see A. 0.87.1 iv 50, vi 44, and Borger, EAK 1 
p. 115 n. 3. 27 The reconstruction of this line follows Borger, 
EAK 1 p. 115 and is supported by the improved reading of the 
last traces in ex. 4. Thus the problem Weidner saw in recon- 
ciling the various exs. is resolved. 28-29 For the restoration 
see A.0.87.1 v 48, 57-58, and Weidner, AfO 18 p, 360 n. 27. 



30.1 me-eh-ri. 30.2 rme^-eh-ri. 32 Restored on analogy with 
RIMA 1 p. 134 lines 58-59. 33 kir can be read g/k/qir or 
b/pis/s. Cf. lu kar-ma-^u. Rost, Tigl. p. 56:7. 34 Restore 
something similar to A.0. 101.1 iii 111. 35-36 For the 
restoration see Borger, EAK 1 p. 116. 37 Restored from 
line 27. 3'.2 [...] xax [...] Borger, EAK 1 p. 116 suggests [... 
/]a(?)-tf rfi-[5H(<?)-.]. 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.2 



35 



4') [...] la-a x [...] x x x 40 gis.x [...] 

5') [... istu ebertan 1]t> za-he su-pa-li-i a-di r e~i- 

[ber-ta-a]nC>) Hd~i pu^rat-te^ 
6') {mat hatte u tamti eleriite sa %]\uu~mu d sam- 

Si i-na 10 BALA.M[ES-/a q]a-ti [lu iksud] 
7) [pa isten useskinsunuti litT-s\u-nu as~bat gun 

it ta-mar-ta v[Gv-su-nu] i~u(?)i-kin 
8') [eli mat assur mat a eli niMa niSe lu urad-d\i 

sub-ta ne-eh-ta u-se-si-ib-[sunuti\ 



9') [...] xf H d tf 8 -frfr [...] 
Lacuna 

1") [..Jxxw/xU 

2") [...] x-5a-a^x[„.] 

3") [...] ma-ha-ra ul x [...] 

4") [...] x w na 4 . na.ru. a.mes-/g [...] 

5") [. . .] r&.GAL-lum */-/ e 5/>-/[e(?) . . ,}-5a ^m- 

sal-ba-rtfi-ma 
6") [ennahu rubu arku anhussu lu-u\d-dis 

NA4.NA.RU. a. MEs-ia *~w"i [te-m]e-ni-ia ii-mur- 

ma 
7") [...] x EN-ti-ia r&(?)i d a-su[r u] d nin-urta a- 

na si-rik-te 
8") [... udu.sis]kur liq-qi a-na ds-ri-su-nu lu u- 

te-er 
9") [... ina tub lib-b]i u ka-sad ir-nin-te ducga- 

is li-it-tar-ru-su 

10") [... md w]m-Wr/a-SUM-IBILA SUKKAL-mff «GAL» 
GAL-e 



5-8') [Altogether I conquered ... from the other 
side of] the Lower Zab to the other [side] of the 
Euphrates, [the Hittites, and the Upper Sea in] 
the west in [my] ten regnal years. [I subdued them 
to one authority], took [hostages from] them, 
(and) imposed upon [them] tribute and impost. 
[To Assyria I] added [land and to its people 1] 
added [people]. I provided [them] with a secure 
abode. 

9') [,>,] the temple of the goddess Istar 

Lacuna 

l"-4") [... I deposited my clay] and monumental 

inscriptions. 



5"-9") [In the future, in days to come, may a later 
prince, when] this palace, the exalted house, its 
[...] becomes old and [dilapidated], restore [its 
weakened (portions)]. May he see my clay and 
monumental inscriptions, [read about the might] 
of my dominion which the gods Assur [and] 
Ninurta gave to me, [may he anoint them with 
oil], make sacrifices (and) return (them) to their 
places. [His name let him write with mine. (Then) 
like me] may [the gods Assur and Ninurta] prop- 
erly guide him [in joy] (and) success. 

10") [Month of ..., ...th day, eponymy of ..., 
grand vizier, son of] Ninurta-nadin-apli, (who 
was) also grand vizier. 



This annalistic text, on several clay tablets found at Assur, describes 
the campaigns in a brief fashion similar to A.0.87.2 and 4. Since some 
campaigns are added to those described in A. 0.87.1 and 2 it must be 
later than those texts. The building section concerns work on the wall 
of Assur. 



4' While it is tempting to try and read here a parallel to 
A.0.87.1 vi 39 (since 5'-7 are parallel to A.0.87.1 vi 40-48) - 
cf. Borger, EAK 1 p. 128 — the traces do not support a 
suitable reading. Moreover, the line drawn across the tablet 
between 4' and 5' clearly marks 4' as the end of the preceding 
passage. 5-8' For the restorations see A. 0.87,1 vi 40-48, 
vii 32-35, and Borger, EAK 1 pp. 109-110. 5"-9" For the 



restorations see Borger, EAK 1 p. 109. 5" Collation shows 
that in the break between t[eQ) ...] and $a (t[e{?) consists of 
the beginning of one wedge) there is room for three or more 
signs. Borger, EAK 1 p. 109 suggested restoring a form of 
muslaiu 'Step Gate* but this edition follows King; cf, A.0.87.1 
viii 17. 



36 






Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.3 
CATALOGUE 










Museum 


Ass 


Ass ph 


ASSur 


Dimensions 


Lines 




Ex, 


number 


number 


number 


provenance 


(cm) 


preserved 


cpn 


i 


Private possession 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1-51 


P 


2 


VAT 9360 


21105a 


S6457 


fA6v 


14.3x8.4 + 


1-27 


c 


3 


VAT 9422 


4463o 


K 420-21 


NW wall of temple 
court in old 
fill on the 

pavement, hD3v 


9.5x5.8 + 


1-14, 43-51 


c 


4 


VAT 13564 


21105b 


S6457 


fA6v 


7x4.4 + 


1-9, 42-50 


c 


5 


VAT 13565 


21105c 


S6457 


fA6v 


10.2x6.8 + 


10-26 


c 


6 


VAT 9624 


8193 


1145 


- 


5X5 + 


1-6, 50-51 


c 


7 


Un located 


- 


- 


- 


- 


16-44 


n 



COMMENTARY 



Ex. 1, in private possession, has not been located but 
has been collated from photographs kindly provided by 
Walker from the file in the British Museum. Weidner 
originally included this ex. in his edition using photo- 
graphs supplied by Wiseman from the British Museum. 
As Weidner observed, the obv. (lines 1-26) is badly 
worn and much of it can only be read with the aid of 
the other exs. or parallel passages. Another problem is 
that several lines (2-3, 5, 25, 34, 38, and 44) obviously 
ran over the edge but no photograph of this portion of 
the tablet was available to us. The master text is ex. 1 



but in the badly damaged portion (lines 1-26) ex. 2 has 
frequently been used and occasionally other exs. 
Readers interested in the details may consult the scores. 

The copy by Schroeder in KAH 2 no. 68 is a con- 
flation of exs. 2-6 with restoration from parallel texts. 
It is, therefore, quite unreliable as collation has shown. 

Ex. 7 is known to us only through the publications 
listed in the bibliography. At the time of Weidner's edi- 
tion it was in his private possession but its present loca- 
tion is unknown. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1900 Scheil, RT 22 p. 157 (ex. 7, copy) 
1901-1906 Winckler, AOF 3 p. 247 (ex. 7, copy) 
1904-1905 Streck, ZA 18 p. 186 (ex. 7, study) 
1917 Olmstead, JAOS 37 p. 171 (ex. 7, study) 
1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 no. 68 (exs. 2-6, copy) 

1925 Schotz, JSOR 9 pp. 105-109 (exs. 2-7, edition) 

1926 Schroeder, JSOR 10 pp. 290-92 (exs. 2-7, study) 
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§299-303 (exs. 2-7, translation) 
1957-58 Weidner, AfO 18 pp. 343-47 (Text i') (exs. 1-7, 

photo, edition) 



1961 Borger, EAK 1 pp. 110 and 116-18 (Tontafel B') (exs. 
1-7, study) 

1968 Ellis, Foundation Deposits pp. 100 and 192 (exs. 1-7, 
study) 

1967 Safvim, Nairi pp. 53-54 (lines 6-11 edition) 

1969 Oppenheim, ANET 3 pp. 274-75 (translation) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxvii 3 (exs. 1-7, translation) 
1982 Miglus, ZA 72 p. 269 (study) 

1984 Borger, TUAT 1/4 pp. 356-57 (lines 16-35, translation) 

1985 Pedersen, Archives 1 p. 81 (exs. 2, 4-5, provenance) 
1985 Russell, Iraq 47 p. 71 (lines 29-35, edition) 



TEXT 



1) [ m Gi$Jukul-t]i-iBiLA-e-£dr-ra man kal man kis 
man kur as-sur 

2) r man i kul-lat kib-rat 4-i et-lu qar-du sa i-na 
Giktukul-ti d a-Sur 

3) u d nin-urta dingir.mes gal.mes en.mes-sw it- 
tal-la-ku 

4) u-sam-qi-tu ge-ri-su 

5) dumu d a-sur-$AG-i-si man kis man kur r d #~ 
Sufi dumu mu-tdk-kil- d nusku man kis man 
kur d a-$ur-ma 



1-4) [Tiglath]-pileser, strong king, king of the 
universe, king of Assyria, king of all the four 
quarters, valiant man who acts with the support 
of the gods A§§ur and Ninurta, the great gods, his 
lords, (and thereby) has felled his foes; 



5) Son of A§sur-resa-isi (i), king of the universe, 
king of Assyria, son of Mutakkil-Nusku (who 
was) also king of the universe (and) king of 
Assyria: 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.3 



37 



6) i-na siq-ri d a-sur EN-/a is-tu e-[ber]-t~ta^-an 

I) id za-be su-pa-li-i a-di aTab.ba e-le^-ni-te 

8) sa siLiM-mw d sam-si qa-a-ti lu ik-sud 

9) 3-su a-na kur.kur na-i-ri lu al-lik 

TDAGAlAMES-te 

10) kur.kur na-^P-ri *~is-tu kur tum^-me^ a-di 
kur f~da-ie~i-e-ni 

II) kur hi-mu-a ^iP a-di kur pa-i-te-ri r/ w a k- 
sucP 

12) 30 LUGAL.MES-/*/ sa kur.kur na-i-ri a-na 

rGlR.II~l.MES-/fl 

13) u-sek-nis li-ti-su-nu as-^bat 

AN§E "I . KUR. RA» ME§ 

14) si-im-da-at gis ni-^P-ri ma-da-ta-su-nu am- 
hur 

15) gun w ta-mar-ta uGu-su-nu u-kin 



16; 

17 
18 

19; 

20 
21 

22 

23; 
24; 

25 



26" 



27 



28 



29 
30 



fa^-na kur lab-na-ni flu* al-lik Gis.tR.rMEs"* 

sa gis e-re-ni 

a-na £ d a-nim u d i§KUR Tdingir.mes gal"1.mes 

EN.MES-Zfl 

ak-ki-is ds-sa-a a-na kur a-mur-ri e-ti-^iq^ 

kur a-mur-ri a-na si-hir-ti-sa ak-sud 

^ma^-da-^aP-ta sa kur gu-bal kur si-du-ni 

kur ar-ma-da 

lu am-hur i-na Gis.MA.MEs-te sa kur ar-ma- 

da-ia 

lu ar-kab 3 danna a.sA is-tu kur ar-ma-da 

sa murub 4 a.ab.ba a-di uru sa-mu-ri sa kur 

a-mur-ri 

lu ak-ta-sir na-hi-ra sa anse.kur.ra sa 

a.ab.ba 

i-qab-bi-u-* su-nP i-na qa-bal a.ab.ba lu a- 

du-uk 



~wT i-na ta-ia-ar-ti-ia kur ha-at-te a-na si- 
hir-ti-sa 

lu ra(?)i-Lpe/(?) ...] li-ftP.MES gun ma-da-ta 
u gis.u[r.mes] 

[sa gis e]-re-ni i-na ugu m i-ni d te-sub man 
kur ha-at-t[e lu as-kun] 



l«.]-su id pu-rat-ta egir ah-la-ml-i 

kur ar-ma-ia. me§ a-na kur ha-at-te sa-at-ta 

2-su 



6-15) By the command of the god Assur, my 
lord, I conquered from the other side of the 
Lower Zab to the Upper Sea in the west. Thrice I 
marched to the lands Nairi (and) conquered the 
extensive lands Nairi from the land Tummu to the 
land Daienu, Himua and to the land Paiteru. I 
subdued 30 kings of the lands Nairi. I took hos- 
tages from them, received their tribute of teams 
of horses in harness, (and) imposed upon them 
tax and impost. 



16-25) I marched to Mount Lebanon. I cut down 
(and) carried off cedar beams for the temple of 
the gods Anu and Adad, the great gods, my 
lords. I continued to the land Amurru (and) con- 
quered the entire land Amurru. I received tribute 
from the lands Byblos, Sidon, (and) Arvad. I 
rode in boats of the people of Arvad (and) 
travelled successfully a distance of three double 
hours from the city Arvad, an island, to the city 
Samuru which is in the land Amurru. I killed at 
sea a nahiru, which is called a sea-horse. 



26-28) Finally, upon my return I became [lord\ of 
the entire land Hatti [...] (and) [imposed] upon 
Ini-Tesub, king of the land Hatti, hostages, tax, 
tribute, and (impost consisting of) cedar beams. 



29-35) I have crossed the Euphrates [...] times, 
twice in one year, in pursuit of the ahlamu- 
Aramaeans, to the land Hatti. I brought about 



li.2 iS-tum^-me instead of i$-tu kur tum^-me, error caused 
by auto-dictation. Cf. note to line 25.7. 21 Weidner has mat 
amu[m1 at the end of the line but this does not exist in any of 
the preserved exs. (1, 5, 7). 21.2 ur[u for kur. 22.2 uru for 
kur. 24 nahiru: See the commentary to A.0.87.4. 25.7 lu u- 
du-uk: cf. note to line 10.2. 27 For the reading at the begin- 
ning of the line see Borger, EAK 1 p. 117. 28 Ini-Tesub (also 
in A.0.87.4 line 30): this reading of the name follows Haw- 



kins, RLA 4 p. 153 sub Hatti §3.3, and cf. Iraq 36 (1974) pp. 
69-71. Note the orthography i-ni-UH in Arnaud, Emar 6/3 
no. 18 line 1; no. 77 line 1; no. 201 lines 1, 19, 23, and 35; 
no. 202 line 1 ; references courtesy of Fales. Landsberger, 
SarrPal p. 33 n. 67, suggested reading either this or Nini- 
Tesub. Weidner, AfO 18 p. 354 read Ili-Tesub. 29 ahlamu: 
See the note to A. 0.87.1 iv 46-47. 30.1 has 2-su, as does 
A.0.87.4 line 34. The reading of the numeral in ex. 7 (which 



38 
31) 

32 
33 
34; 

35' 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.3 



36; 

37 
38 

39; 

40 

41 

42 

43 
44 



45 

46 

47 

48 
49 



50 
51 



[lu] ^e^-te-bir is-tu gir kur iab-na-ni uru 

ta-ad-mar 

[s\a kur a-mur-ri a-na -at sa kur su-u-hi 

u a-di uru ra-pi-qi sa kur kar-du-ni-ds 

ddb-da-su-nu ds-kun sal-la-su-nu mar-si-su- 

nu 

a-na uRU- r /a~i d a-sur ub-la 



^i-na u 4 ~me-su-ma^ bad sa URV-ia d a-sur sa 

URU GIBIL 

r?a i-na pa^-na md tf-swr-suM-§ES.MES sid d a- 

§ur man a-bi 

^a-lik pa^-ni-ia e-pu-su bad su-a-tu is-tu a- 

sa-i-te 

i~GAL-te sa~^ kA d iDiGNA a-di si-ma-ra-a-te 

it a-di bad r&n uru.sa-uru si-pi-ik 

SAHAR MES 

A:/-/tta du 6 f-fltf muh-hi-su ds-pu-uk u-de-nin 

*~bad~i dan-na a-na omiL-ut-te i-na mah-ri-su 

ar-sip 

is~tu us-se-su a-di gaba-dib-bi-su e-pu-us 

u-sek-lil NA 4 .NA.Rtr.A.MES-/a i-na qer-bi-su 

ds-kun 



a-na egir u 4 -me a-na u 4 -um sa-a-te e-nu-ma 

bad su-u 

u-sal-ba-ru-ma e-na-hu nun egir-w 

t'ani-hu-rsui lu-ud-dis su-mi sat-ra a-na ds- 

ri-su 

lu-te-er 6 a-sur en gal-u ik-ri-bi-su 

i-se-em-me 



Iti ku-zal-lu ud 13.kamT ti-mu m ni-nu-a-ia 
dumu i~as-sur-iBiLA-si(!),SA~i gal rma-kP- 
si. MES 



their defeat from the foot of Mount Lebanon, the 
city Tadmar of the land Amuirii, Anat of the 
land Suhu, as far as Rapiqu of Kardunias. I 
brought their booty (and) possessions to my city 
Assur. 



36-44) At that time the wall of my city Assur, of 
New City, (the wall) which Assur-nadin-ahhe, 
vice-regent of the god ASsur, king, my forefather 
who preceded me, had previously built — upon 
this wall, from the great tower of the Tigris Gate 
to the ...s and to the wall of Inner City, I piled 
up earth like a ruin hill (and thereby) reinforced 
(it). I constructed anew a strong wall in front of 
it. I built (and) completed it from top to bottom. 
I deposited my monumental inscriptions therein. 



45-49) In the future, in days to come, may a later 
prince, when this wall becomes old and dilapi- 
dated, restore its weakened (portions). May he re- 
store my inscribed name to its place. (Then) the 
god Assur, the great lord, will listen to his 
prayers. 



50-51) Month of Kuzallu, thirteenth day, epon- 
ymy of Ninuaiia, son of Assur-aplu-Zrs/r, chief of 
revenue officers. 



This is one of the most interesting but difficult texts of Tiglath-pileser. 
It is interesting because it gives a wide summary of his military cam- 
paigns. It includes the first narrative of the conquest of Babylonia 
(lines 37-40 and 44-51), thus dating it later than A.0.87.1-3 in which 
there is no mention of this campaign. The building section is also 



cannot be collated) is a problem. Scheil's copy shows [x] 2-su 
but Winckler's copy has \2-su. I suspect there was a small hole 
in the tablet before 2 which Winckler incorrectly read as a 
Winkelhaken. Thus ex, 7 probably has 2-su. 30 sa-at-ta 2-su: 
'twice in one year' (cf. A. 0.87. 4 line 34); Weidner's translation 
'twice a year' (jahrlich zweimal), which would reduce the num- 
ber of years to fourteen, was based on the belief that TigL i 
could not have reigned so long (see AfO 6 [1930-31] p. 92 



n. 81). This objection has now been removed and the 
expression probably refers to a double crossing in only one 
year. See Borger, EAK 1 p. 117 and cf. Tadmor, JCS 12 
(1958) pp. 29-30 n. 64 and Brinkman, PKB p. 127 n. 747. 
51 -rsi(?).sAT = ttSir is preserved only in ex. 1. The name of 
the eponym's father is otherwise unattested. The reading was 
proposed by Borger, EAK 1 p. 117. 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.4 



39 



interesting because it provides a very detailed description of work on 
various parts of the palace at Assur. The first work described is on the 
'house of the sahurtf and the 'house of the labunu' (lines 52-66, cf. 
A.0.89.7 v 4-6), the latter made of terebinth (cf. A.0.87.5 lines 1-3). 
The next passage (lines 67-71), perhaps the most interesting, concerns 
the creation of animal figurines and setting them up at the palace en- 
trance (cf. A.0.87.5 lines W-W and further A.0.87.8 lines 4'-6', 
A.0.87.11 lines 9-191, and A.0.89.7 v 16-19). Fragments of these 
figurines with traces of inscriptions were found by the German excava- 
tors at the palace entrance and the text is edited as A. 0.87. 17. A simi- 
lar animal figurine bears an inscription of Assur-bel-kala (A. 0.89. 11). 
The next building section (lines 72-76) describes the construction, be- 
side the palace, of a 'palace of weapons' with boxwood (cf. A.0.87.8 
and 29). The narrative concludes (lines 77-89) with the construction of 
the palace itself, which is described as the 'cedar palace' and named 
Egallugalsarrakurkurra. Various woods were used in its creation (see 
the introduction to A. 0.89, 7). Also of interest in this text are the con- 
cluding remarks in the building section in which it is stated that the 
palace was the residence of the king, not the gods. The gods could 
visit the king in his palace but they could not reside there. 

As interesting as this text is, it is also very difficult. It consists in 
large part of long and complicated sentences, particularly in the build- 
ing section, where the writer and the reader tend to lose themselves 
(cf. Borger, EAK 1 pp. 131-32 and van Driel, Assur p. 110). An en- 
tirely different kind of difficulty is the state of the sources for this text. 
The text has been reconstructed from numerous fragments of clay tab- 
lets, as well as three stone tablets and one clay prism fragment, all 
from Assur. Weidner originally put this text together with his usual in- 
genuity and skill and, while this edition largely follows his recon- 
struction, some changes have been made. The Ninevite texts, which 
are very similar, have been edited with A. 0.87. 10 and 11 where they 
really belong. Three of the exemplars (22-24) included here are prob- 
ably of a different date with a different building description (see the 
commentary). The remaining majority of exemplars are later in date 
than A.0.87.3. 



CATALOGUE 





Museum 


Ass 


Ass ph 


Assur 




Dimensions 


Lines 




Ex. 


number 


number 


number 


provenance 


Object 


(cm) 


preserved 


cpn 


1 


VAT 9489 + 


5838 + 5879 


843, 1137-38 


VAT 9489: dE5v 


Clay tablet 


10,5x7,7 + 


1-12, 93-94 


c 




9557 






VAT 9557: eB6i 










2 


VAT 14399 


14786 


4203 


fC9i 


Clay tablet 


6x8.4 + 


12-25 


c 


3 


VAT 10444 


- 


- 


- 


Clay tablet 


10.3x9 + 


12-26 


c 


4 


VAT 13562 


4330f(?) 


- 


- 


Clay tablet 


6x4.5 + 


11-18 


c 


5 


A644 


6138 


887 (K 209) 


City area 


Clay tablet 


7.3x4 + 


14-23 


c 


6 


A 111 


18274 


5866 


In fill, iB4iv 


Clay tablet 


6.2x7.5 + 


17-25, 84-93 


c 


7 


ES7171 


18641 


6448-50 


Under lower edge of 
foundation, iC5iSE 


Clay prism 




9-11, 21-25, 
33-36, 47-50, 
62-65, 78-80 


p 


8 


VAT 9639 


1548+1567 + 
1576 


- 


Northern NE corner 
of temple 


Clay tablet 


10.8x6.8 + 


21-31, 72-85 


c 


9 


A 33 


4312 + 4428 + 
4530 + 4533k 


564-67, 
(K 179-80 
424-25, 429 
453 » 459) 


4312: NW side of temple 
court on pavement 
4428: north in temple 
court, hD3v 
4530 + 4533k: NW front 
of temple court, hD3v 


Clay tablet 




22-91 


n 



40 



Tiglath-pileser i A . . 8 7 . 4 





Museum 


Ass 


Ass ph 


Assur 




Dimensions 


Lines 




Ex. 


number 


number 


number 


provenance 


Object 


(cm) 


preserved 


cpn 


JO 


A 2126 


8569 


1260, 1362 


Dump 


Clay tablet 


3.8x2.7 + 


24-28 


c 


Jl 


VAT 9496 


6469a 


959 


SW, above old temple, 
eB5vSW 


Clay tablet 


11.5x8.3 + 


26-41 


c 


12 


BM 115693 
(1922-8-12,68) 


18438 


6317 18 


Under upper edge of stone 
foundation in B, iD4vSE 


Stone tablet 


- 


27-67 


n/p 


13 


VAT 9650 + 
13563 


2880 


_ 


On west massive, gA4n 


Clay tablet 


6.2x4.2 + 


27-34 


c 


14 


VAT 9484 


19334 


5882 


On the libben terrace, 
gB4vSE 


Clay tablet 


8.5x7.5 + 


30-40, 73-79 


c 


15 


ES 6698 


977 


159, 555-56 


Northern prothyse, 
pavement, temple A 


Stone tablet 


— 


33-47, 62-75 


p 


16 


A 672 


5165 


696 


h5En 


Clay tablet 


7.5x6.4 + 


35-44 


c 


17 


A 674 


10314 


1613 


City area 


Clay tablet 


4.8x4.2 + 


35-39 


c 


18 


A 668 


14306 


3981 


Second test trench level, 
dB8i 


Clay tablet 


7.8x4.6 + 


41-47, 52-59 


c 


19 


A 690 


19569 


6372 


- 


Clay tablet 


5x5.5 + 


47-53 


c 


20 


IMoeated 


1070 


159, 536 


Southern prothyse, 
temple A 


Stone tablet 


— 


49-51 


p 


21 


VAT 10749 


- 


- 


- 


Clay tablet 


9x6.2 + 


67-75 


c 


22 


VAT 9646 


— 


— 


— 


Clay tablet 


6x7.8 + 


17-19, 22-27, 
87-91 


c 


23 


VAT 9636 


4565 


459 


Hole in kiln, temple, 
hD3v 


Clay tablet 


8.7x12.8 + 


14-17, 24-36, 
41-51 


c 


24 


Unlocated 


14809 + 
15134 


4203, 4317 


City area 


Clay tablet 


— 


15-17, 24-30, 
41-51 


p/n 


25 


K 10042 


- 


- 


- 


Clay tablet 


4.3x4.5 + 


48-51, 55-59 


c 


26 


Private 
possession 


— 


— 


_ 


Clay tablet 


8.3x8.1 


1-12, 92-93 


c 



COMMENTARY 



This text was originally reconstructed by Weidner from 
a variety of fragmentary inscriptions. Weidner included 
fragments from both A§sur and Nineveh but, since the 
Ninevite inscriptions clearly belong to a different text f 
these have been treated separately as A. 0.87. 10 and 11. 
The vast majority of the ASSur fragments are of clay 
tablets, but three (exs. 12, 15, and 20) are of stone tab- 
lets and one (ex. 7) is of a six-sided prism. Among the 
clay tablets it is possible that exs. 1 and 3-4 come from 
the same tablet, as Weidner suggested. But exs. 8 and 
21 cannot also come from this tablet, as Weidner also 
suggested, since they overlap in line 75. Of the stone 
fragments, exs. 15 and 20 could be from the same ob- 
ject but neither can be from the same stone as ex. 12 
since they overlap. 

No ex. has a complete text and, in fact, most exs. 
really have only parts of various lines. Thus the text 
presented here, based on Weidner's work, is frequently 
a conflation of two or more exs. for any given line. It 
would be impractical to give a complete list of the 
sources for each line. The interested reader is referred 
to the scores. 

Ex. 22 omits the section (lines 20-21) in which the 
conquest of the Urumu and Abeslu is described and, if 
the omission is not simply scribal error, this suggests a 
different text with a different date. 

Exs. 23-24 vary considerably from the master text. 
They both omit three sections (lines 18-23) near the be- 
ginning in which the conquests of the Musku, Urumu, 
and Lullumu are described. Ex. 23 further omits (ex. 24 



is not preserved in the relevant portions) the description 
of the plunder of Enzatu and other cities (see the note 
to lines 31-33) and the conquest of the East Tigris re- 
gion (lines 37-40). The same exs., 23-24, vary from the 
master text by placing the description of the invasion of 
Babylonia (lines 44-51) before the section narrating the 
campaign to Suhu (lines 41-43). After these two sec- 
tions ex. 23 stops, as does ex. 24 according to Weidner 
(uncollated), and only illegible traces of a date appear 
after a blank gap in ex. 23. Thus neither ex. had a 
building section and they were in fact patterns (Vor- 
lage) for inscriptions to which the building portions 
were to be added. The obv. of ex. 24 was collated from 
photos; the rev. could not be collated. 

Ex. 25 is a minuscule fragment but enough is 
preserved to confirm that it belongs to this text. Since it 
has traces of the building section it must come from 
Assur despite its Kuyunjik number (cf. Borger, EAK 1 
p. 130). 

The lines drawn across the transliteration in this edi- 
tion are lines which appear on the clay tablet frag- 
ments, indicating as usual meaningful sections. The exs. 
on the stone tablets and on the prism fragment have no 
such lines, although they have faint rulings after each 
line of text. The scribe who wrote ex. 2 mistakenly 
omitted the ruling between lines 19-20. Ex. 26 has a 
horizontal line dividing l-8a (ending ipelu gimra 'be- 
come lord of all 1 ) from the following. 

Weidner gave the Assur no. of ex. 4 as 4330f but 
from records in Berlin this appears to be incorrect. 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.4 



41 



As to the prism fragment, ex, 7, here are the details 
of what is preserved on each col.: i - 9-11; ii = 
21-25; iii = 33-36; iv = 47-50; v = 62-65; vi = 
78-80. At the top of col. ii there are illegible traces of a 
line (before the equivalent of line 22) which Weidner 
thought might be of line 19. This would mean it had 
omitted lines 20-21 (as ex. 22, see above). But the 
traces are illegible and presumably are of line 21. 

Ex. 12 could not be collated against the original 
stone fragment. The rev. was collated, however, from a 



very small photo. The obv. has not been collated at all. 

Only the rev. of ex. 18 has been collated. The sole 
source of information about the obv. is Weidner, who 
said that it had the second half of lines 41-47 and gave 
vars. Thus in our scores three dots appear in these lines 
for this ex. except where we have Weidner's vars. 

The first part of the inscription is, as usual, in Baby- 
lonian dialect but the building section is in Assyrian di- 
alect (cf. Borger, EAK 1 p. 130). 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1893-97 Winckler, AOF 1 pp. 387-89 (ex. 25, edition) 
1904 Andrae, MDOG 22 p. 20 (ex. 20, provenance) 
1911 Andrae, MDOG 47 p. 34 (ex. 12, provenance) 
1922 BM Guide p. 66 (ex. 12, study) 

1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 nos, 63, 66, 69, 71, 71a, and 73 (exs. 
1-3, 6-8, 11-13, 18, 21-24, copy) 

1925 Schotz, JSOR 9 pp. 106-109 (edition) 

1926 Schroeder, JSOR 10 pp. 287-92 (edition) 
1926 Meissner, IAK pp. 30-31 n. 2 (edition) 

1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§272-312, (translation) 

1926-27 Luckenbill, AJSL 43 pp. 221-22 (study) 

1934 Landsberger, Fauna pp. 142-43 (study) 

1957-58 Weidner and Kdeher, AfO 18 pp. 347-59 and pis. 

xxvi-xxix (Text if) (exs. 1-24, copy, edition) 
1961 Borger, EAK 1 pp. 110, 118-20, and 131-33 (Tontafel 

C) (exs. 1-25, study) 



1967 Salvini, Nairi pp. 53-83 (study) 

1968 Ellis, Foundation Deposits pp. 100 and 192 (exs. 1-24, 
study) 

1969 van Driel, Assur pp. 110 and 166 (study) 
1969 Oppenheim, ANET 3 p. 275 (translation) 

1975 Grayson, Chronicles pp. 247-48 (exs. 1-25, study) 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxvii 4 (exs. 1-25, translation) 
1984 Borger, TUAT 1/4 p. 357 (lines 24-36, translation) 

1984 Postgate, Sumer 40 pp. 155-56 (lines 37-40, edition) 

1985 Russell, Iraq 47 p. 71 (lines 41-43, edition) 

1985-86 Pedersen, Archives 1 p. 39 no. 22 (ex. 11); 2 p. 13 n. 
9 (ex. 8), p. 21 no. 32 (ex. 9), p. 24 no. 94 (ex. 23), and 
p. 76 (ex. 14) (provenance) 

1986 Miglus, MDOG 118 pp. 209-10 (study) 
1988 Finkel, ARRIM 6 pp. 13-14 (ex. 26, copy) 
1990 Donbaz, ARRIM 8 p. 3 (exs. 5, 10, 19, copy) 



TEXT 



1) m Gi$Juku!-ti-imtA-e-sdr-ra lugal dan-nu lu- 

GAl » KIS 1 LUGAL KU[R CtSSlir] 

2) lugal kul-lat kib-rat 4-/ mu-la-it gi-mir tar- 

gi-g\(\ 

3) sa-ah-tu za-nin e-kur bi-bil lib-bi d a-sur et-lu 
qar-du ges-ru la pa-du-u 

4) sa i-na gis. tukuUti d a-sur u d nin-urta 

DINGIR.MES GAL.MES EN.MES-SU tt-tal-la-ku-ma 

5) u-sam-qi-tu ge-ri-su nun-w na-du sa i-na si- 
qir d uxu qu-ra-di 

6) is-tu uru.kA.dingir.ra.ki sa kur ak-ka-di-i 
a-di [a.ab.b]a e-le-ni-te sa kur a-mur-ri 

7) u a.ab.ba sa kur na-i-ri i-na ta-ds-nin-t[i u 
d\a-na-ni qa-a-su ik-Su-du-u-ma 

8) i-pe-lu gim-ra gis-gi-nu-u dan-[nu sa i-n]a ti- 
ib gis.tukul.mes-^w ez-zu-u-te 

9) tu-bu-qa-at er-bit-ta us-ra-ab-bu-ma i-hi-il-lu 
da-ad-mu u al-tu-ti na-ki-ru-ut d a-sur 

10) a-sar taq-m-ub-ti a-na hai-te u-kin-su-nu-ma 
zi-qi-qi-is um-mi 

1 1) dap-pa-a-nu sam-ru sd nap-har [m]al-ki.MES 
Sa kib-ra-a-te f~M&~i-su ez-z[u e]- r diP-ru-ma 



1-12) Tiglath-pileser, strong king, king of the 
universe, king of [Assyria], king of all the four 
quarters, encircler of all criminals, pious, provider 
for Ekur, select of the god Assur, valiant young 
man, merciless mighty man who acts with the 
support of the gods Assur and Ninurta, the great 
gods, his lords, and (thereby) has felled his foes, 
attentive prince who, by the command of the god 
Samas the warrior, has conquered by means of 
conflict and might from Babylon of the land 
Akkad to the Upper Sea of the land Amurru and 
the sea of the lands Nairi and become lord of all, 
strong giSginu who by the attack of his fierce 
weapons has caused the four corners (of the 
world) to quake so that the habitations convulsed 
— indeed on the battlefield he has put in their 
graves the dangerous enemies of the god Assur 
and turned them into ghosts — storm-trooper 
whose fierce battle all princes of the (four) quar- 
ters dreaded so that they took to hiding places 
[like] bats and scurried off to inaccessible regions 
[like jerboa]; 



2-8 For the restorations see A.0.87.10 lines 1-9. 



42 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.4 



[kima s\u-ti-ni is-ba-tu tu-b[u-qe-ti it kima 
arrabe i]h-tal-la-l[u] ^er^se-et la ba-H 



[dum]u d a-sur-s[AG-isi $ar kissati sar mSt] 



f a a-suri 



dumu mu-tak-kil- d nusku [sar kissati m]an 



kur a-sur-ma 



3-su a-na kur.kur n[a-i-ri lu\-u alAik 

dagal.mes ku[r.ktjr na?iri\ is-tu kur tum 4 - 

me 

a-di kur da-ie-ni kur [hi]-mu-a kur pa-i-te- 

ri it kur hab-hi 

lu ak-sud anse.kur.ra.mes si-i[m-da-a]t gis 

ni-i-ri ma-da-at-ta-su-nu lu am-hur 



12 lim iRiN.Hi.A.MES-a^ k[ur mus-ki.ME]s 

dagal.mes i-na qe-reb ta-h[a-zi\ qa-a-ti lu 

ik-sud 

sal-ma-at qu-ra-di-s[u-nu muqtab]-li i-na zi- 

qit mul-mul-[li eli] pi-rik na-me-e lu-me-es-si 



4 lim kur u-\rumaia].MEl kur a-be-es-la- 
o.mes [ummanat] kur ha-at-te^e 
la-a ka-ni-se al-qa-a [assuha a\-na un.mes 
KUR-ti-ia am~nu 



kur lu-lu-me-e a-na si-hir-ti-M kur sa4u-a 

kur qum-me-ni kur kat-mu-hi 

u kur al-zi a-na pat gim-ri-si-na lu~u ak-sud 



i-na qi-bit d a-nim u d iSKUR dingir.mes 

gal.mes nEN~J.MEs-/a ^a^-na KUR-e lab-na-ni 

lu al-lik 

gis.tjr.mes sa gis e-re-ni ^a^-na e d a-nim [it 

adad} dingir.mes gal.mes en.mes-/^ 

[ak-k]i-iss ds-[M] a-na kur a-mur-ri lu e-tiq 

kur [a-mur]-ri a-na si-hi[r-tTsa !\u ak-sud 

ma-da-at-ta sa uru ar-ma-d[a mat g]u-bal 

kur si-du-n[i nam-s]u~ha pa-gu-ta GAL-[ti] sa 

a-ah a.ab.ba 

lu am-hur u [i\-na ta-ia-ar-ti-i[d\ kur ha-at-te 

a-na si-hir-ti-sa lu a-pel 

|gu]n ma-da-at-ta it giS.ur.mes sa gis e-[re- 

ni] i-na ugu m i-ni^ d te^-[sub] lugal [k]ur 

ha-at-te lu ds-kun 



13-14) Son of Assur-r[esa-isi (i), king of the 
universe, king of] Assyria, son of Mutakkil- 
Nusku (who was) also [king of the universe (and)] 
king of Assyria: 

15-17) Thrice I marched to the lands N[airi] (and) 
conquered the extensive lands [Nairi] from 
Tummu to the lands Daienu, Himua, Paiteru, and 
Habhu. I received their tribute of teams of horses 
in harness. 



18-19) I conquered 12 f 000 of the troops of the 
land of the extensive [Musku] in battle. I laid out 
by means of the bow (lit. 'at arrowpoint') the 
corpses of their fighting men right through the 
plain. 

20-21) I took (and) [uprooted] 4,000 U[rumu] 
(and) Abeslu, insubmissive [troops] of Hatti, 
(and) regarded them as people of my land. 



22-23) I completely conquered the entire land of 
the Lullumu, the lands Salua, Qummenu, 
Katmuhu, and Alzu. 

24-30) By the command of the gods Anu and 
Adad, the great gods, my lords, I marched to 
Mount Lebanon. I cut down (and) carried off 
cedar beams for the temple of the gods Anu [and 
Adad], the great gods, my lords. I continued to 
the land Amurru (and) conquered the entire land 
[Amurjru. I received tribute from the city Arvad 
(and) the lands Byblos (and) Sidon (and) a croc- 
odile (and) a large female monkey of the sea 
coast. Finally, upon my return I became lord of 
the entire land Hatti (and) imposed upon Ini- 
Tesub, king of the land Hatti, tax, tribute, and 
(impost consisting of) cedar beams. 



12-21 For the restorations see A. 0,87. 10 lines 14-25. 
18-23 omitted in exs, 23-24, 20-21 omitted in ex. 22. 
24-27 For the restorations see A.0.S7.10 lines 28-32, 
27 Weidner says exs. 23-24 omit kur gu-bal kur si-du-ni, but 
both exs. are broken here, 27 [nam-s\u-ha ... gal-[//J: cf. 



A. 0.89.7 iv 29. For -[ti] t Schroeder gives traces in his copy of 
ex. 11 (KAH 2 no. 69), but none are now visible, 28-30 For 
the restorations see A. 0.87. 10 lines 33-35. 30 Regarding the 
old erroneous reading hatte rabfte 'Great Hatti' see Hawkins, 
RLA 4 p. 153 and Iraq' 36 (1974) pp. 70-71. 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.4 



43 



a-na uru mi-li-di-a sd kur ha-at-te GAi-te 

lu-u al-lik ma-da-aUta Sa al-lu-ma-ri 

lu am-hur uru en-za-ta Sa kur i-Su-a it kur 

su-uh-me 

[ak]-Sud ^Sal-la^-su-nu as-su-ha a-na kur-//- 

ia uh-la 



28-Su egir kur ah-la-me-e kur ar-ma-a- 
/a.MEs id pu-rat-ta mu LkAm 2-ii/ lu e-te-bir 
iS-tu uru ta-ad-mar Sd kur a-mur-ri uru a- 
/ia-a/ sa kur sw-/n w a-di uru ra-pi-qi 
sd kur kar-du-ni-dS ddb-da-Su-nu lu dS-kun 
Sal-la-su-nu mar-si-su-nu a-na uRU-/a aS-Sur 
ub-la 



a-na kur kar-du-ni-ds lu-u al-lik is-tu e-ber- 

ta-an id £ff-6tf Su-pa-le-e 

uru ar-ma-an A.Gm»uRu-sa-lum a-rf/ uru 

lu-ub-di lu ak-Sud id ra-da-na 

lu-u e-te-bir uRU.MEs-m sa gir kur ka-mul-la 

kur kaS-til-la lu ak-sud 

sal-la-su-nu bu-Sd-su-nu lu u-se-sa-a a-na 

URU-ia d a-5u/- /w-w «Wa 



/-«a ger-ri-ia an-ni-im-ma a-na kur $«-#/ /w-w 
a/-/Mr uru sa-pi-ra-ta Sd murub 4 id pu-rat-te 
a-di uru hi-im-da-ni uru.mes-/?/ gab-ba sd 
kur sw-to /w ak-sud Sal-la-su-nu lu dS-lu-ul 

DINGlR.MES-W-SW-fl« MO-du-te U NIG.GA.MES- 

5w-«w /w ds-Sd-a a-na VRV-ia d a-sur lu ub-la 



i-na qi-bit d nin-urta AGA-i[a] a-na kur kar- 
du-ni-ds lu-ii al-lik 

VKV,BkD- m ku-ri-gal-zu uru si-pfr-Sd- d vjv 
uru si-pir-Sa- d a-nu-ni-ie 
uru.ka.dingir.ra.ki uru u-pe-e Sa gir am- 
ma-a-te Sa id.idigna ma-ha-zi gal.mes 
Sa kur kar-du-ni-ds a-di hal-sa-ni-Su-nu lu-u 
ak-sud di-ik-ta-Su-nu ma^a-ta 
lu~u ds-kun Sal-la-su-nu a-na la me-na lu ds- 

lu-Ul E.GAL.MES Sa URU.KA.DINGIR.RA.KI 

Sd md AMAR.UTu-suM-a-#/ man kur kar-du-ni- 
dS lu-u ak-sud i-na izi.mes lu ds-ru-up i-na 



31-33) I marched to the city Milidia of the great 
land Hatti. I received the tribute of Allumaru. I 
conquered the city Enzatu of the land Isua and 
the land Suhmu. I uprooted prisoners (from) their 
(midst and) brought (them) to my land. 



34-36) I have crossed the Euphrates twenty-eight 
times, twice in one year, in pursuit of the 
ahlamu- Aramaeans. I brought about their defeat 
from the city Tadmar of the land Amurru, Anat 
of the land Suhu, as far as the city Rapiqu of 
Kardunias. I brought their booty (and) posses- 
sions to my city Assur. 

37-40) 1 marched to Kardunias. I conquered from 
the other side of the Lower Zab, the city Arman 
of Ugar-Sallu, as far as the city Lubdu, I crossed 
over the River Radanu, I conquered the cities at 
the foot of Mounts Kamulla (and) KaStilla. I took 
out their booty (and) possessions (and) brought 
them to my city Assur. 



41-43) On this campaign of mine I marched to 
the land Suhu. I conquered (from) the city 
Sapiratu, an island in the Euphrates, as far as the 
city Hindanu (Himdanu), all the cities of the land 
Suhu. 1 took prisoners from them, carried off 
their numerous gods and their property, (and) 
brought (them) to my city Assur. 

44-51) By the command of the god Ninurta, who 
loves me, I marched to Kardunias. I conquered 
the cities Dur-Kurigalzu, Sippar-of-Samas, 
Sippar-of-Anunltu, Babylon, Opis, which is on 
the far side of the Tigris, the great towns of Kar- 
dunias together with their fortresses. I brought 
about the defeat of their multitudes (and) took 
prisoners without number from them. I captured 
the palaces of Babylon which belonged to 
Marduk-nadin-ahhe, king of Kardunias, (and) 
burnt them. In the eponymy of Assur-sumu-eris 
(and) in the eponymy of Ninuaiia, twice, 1 drew 
up a battle line of chariots against Marduk- 



31-33.23 has only a-na uru mi-li-di-a s[a ... m]a-da-at-ta §a 
m a[t-...] and probably (considering size of lacuna) omitted all 
of uru enzata ... tibia ( I conquered the city Enzatu ... to my 
land.' 35.11-12 su-ii-hi. 37-40 omitted in ex. 23. 41.23 omits 
ina girriia annimma 'On this campaign 1 . (There is room in the 
break only for *~a-na^.) 42.23-24 hi-m-da-ni. 
42.23 ur[u.mes-w ...] gis.kiri 6 .mes-sm-«« ak-{kis ...] Sal-la- 



su-nu lu aS-[lu-ul\ '... I cut [down] their orchards [...(and)] 
carried off their booty.' 45.9 uru z[i-i\m-bir-[sa-samas\, 
46.23 omits sa &pe ammate sa idiqlat 'On the other bank of 
the Tigris'. 48.7, 23 lu a-duk for lu-u ds-kun. 49.23 [...] man 
kur kar-du-ni-ds l[u-u ...] nig.ga.mes E.GAL.MES-in [...] '[...] 
king of Kardunias [I conquered (...)] the property of his 
palaces [I plundered, I burnt (his palaces)].' 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.4 



i-na //-me m ni-nu-a-ia 2-Su si-di-ir-ta Sa 

GIS.GIGIR.MES 

iS-tu md AMAR.UTu-suM-flr-A/ man kur kar-du- 
ni-dS dS-ku-un a-duk-^sifi 



e-nu-ma e Sa-hu-ru sa pa-an e la-bu-ni sa 
m Gis.TUKUL- d MAS a-bi Sid aS-Sur e-pu-Su 
e Su-a-tu a-na si-^hir^-ti-Su u e.gars a-di pu- 
ta-ti-Su sa ku-tal-li-Su 

sa e Sa-hu-ri-ma ia-be-ru-te sa pa-an e la-bu- 
ni Sa m aS~Sur-$UM-a-hi 
a-bi sid as-Sur nun-w a-lik pa-ni-ia e-pu-su 
u-ne-kire e Sa-hu-ri 

Sa-tu-nu a-na GiBit-ut-te ad-di uS-Se-Su-nu i- 
na na 4 pe-e-ii ki-ma ki-$ir kur-i 
u-Ser-Sid 15 gir.mes u-ri-ik 5 Vi gIr.meS «- 
ra-pe-eS 6.ta.am i-na gir.mes 
e gis bu-uUni Sa pu-ti-Su u-lab-bi-in 



i-na gis e-re-ni u Gis.tiR.MES sa i-na si-qir d a- 
Sur u d a-nim dingir.mes gal.mes EN.MES-ia 
a-na kur lab-na-ni al-li-ku-ma ak-ki-su-u-ni 
ds-si-an-ni giS.ur.meS sig 5 .mes 
e d a-nim it d i§KUR dingir.mes gal.mes 
en.mes-/# u-ka-i-nu-u-ni i-na si-te-et 
gis e-re-ni e Sa-hu-ri Sa-tu-nu iS-tu us-Se-Su 
a-di gaba-dib-be-Su ar-sip 
i-na a-gur-ri Sa na 4 .ad.bar a-na si-hir-ti-Su 
al-mi £ la-bu-ni Sa pu-ti-Su 
i-na giS bu-ut-ni is-tu uS-Se-Su a-di gaba-dib- 
be-Su ar-sip i-na a-gur-ri Sa na 4 pe-e-li 
pa-se-e a-na si-hir-ti-Su al-mi E.GAL-la su-a-ti 
i-na gis e-re-ni 
u gis bu-ut-ni ar-sip u-Sek-lil u-Ser-rih u-si-im 



na- r hH~ra Sa anse.kur.ra Sa a.ab.ba i-qa- 

bi-Su-u-ni pa-ri-an-gi ep-Set qa-ti-ia 

Sd i-na siq-ri d MAs u d iGi.DU dingir.meS 

gal.meS EN.ME§-/a Una a.ab.ba 

[(rabTte) Sa mGt a\-mur-ri a-du-ku-ni bur-hi-iS 

ba-al-ta Sa iS-tu kur lu-ma-dS 

[,..]-te am-mi-te Sa kur hab-hi na-su-u-ni 

tam-Si-li-Su-nu Sa na 4 .ad,bar e-pu-uS 

[ina nerib SarrQ\-ti-ia im-na u Su-me-la u-Sa- 

zi-iz 



u gis tas-ka-ri-n[i\ Sa iS-tu gis.ur.meS Sa g[is] 
f"el-re-ni ak-ki-su-u-ni dS-Si-an-ni 



nadin-ahhe, king of Kardunias, (and) defeated 
him. 



52-58) At that time the house of the Sahuru, 
which is in front of the house of the labunu, 
which TukultT-Ninurta (i) my forefather, vice- 
regent of Assur, had built — I entirely cleared 
away this house and the wall as far as its surfaces 
at the back of the house of the old Sahuru, which 
is in front of the house of the labunu (and) which 
As§ur-nadin-ahhe my forefather, vice-regent of 
A§Sur, a prince who preceded me, had built, I 
founded anew the house of those SahUru (and) 
made their foundation of limestone like bedrock. 
I made it fifteen 'feet' longer and five and one-half 
'feet' wider. I reinforced the hall of terebinth on 
(both) sides, (each) six by six 'feet'. 

59-66) With cedar and beams, which by the com- 
mand of the gods Assur and Anu, the great gods, 
my lords — (after) I had marched to Mount 
Lebanon — I had cut down, carried off, (and) in- 
stalled (these) excellent beams in the temple of the 
gods Anu and Adad, the great gods, my lords: 
with the remains of the cedar I constructed the 
house of those Sahuru from top to bottom. I en- 
tirely surrounded it with basalt slabs. I con- 
structed the house of the labunu, before {which) it 
{stands), of terebinth from top to bottom. I en- 
tirely surrounded it with white limestone slabs. 
(Thus) I constructed, completed, (and) decorated 
this palace in a splendid fashion with cedar and 
terebinth. 

67-71) I made replicas in basalt of a nahiru, 
which is called a sea-horse (and) which by the 
command of the gods Ninurta and Nergal, the 
great gods, my lords, I had killed with a harpoon 
of my own making in the [(Great)] Sea [of the 
land] Amurru, (and) of a live burhiS which was 
brought from the mountain/land Lumas [...] on 
the other side of the land Habhu. I stationed 
(them) on the right and left at my [royal en- 
trance]. 

72-76) Finally, with boxwood, [which] I had cut 
down (and) carried off with the cedar beams, I 



S3 a-di: either 'as far as* or 'together with'. 53 pu-ta-ti-su: 
difficult. Weidner, AfO 18 p. 355 suggested 'pillars* or 'niches' 
but cf. von Soden, AHW p. 884 sub pQtu B4; van Driel, 



ASsur p. 110. 7§ Engel, Damonen pp. 73 and 136-38 restores 
[sa bat)-te. 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.4 



45 



[ina] ri-ta^-at £.gal gis e-re-ni sa-a-ti e.gal 

GIS.TUKUL.MES a-na mul-ta-H-it 

[E]N-r/-/cr e-pu-us us-se-sa i-na a-gur-ri sa 

na 4 .gis.nuh.gal a-na si-hir-ti-sa 

lu-u al-mi is-tu us-se-sa a-di gaba-dib-be-sa 

i-na gis tas-ka-ri-ni ar-sip 

u-sek-lil na4.na.ru. a. MES-/a al-tu-ur i-na 

qer-be-si-na ds-kun 



e.gal gis e-re-ni si-i i-na pi-it ha-[si-s]i u ni- 

kil lib-bi e-pu-us 

e-gal-lugal-sdr-ra-kur-kur-ra e.gal lugal 

kis-s[at kuk.m]es MV-sa ab-be a-na su-bat 

Mxs-ti-ia 

sa da-ra-a-ti u-s[i(l)4m(7)] ki-i pi-i 

&.GAL»ME§-ma mah-ra-a-te sa nun.meS 

a-tik pa-ni-ia rp-[n]a man.mes-w la-be-ru-t[e 

a-d\i muh-hi-ia sa e.gal.mes-™? 

er-si-pu-ma a-na [su-ba]t MAN-ti-su-nu d[a- 

ru]-ti i-na i-si-na-at xjRU-su-nu 

r d ~ia-sur en u dingir.m[es gal].mes a-na lib- 

bi-f~si-na~i i-qa-ru-u-ma udu.siskur.mes 

[i]-na-qu-d [...]-fiP £.gal.mes si-na-ti-na la 

qa-su-da-ma a-na su-bat dingir-# 

[la] sa-ak-na [...] e.gal-Io e-pu-su 

dingir.mes-ww-5w a-na lib-be il-lu-ku 

udu.siskur.mes [ana d]ingir.mes-ah i-na lib- 

bi-ma i-sa-kan k[i]-i pi-i E.GAL.MES-te-ma 

ma-da-a-te [lug]al.mes a-lik pa-ni-ia la u- 

qa-si-d[u]-si-na-ma a-na su-bat dingir-*/ 

la is-ku-nu [(...)] r E~i.GAL gis e-re-ni sa-a-ti 

mu I.kam e.[gal d a]-sur en u dingir.mes 

gal.mes 

[...]-x da-ru-ii udu.siskur.mes a-na pa-ni-su- 

nu i-[na-qu]-u t.GAL-lum si-i 

[la qa-s\u-da-at ^a-na^ [subat ilu\-ti la sa-ak- 

na-at lugal r^'i [...]. rME£~i-sw ^i-na lib-bi 

ds^-bu 



[...] x e-nu-ma £.gal gis e-re-ni [si] 

[... u-S\al-ba-ru-ma e-na-h[u (...) tas-k]a(l)~ 

ri-nu 

[... ina q\er-be-Si-na 

[... rubu] egir-w [...] d a-sur [...] i-se-me 

iti hi-bur sa tar-si iti.gan ud 18.kam l[i-mu 
m ta]k-lak-a-na d a-sur 



built a palace of weapons for my lordly leisure 
beside this cedar palace. I entirely surrounded its 
foundation with slabs of g/s/zwga//«-alabaster. 
(Thus) I constructed (and) completed it from top 
to bottom with boxwood. I inscribed my monu- 
mental inscriptions (and) deposited (them) therein. 



77-89) This cedar palace I built with understand- 
ing and skill (and) called it EgallugalSarra- 
kurkurra, 'Palace of the King of Ail [Lands]*. I 
[made it fitting] for my royal residence for eter- 
nity. As the former palaces — into which princes 
who preceded me, older kings down to my time, 
who constructed such palaces and (made them 
fitting) for royal [residences for eternity], would 
invite inside the god A§§ur, my lord, and the 
[great] gods at the festivals of their city and make 
sacrifices [...] — (as) those palaces were not con- 
secrated or designated as divine residences [but 
when a prince/king] built a palace, his gods 
would come inside (and) he would present therein 
sacrifices [to] the gods: as the numerous palaces, 
[which] the kings who preceded me did not con- 
secrate or designate as divine residences, this 
cedar palace, first/one year, palace of the god 
Assur, my lord, and the great gods [...] eternity, 
sacrifices were made before them (although) this 
palace was [not] consecrated or designated as a 
divine [residence] — the king and his [...] dwell 
therein. 



90-93 a) [In the future, in days to come, may a] 
later [prince], when [this] cedar palace [...] be- 
comes old and dilapidated, [restore its weakened 
portions either] with boxwood, [or ...] within 
them [...] 

93b) (Then) the god Assur will listen to [his 
prayers]. 

94) Month of Hibur, equivalent of the (Baby- 
lonian) month Kislev, eighteenth day, [eponymy] 
of [Ta]klak-ana- Assur. 



87 mu I.kam: see the note to A. 0.87. 3 line 30 and cf. van 
Driel, Assur p. 166. 90-93 Cf. A.0.87.11 lines 19'-26'. 



91 [tas-k]a(l)-ri-nu: preserved only in exs. 6 and 22, the traces 
before -ri-nu are not of e but could be of ka. Cf. line 72. 



46 



Tigiath-pileser i A.0.87.5 



This text, on a clay tablet fragment from Assur, describes work on the 
palace at Assur and is very similar to, but not a duplicate of, 
A. 0.87.4. Only part of the reverse of the tablet is preserved and 
doubtless the missing obverse had an introduction similar to A. 0.87. 4. 



COMMENTARY 



The preserved passage is in the Assyrian dialect like the 
building passage in A. 0.8 7. 4. 

Restorations are based largely on A. 0.87. 4 (cf. 
Borger, EAK 1 p. 132) but, since there is considerable 
variation, may not be accurate in detail. Parallel or du- 
plicate passages are (the numbers in parentheses refer to 
lines in A.0.87.4): 2' (54), 3'-4' (58-60), 5' (62 and 64), 



6' (63b-64a), 7 (63a), 8' (66), 9' (A.0.87.10 lines 68-69 
and A.0.87.11 rev. 7'), ll'-12'a (69b-70), and 12'b-14' 
(67-69a). 

The fragment (VAT 9540, Ass 18723, Ass ph 5845) 
measures 10x8.8+ cm. It was found in the fill of the 
'railway embankment', iD4vNW, and the inscription 
has been collated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 no. 67 (copy) 

1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§291 and 298 (translation) 

1957-58 Weidner, AfO 18 p. 342 n. 7 (study) 



1961 Borger, EAK 1 pp. 130 and 132 (study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxvii 5 (translation) 
1986 Pedersen, Archives 2 p. 28 no. 152 (provenance) 



TEXT 



Lacuna 

V) [...] W-pu-u[s ...] 

2') [...] x£la-bu-ni[...] 

3') [...] u-la-bi-in i-na gis tas-ka-ri~n[i ... sa ina 

siqir assur u anim] 
4') [Hani rabuti belTia is-t\u KUR-e lab-na-a-ni 

ak-ki-su-u-[ni assPanni] 
5') [... is\-tu us-se-sa a-di gaba-dib-bi-sa ar-[sip 

6') [bit labuni sa] pu-ti-su i-na gis tar-pe-^e ar- 

[sip ...] 
7') [ina a-gu]r-ri sa na 4 .gis.nui i.gal a-na si-hir- 

t[i-sa almi ekalla suati arsip] 
8') [useklil u-$er-ri]h u-si-im E.GARg.MES-ia w [...] 
9') [, , .] sik-kat kar-ri a-na si-ma-te-sa [almi . . . ] 

100 [•■•] qe-reb tam~le~e Su-a-tu u a-na a-x-[...] 
1 1') [,..]-te bur-hi~is bal-ta sa is-tu kur lu-ma-[as 

...~te ammite] 
12') [sa mat habhi na-su-u]-ni na-hi-ra sa 

anse.kur.ra sa a.ab.ba [iqqabbTsuni] 



Lacuna 

l'-9') built [...] the house of the labunu [...] I 
strengthened. With boxwood, [which by the com- 
mand of the gods Assur and Anu, the great gods, 
my lords], I had cut down (and) [carried off] from 
Mount Lebanon, [... / installed /built ...J from 
top to bottom I constructed [... the house of the 
labunu], before {which) it {stands), I constructed 
with tamarisk. [... I] entirely [surrounded it with] 
slabs of g/sw«ga//w-alabaster, [/ constructed, com- 
pleted, {and)] decorated [this palace in a splendid 
fashion]. Its walls and [... I surrounded with] 
knobbed nails to enhance its appearance. 



](y~-14') [,,,] within this terrace and to [... I made 
replicas in ... of a] live burhis which [was 
brought] from the mountain/land Luma[s ... on 
the other side of the land Habhu (and) of] a 
nahiru, which [is called] a sea-horse (and) which 



8' Instead one might restore from A.0.87.10 line 87 and 
A.0.87.11 rev. 6: [eli mahre u-&r-ri]h u-si-im 'I decorated (it) 



in a fashion [more splendid than ever]. 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.5 



47 



13') [pariangi epset] ^qa^-ti-ia sa d MAS u d iGi.DU 

[ilanu rabutu] 
14') [beluia ina aI.Tab.ba GAL~Me sa ^kur a-mur- 

m [...] 

Lacuna 



the gods Ninurta and Nergal, [the great gods, my 
lords, allowed me to kill with a harpoon of] my 
own [making in] the Great Sea of the land 
Amurru. 
Lacuna 



This is a small fragment of a clay tablet from Assur on which is 
preserved the beginnings of the first few lines of an introduction to a 
text of Tiglath-pileser i. Some of the epithets preserved are unique for 
this king and the original text was clearly different from the other 

Assur texts. 



COMMENTARY 

The fragment (VAT 9497, Ass 10766, Ass ph 1934) measures 5.5x4.5+ cm. 
It was found in the city area and the inscription has been collated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 no. 70 (copy) 

1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§327 and 336 (translation) 

1957-58 Weidner, AfO 18 p. 342 n. 7 (study) 



1961 Borger, EAK 1 pp. 122-24 (study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxvii 6 (translation) 



TEXT 



1) m Gis. tukul-ti-m[LA-esarra sarru dannu sar 
kissati sar mat assur] 

2) man kul-lat ki[b-rat arba-i ...] 

3) sa i-na re(l)-s[u(l)-ut{l) ...] 

4) man sa a-bu-u[b ...] 

5) qi-it-ru-u[b ...] 

6) d GiBiL 6 (NE.ci) m[u-la-it(l) ...] 

7) [s\a r 'si-it pi-P-\su ...] 
Lacuna 



1-7) Tiglath-pil[eser, strong king, king of the 
universe, king of Assyria], king of all the [four] 
quarters, [...] who with the aid [of ...], the king 
who the Deluge of [...] approach of [battle ...] 
the god Girru (fire god) encircler [of ...] whose 
command 
Lacuna 



This tiny fragment of a clay tablet from Assur comes from a text of 
Tiglath-pileser i in which the Babylonian conquest was described in a 
manner different from that in A.0.87.4 and 10. 



1-2 Cf. A.0.87.3 lines 1-2 and similar texts. 3 Cf. A.0.87.15 
line 1. 5 Cf. A.0.87.10 line 13. 6 Cf. Seux, ERAS p. 149 



n. 16 and pp. 181-82. Also note A.0.87.4 line 2 and A.0.87,10 
line 2. 



48 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.7 
COMMENTARY 



Note the parallel passages A.0.87.4 lines 46-51 and 
A. 0.87. 10 lines 47-53. These parallels strongly indicate 
an identification of the fragment with Tigl. i. Such an 
identification is buttressed by the distinctive form of the 
signs, the Tiglath-pileser f script, and the texture of 
clay which consists of an ivory-white centre covered 



with a red slip (see the introduction to this reign). 

The fragment (A 635, Ass 17861, K 209, Ass ph 
5664) measures 4.9x4+ cm and the inscription has 

been collated. No specific provenance at ASsur is 

known. 



1957-58 Weidner, AfO 18 p. 359 n. 25 (study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxvii 7 (study) 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1990 Donbaz, ARRIM 8 p. 3 (copy) 



TEXT 



Lacuna 



1') 


[...] X KUR [...] 


2') 


[...] x uru.kA.dingi[r.ra.ki ...] 


3') 


[... kardu]-ni-d$ lu a[k-Sud ...] 


4') 


[...] rn.GAL-.fw lu a[k(?)-...] 


5') 


[...\-su-nu /-rnai [...] 


6') 


[...] x-s[u ...] 


7') 


[...] x [...] 



1-7') No translation warranted. 



Lacuna 



8 



This fragmentary text, on pieces of a clay tablet from Assur, has 
remains of a description of the manufacturing of animal figurines (see 
the introduction to A.0,87,4) and other decorative creations for the 
palace. Specific reference is made to the part of the palace constructed 
of boxwood. 



COMMENTARY 



The fragmentary text is preserved on several pieces 
joined by Veysel Donbaz: A 646 (Ass 17874b) + A 661 
(Ass 17874a) + A 2512 (Ass 17874c)( + )Ass 17874d. 
Photos of all the fragments appear on Ass ph 5664 
and, although the original of Ass 17874d could not be 



located, it obviously joins the other fragments. The in- 
scription has been collated. No specific provenance at 
Assur is known. The tablet has the same characteristic 
form of script and clay texture noted for A.0.87.7. 



4' a[k(?)-...]: possibly a[k-sud\ or a[q-qur]. 



1957-58 Weidner, AfO 18 p. 359 n. 25 (study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxvii 8 (study) 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.8 
BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1990 Donbaz, ARRIM 8 p. 4 (copy) 



49 



TEXT 



Lacuna 

V) [...] rcn-na a-m[a(iy...\ 

2 f ) [...] //(?) r/w(?)i se(l) ku w[e(?) ...] 

3') [...] x-ra-da-a an-n[u(l)-...] 

40 [... sa ina sigri] d MAS d d riGi.DU~i dingir.mes 

g[al.mes belTia ina tamti] 
50 [rablti] sa Tkur"* a-mur-rrP a-du-ku-ni [...] 
60 [/>za Azm& sarrii\-ti~ia zag [w g]ub u-s[a-zi-iz 



T) I 

80 [ 

9') [ 

100 I 

no [ 



,,] me-sir sar-^pi if* ku.gt u-[...] 

. g]is(?).tukul £/-/ i-na ta-* simMi x [...] 

..] x si x tu [...] 

,.] E,GAL [X] DINGIR.M[ES(?) ,..] 

,. na4.na.ru. a. M]ES-/a al-tu~u[r ...] 



120 [aw arkat umT ana um sate e-nu]-ma e.gal- 

i[um st] 
130 [usalbaruma ennahu la ta]s(l)-ka-ri-nu i~wT 

[ft?...] 
140 [...] xxx[...] 
Lacuna 



Lacuna 

1-30 No translation warranted. 



4'- IT) [... which by the command of] the gods 
Ninurta and Nergal, the great gods, [my lords], I 
had killed [with a harpoon of my own making in 
the Great Sea] of the land Amurru [(...)] I sta- 
tioned (them) on the right [and] left at my royal 
[entrance]. I [fashioned (...)] bands of silver and 
gold [,..] this weapon with wisdom [/ manufac- 
tured .,,], The palace [...] the gods [...] I in- 
scribed my [monumental] inscriptions [and depos- 
ited them therein]. 

12-14*) [In the future, in days to come, may a 
later prince], when [this] palace [becomes old and 
dilapidated, restore its weakened portions either 
with] boxwood or [...] 
Lacuna 



This text is found on a clay tablet fragment from Assur and it is virtu- 
ally certain that it is a fragment of an otherwise unknown text of 
Tiglath-pileser i. 



COMMENTARY 



The fragment (VAT 9511, Ass 12901, Ass ph 3235) was 
found in the city area. It measures 5.1 x 6+ cm and the 
inscription has been collated. It has the same charac- 
teristic form of script and clay texture as A. 0.87. 7. The 



strongest indicator that it is from a text of Tigl. I is the 
place-name Adaus which is attested almost exclusively 
in inscriptions of that king. 



4-6' cf.A.0.87.4 lines 68-71. 7 sarpu = 'silver* in MA; see 
CAD 16 ($) pp. 113-14 sub b. 12-13' cf. A.O.87.11 lines 19'-20'. 



50 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.9 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 no. 72 (copy) 

1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§327 and 335 (translation) 

1957-58 Weidner, AfO 18 p. 342 (study) 



1961 Borger, EAK 1 p. 121 (study) 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxvii 9 (translation) 



TEXT 



Lacuna 



1') [. 


..] 


21 [. 


«•] 


3') [. 


..] 


40 [. 


"J 


5') [• 


,.] 


6") [. 


*«] 


7') [. 


••] 


80 [. 


..J 


91 [. 


«•] 


W [■ 


..J 


in [. 


..J 



Lacuna 



f~a^-na uru s[u-...] 

■su-nu i-na x [.,.] 

i-du-ku i-na x [...] 

x a-na muh-hi-su-nu [...] 

sa kur a-da-us [...] 

■a en. uru sa uru £«-[...] 

■x-ia sa kur a-da-us x [...] 

■//-/ uru it se-ra [...] 

x a-na kur a-da-us e-ru-[ub 

x [...] x sa ni [...] 

x[...] 



Lacuna 

l'-llO [■••] to the city Su[...] their [„.] in [...] 

they killed in [...] against them [...] of the land 

AdauS [...] the city-ruler of the city Su[...] of the 

land Adaus [...] ... city and country [...] to the 

land Adaus I/he entered. [...] ... [...] 

Lacuna 



10 



The following text, on clay tablets from Nineveh, has an introduction 
closely parallel to A. 0.87.4 and a description of various building 
works at Nineveh. A second text from Nineveh, A.0.87.11, has a 
different description of building operations but its introduction is al- 
most an exact duplicate of this text and so has been edited here (as 
'exemplar 2') for convenience. This introduction, (lines 1-53), as just 
stated, is closely parallel to A. 0.87. 4, except that it does not include 
the campaigns against Milidia and the Aramaeans (A.0.87.4 lines 
31-36). Moreover, the campaigns against the Musku, Urumu, and 
Lullumu (A.0.87.4 lines 18-23) are found only in exemplar 2, not in 
exemplar 1 (the other exemplars are not preserved here). 

The building operations at Nineveh concern the city wall (lines 
54-62) and the palace of Assur-resa-isi i (lines 63-70 and possibly 
A.0.87.11, cf. RIMA 1 p. 315 A.0.86.5). The final construction pas- 
sage (lines 71-88) describes work on a garden and canal (cf. 
A.0. 87. 24-27) and a palace beside the Istar temple. 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.10 
CATALOGUE 



51 





Museum 


Registration 


Nineveh 


Dimensions 


Lines 




Ex. 


number 


number 


provenance 


(cm) 


preserved 


cpn 


1 


BM 122622 + 


1930-5-8,11-12 • 


Possibly chamber i 


24.5x17 + 


1-94 


c 




122623+123361 


1932-12-10,304 


in SE wall and 
chamber iv in SW 
wall, Asn. palace. 
Cf. AAA 18, pp. 84-86 








2 


Sm 1874 


- 


- 


16.4x16 + 


6-28 


c 


3 


K2805 


- 


- 


7.2x6.6 + 


1-13, 94 


c 


4 


BM 122632 


1930-5-8,21 


- 


6.2x7.3 + 


10-18, 82-93 


c 


5 


BM 121067 


1929-10-12,63 


NT. xxv. 3 


5.1x4.1 + 


2-8, 94 


c 


6 


BM 134564 


1932-12-12,559 


- 


4x3.2 + 


45-51, 64-70 


c 


7 


- 


79-7-8,280 


- 


4x4 + 


13-16, 79-85 


c 


8 


- 


Bu 89-4-26,28 


- 


3x4.5 + 


46-63 


c 



COMMENTARY 



The master text (ex. 1) is the only reasonably complete 
inscription. 'Ex. T is, in reality, the introductory por- 
tion of A. 0.87.11, which has been edited here for con- 
venience. Ex. 2 is badly worn and many readings are 
possible only by comparison with other exs. or parallel 
texts. The remaining exs. are just fragments and it is 
not absolutely certain that they all belong to one text. 
However, they certainly do not belong to A. 0.87. 4, a 
closely parallel text, since they share major vars. from 
that text and, when preserved, the building sections 
concern Nineveh. Indeed many of them (exs. 4-6) are 
definitely from Nineveh and the remainder (exs. 3, 7-8) 
at least have Kuyunjik registration numbers. 

Ex. 6 is a tiny fragment with traces on the rev. which 
duplicate the master text (lines 64-70). On the obv. are 
traces in which Kardunias is mentioned twice. Millard, 
followed by Grayson (ARI 2 lxxxvii 14), thought this 
represented a unique text of this king. However, the 
traces can be identified with lines 45-51 of the master 
text. The only problem with this is the line ruling in 
ex. 6 which appears after a-duk in line 49. This suggests 
a variation in this inscription but does not justify re- 
garding it as unique. 



Ex. 8 is also a tiny fragment and, while most of its 
traces match the master text, it is awkward trying to fit 
into lines 60-62 the traces which it preserves. It is just 
possible, then, that it represents a description of a 
different building project. 

There are many small breaks in ex. 1 which neces- 
sitate the use of other exs. to construct the master text. 
Details follow (the ex. numbers are in parentheses): 1 
(1, 3), 2-4 (1, 3, 5), 5-7 (1, 3), 8 (1, 3, 5), 9 (1, 3), 
10-11 (1-2), 12-15 (1), 16-20 (1-2), 21-27 (2), 28-63 
(1), 64 (1, 6), 65-81 (1), 82-93 (1, 4), and 94 (1, 3, 5). 

The introduction (lines 1-53) is a very close parallel 
of the introduction to A. 0.87. 4 (lines 1-51) and restora- 
tions are from the latter unless stated otherwise. The 
major variations from A. 0.87.4 have been mentioned in 
the introduction to our text but also note that ex. 2 
omits the line ruling between lines 8-9, thus regarding 
lines 1-15 as one section (as does A. 0.87. 4). The paral- 
lel passages are (the line numbers in A. 0.87,4 are in 
parentheses): 1-15 (1-12), 16 (13-14), 17-20 (15-17), 
21-23 (18-19), 24-25 (20-21), 26-27 (22-23), 28-35 
(24-30), 36-40 (37-40), 41-44 (41-43), and 45-53 
(44-51). 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1870 3 R pi. 5 no. 1 (ex. 3, copy) 

1893 Winckler, Sammlung 1 p. 26 (ex. 3, copy) 

1896 Bezold, Cat. 4 pp. 1722 and 1919 (exs. 7-8, study) 

1898 Winckler, OLZ 1 76-77 (exs. 7-8, study) 

1902 King, AKA pp. 109-13 (exs. 2-3, copy, edition) and 

125-26 n. 3 (exs. 7-8, study) 
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§272-81 (ex. 3, translation) 
1931 Thompson, AAA 18 pp. 84-86 (ex. 1?, provenance) 
1957-58 Weidner and Kocher, AfO 18 pp. 347-59 (exs. 1-3, 

edition) 
1959-60 Weidner and Kocher, AfO 19 pp. 141-43 and pis. 



xxviii-xxx (ex. 1, copy, edition) 
1961 Borger, EAK 1 pp. 110-33 (exs. 1-3, study) 
1968 Ellis, Foundation Deposits pp. 100 and 192 (exs. 1-3, 

study) 
1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. pp. 7, 14-15, and 78 (exs. 1, 

4-6, study) 
1970 Millard, Iraq 32 pp. 167-68, 171, and pis. xxxv-xxxvi 

(exs. 4-6, copy) 
1972 Grayson, ARI 1 p. 156 (ex. 6, study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 i.xxxvn 4, 10, and 14 (exs. 1-6, transla- 
tion) and p. 1 n. 8 (exs. 7-8, study) 



52 



Tiglath-pileser i A. 0.87. 10 

TEXT 



1) [tukultt\^iBiLA^-e-sdr-ra lugal dan-nu r Lu- 
gal~i ki[s sat mat assur] 

2) [sar] kul-lat [kib\-rat 4-i mu-la-it gi-mir [tar- 

3) [sahtu] za-nin [e-ku]r bi-bil lib-bi d a-sur et-lu 
[qardu (gesru la padu)] 

4) [sa ina Gi]Ltukul-ti [assur] r«n d nin-urta 

DINGIR.MES GAL.MES-te EN.MES-5W 

5) it-ta[l-la-ku-ma] ^iH-sam-qi-tu ge-ri-su nun-w 
na-a-[du] 

6) r&i i-na si-qir d UTU qu-ra-di is-tu 

URU.KA.DINGIR.RA.KI Sa KUR.URI. [Kl] 

7) [adi] a.ab.ba e-le-ni-te sa [k]ur a-^muf^-ri u 
tam-di Sa kur.kur na-i~r[i] 

8) {ina tas\^nin^-te qa-a-su ik-su-du-ma i-pe-lu 
gim-r[a] 

9) [gis-g]i-nu-ii dan-nu sa i-na ti-ib 

GIS.TUKUL.MES-SW eZ~ZU-te 

10) rtu-bu^-qa-at 4~ta us-ra-bu-ma i~hi~lu da-ad- 

/Wt/.MES 

1 1) r#i al-tU'tu na-ki-ru-ut d a-Sur a-Sar taq-ru- 
ub-te a-na hal-te 

12) [i{l)-si{l)]-mu-su-nu-ma zi-qi-qi-is um-mi da- 
ap-pa-nu sam-ru 

13) [sa] ri-na^ qit-ru-ub tam-ha-re-e-su ek-du-te 
mal-ki. mes sa ub.mes 

14) ta-ha-su ez-za e-du-ru-ma ki-ma su-ti-ni is- 
ba-tu tu-bu-qe-ti 

15) it ki-ma ar-ra-be ih-tal-la-lu er-se-et ia-a ba-H 

16) dumu d a-sur-SAG-i-si lugal kis Tlugal - ! kur 
d a-r$ur dumu"* mu-tak-kil- d nusku lugal kis 
lugal kur as-sur-ma 



17) T31-5W a-na kur.kur na-i-ri lu ^al-lik 
dagal^.mes kur.kur na-i-ri is-tu kur tum 4 - 

18) [adi ku]r ^da-ie^-e-ni ^iu ak-su-ud kur 
hab^-hi set be-^td^-nu kur hi-mu-a 

19) kur p[a]-rp-te-ri r/«i ak-sud 
[a1nse.kur.Tra.mes si-inO-da-at gis ni-ri 

20) ma-da-ta-su-nu r /ui-[(w)] am~hu^uf\ 



1-8) [TiglathJ-pileser, strong king, king of the 
universe, [king of Assyria, king] of all the four 
quarters, encircler of all [criminals, pious], pro- 
vider for [Eku]r, select of the god Assur, [valiant] 
young man [(merciless mighty man) who] acts 
[with] the support of the gods [Assur] and 
Ninurta, the great gods, his lords, [and] (thereby) 
has felled his foes, attentive prince who, by the 
command of the god Samas the warrior, has con- 
quered by means of conflict from Babylon of the 
land Akkad [to] the Upper Sea of the land 
Amurru and the sea of the lands Nairi and be- 
come lord of all; 



9-15) strong gisginu, who by the attack of his 
fierce weapons has caused the four corners (of the 
world) to quake so that the habitations convulsed 
— indeed on the battlefield he has put in their 
graves the dangerous enemies of the god A§§ur 
and turned them into ghosts — storm-trooper, at 
the approach of whose ferocious onslaught, the 
princes of the (four) quarters dreaded his fierce 
battle and took to hiding places like bats and 
scurried off to inaccessible regions like jerboa; 



16) son of Assur-re§a-iSi (i), king of the universe, 
king of Assyria, son of Mutakkil-Nusku (who 
was) also king of the universe (and) king of 

Assyria: 

17-20) thrice I marched to the lands Nairi (and) 
conquered the extensive lands Nairi from Tummu 
[to] the land Daienu. I conquered the interior of 
the land Habhu, the lands Himua (and) Paiteru. I 
received their tribute of teams of horses in har- 
ness. 



8 There is not enough room (in ex. 1, the main ex.) to restore 
all of ina tasninte u danani qassu from the parallel A.0.S7.4 
line 7. There is only room for about five signs before 
iksuduma and thus the reconstruction of the beginning of the 
line may be faulty. 11-13.2 This ex, departs widely from the 
other exs.: u ^al-tu-te kur.mes §d{!) ^a-sur [x (x) x x x)-Vma^ 
zi-qi-qi-is' r um-mi u-sum(?.)-gal{7) darO-nu ki~x-[x x x x x] sa 



nap~rhar(?p mai-ki.MES r$a{?) ub^.mes changing the 
translation to '- indeed [...] the dangerous enemies of the god 
AlSur and turned them into ghosts — strong dragon ... [...] 
whose (fierce battle) ail the princes of the (four) quarters 
(dreaded)'. 12 [iC!)-8(l)]-mu-$u-nu-ma: the parallel A.0.87.4 
line 10 has ukmsunuma; for the suggested restoration see the 
references cited by von Soden, AHw p. 1225b sub n 3. 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.10 



53 



21) [12 LIM ERIN.HI.A.ME]S-dtf KUR WUS-ki.MES 

rto-o(?) ka-ni-se(2p i-^na^ qe-reb ^tamP-[ha- 
ril 

22) [qatT] r/ w (?yi ik-^su^-ud qu-^ra-di-su^-nu 
^muq^-tab-^li i-ncP zi-[qit\ 

23) [mulmullt\ t~e-lP pi-ri-ik ^na-me-e^ lu-me-[si\ 

24) [4 lim kur M-nt]-^ma~i-a-ia.ME$ kur a-^be- 
es-la~i-a-fia.MEp [ummanat mat hatte] 

25) [{la kanise) al-q]a ^as^-su-ha [a-n]a(l) 
fKVK(l)-ti(l)Mia amnu] 

26) [mat sa{l)]-^lu(l)^a kur /w-i'/w i-me-e a-^na 
sP-[hirtiSd\ 

27) [,..] r^ i kur al-zi lu^iP [aksud] 

28) 17-^1 qi-bit d a-sur d a-nim u d [adad il&ni 

GA]L.MES-te EN.MES-/ff 

29) a-na KUR-e kur lab-na-ni lu al4[ik 
gis.ur.me]s sa gis e-re-ni 

30) a-na t d a-nim u d i§KUR di[ngir.mes 

GA]L.MES-^ EN.MES-Wf 

31) ak-ki-is ds-sa-a a-na kur a-mur-^rP e-tiq 
kur (a)-mur-ri a-na si-hir-ti-^sa^ 

32) ak-sud ma-da-ta sa uru ar-ma-da kur gu-bal 
kur si-du-ni 

33) /« am-hur i-na ta-ia-ar-ti-ia kur ha-at-te a-na 
pat gim-ri-sa 

34) a-pe-el gun ma-da-ta u gisTur"I.[mes] n&fi 
giS e-re-ni 

35) /-ra? ugu m l-ni- d te-sub lugal kur ha-at-^te^ 
[{lu) ds-k}u-un 

36) [a-rt]a kur kar-du-ni-ds r /w"i #/-//£ /s-/w uru 
tur-sd-an sa e-ber-ta-an 

37) [i]d za-&a su-*~ba~i-le-e uru ^ar^-ma-an 
A.GkR.URV-sa-al-lum 

38) [a] -<# uru lu-ub-di lu ak-^sucP id ra-da-na 
lu-u e-be~er 

39) [u]ru.mes-/i/ sa gir kur kas-til-^la iP gir 
kur ka-mul-la lu ak-sud 

40) [sa]l-la-su-nu bu-sa-su-nu [l\u-se-$i-a a-na 
ruRui-Za d a-sur ub-la 

41) [/-#]a ger-ri-ia an-^nP-ma a-na kur sw-/i/ /w 
fir/-///: is-tu uru sa-bi-ri^te^ 

42) [ia mu]rub 4 id r pu-raO-te uru.meS-w & g!r 
an-na-te u gir am-ma-a-te 



21-23) I conquered [12,000 of the] troops of the 
land of the insubmissive Musku in battle. I laid 
out by means of the bow (lit. 'at arrowpoint') 
their fighting men right through the plain. 



24-25) I took (and) uprooted [4,000 Uru]mu (and) 
Abeslu, [(insubmissive) Hittite troops, (and) re- 
garded them as belonging to my] land. 



26-27) [I] [conquered the land Sa]lua, the entire 
land of the Lullumu, [the lands .,.] and Alzu. 



28-35) By the command of the gods A§5ur, Anu, 
and [Adad], the great [gods], my lords, 1 marched 
to Mount Lebanon. I cut down (and) carried off 
cedar beams for the temple of the gods Anu and 
Adad, the great gods, my lords. I continued to 
the land Amurru (and) conquered the entire land 
Amurru, I received tribute from the city Arvad 
(and) the lands Byblos (and) Sidon. Upon my re- 
turn I became lord of the entire land Hatti (and) 
imposed upon Ini-Tesub, king of the land Hatti, 
tax, tribute, and (impost consisting of) cedar 
beams. 



36-40) I marched to Kardunias. I conquered from 
the city Tursan on the other side of the Lower 
Zab, the city Arman of Ugar-Sailu, as far as the 
city Lubdu. I crossed over the River Radanu. I 
conquered the cities at the foot of Mount KaStilla 
(and) the foot of Mount Kamulla. I took out their 
booty (and) possessions (and) brought them to my 
city ASSur, 



41-44) On this campaign of mine I marched to 
the land Suhu, I conquered from the city Sabiritu, 
an island in the Euphrates, the cities on this bank 
and the far bank [as far as the city HJindanu. I 



21-27 omitted in ex. 1 and preserved only in ex. 2. 
24-25 There is not enough room in ex. 2 (the only preserved 
ex.) in the break at the end of line 24 and the beginning of 
line 25 to restore everything from the parallel A.0.87.4 lines 
20-21 and la kanise Insubmissive* was probably omitted. 



27 There is not enough room at the beginning in ex. 2 (the 
only preserved ex.) to restore both Qummeni and Katmuhu 
from the parallel A.0.87.4 line 22 and no doubt one of the 
place-names was omitted. 



54 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0,87.10 



[adi uru he]-en-da-na r/« ak^-sud un.mes- 
su-nu as-su-[ha] 

[DiNGiR.MES-rtjKSU-ttw [lu] ds-sa-a a-na URU-/a 
d a-sur uh-^la~\ 



[ina qi-b]it nin-urta ra- J i-mi-ia-a-te-ia a-na 
kur rjcar-du-nD-ds 

[lu al-li]k uru. bad-™ ku-h-gal-zu uru si- 
par 5 -sd- d rviv^ uru si-par s-sd- d a-nu-ni-te 
[uru.ka.ding]ir.ra.ki uru u-fpe^-e ma-a- 

ha-^ZP GAL,MES-te 

[sa kur kar-d]u-ni-ds a-di hal-sa-ni-su-f niO 
lu-u ak-Sud 

[di-ik-t]a-su-nu ma~a-a J -ta lu a-duk ^saD-la- 
su-n[u a-ri\a la mi-na 

[lU aslul] rE~l.GAL.MES sa 

uru.ka.dingir.ra.ki sa m r d i[tnarduk~sv]M- 

TSES.MES"! 

[sar mat kar-d]u-ni-ds Una izi.mes lu d[s-ru- 

up x x x] 

[x x x] rE.GAL"i.MES~le-sw ma-a-a>-da-t[e lu 

aslulO) u sidirta sa(W 

[narkabati(l) is-t]u md AMAR.UTU-suM-a-W 

man kur ^kar-du^-[ni-ds askun aduksu] 



[ina Umesuma duru sa ur]u ni-nu-a r&fi x 

U] 

[rubu alik pa-n]i-ia e-pu-su e-na-a[h-ma ...] 

[asarsu] ^tD-me-si dan-na-su ak-su-ud x 

[....M]ES [...] 

[.., b]ad su-a-tu ad-di 9Vi sig^mes u- 

[kebber] 

[duru sua]-tu a-na si-hir-ti-su is-tu ^us^-se-su 

a-di gab[a]-^dib-bP-[su] 

[sipik] e/7-r/.MES faM ma 1 dul a-na ti-mi-ti-su 

ds-pu-u\k\ 

[... t]i-ip-ki(*). mes a-na su-ba-li i-na e-pe-ri 

li-ka-ti-im 

[...] ina dub uru [eli mah-r]e-e u-^dan^-[n]in 

ut-te-er 

[... s]a-qa~a *a~^-n\a x x (x)] a.Tmes(?)t x i-na 

Tna 4 ^ pi-li a-gur-ri ak-ser 



[ekallu] sa md a-sur-[sA]G-i-si a-bi sid d a-sur 

^e^-pu-su 

[I)a-a u-sek-li-lu e.gal-/j su-a-tu ar-sip u- 

[s]ek-lil 

r£.GARs~i.MES-te-sa u na-me-ri-sa u-sa-q[i\-ma 

i-na a-gur-ri na 4 .mes na 4 sur-ri na4.za.gin 

NA4.BABBAR.Din na 4 pa-^ru^-te 



uprooted their people, carried off their [gods], 
(and) brought (all of) them to my city Assur. 



45-53) [By the] command of the god Minurta, 
who loves me, I marched to Kardunias. I con- 
quered the cities Dur-Kurigalzu, Sippar-of-Samas, 
Sippar-of-AnunTtu, Babylon, Opis, the great 
towns of [Kardjunias together with their for- 
tresses. I brought about the defeat of their multi- 
tudes (and) took prisoners without number from 
them. I burnt the palaces of Babylon which 
belonged to [Marduk-na]din-ahhe, [king of 
Kardjunias. [... / plundered] the numerous 
palaces. [/ drew up a battle line of chariots] 
against Marduk-nadin-ahhe", king of Kardunias, 
[(and) defeated him]. 



54-62) [At that time the wall of] the city Nineveh 
which [previously ... a prince who preceded] me, 
had built, had become dilapidated [...J I delin- 
eated [its area] (and) dug down to the bottom of 
its foundation pit. [...] I laid [the foundation of] 
this wall (and) [made it the thickness] of nine and 
one-half bricks. Around the entire circumference 
of [this wall] from top to bottom I piled up earth 
like a ruin hill. The lower [...] layers of brick I 
covered with earth. I made it stronger (and) 
bigger [than before. ...] ... water. 1 covered (it) 
with a facing of limestone slabs. 



63-70) [The palace] which Assur-resa-isi (1), my 
father, vice-regent of the god ASSur, had built 
(but) not completed — this palace I constructed 
(and) completed. I raised its walls and towers and 
made (them) fast, with a facade of bricks glazed 
(the colour of) obsidian, lapis lazuli, pappardilu- 
stone, (and) /wwfw-alabaster. I installed on its 



45 ra^i-mi-ia-a-te-ia: an anomalous form. Is it in error for 
ra-n-mi-ia ia-a-tel 51-52 The parallel A.0.87,4 lines 49-50 is 
not exactly the same and in particular there is no room to 



restore the timu dates from A. 0.87. 4. 61-62 The beginning of 
these lines is from ex. 8 and the exact position of the traces in 
relation to ex. 1 is uncertain. 



Tiglath-pileser i A.O.87.10 



55 



ki-ma tam-M-te u-re-ki-is tam-si-il 

GIS.GISIMMAR.MES SO SUr-^rD 

i-na na-me-ri-sa li-se-zi-iz sik-kdt kar-ri za- 

bar 

al-mi gis.ig.mes gis a-s[u-h]i si-ra-te du-ws i- 

na me-sir zabar 

u-re-ki-is i-na K[A.M]ES-sa u-re-et-te 



towers replicas in obsidian of date palms (and) 
surrounded (them) with knobbed nails of bronze. 
I made high doors of fir, made (them) fast with 
bronze bands, (and) hung (them) in its gateways. 



i-na a-ah tam-le-e su-a-tu [gis.kir]i 6 a-na 

mul-ta-a?4t 

EN-ti-ia ds-qu-up i[d pattu(l) i]s-tu id hu-sir 

lu ah-ra-a 

i-na qe-reb gis.kiris su-a-tu r/wi [...] x si-te- 

et a.mes sa-tu-nu 

a-na ta-mer-ti uru a-na ^tam^-k[i-r]i u-se-li 

i-na qe-reb gis.kiri 6 

su-a-tu B.GAL-I[a x] x la-a x-x-ti-ia e-pu-us 

ki-sit-ta u da-^na(l)-ni(l)^ sa d a-Su[r] r«i 

d MAS dingir.mes ra-H-mu 

isanga \-[t]i-ia ^ u^-sat-li-mu-ni-ma [(x)] H- 

na~i lib-be u-sir 

[...] x [a]n-na-ma [...] x-su £JGAL*-Ia ^sd 

uglH tam-le-e sa i-da-at 

[bit] r d ~ii$%-tdr m[N-i]a r sa nun^-w a-lik \p\a- 

ni-ia e-pu-su 

^e^-na-ah-ma [m\u-tdk-kil- d nusku a-b[i] sid 

d 

a-sur 

[...] x [...] x e-na-ah-ma ^E^.GAL-ta su-a-tu 
[sa idat bit d isg-t]dr nin-/# x-x u tam-la-a a- 
na si-hir-ftD-[. t .] ^me(l)^-eh-rat 
sa e dingir Sa e-f~na~i-hu-ma x x x [... k\i-ma 
ka-nu-ni 

[aspuk ...] a-na ds-ri-su u-^ter e mufP-[[]a-la 
[...] fafi-si-ip e. gal- la su-bat iajg AL-ti-^ia~^ 
[...] x an-ni-ma e-^pu^-us iS-tu us-se-sa a-di 
gaba-dib-bi~s[a] 

[a r-si\-ip ugu mah-re-e u-ser-ri-ih u-si-im 
NA 4 .NA.RU.A.MES-/a al-tu-ur i-na bad 
E.GAL.MES-te sd-tu~nu ds-ku-un 



a-na ar-kdt ud.mes a-na u 4 -um sa-a-te e-nu- 

ma bad e.gal.mes 

[sa-tu]-i~nu^ it-sal-ba-ru-ma e-na-hu nun-w 

ar-ku-u 

[an-h]u-su-nu lu-u-^ucH-di-is 

na4.na.ru. a. MES-ia li-mur-ma 

[lu-m]es-si lmes Up-su-us udu.siskur liq-qi 

a-na ds-ri-su-nu lu-ter 

d a-sur en gal-w u d is%-tdr mw-at uru ni-nu-a 

ik-ri-be-su i-se-mu-^tP 



71-88) Beside this terrace I planted a garden for 
my lordly leisure. I excavated a [canal] from the 
River Husir (and) [directed it] into this garden. I 
brought up the remainder of that water to the city 
plain for irrigation. Within this garden I built a 
palace, ... I portrayed therein the victory and 
might which the gods Assur and Ninurta, the 
gods who love my priesthood, had granted me. 
[...] the palace which is upon the terrace, which is 
beside [the temple of] the goddess I star, my mis- 
tress — which a prince who preceded me had 
built (and when) it became dilapidated Mutakkil- 
Nusku, my father, vice-regent of the god Assur, 
[rebuilt it ...] — had become dilapidated. This 
palace [which is beside the temple of the goddess 
Ist]ar, my mistress, the ... and the terrace [I] en- 
tirely [rebuilt]. Opposite the temple which had be- 
come dilapidated [/ piled up this entire area with 
bricks] like an oven. [...] I restored. The house of 
the Step Gate [...] I constructed. The palace, my 
royal dwelling, [...] ... I built. I constructed it 
from top to bottom (and) decorated (it) in a 
fashion more splendid than ever. I inscribed my 
monumental inscriptions (and) deposited (them) in 
these palace walls. 



89-93) In the future, in days to come, may a later 
prince, when these palace walls become old and 
dilapidated, restore their weakened (portions), 
May he see my monumental inscriptions, identify 
(them), anoint (them) with oil, make sacrifices, 
(and) return (them) to their places. (Then) the god 
Assur, the great lord, and the goddess Istar, mis- 
tress of Nineveh, will listen to his prayers. 



69-70 See the introduction to A.O. 101.51. 79.7 Instead of 
nun-« or any form of ruba^u there are two broken signs, the 
first of which looks like Faz~i. 82 The restoration and 



reconstruction of the beginning of the line is on analogy with 
lines 78-79 and is not entirely certain. 83-84 Cf. A.0.87.1 
vii 79-80. 



56 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.10 



94) [rn....]-x ud 18.kam li-m\u ...] me su-te^-e 



94) [Month of ...], eighteenth day, eponymy [of 
...] of the Sutu. 



11 



This text, on a broken clay tablet from Nineveh, has an introduction 
which is a duplicate of A.0.87.10 (where it is edited as 'ex. 2') and a 
building section in which work on a palace at Nineveh is described. 
Despite the broken state of the text, much of it can be restored from 
parallel passages in A. 0.87.4 and 10. Indeed, the same palace (which 
seems to be called Egallugalublimmuba) may be the subject of 
A.0.87.10 (lines 63-70). 



COMMENTARY 

The piece of clay tablet, Sm 1874, on which this text is found measures 
16.4 X 16+ cm. The text has been collated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1902 King, AKA pp. 113-16 (copy, edition) 

1961 Borger, EAK 1 pp. 132-33 (Tontafel c Ex. b') (study) 



1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxvii 11 (translation) 



TEXT 



(For the obverse see A.0.87.10) 

Reverse 

Lacuna 

10 [...]x<h5[...] rtfi-[...] 

2') [.. J x ni x x-ri-ti sa fnP-x x [...] 

3') I . . ]-su §a be-ta-nu a-^dP e-HP [. . . ] 

4') [,..]-ri-te sa a-na x [(x)] ^kuflufvP §a i-fdcfi- 

50 [... E]jGAiJ-lum si-i is-^tu^ us-se-§[a adi 

gabadibbTsa] 
60 \ar-$i\p ugu mah-re-e u-ser-^rifp [ussim] 
70 [sikkat karri za]bar al-mi gis.ig.mes gis a- 

s[u-hi sirate epus\ 
80 Una mesir zaba]r u-^ra^-ki-is 5 i-na KA-sa u- 

[rette] 



(For the obverse see A.0.87.10) 

Lacuna 

rev l'-80 its inner [...] as far as ... [...] ... [...] 
This palace I constructed from top to bottom 
(and) [decorated] (it) in a fashion more splendid 
than ever. I surrounded (it) [with knobbed nails 
of] bronze. [I made high] doors of fir, made 
(them) fast with bronze [bands, (and) hung 
(them)] in its gateway. 



A. 0.87, 10 line 94 The number of the day in ex. 3 is 18 and in 
ex. 1, despite slight damage, it is also clearly 18 (against 
Kocher who saw 17). Ex. 5 has in the very bottom corner of 
the rev. [...] me su-tes-e which must be part of the title of the 
ifmu, a title otherwise unknown for ttmus of this reign. 



A.0,87.11 line 3' Cf. RIMA 1 p. 192 line 34. A.0.87.11 lines 
5'-6' Restored from A.0.87.10 lines 86-87. A.0.87.11 lines 
7-8' Restored from A.0.87.10 lines 68-70. A.0.87.11 lines 
7-8' See the introduction to A. 0. 101 .5 1 . 



Tiglath-pileser i A. 0.87.11 



57 



90 [...]& i-na Gil.tukul-ti d a-sur d a-nim Sad 
W) [Hani galR^ tik-li^ia^ [x] x 

[KUR(?)].KUR.MES-te Sa X [X x] 

11') l..]-lurTgu\-nu [...] x qa-tix[...] x [...] 
12') [ilani(7) rabuti(l) EN(?).M]Es-/a w-[...] xarx 

[...]x[...] 
13') [...] ^bur^-hi-is [balta sa i\s~tu kur [lumas 

...-*M?) 
14') [...] x x tam-S[i-lJ§unu\ ' Sa^ na 4 pa~i ru*-u-[te 

15') [...] re-pw(*)l-wi r [*>w /z£r/£] LUGAL-t[i-ia imna 

u sumela(l)] 
16') [usazizl-ma NA 4 . r NA.RU^.[A.(MEs)]-r/a - ' a/~ 

17') [...] x-i i-na ta-si-[!)a-at lib-[bi ...] 
18') [egallugalublimmu(7)]-rba^ £.gal lugal kib- 
rat 4-[/ SM/nsa aZ?W(?)] 



rev. 9*-18') [...] which with the support of the 
gods Assur, Anu, Enlil, [... the great gods], my 
sustainers f the lands of /which [...] I made replicas 
in poril/w-alabaster [and basalt of a nahiru, which 
is called a sea-horse (and) which by the command 
of the gods Ninurta and Nergal, the great gods], 
my [lords, I had killed with a harpoon of] my 
own [making in the Great Sea of the land 
Amurru, (and) of a live] burhis [which was 
brought] from the mountain/land [LumaS ... on 
the other side of the land |Jab|iu. I stationed 
(them) on the right and left at my] royal [en- 
trance]. [...] I inscribed my monumental inscrip- 
tions (and) [deposited (them)] joyfully [in ... I 
called it Egallugalublimmubja, *Palace of the King 
of the Four Quarters'. 



19) [ana arkat UmT ana] u 4 -um sa-a-te e-nu-ma 

1f.[GAL-/w/W §T\ 

20') [usalbaruma e]-i~na~i-hu iu-ii gis ^e-re-nu^ 

21') [lu ...]-x lu-u gis tar-pu-^u ...] 

22') [...] x tar me ta ir ta x [...] 

23') [...] rNAANA.RU. a. mes-«7 l[i-murma] 

24') [lumessi samna lipsus UD]u.siSKUR-a liq-qi 

^a^-[na asrlsunu luter] 
25') [assur belu rabu] 1^1 d iNANNA be-lat u[ru 

ninua] 
26') [ikribesu isemmu] 



rev. 19-26') [In the future, in] days to come, 
[may a later prince], when [this palace becomes 
old and] dilapidated, [restore its weakened por- 
tions] either with cedar, [or ...], or tamarisk [...] 
... May [he see] my monumental inscriptions, 
[identify (them), anoint (them) with oil], make 
sacrifices, (and) [return (them)] to [their places. 
(Then) the god Assur, the great lord, and] the 
goddess Istar, mistress of [Nineveh, will listen to 
his prayers]. 



12 



This broken text, preserved on two clay tablet fragments from 
Nineveh, describes some military campaigns which are otherwise un- 
known and work on the Istar temple. The work on this structure by 
three earlier kings, Samsl-Adad 1 (RIMA 1 pp. 51-55 A. 0.39. 2), 
Assur-uballit 1 (RIMA 1 pp. 115-16 A.0.73.1001), and Shalmaneser 1 
(RIMA 1 pp. 205-225 A.0.77. 17-19, 29, and A.0.77. 1003-1004), is 
briefly mentioned. 



10' [KUR(?)].KUR.MES-te: See Schott, ZA 44 (1938) p. 177 n. 2. 
ll'-lff Restored from A.0.87.4 lines 67-71. Since our text is 
about work at Nineveh and A.0.87.4 is about work at ASSur 
there are vars. (e.g. parUtu instead of atbaru) and the 
restorations may not be exactly correct. See, for example, 
Engel, Damonen p. 138. 14' The traces preserved for the first 
two signs are very faint but do not support a reading na\-su- 



ni. 15' For -fptfi- the text has -r/i-. 16' There is hardly room 
to restore mes. IT Cf. RIMA 1 p. 185 lines 147-48. 18' For 
the restorations see Borger, EAK 1 p. 132. IS'-l^ The line 
ruling was mistakenly omitted by King. W Cf. Borger, EAK 
1 p. 133 and Grayson, ARI 2 p. 35 n. 166. 21' tar-pu-[>u ...]: 
the reading was suggested by J.N. Postgate and confirmed by 
collation. 23-26' Restored from A.0.87.10 lines 91-93. 



58 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.12 
CATALOGUE 



Ex. 



Museum 
number 



Dimensions 
(cm) 



Lines 
preserved 



cpn 



K2807 

Bu 91-5-9,196 



10x10 + 

7,5x8 + 



r-3r 

5'-29 f 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1893 Winckler, Sammlung 1 p. 29 (ex. 1, copy) 

1898 Winckler, OLZ 1 108 (ex. 1, study, correct 'K 2804' to 

'K 2807') 
1901-1906 Winckler, AOF 3 p. 246 (ex. 2, copy) 
1902 King, AKA pp. 121-25 (exs. 1-2, edition) 
1904-1905 Streck, ZA 18 pp. 182-86 (exs. 1-2, study) 



1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§317 and 323-26 (exs. 1-2, 

translation) 
1957-58 Weidner, AfO 18 p. 342 (exs. 1-2, study) 
1961 Borger, EAK 1 pp. 120-21 (exs. 1-2, study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxvii 12 (exs. 1-2, translation) 



TEXT 



Lacuna 

1') [... kardu(?)]-nid[s .,.] 

2') [,., ana alTia] d a- v sur^ u[b-la (. 



6') 

7') 

8') 
9') 



■ )] 



3') [, tm ]-ir~di uru.meS-h/ sa kur q[um-me~ni(l) 

4') [... i-k]al~lu-ni sa gun u ta-ma[r-ta] 
5') [ana assur beliia iklu(l) sa istu urn sdte(l) la 
i-d]u-ti ka-na-sa sa man a4a-u[m~ma] 
[alik pa-ni-i]a a-na lib-be-su-nu la il-li-k[u] 
I 



GIS].GIGIR.MES U £RIN.HI.A.MES-/tf ad-k[l] 

[...] x uru ma-at-qi-u uru su-ud-ru-^un^ 

[,.. ur]u dr-ru-hu-un-du uru sa-a-qa 
10') [... ur]u i-ni-is-ti uru sa-a-qa-ma 
11') [...-t]u-un uru su-ri-a 
12') u uru na-[...-h]i(!)-ir-di uru.mes-/?/ 
13') sa kur ha[b-hi(l) ... ur]u lu-u-a uru hi-ri- 

is-tu 
14') [...] x su.nigin 14 URU.MES-m ak-su-ud 
15') [ina isati asrup abbul aqqur sal-!\a-su-nu bu- 

sa-su-nu 
16') [u marsfssunu ana alT-i]a as-sur ub-la 



17') [. 



. ana mat lu-l\u-me-e al-lik 



18') [... ur]u ma-at-qi-a uru an-da-ri-a 

19') [... a(l)-d\a-us sa gir.mes an-na-te 

20') [... z]a-ba sap-le-e ak-su-ud 

21') [*,. mat lu-lu\~me-e dagal-/« it kur a-da-us 

22') [.,. ana G]iR.MES-/a u-sek-niS 

23') [nlr belutiia kabta ana sa-a\t ud.mes ugu-5«- 
nu u-kin 



Lacuna 

l'~2') [.., Kardu]mas [...] I brought [... to my 

city] A§sur. 

3-16') [... the city ,,.]irdi, cities of the land 
Qum[m@nu ... which ...] held, which [had 
withheld] tribute and impost [from the god Assur, 
my lord, which from ancient times had not] 
known submission, into the midst of which no 
king [who preceded] me had marched [...] my 
chariots and troops I mustered. [...] the cities 
Matqiu, Sudrufn], [...], Arruhundu, Saqa, [...], 
Inisti, the other Saqa, [...t]un, Suria, and 
Na[...]hirdi, cities of the land £fab[hu ...], the cit- 
ies Lua, Hiristu, [...], altogether 14 cities I con- 
quered. [/ burnt, razed, (and) destroyed (them), 
(and)] brought their booty, possessions, [and 
goods to] my [city] Assur. 



17'-23') [... to the land of the Lull]umu I 
marched. [...] the cities Matqiu, Andaria, [... 
/i]daus, which is on this side of the Lower Zab, I 
conquered. [... the land of] the extensive 
[Lullu]mu and the land AdauS [...] I subdued. I 
imposed upon them forever [the heavy yoke of 
my dominion]. 



4'-5' Restored from A.0.87.1 i 90-91, iii 74-75, and iv 51. 
10' sa-a-qa-ma: the enclitic -ma is used to differentiate 
between two people, two gods, or two places with the same 
name. See von Soden, AHw p. 570a and Borger, EAK 1 



p. 121 n. 1 and to their references add Johns, ADD no. 349 
line 11. 15-16' Restored from A.0.87.1 v 60-63. 
17-23' Restored from A.0.87.4 lines 22-23 and A.O.87.10 
lines 26-27. 23' Restored from A.0.87.1 ii 54-55. 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.12 



59 



24') 

25') 
26') 
27) 
28') 
29') 
30) 
31') 
Lacuna 



[/«</ umisuma bit istar belat ni-nu]-^a nin-j'oI 
A? m sam~si- d i$KUR 
[...] T(fi-lik pa-ni-ia ud-di-Su 
[u^albarUma(l) e-n]a-ah m as-$ur-u-Ti.LA 
[abl(l) uddiS(7) e-n]a-ah md Ml-ma~nu-SAG 
[abl(7) uddis(l) e-na-a\h-ma u tam-ia-su 
[...] ^ist-tdr Nis-ia 
[...] ^c^-na GiBiL-wr-/[e] 
[... u-ser-ri]h(7) ti-ra[d-di] 



24-31') [At that time the temple of the goddess 
Istar, mistress of Ninevjeh, my mistress, which 
Sam&T-Adad (i)» [...] my predecessor, had restored 
— [it became old and] dilapidated (and) ASSur- 
uballif (i), [my forefather, restored (it but) again] 
it became dilapidated (and) Shalmaneser (r), [my 
forefather, restored (it) — once again it had] be- 
come dilapidated and its terrace [...] the goddess 
Istar, my mistress, [...I built] anew. [... I made] 
splendid, I added, 
Lacuna 



13 



This broken text, preserved on a clay tablet fragment from Nineveh, 
contains descriptions of three campaigns of this king, all of which are 
known in slightly different versions from other texts. 



COMMENTARY 



The fragment, BM 122630 (1930-5-8,19), measures 
7.5x8.7 \ cm and the inscription has been collated. 
Restorations are from parallel passages: l'-3' (A. 0.87. 2 
lines 25-27, A.0.87.3 lines 6-15, A.0.87.4 lines 15-17, 



and A.0.87.10 lines 17-20), 4'-9' (A.0.87.1 v 44-63 and 
A.0.87.2 lines 28-29), and 10-13' (A.0.87.3 lines 16-25, 
A.0.87.4 lines 24-30, and A.0.87.10 lines 28-35). 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 14 (study) 

1970 Millard, Iraq 32 pi. xxxiv and p. 168 (copy, study) 



1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxvii 13 (translation) 



TEXT 



Lacuna 

l 1 ) [...] r K uR(?yi [...] 
2') [...] x x x x ia x [...] 
3') [3-su a-n]a kur.kur na-i-ri al-lik is-t[u 
tumme adi daieni aksud (...)] 



Lacuna 

l'-3') [Thrice] I marched to the lands Nairi (and) 

[conquered] from [Tummu to the land Daienu 

(...)]■ 



4') 

5') 

6') 

7) 



r/-/iflfi si-qir d a-sur r~w ^mas dingir.mes 

[rabuti belTia istu tarsi mat suhi] 

a-di uru kar-ga-mis sa kur h[a-at-te ina 1 

ume] 

ak-sud id p u- (ra) ~ta ki-ma x [. . . ] 

17 URU.MES-fl/-5«~nw is-tu [tadmar sa mat 



4-9') By the command of the gods Assur and 
Ninurta, the [great] gods, [my lords], I conquered 
[from the edge of the land Suhu] to the city 
Carchemish of the land Ha[tti in a single day, I 
crossed] the Euphrates as though it were [a 
canal]. Seventeen of their cities, from [the city 



A.0,87,12 lines 24'-31' For the restorations see especially 
R1MA 1 pp. 205-207 A.0.77.17. A.0.87.13 line 7 There is not 



enough room to restore the entire phrase from A. 0.87, 4 lines 
35-36. 



60 



Tiglath-pileser i A. 0.87. 13 



amurri (anat sa mat suhi) adi rapiqi sa mat 

kardunias\ 
W) i-na izi.meS ds-ru-up a[b-bul aqqur sailas- 

sunu] 
9') H-tLMES-su-nu u m[ar-si-su-nu ana atiia a$sur 

ubla] 

W) i-na qf-bit d isKUR AGA-i[a ana Sade labnani 

allik] 
HO Gis.rfjiO.ME§ §a gi§.e[ren ana bit anim u 

adad il&ni rabuti betiia akkis assa ana mat 

amurri\ 
12 1 ) e-tiq kur a-mur-r[i ana sihirtisa aksud ma- 

datta sa] 
13') kur e-pi-^ni kurI [... lu amhur ...] 
Lacuna 



Tadmar of the land Amurru, (Anat of the land 
Suhu), as far as Rapiqu of Kardunias], I burnt, 
[razed, (and) destroyed. I brought their booty], 
their hostages, and [their goods to my city Assur]. 



10-13') By the command of the god Adad, who 
loves me, [I marched to Mount Lebanon. I cut 
down (and) carried off] cedar beams [for the tem- 
ple of the gods Anu and Adad, the great gods, 
my lords]. I continued [to the land Amurru (and) 
conquered the entire] land Amurru. [I received 
tribute from] the lands Epinu, [...] 
Lacuna 



14 



This fragmentary text, on a piece of stone octagonal prism (bored 
vertically) found at Nineveh, contains the name Tiglath-pileser. There 
is no indication which king of this name is intended. 



COMMENTARY 



We have been unable to locate the fragment. According 
to Thompson it is 13.5 cm high and each face 8.3 cm 



wide. He gives the provenance at the Istar temple as 
Q.O. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1932 Thompson, AAA 19 p. 107 and pi. lxxxiii no. 
(copy, edition) 



270 1961 Borger, EAK 1 p. Ill (study) 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxvii 15 (translation) 



TEXT 



Lacuna 

1 # ) [(...) m oisJukul-t]i-iBiLA-e-sdr-r[a 
2 f ) [... n]ig ka-sid kur.kur.me[s ...] 
3') [... sar] kis man kur a$~Su[r ...] 

Lacuna 



Lacuna 

1-3') [(,..) Tigla]th-pileser [...] conqueror of lands 

[... king of] the universe, king of Assyria [...] 

Lacuna 



11' There is not enough room for the entire restoration and 
our text must have been abbreviated. 



Tiglath-pileser i A . . 8 7 . 1 5 



61 



15 



This text is inscribed on a rock face near the source of the Tigris. It is 
at the point where the river (Sebeneh-Su) emerges from a tunnel. On 
the right of the inscription an image of the king has been engraved. 
Inscriptions of Shalmaneser in also appear in this location. The in- 
scription seems to have been engraved to commemorate the successful 
completion of the third campaign against Nairi. It is unusual for an 
Assyrian royal inscription to begin With the aid of ...' The text has 
been collated from the photo published by Lehmann-Haupt. 

Ashurnasirpal n records (A.0.10L1 i 104-105) discovery of images 
of Tiglath-pileser (i) and Tukultl-Ninurta (n) at the source of the River 
Subnat (Sebeneh-Su); cf. Lehmann-Haupt, Mat. p. 56 and Hawkins, 
AnSt 19 (1969) pp. 119-20. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1902 King, AKA p. 127 n. 1 (edition and citation of older 

literature) 
1906 Lehmann-Haupt, Mat. pp. 16-18 no. 7 (photo, edition) 
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§268 and 271 (translation) 
1961 Borger, EAK 1 pp. 132-33 (study) 



1964-66 Michel, WO 3 p. 149 (study) 

1969 Oppenheim, ANET 3 p. 275 (translation) 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 Lxxxvn 16 (translation) 

1981 Hawkins (apud Reade) in Fales, ARIN pi. 1 (photo) 

1982 Borker-Klahn, Bildstelen no. 130 (photo, study) 



TEXT 



10) 



ina re-su-te sd as-sur 

d UTU d ISKUR DINGIR.MES 
GAL.MES EN.MES-a 

ana-ku m tukul~ti-A-e-sdr-ra 

MAN KUR AS A m AS-SAG-/-S/ 

man kur as A m mu-tdk-kil- d nus[ku] 
man kur Kl-ma ka-Sid i[s-tu(l)] 
tam-di GAL-te sd kur a-mur-ri 
u tam-di sd kur na-i-ri 
3-su ana kur nai-ri du 



1-10) With the aid of the gods Assur, SamaS, 
(and) Adad, the great gods, my lords, I, Tiglath- 
pileser, king of Assyria, son of Assur-resa-isi (i), 
king of Assyria, son of Mutakkil-Nusku, (who 
was) also king of Assyria, (I) the conqueror from 
the Great Sea of the land Amurru and the sea of 
the land(s) Nairi, marched thrice to the land(s) 
Nairi. 



16 



This text is on a rock face at Yoncali in the Melazzert region, north of 
Lake Van, and commemorates successful campaigning in Nairi and 
Habhu. It has been collated from the photo published by Lehmann- 
Haupt. 



7-9 The phrase i[S-tu(?)] ... u is awkward. The u (not en: adi) 
is clear from Lehmann-Haupt's collation and the photograph 
of the squeeze which he published. The i[s~tu(l)] is of course 



not so certain. This is possibly a clumsy abbreviation of a 
longer phrase. Cf. A.0.87.17. 



62 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.16 
BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1906 Lehmann-Haupt, Mat. pp. 15-16 no* 6 (photo, edition, 

citation of older literature) 
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§268-70 (translation) 



1961 Borger, EAK 1 pp. 132-33 (study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxvii 17 (translation) 



TEXT 



1 ) m Gis. tukul-ti-iMLA~e-sdr-ra 

2) man dan-nu man ki£ man kur as-sur 

3) man kib-rat 4-i 

4) ka-sid kur.kur na-i-ri 

5) is-tu kur tu-um-mi 

6) a-[d]i kur da-ie-ni ka-sid 

7) r K uR~i hah-hi a-di a.ab.ba GAL-te 



1-7) Tiglath-pileser, strong king, king of the 
universe, king of Assyria, king of the four quar- 
ters, conqueror of the lands Nairi from the land 
Tummu to the land Daienu, conqueror of the 
land Habhu to the Great Sea. 



17 



In 1905 Andrae's expedition to Assur discovered a large number of 
stone fragments of small sculptures and slabs with traces of inscrip- 
tions of Tiglath-pileser i. Since these were discovered at the entrance 
to this king's palace, they are probably the exotic creatures described 
in his texts as being set up at the palace entrance. See the introduction 
to A. 0.87, 4 for references. Andrae distinguished four different texts 
among these fragments. One is edited here and the remaining three are 
discussed under A. 0.87. 18-20. The edition presented here is highly hy- 
pothetical, as explained in the commentary, but it is clear that in addi- 
tion to containing a brief statement about the king's conquests, it con- 
cerned the work on the cedar palace (see A.0.87.4). 



COMMENTARY 



In MDOG 26 (1905) pp. 52-56 Andrae gave a brief 
description of the inscribed material. Subsequently 
Weidner identified on Ass ph 3112 further fragments. 
Unfortunately we have not been able to locate any of 
the original objects with the inscriptions discussed by 
Andrae and Weidner. Thus, we can only glean what- 
ever possible from Andrae's description, assisted by 
Weidner's later work. 

Andrae said the numerous fragments represented 
four different texts. Of these he gave a relatively de- 
tailed description and translation of only one, and 
Weidner reconstructed a hypothetical transliteration of 
this which included two fragments (Ass 12694 and 
12722) he had identified on Ass ph 3112. The inscrip- 



tions on these fragments have been collated from the 
photo. We have, for lack of better information, ac- 
cepted Weidner's reconstruction and edited it here as 
A. 0.87. 17. But it must be emphasized that this text, in 
both form and detail, is very uncertain. The remaining 
fragments have been treated under A. 0.87. 18-20. 

In addition to the two fragments Ass 12694 and Ass 
12722 on Ass ph 3112 used for this text by Weidner, 
other fragments mentioned by Andrae which may con- 
tain remains of this text are: Ass 4106, 4184I-m, and 
4211a. The last fragment is given the specific prove- 
nance TD4in above and near the tunnel', while for Ass 
4106 and 41841-m it is '1134111 north of the Old Palace'. 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.17 63 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1905 Andrae, MDOG 26 pp. 52-53 and 55-56 (edition) 1961 Borger, EAK 1 pp. 132-33 (study) 

1955 Preusser, Palaste p. 18 and n. 68 (study) 1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxvii 18 (translation) 

1957-58 Weidner, AfO 18 pp. 357-58 (edition) 1977 Andrae, WEA 2 p. 192 (study) 



TEXT 

1) r^i.GAL m Gis .tukul-t[i-apil-esarra sar mat d a- 1-4) (Property of) the palace of Tiglath-[pileser, 
slur ka-si-i[d] king of] Assyria, conqueror [from] Babylon [of 

2) lis-t]u uRu.rKA.DiNGiR"i.[RA.Ki sa mat the land Akkad] to Mount Lebanon [to the Great] 
akkadf\ ^a^di KUR-e lab-na-ni Sea [of the land Amurru and] the sea [of the 

3) ladi A].rAB"L[BA rabite sa mat amurri u] land(s) Nairi, builder of] the cedar [palace]. 

A.AB.BA 

4) [sa mat naHri bani ekai gis] e-re-ni 



18-20 



As explained in the edition of A.0.87.17, among the numerous frag- 
ments of inscribed stone discovered at the entrance to this king's 
palace at A§sur, four texts were distinguished by Andrae, MDOG 26 
(1905) pp. 52-56. One of these texts was edited as A.0.87.17 and the 
remainder are discussed here as A. 0.87. 18-20. Since the texts were 
never fully published and we have been unable to locate the originals 
or photos, no edition can be given. In fact we can only present here a 
summary of what Andrae says. One of the three texts, including Ass 
4279a, had several lines with [Assur-s]AG-i-si in the third line. 
Another, including Ass 4292g, was a two-line inscription which re- 
ferred to the 'Cedar Palace'. A third, which included 4212b, 4193v, 
and 4184n, had in the last line: na 4 .ad.bar du(?)-ms ina ne-r[i-bi\ 
MAN(7)-ti-ia 'I made (replicas in) basalt (... I stationed them on the 
right and left) of my royal entrance.' Cf. A. 0.87.4 lines 70-71. 

Andrae gives the following Assur excavation numbers, including the 
few already cited: Ass 4151b, 4184n and t, 4193v, 4199a, 4212b, 
4279a, and 4292g. 

Preusser, Palaste p. 18 n. 68, cites other excavation numbers: Ass 
4140, 4150, 4184, 4193, 4211, 4233, 4236, and 4236a. Finally, Ass ph 
3112, on which Weidner identified two fragments of A.0,87.17, has 
two other fragments, Ass 12614 and Ass 12719, with inscribed traces 
which could be of texts of Tiglath-pileser. Ass 12614 has only the sign 
a. Ass 12719 has: [(...) m Gis JukultT-apil-e-sdr]-^ra(ip man dan-nu [...] 
and illegible traces of a second line. 



21 



This broken text appears in a collection of royal inscriptions copied on 
a clay tablet fragment (K 2838 + 13656) from Nineveh. The top of the 
tablet is broken off and the first section preserved, lines 1-1 T, is a text 



64 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.21 



of Ashurnasirpal n (A.O.101.53). The second section, lines 12-14', is 
the text edited here and it is almost certainly a text of Tiglath-pileser i 
(cf. A.0.87.17), Traces of a third section are preserved on the reverse 
but not enough text is extant to ascribe it to any king. 



COMMENTARY 

The traces of the third section may be of a text earlier 17') u [...} 

than Tigl. i. For the sake of completeness a translitera- 18') x [...] 

tion of this section is given here: 19-27) (traces) 

15 1 ) ±g[al ...] Lacuna 

16*) ^tu [...] 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1907 Le Gac, Asn. pp. 169-70 (copy) 
1954-59 Michel, WO 2 p. 313 (study) 



1961 Borger, EAK 1 p. Ill (study) 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxvii 19 (translation) 



TEXT 



12') e.gal m tukuNi-^A^[esarra ...] 

130 A.AB.BA GAL-te SQ KUR [...] 

140 morx-l..] 



12'- 140 (Property of) the palace of Tiglath-pil[eser 
...] the Great Sea of the land [Amurru ...] ... [...] 



22 



This text is inscribed on several paving bricks found in the fountain 
courtyard (eC5v) of the Anu-Adad Temple at Assur and briefly com- 
memorates work there. Bricks with a similar inscription, but mention- 
ing only the Adad shrine, were found with them and are edited as 
A. 0.87. 23. There may have been bricks with a text recording work 
only on the Anu shrine, but these were not discovered. 



CATALOGUE 





Museum 


Ass 


Ass ph 




Ex. 


number 


number 


number 


cpn 


1 


VA Ass 3251b 


5683e 


2264-65 


c 


2 


Istanbul no number 


5683f 


3459 


c 


3 


Unlocated 


5683a 


703 


P 


4 


Unlocated 


5683x 


704 


P 


5 


ES 9452 


- 


- 


c 


6 


E5 9451 


- 


- 


c 


7 


VA Ass 3251a 


5603 


- 


c 


8 


VA Ass 3251c 


6277a-d 


_ 


c 


9 


VAAss3251d 


7472 


- 


c 


10 


VA Ass 4315 


..77f 


- 


c 


11 


VAAss3251e 


8825a 


- 


c 



Tiglath-pileser i A. 0.87. 22 
BIBLIOGRAPHY 



65 



1909Andrae, AAT pp. 31-32 and pi. xix (exs. 1-4, photo, 

copy, edition) 
1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 no. 65 (exs. 1-4, copy) 
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §313 (exs. 1-4, translation) 



1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxvii 20 (exs. 1-4, translation) 

1984 Marzahn and Rost, Ziegeln 1 nos. 247-51 and 260 (exs, 
1, 7-11, study) 



TEXT 



1) m GiLtukul-ti-iBiLA-e-sdr-ra sid as-sur 

2) dumu as-sur-SAG-i-si sid as-sur-ma 

3) e d a-nim u d isKUR en.me3-sw 

4) T>t-u§-ma ik-si-ir 



1-4) Tigiath-pileser, vice-regent of AsSur, son of 
As$ur-re§a-isi (i) (who was) also vice-regent of 
Assur, built and reconstructed the temple of the 
gods Anu and Adad, his lords. 



23 



This text is inscribed on numerous paving bricks from the fountain 
courtyard (eC5v) of the Anu-Adad Temple at ASsur. Several of the 
bricks were actually found in that location among bricks bearing the 
text A.0. 87.22. See the introduction to that text for further comment. 



CATALOGUE 





Museum 


Ass 


Ass ph 




Ex. 


number 


number 


number 


cpn 


1 


Unlocated 


5683 b 


2260 


p 


2 


VA Ass 3251 h 


5683c 


2264 


c 


3 


Unlocated 


5683d 


2271 


P 


4 


BM 90252 


- 


- 


c 


5 
6 

7 


(1979-12-20,154) 

E§ 9450 

ES9449 

VA Ass 3251 f 


5611 


- 


c 
c 
c 


8 


VA Ass 4309d 


5640 


- 


c 


9 


VA Ass 3251 g 


5683 


- 


c 


10 


VA Ass 325 li 


5703a-c 


- 


c 


11 


VA Ass 3251k 


5703c + d 


- 


c 


12 


VA Ass 32511 


7418 


- 


c 


13 


VA Ass 3251m 


74 


- 


c 


14 


VA Ass 325 In 


- 


- 


c 


15 


VA Ass 4311b 


- 


- 


c 


16 


VA Ass 3251s 


- 


- 


c 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1861 1 R pi. 6 no. 5 (ex. 4, copy) 

1902 King, AKA p. 127 (ex. 4, copy, edition) 

1909 Andrae, AAT pp. 31-32 and pi. xix (ex. 1, copy; ex. 2, 

photo) 
1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 no. 65 (exs. 1-3, copy) 
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §314 (exs. 1-3, translation) 



1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxvii 21 (exs. 1-4, translation) 
1981 Walker, CBI no. 137 (ex. 4, edition) 

1984 Marzahn and Rost, Ziegeln 1 nos. 252-59 and 261-63 
(exs. 2, 7-16, study) 

1985 Rost and Marzahn, VAS 23 nos. 85-87 (exs. 8, 15-16, 
copy) 



66 



Tiglath-pileser I A.O.87.23 
TEXT 



"gis. tukul-ti-iBiiA-e-sdr-ra 



1) 
2) 

3) sid as-sur e "iskur en-su 

4) Du-us-ma ik-si-ir 



sid as-sur dumu as-sur-sAG-hsi 



1-4) Tiglath-pileser, vice-regent of Assur, son of 
Assur-resa-isi (i), vice-regent of Assur, built and 
reconstructed the temple of the god Adad, his 
lord. 



24 



Various texts of this king are attested on bricks and brick fragments 
from Nineveh. All of the bricks were discovered by Thompson at the 
beginning of the century, and he copied and edited the inscriptions in 
subsequent years. More recently, Walker has systematically gone 
through the majority of these bricks (all he could find in England, 
mainly in the British Museum). The inscriptions represent five different 
texts (A.0.87. 24-28). The first two texts (A.0.87.24-25), and possibly 
the third and fourth (A.0. 87.26-27), concern work on the quay wall 
facing the River Husir. The fifth text (A.0.87. 28) has only the titles of 
the king. 



CATALOGUE 



Ex. 



Museum 
number 



Registration 
number 



Thompson 

number 



cpn 



BM 137477 
BM 137489 
BM 137492 
Unlocated 



1929-10-12,189 
1932-12-10,33 
1932 12-10,36 



Arch. 79 no. 54 b 
AAA 19 no. 283 
AAA 19 no. 288 
Arch. 79 no. 54 a 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1929 Thompson, Arch. 79 p. 122 and pi. xliii nos. 54a-b (exs. 

1, 4, copy, study) 
1932 Thompson, AAA 19 p. 115 and pi. lxxxviii nos. 283 and 

288 (exs. 2-3, copy, study) 



1959-60 Weidner, AfO 19 pp. 142-43 (exs. 1-4, study) 
1967 Borger, HKL 1 pp. 526, 528, and 536 (exs. 1-4, study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxvii 22 (exs. 1-4, translation) 
1981 Walker, CBI no. 138 (exs, 1-4, edition) 



TEXT 



e.gal m Gis. tukul-ti-A-e-sdr-ra 

MAN KAL MAN KIS MAN KUR QS-SUr 

a as-sur-SAG-i-si 

MAN KAL MAN KIS MAN KUR dS-SUr 

a mu-tdk-kil- d nusku 

MAN KAL MAN KIS MAN KUR QS-SUr-ma 

sa ki-[sirte\ 
sa id [husir] 



1-8) (Property of) the palace of Tiglath-pileser, 
strong king, king of the universe, king of Assyria, 
son of Assur-resa-isi (i), strong king, king of the 
universe, king of Assyria, son of Mutakkil-Nusku 
(who was) also strong king, king of the universe 
(and) king of Assyria: (brick) belonging to the 
facing of (the quay wall) of the River [Husir]. 



Tiglath-pileser I A.0.87.25 



67 



25 



This text is attested on four inscribed bricks and brick fragments from 
Nineveh and concerns work on the quay wall facing the River Husir. 



CATALOGUE 



Ex. 



Museum 
number 



Registration 
number 



Thompson 
number 



BM 137472 
Unlocated 
Unlocated 
BCM A44 '87 



1929-10-12,184 



Arch. 79 no. 55 
Duplicate of no. 55 
AAA 19 no. 281 
AAA 18 no. 34 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1929 Thompson, Arch. 79 pi. xliii no. 55 (exs. 1-2, copy) 

1931 Thompson, AAA 18 p. 98 and pi. xix no. 34 (ex. 4, 
copy, edition) 

1932 Thompson, AAA 19 pi. lxxxviii no. 281 (ex. 3, copy) 



1959-60 Weidner, AfO 19 pp. 142-43 (study) 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxvii 22 (exs. 1-4, translation) 

1981 Walker, CBI no. 139 (ex. 1, edition) 



TEXT 



1) E.GAJL m GIS.TUKUL-A-e-£<7>-ra MAN KAL MAN K1S 

[sar mat assur\ 

2) A as-$ur-sAG-i-si man kai man kis man kur 
as-sur [...] 

3) sa ki-sir-te fo hu-si-ir [...] 



1-3) (Property of) the palace of Tiglath-pileser, 
strong king, king of the universe, [king of 
Assyria], son of A§sur-reSa-iSi [(who was) also] 
strong king, king of the universe (and) king of 
Assyria [(...)]• (brick) belonging to the facing of 
(the quay wall) of the River Husir [...] 



26 



This broken text is inscribed on the edge of a brick fragment from 
Nineveh and concerns work on the facing of the quay wall of the 
River Husir(?). 



COMMENTARY 

The brick is BM 137488 (1932-12-10,31) and the inscription has been collated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1932 Thompson, AAA 19 p. 115 and pi. lxxxviii no. 287 

(copy, edition) 
1961 Borger, EAK 1 p. Ill (study) 



1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxvii 23 (translation) 
1981 Walker, CBI no. 140 (edition) 



68 



TIglath-pileser i A.0.87.26 
TEXT 



1) £.gal m Gis Jukut-ti-A-\esarra 

2) Sd ki-sir-te Sd i[d husir(l)] 

3) ri<n-tu ^re^-si a-na e-[...] 



1-3) (Property of) the palace of Tiglath-pil[eser 
...]: (brick) belonging to the facing of (the quay 
wall) of the River [ffusir], from the top to the 



27 



This text is inscribed on three bricks or brick fragments from Nineveh 
and concerns work on the quay wall facing the River Husir(?) and 
protecting a garden, presumably a royal garden. 



CATALOGUE 



Ex. 



Museum 
number 



Thompson 
number 



cpn 



Unlocated 
Unlocated 
Unlocated 



AAA 19 no. 284 
AAA 19 no. 285 

Arch. 79 no. 117 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1929 Thompson, Arch 79 pi. xlvi no. 117 (ex. 3, copy) 
1932 Thompson, AAA 19 p. 115 and pi. lxxxviii nos. 284-85 
(exs. 1-2, copy, edition) 



TEXT 



1) ±. gal ra 'giskim- A-e-sdr-ra 

2) MAN KIS MAN KUR QS-SUr 

3) sd ki-sir-te sd to [husir{l)} 

4) sd Gis.KiRi 6 sd uru \ninua{l)] 



1-4) (Property of) the palace of Tiglath-pileser, 
king of the universe (and) king of Assyria: 
(brick) belonging to the facing of (the quay wall) 
of the River [{jusir] at the garden of the city 
[Nineveh], 



28 



Only the name and titles of the king appear in this text inscribed on 
the edge of bricks from Nineveh and ASsur. 



Tiglath-pileser i A. 0.87.28 
CATALOGUE 



69 





Museum 


Registration 


Ass 


Ass ph 


Publication 




Ex. 


number 


number 


number 


number 


reference 


cpn 


1 


BM 137479 


1929-10-12,191 


- 


— 


Arch. 79 no. 53 


c 


2 


BCM 360 79 


- 


- 


- 


AAA 18 no. 28 


c 


3 


BCM A45 '87 


- 


- 


- 


AAA 18 no. 27 


c 


4 


VA Ass 4305a 


- 


20999 


- 


VAS 23 no. 147 


c 


5 


VA Ass 4306c 


- 


5936a + b 


_ 


VAS 23 no. 149 


c 


6 


VA Ass 4306a 


- 


12705 


3107 


VAS 23 no. 150 


c 


7 


VA Ass 4306b 


- 


12733 


4178 


VAS 23 no. 152 


c 



COMMENTARY 

There are some minor vars.: line 1 m Gis. [tukultT-...], line 2 as for as-sur. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1929 Thompson, Arch. 79 p. 122 and pi. xliii no. 53 (ex. 1, 

copy, edition) 
1931 Thompson, AAA 18 p. 98 and pi. xix nos. 27-28 (exs. 

2-3, copy, edition) 
1976 Grayson, ARl 2 lxxxvii 24 (cxs. 1-3, translation) 
1981 Walker, CBI no. 141 (exs. 1-3, edition) 



1984 Marzahn and Rost, Ziegeln 1 nos. 399 and 401-403 (exs. 
4-7, study) 

1985 Rost and Marzahn, VAS 23 nos. 147, 149, 150, and 152 
(exs. 4-7, copy) 

1986 Gaiter, ZA 76 p. 304 (exs. 4^7, study) 



TEXT 



1) e.gal m tukul-ti-K~e-sdr-ra 

2) MAN KIS MAN KUR QS-SUf 



1-2) (Property of) the palace of Tiglath-pileser, 
king of the universe, king of Assyria. 



29 



This label appears on numerous, largely fragmentary, stone slabs 
found in Tiglath-pileser's palace at Assur. 



CATALOGUE 





Museum 


Ass 




Ex. 


number 


number 


cpn 


1 


E$ 9525(?) 


160 


c 


2 


ES 9560(?) 


224 


c 


3 


E$ 9549(?) 


225 


c 


4 


E$ 9566(?) 


254 


c 


5 


Unlocaleti 


1515 


n 


6 


Unlocated 


- 


n 


7 


E$ 4689 


- 


P 


8 


E$ 5950 


562 


P 


9 


E$ 6234 


- 


P 


10 


E§ 9527 


- 


P 


11 


E§ 9528 


_ 


c 


12 


E$ 9529 


_ 


P 


13 


E§ 9530 


_ 


P 


14 


E§ 9531 


_ 


P 


15 


E§ 9532 


525 


P 


16 


E§ 9533 


- 


P 



70 Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.29 





Museum 


Ass 




Ex. 


number 


number 


cpn 


17 


ES 9534 


- 


P 


18 


E$ 9535 


220 


P 


19 


ES 9536 


- 


P 


20 


E§ 9537 


- 


P 


21 


ES 9538 


- 


P 


22 


ES 9539 


- 


P 


23 


ES 9540 


- 


P 


24 


ES 9541 


_ 


P 


25 


ES 9542 


- 


P 


26 


ES 9543 


- 


P 


27 


ES 9544 


- 


P 


28 


ES 9545 


- 


P 


29 


ES 9546 


- 


P 


30 


ES 9547 


- 


P 


31 


ES 9548 


- 


p 


32 


ES9551 


- 


P 


33 


ES 9552 


- 


P 


34 


ES 9554 


- 


P 


35 


ES 9555 


- 


P 


36 


ES 9556 


_ 


P 


37 


E$ 9557 


_ 


P 


38 


ES 9558 


- 


p 


39 


ES 9560 


_ 


P 


40 


ES 9561 


- 


P 


41 


ES 9562 


- 


P 


42 


ES 9563 


_ 


P 


43 


E$ 9564 


- 


P 


44 


ES 9565 


_ 


P 


45 


ES 9566 


- 


P 


46 


ES 9568 


- 


P 


47 


ES 9569 


- 


P 


48 


ES 9570 


- 


P 


49 


ES9571 


- 


P 


50 


Unlocated 


1553 


n 



COMMENTARY 

Most of the fragments have been collated only from from the publication by Scheil, who included it among 

photos and it is possible that examination of the origi- 'brick* inscriptions. According to Scheil's copy this ex. 

nals would yield several joins. Ex. 6 is known only omits m Gis\ in line 1 and has -a- for -ibila-. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1900 Scheil, RT 22 p. 37 (ex. 6, copy) 1911 Messerschmidt, KAH 1 no. 22 (exs. 1, 3, 5, copy) 

1903 Andrae, MDOG 20 p. 29 (ex. 1, provenance) 1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §822 no. 2 (exs. 1, 3, 5, translation) 

1904 Andrae, MDOG 21 p. 11 (exs. 2, 4, provenance) 1955 Preusser, Palaste p. 18 (exs. 1-4, provenance) 
1904 Andrae, MDOG 22 p. 37 (ex. 5, provenance) 1961 Borger, EAK 1 p. Ill (study) 

1904 Andrae, MDOG 25 pp. 17-18 (exs. 5, 50, provenance) 1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxvii 25 (translation) 



TEXT 

1) e.gal m GisJukul"ti~miLA-e~sdr-ra 1-2) (Property of) the palace of Tiglath-pileser, 

2) man kur as-Sur M e gis tas-ka-ri-ni king of Assyria: (slab) belonging to the house of 

boxwood. 



Tiglath-pileser i A.O.87.30 



71 



30 



A tile (of clay?) found at Assur (Ass 197) bore the name of the king, 
Tiglath-pileser. The object was discovered in the Old Palace in secon- 
dary use in the eastern wall of a room east of the Tiled Room'. Un- 
fortunately we have not been able to locate the tile. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1903 Koldewey, MDOG 20 pp. 28-29 (provenance) 

1904 Andrae, MDOG 21 pp. 11-12 (provenance) 



1001 



This fragmentary inscription on a piece of clay tablet, for which there 
is no provenance, is from the annals of a late Middle Assyrian or 
early Neo-Assyrian king and the most probable candidate is Tiglath- 
pileser i. 



COMMENTARY 



A detailed study of this fragment and the arguments in 
favour of its probable ascription to Tigl. I have been 
presented in the original publication by Grayson. In 
summary, the reasons are: 

1) The content is a close parallel to a passage in 
A.0.87.1 vi 58 - vii 30. 

2) The inner clay of the tablet is red covered by a white 
slip (see p. 6). 

3) The inscription has sign forms typical of the period 
and especially of the reign of Tigl. i (see p. 6). 

The text is a very brief summary of the activities of 
the king. The first section (1-2') concerns a building 
operation. The second section (3'-4') speaks of the 
reconstruction of 'palaces' — cf. A.0.87.1 vi 94ff , 
A.0.98.1 line 64, A.0.99.2 line 120, and A.0. 100.5 line 



132. The third section (5') mentions ploughs — cf. 
A.0.87.1 vi 101, A.O.98.1 lines 64-65, A.0.99.2 lines 
120-21, and A.0. 100.5 line 132, The fourth section (60 
mentions chariots - cf. A.0.87.1 vii 28-30, A.0.98.1 
line 66, and A.0.99.2 line 121. The fifth section (7'-8') 
talks about herds of animals — cf. A.0.87.1 vi 105ff 
and A.0.99.2 lines 126-27. The sixth section (9'-ll') 
speaks of various woods — cf. A.0.87.1 vii 17fF. The 
seventh section (12-14') describes a hunting expedition 
- cf. A.0.87.1 vi58ff, A.0.98.1 lines 68-72, A.0.99.2 
lines 122ff, and A.0. 100.5 lines 134-35. The eighth and 
last preserved section (15') is too broken to identify the 
content. 

The fragment, BM 135910, measures c. 6x9+ cm 
and the inscription has been collated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1975 Grayson, Iraq 37 pp. 71-74 (copy, edition) 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 1 n. 8 (study) 



72 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1001 
TEXT 



Lacuna 

V) £[...] 

2') i~na kAx [...] 



l'-15') No translation warranted. 



3') e,gal.mes su-{bat sarrute ,..] 

4') ar-si-ip [...] 

5') gis.apin.mes i-na si-di [matTia ...] 

6') gis.gigir.meS si-im-d[a~at riiri ...] 



7') su-gul4a-a-at x [. . . ] 
8') & a~pe~lu-si-{na-ti ...] 



90 gis e-re-w Gi§ ha-s[u(l)-ri(l) „ . ] 

10') 5a /-iter KUR-//-/[a ...] 

IT) gis.mes sa-tu-[nu ...] 

12') d nin-urta d iGi.Du [...] 

13') Su-tu-ru-te s[u-ut(l) qarni(l) ...] 

14') a-*/w£ 16 mu~r[i baltute sa nmani{!) ...] 

15') [x x xJ.mes x [...] 
Lacuna 



1002 



This fragmentary inscription is on a piece of clay tablet found at 
Nineveh. It represents a piece of an annalistic text of a king who was 
possibly Tiglath-pileser i or a slightly later successor. 



COMMENTARY 



Both the content and the form of the script of this 
fragmentary inscription indicate that it is probably of 
the time of Tigl. l The script exhibits the characteristics 
of the period (see p. 6). The content has parallels in the 
annals of this king. The first section (l'-3') is too bro- 
ken for identification but the second section (4-5') 
seems to be a hunting passage — cf. A.0.87.1 vi 58tf, 
A.0.98.1 lines 68-72, A.0.99.2 lines 122ff, and 
A. 0,100.5 lines 134-35. Similarly the one section on the 
rev. (rev. 4-6') which can be deciphered speaks of Vic- 
tories' in a style reminiscent of the annals of Tigl. i — 



cf. A.0.87.1 viii 39. The third, and last, preserved sec- 
tion on the obv. (6'-9 / ) speaks of events 'At the begin- 
ning [of my reign]'. The word Surratu first appears in 
Assyrian royal inscriptions after Tigl. i while surru is 
used in texts of Tigl. i (e.g. A.0.87.1 i 62) and this sug- 
gests that our fragment might be a little later than the 
reign of Tigl, i. 

The fragment, BM 123387 (Th 1932-12-10,330), 
measures c. 6x6.5+ cm and the inscription has been 
collated. The provenance at Nineveh is the Istar Tem- 
ple, EE. 10.113. 



13' See A.0,99.2 line 125 and cf. Borger, EAK 1 p. 137. 
14' Cf. A. 0.89. 7 iv 6. 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1002 
BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 21 (study) 



73 



TEXT 



Obverse 

Lacuna 

10 xx[,.J 

2 f ) a-sam-l.„] 

30 d-ki-lin ...] 



1-1 20 No translation warranted. 



4 ; ) d MA§ d l[GI.DU ...] 

50 na-aff-l..] 



60 i~na sur-rat [...] 

7') LUGAL-le [...J 

8') ana d u.GUR [...] 

9) ugu kur as-s[ur .,.] 

W) a-na gi-[mir(l) ...] 

11') kur a$-sur x [...] 

Lacuna 

Reverse 

Lacuna 

1') x[...] 

2') sV[...] 

3') a-na r d a n-[^r(?) ...] 



40 lugal sa li-ta-[at ...] 

50 RA DA PAP SU Kl(?) [...] 

60 un.mes kur as-5«r e-x [...] 



70 [...]-mai[...] 
80 [...]xx[...] 
Lacuna 



1003 



This is a fragment, on a piece of clay tablet, from Nineveh, of the an- 
nals of a king of the period from the eleventh to ninth centuries BC 
and it just might be of Tiglath-pileser i. 



COMMENTARY 



While this fragmentary text is clearly a piece of an an- 
nalistic text of the late MA or early NA period, there is 
no certainty about which king. The word mudbaru (T) 
is first attested in Assyrian royal inscriptions with Tigl, 
i (A.0.87.1 v 45) and thus the fragment has been placed 



here very tentatively. 

The fragment, BM 123391 (Th 1932-12-10,334), 
measures c. 4 x 7 4- cm and the inscription has been col- 
lated, The provenance at Nineveh is the Istar Temple 
CC. + 1.103. 



74 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1003 
BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 22 (study) 



TEXT 



Lacuna 

n [-]x[...] 



r-12 1 ) No translation warranted. 



2 1 ) [...]xi»(...] 

3') [.- fld(?) */ x [...] 

4') [....m]e§(?)-/;/ ^a(?) ...] 

5') [...]-x-£w-«« [...] 

6') [...]-e ii d is s -tar r[a-imiiap.) 

7) [...] mu-ud-ba-ri &[...] 

8') [...]-x-te-.sM-ww lu sa [...] 

9') [...] di-ik-ta-Su-nu [...] 

10') [...] r e i. Z HJw-6[/.B...] 

11') [... (x + )]16mesal.[...J 

12') [...] r a -i-ra-a-i7 M '(?)-| [...] 
Lacuna 



1004 



This is a tiny fragment on a piece of a clay tablet, presumably from 
Nineveh, and may be the remains of a text of Tiglath-pileser i. 



COMMENTARY 



The fragment (K 2842) might be the upper right corner 
of a tablet but it is not certain because the top edge is 
not clearly preserved. It measures 5x3+ cm and the 



inscription has been collated. There is no obvious phys- 
ical join with any known K tablet of Tiglath-pileser i. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1891 Bezold, Cat. 2 p. 480 (study) 
1902 King, AKA pp. 125-26 n. 3 (study) 



1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p, 1 n, 8 (study) 



1) [(. . .) m tukulti-apil-e\-sdr-[ra{l)} 

2) [... sarru] dan-nu 

3) [... sar mat] d as-sur.Ki 

4) [...] x d en-lil 
Lacuna 



TEXT 

1-4) No translation warranted. 



Tiglath-pileser i A.O.87.1005 



75 



1005 



Two insignificant and largely illegible fragmentary inscriptions on 
pieces of clay tablets from Nineveh might be attributed to this king 
and are listed here as A.0.87. 1005-1006. Not enough of either can be 
deciphered to warrant an edition. 



COMMENTARY 



The fragment (K 4468) measures 3.2x5,5+ cm and the 
inscription has been collated. The piece is covered by a 



white slip but the clay underneath is not red as in some 
other tablets of the same period. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1891 Bezold, Cat. 2 p. 635 (study) 

1898 Winckler, OLZ 1 69 (study) 

1902 King, AKA pp. 125-26 n. 3 (study) 



1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 1 n. 8 (study) 
1990 Millard, ARRIM 8 (copy) 



1006 



See the introduction to A.0.87. 1005. 



COMMENTARY 



The fragment (BM 98572, Th 1905-4-9,78) measures 
5x8+ cm and the inscription has been collated. The 
script is like that of many inscriptions from the tenth 



and ninth centuries BC. In obv. 12' [... as-su]r(l)-Ti.LA 
a [...] reminds one of A.0.87. 12 line 26' although this 
fragment is from a different text. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1914 King, Cat. p. 58 (study) 
1961 Borger, EAK 1 p. Ill (study) 



1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 1 n. 8 (study) 
1990 Millard, ARRIM 8 (copy) 



1007 



Four fragmentary inscriptions (A.0.87. 1007-1010) on broken clay 
cones from ASSur may all be exemplars of the same text of Tiglath- 
pileser i. However, it is difficult to match the traces line by line and so 
they are edited here separately. The attribution to Tiglath-pileser i is 
suggested by the fact that the structure, the name of which is not 
preserved, was worked upon by Ilu-summa, Shalmaneser (i), and 
ASSur-dan (i). This can only be the Old or Assyrian Istar Temple since 
texts of Ilu-summa speak only of this structure (see RIM A 1 pp. 15-18 



76 Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1007 

A.0.32). The other known builders of the temple are Sargon i, Puzur- 
Assur in, Adad-nararT i, Shalmaneser i, TukultT-Ninurta i, and 
Tiglath-pileser i. This conclusion agrees with Saporetti, Eponimi 
p. 152, who placed the eponymy Assur-kena-sallim about the time of 
Tiglath-pileser i. 



COMMENTARY 

The inscription (A 3449, Ass 6719) has been collated. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1939-41 Weidner, AfO 13 p. 312 (study) 1984 Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA no. 115 (copy, edition) 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 1 n. 8 (study) 



TEXT 

Lacuna 

V) [... temmem-i\a ds~ku-u[n ,..] Y-G) No translation warranted. 

20 [...] x x DiNGiR-swm-raa §i[d aSsur ...] 

30 [...] aMur-da-a-an sid as-Sur-ma a-n[a aMsu 

(lu) uter] 
(space) 

40 [it]i kal~mar-tu ud 18.kam [(...)] 
50 [l\i-mu m a$-sur-ke-na-sal-lim [(,..)] 
60 [dum]u as-sur-is-ma-ni [(...)] 



1008 



See the introduction to A.0.87.1007. 

COMMENTARY 

The inscription (A 3588, Ass 16474) has been collated. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1984 Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA no, 116 (copy, edition) 
1988 Deller, JAOS 108 p. 516 (study) 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1008 
TEXT 



77 



Lacuna 

1') [...]xx4(?)x[,.J 

2') [... usal]-rhcn-ru-ma e-na-hu x [...] 

3') [...] mu md sul-ma-nu-up& Sid as-sur [...] 

4') [..,] as-sur-ma a~na ds-ri-$u lu u-ter [...] 

5') [...] i-na KAL-te lu w'-fc[w(?) ...] 



l'-5') No translation warranted. 



1009 



See the introduction to A.0,87.1007. 

COMMENTARY 

The inscription (A 3611, Ass 18474) has been collated. 



1939-41 Weidner, AfO 13 p. 312 (study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 1 n. 8 (study) 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1984 Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA no. 117 (copy, edition) 
1988 Deller, JAOS 108 p. 516 (study) 



TEXT 



Lacuna 

n i...]x[...] 

2') [...]xe(?)x[...] 

3') [... DiNGiR]-sum-ma sid aS-$[ur ...] 

4') [... assur-da-a-a]n sid as-sur-ma a-na ds-r[i- 

su (lu) uter] 
5') [...] x i-na KAL-te lu [uktn(l)] 



1-5') No translation warranted. 



1010 



See the introduction to A. 0.87, 1007. 



COMMENTARY 

The inscription (A 3529, Ass 11601) is in 'archaic' script and has been collated. 



78 Tiglath-piieser i A.0.87.1010 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1984 Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA no, 118 (copy, edition) 

TEXT 

Lacuna 

Y) [... istu us\-si-su [adi gabadibbTsu ...] 1-4') No translation warranted. 

2) [... temmeniia] as-[kun ...] 

3') [... e]nsi d a-s[ur ,..] 

4') [... awa asrl]-sw [luter ...] 

Lacuna 



1011 



This curious text fragment is inscribed on a broken brick from Assur. 
The form of the inscription is odd since texts on bricks normally begin 
with the royal name or 'palace of followed by the royal name or ? oc- 
casionally, with a dedication to a deity. Thus in the edition I have sug- 
gested that one or more lines are missing from the top although there 
is now no physical evidence of a break. But even if there were such a 
lacuna, the form is still unusual. The identity of the king is also a 
problem, Adad-nararfs name appears in line 3' but, as I pointed out 
in RIMA 1 p. 177, commentary to A.0.76.47, an identification with 
this king, although possible, poses problems. First, there is no other 
record that Adad-nararT i (or Adad-nararl ii or in for that matter) 
worked on the Anu-Adad temple at Assur (line 2'). Second, the posi- 
tion of the royal name in the inscription suggests he is being referred 
to as a previous builder (although the indicative rather than subjunc- 
tive form of epus argues against this). Assuming this to be the case, 
only two other kings after Adad-nararT i are possible candidates. 
Assur-resa-isi i worked on this temple (RIMA 1 pp. 316-18 
A.0.86.7-8) but he called it 'the temple of Adad and Anu\ citing the 
divine names in reverse order to this text. Thus the most likely attribu- 
tion is Tiglath-piieser i, who did extensive work on the temple and 
called it 'the temple of Anu and Adad' as this text does. But this 
identification is far from certain. 



COMMENTARY 

The inscription (VA Ass 3238c) has been collated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1984 Marzahn and Rost, Ziegeln 1 no. 165 (study) 

1985 Rost and Marzahn, VAS 23 no. 36 (copy) 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1011 
TEXT 



79 



Lacuna(?) 

V) su-ur~ru sd gis.i[g(?) ...] 

2') Sd r£i d a-nim r«i [ d adad (...)] 

3') [ md ]riSKUR^-6RIN.TAH §[lD(?) CtSSUr (...)] 

Lacuna(?) 



Lacuna(?) 

Y-A f ) centre/ interior of the doorway [...] of the 

temple of the gods Anu and [Adad (...)] Adad- 

narafi (i), vice-\regent of Assur (...)]> built. [(...)] 

Lacuna(?) 



1012 



This broken text is inscribed on two brick fragments from Nineveh. 
The royal name in the first line could be either Tiglath-pileser (i) or 
TukultT-Ninurta (n). 



COMMENTARY 

We have not been able to locate and collate the brick fragments. Thompson 
gave the provenance as 'Chamber n, N.E. wall' in the 'Asn. Palace'. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1931 Thompson, AAA 18 p. 98 and pi. xix no. 25 (copy, provenance) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 40 n. 182 (study) 



1) m GlS.tukul-[th...] 

2) A d [...] 

3) DU-«[5...J 

4) x [...] 



TEXT 

1-4) No translation warranted. 



1013 



A badly preserved stele (Ass 15269) from the row of steles at Assur 
has a few traces of cuneiform signs but nothing certain can be read. 
On the basis of the position of the stele in relation to adjacent 
identified steles, Andrae suggested it was of Ashurnasirpal n. But such 
a stele of that king has been recovered (A. 0.101.108) and Herzfeld 
preferred identification, on the basis of style, with Tiglath-pileser i. 



80 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1013 
BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1913 Andrae, SteJenreihen pp. 30-35 and pi. xvn no. 16 

(photo, copy, study) 
1920 Herzfeld, OLZ 23 209 (study) 



1961 Borger, EAK 1 p. Ill (study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 1 n. 8 (study) 



1014 



This broken text is inscribed on a clay tablet fragment found at Assur. 
It is a school copy of an inscription from an object dedicated to the 
goddess NinliL Of all the kings whose texts are edited in this volume, 
only Tiglath-pileser i is known to have worked on the Ninlil shrine at 
Assur (see A.0.87.1 iv 32-39). 



COMMENTARY 

The tablet fragment (A 760, Ass 13199, Ass ph 3948) measures c. 6x2.5 cm 
and the inscription has been collated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1985 Donbaz, Akkadica 42 pp. 1 1 and 23 (copy, edition) 

TEXT 



1) ana nin.lil nin [...] 

2) GAL-teNIN-SW md [...] 

3) gar d BAD sid [assur (...)] 
Lacuna 



l-2a) To the goddess Ninlil, mistress of [...] 

great, his mistress: 

2b-3) [Tiglath-pileser]^ appointee of the god Enlil, 

vice-regent of [A£§ur, (...) has dedicated (this ...)] 

Lacuna 



1015 



There are several bits of inscriptions on clay tablet fragments from 
Nineveh which should belong to about this time and are listed as 
A. 0.87. 1015-1021. Not enough is preserved of any of them to warrant 
an edition. All of them, including A. 0.87. 1015 (Rm 573), are in the 
British Museum and have been collated. 



1899 Bezold, Cat. 5 p. 2202 (study) 
1901-1906 Winckler, AOF 3 p. 245 (copy) 
1902 King, AKA pp. 125-26 n. 3 (study) 
1904-1905 Streck, ZA 18 p. 185 (study) 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1961 Borger, EAK 1 pp. Ill and 121 (study) 
1967 Borger, HKL 1 p. 629 (study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 1 n. 8 c (study) 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1016 81 

1016 



Regarding this broken text on a clay tablet fragment (BM 128069 
1929-10-12,725) see the introduction to A.0.87.1015. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 47 (study) 1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 2 n. 9 (study) 

1970 Millard, Iraq 32 pi. xxxv (copy) 



1017 



Regarding this broken text on a clay tablet fragment (BM 134498 
1932-12-12,493) see the introduction to A.0.87.1015. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1968 Lambert and Millard. Cat. p. 73 (study) 1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 2 n. 9 (study) 

1970 Millard, Iraq 32 pi. xxxrv (copy) 



1018 



Regarding this broken text on a clay tablet fragment (BM 128030 
1929-10-12,686) see the introduction to A.0.87.1015. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 44 (study) 1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 2 n. 9 (study) 

1970 Millard, Iraq 32 pi. xxxv (copy) 



1019 



Regarding this broken text on a clay tablet fragment (BM 128137 
1929-10-12,793) see the introduction to A.0.87.1015. 



82 



1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 50 (study) 
1970 Millard, Iraq 32 pi. xxxvn (copy) 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1019 
BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 2 n. 9 (study) 



1020 



Regarding this broken text on a clay tablet fragment (BM 134585 
1932-12-12,580) see the introduction to A.0.87.1015. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 79 (study) 
1970 Millard, Iraq 32 pi. xxxvn (copy) 



1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 2 n, 9 (study) 



1021 



Regarding this broken text on a clay tablet fragment (BM 134821 
1932-12-12,616) see the introduction to A.0.87.1015. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 83 (study) 
1970 Millard, Iraq 32 pi. xxxyii (copy) 



1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 2 n. 9 (study) 



1022 



This broken text, from about this time, is on a black stone fragment 
from Kuyunjik and published by Layard, but which cannot now be lo- 
cated. Not enough is preserved to warrant an edition. 



1851 Layard, ICC pi. 75f (copy) 
1967 Borger, HKL 1 p. 296 (study) 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 1 n. 8 f (study) 



1023 



Two broken inscriptions, from about this time, on stone fragments 
found at Nineveh may be duplicates of one another, but this being 
uncertain, they are listed as separate texts, A.0.87.1023 and 1024. 



Tiglath-pileser i A.0.87.1023 83 

Neither object could be located and not enough is preserved to war- 
rant editions. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1929 Thompson, Arch. 79 p. 119 and pi. xu no. 11 (copy) 1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 1 n. 8 f (study) 

1967 Borger, HKL 1 p. 526 (study) 



1024 



See the introduction to A.0.87.1023. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1931 Thompson, AAA 18 p. 98 and pi. xvm no. 20 (copy) 1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 1 n. 8 f (study) 

1967 Borger, HKL 1 p. 526 (study) 



1025 



This broken text is on a clay cone fragment from Nineveh (BM 128174 
= 1929-10-12,830) and should belong to this general period. Not 
enough is preserved to warrant an edition. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 52 (study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 1 n. 8 (study) 



2001 



This private dedicatory text was inscribed on a small brick (Ass 5169, 
c. 25.5x20 cm) found at Assur. Assur-ismanni is a Umu of the reign 
of Tiglath-pileser i (see Saporetti, Eponimi p. 160). The brick has not 
been located or the inscription collated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1924-25 Delitzsch and Schroeder, AfK 2 p. 69 (copy, edition) 1961 Borger, EAK 1 p. 26 (study) 

1939-41 Weidner, AfO 13 p. 312 (study) 1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 2 n. 11 (study) 



84 



1) 

2) 
3) 
4) 
5) 



a-na tas-me-ti ^nin^-su 
md a-sur-is-ma-ni dub.sar 

DUMU d tf-5Wr-DI.KUD 

a-na ti.la-£u 



Tigiath-pileser i A.0.87.2001 

TEXT 



1-5) To the goddess Tasmetu, his mistress, has 
A§Sur-i§manni, the scribe, son of Assur-daiian, 
dedicated (this) for his life. 



Asared-apil-Ekur 

A.0.88 



No royal inscriptions are preserved for this rather obscure king who 
ruled only two years (1075-1074 BC). At one time his name was read 
Ninurta-apil-Ekur, being regarded as the second monarch with this 
name, and a text fragment from Assur (edited in RIMA 1 p. 303 as 
A. 0.82.1) was attributed to him. The correct reading was established 
by king lists (see Grayson, RLA 6 pp. 86-135). The broken eponym 
list mentioned in the introduction to the reign of Tiglath-pileser i also 
has traces of the names of the eponyms for the reign (see Grayson, 
ARI 2 p. 45 §204). 



85 



Assur-bel-kala 

A.0.89 



Despite the setback which Assyria suffered at the hands of the 
Aramaeans later in the reign of Tiglath-pileser i (and which probably 
lasted during the shadowy reign of ASar5d-apil-Ekur), the Middle 
Assyrian Empire was revived briefly by Assur-bel-kala (1073-1056 
BC). This monarch boasts in his royal inscriptions of military expedi- 
tions as far east and south as Babylonia and as far west as the 
Lebanon. Babylonia became in fact a vassal state of Assyria and the 
Egyptians were so impressed by this Asiatic power that, according to 
Assur-bel-kala, the pharaoh sent to the Assyrian king exotic animals 
as gifts. But the Aramaean pressure continued, as revealed in a 
significant passage of the Broken Obelisk (A. 0.89. 7 column iii) where 
numerous clashes between Assyrian and Aramaean forces are 
recorded. Most if not all of A§§ur-b5l-kala's royal inscriptions date 
very early in his reign, which suggests that the Aramaeans gradually 
gained the upper hand later in his period of rule. This suggestion is 
supported by the dramatic decline in Assyrian power evident in subse- 
quent reigns. 

Among the royal inscriptions preserved for Assur-bel-kala, most are 
annalistic texts (A.0.89.1-9). The earliest in date is A.0.89. 1 while the 
latest seems to be A.0.89.7, which probably dates to the fifth or sixth 
regnal year, or a little later. Most of the texts come from Assur, indi- 
cating that Assur-bel-kala concentrated his building projects there. 
Unfortunately the various passages describing these works are badly 
damaged or totally missing, with the exception of the building section 
in A. 0.89.7. But this latter passage more than compensates for the loss 
since it describes work on several different structures at Assur: pal- 
aces, the moat, gates (cf. A.0.89. 3), the city wall, a canal, a garden, 
and the quay by the Tigris Gate. In the same text (A. 0.89. 7) the con- 
struction of palaces at Apqu, Saqa, and Sikkatu is narrated. Only two 
fragments of annals from Nineveh are preserved (A. 0.89.8-9) and the 
building section is missing from both so that it is unknown what work 
Assur-bel-kala did in that city. 

From chronicles (see Grayson, Chronicles p. 165 ii 25-37' and 
pp. 180-81 lines 4-11) considerably more detail about Assur-bel-kala's 
relations with Babylonia is available. This monarch also appears, of 
course, in various king lists (see Grayson, RLA 6 pp. 86-135) and 
there is a hymn addressed by him to the god Adad (see Strong, JRAS 
[1892] pp. 342-44 and Borger, EAK 1 p. 138). 



86 



A35ur-bel-kala A.O.89.1 



87 



1 



The annals of Assur-bel-kala are attested on several fragments of clay 
tablets, one clay cone fragment, and a stone stele. Most of the tablets 
were found at Assur, but some come from Nineveh as does, ap- 
parently, the stele. The stele, commonly called the 'Broken Obelisk*, is 
edited below as A. 0.89. 7. The clay tablet and cone fragments preserve 
the remains of various versions of the annals which have been edited 
below as A.0.89.1-6 and 8-9. A.0.89.1 is the earliest of the annalistic 
texts. 



CATALOGUE 



Ex. 



Museum 

number 



Ass 
number 



Ass ph 
number 



AsSur 
provenance 



Dimensions 
(cm) 



Lines 
preserved 



epn 



A 34 



VAT 9627 



K 2817 



6556 



4533r 



960-61 



459 t 566-67(?) 



Near Anu-Adad temple between 


8.7x7,7 + 


Obv. 


r-i9' 


south corner of ziqqurrat and 




Rev. 


r-i6' 


west corner of temple, eA5v; 








Pedersen, MA library, M2 








NW side of A§§ur temple 


8,2x7,3 4 


Obv. 


2'-16 f 


courtyard, hD3v; Pedersen, ASSur 








temple library and archive, Nl 








— 


8x4 + 


Obv, 


6'-11' 



COMMENTARY 



The annals of Assur-bel-kala are preserved on a large 
stone stele, commonly called the 'Broken Obelisk' 
(A.0.89.7), probably from Nineveh; numerous frag- 
ments of clay tablets (A. 0.89. 1-2, 4-6, and 8-9) from 
both Aslur and Nineveh; and a clay cone fragment 
(A.0.89,3) from Assur. The identification of all of these 
inscriptions with Assur-bel-kala has involved meticulous 
research, mainly by Weidner and Borger, and thanks to 
their work there is scarcely any doubt now that the 
Broken Obelisk and the various pieces of annals on clay 
fragments edited here belong to this king. 

But the exact text division of the inscriptions on clay 
tablet fragments is still a difficult matter which cannot 
be settled until more material is available. In this edi- 
tion I have been more cautious than Weidner, who 
tried to identify most fragments as parts of one text. 
Borger already noted that more texts were involved 
than allowed by Weidner and I believe that the frag- 
ments possibly represent several texts. The reasons 
behind this new division are the following. 

A.0.89.1 (three exs.) and A.0.89.2 (five exs.) cannot 
be the same text. They have no duplicate passages and 
one ex. of A. 0.89,1 (ex. 1) has a description of hunting 
on the rev. (rev. 7-10', previously unpublished) which 
is similar to, but not a duplicate of, a passage in 
A.0.89.2 (iii 29-35'). Yet another version of this hunt- 
ing passage is found in A. 0.89.6 (lines 2-5') and so it 
must be part of a third text. A fragment from Nineveh 



(A.0.89.9) has a narrative (lines 3'-lCf> describing a 
campaign west of the Euphrates which is similar to, but 
not a duplicate of, a passage in A. 0.89.6 (lines 6-15'). 
Thus A.0.89.9 has been regarded as a separate, fourth 
text. A fifth text is clearly represented by A. 0.89.5, 
which has a description of the campaign to Uruatri 
(2-1 1') which is a duplicate of a passage in A.0.89.2 
(i 8-18') but then contains an abbreviated version 
(A. 0.89. 5 lines 12-16') of the campaign described in 
more detail in A.0.89.2 (i 19-36). 

Introductory titles and genealogies are preserved on 
two texts, one from Nineveh (A. 0.89. 8) and one from 
Assur (A.0.89.4). In theory A.O.89.8 could be the intro- 
ductory portion of A. 0.89. 9 while A.0.89.4 could be 
the same for any of A.0.89.1, 2, 5, or 6. 

This division of the clay tablet fragments may in fu- 
ture prove unsubstantiated; but for the moment it is, I 
believe, the best we can do. Weidner (AfO 6 p. 79) ar- 
gued that A.0.89.2. 4 (Ass 17184) and A. 0.89.5 (Ass 
17148) were fragments of the same tablet on the basis 
of their having approximately the same provenance and 
the similarity of script and colour of the clay. None of 
these factors are compelling reasons although it is just 
possible that Weidner is correct. 

Interrelated with the division of the fragments into 
texts is the chronology of the texts. A.0.89.1 is clearly 
earlier than A.0.89.2. In the latter text a second cam- 
paign against Mari (ii 5') is described, while in A.0.89.1 



88 



AsSur-bel-kala A.0.89.1 



(obv. 14') the campaign against Mari is by implication 
the first. In the concluding portion of A.0.89.2 (iii 22') 
the fourth regnal year is cited, which means that this 
text was written in that year, or possibly the fifth year. 
A.0.89.3 may have been composed about the same time 
as A.0.89.2, since 'the second year' is mentioned in a 
hunting passage in A.0.89.3 (line 70 and A.0.89.2 
(iii 32'). About the same date must be ascribed to 
A.0J9.4 (or at least ex, 1 of that text) for it (i.e. ex. 1) 
is dated in the eponymy of A§sur-r£m-ni§esu. This epo- 
nymy appears in A. 0.89. 7 (iii 3), where it seems to be 
about the fourth year mentioned (cf. Borger, EAK 1 p. 
140 and Brinkman, PKB p. 142 n. 859). In turn 
A.0.89.7 must be at least a year later than A.0. 89.4, 
since events in an eponymy after A§$ur-rBm-ni§6su are 
narrated. 

The relative chronology of the remaining texts is un- 



certain. However, if one assumes that texts with short 
descriptions of events are later than texts with longer 
descriptions of the same events (a very uncertain as- 
sumption), this would mean that A. 0.89.5 would be 
later than A.0 .89.2, 

Let us turn now to special items regarding A.0.89.1. 
All three exs. are in very fragmentary condition and the 
readings and reconstruction of lines are often very un- 
certain. Weidner's copy and edition seem to suggest 
that exs. 1 and 2 join but this is impossible since they 
overlap in obv. ICF-ll'. Ex. 3 has a Kuyunjik registra- 
tion number and therefore may come from Nineveh 
but, since the building section is not preserved, this 
cannot be confirmed. The master text is a conflation of 
all three exs., where preserved. Readers interested in de- 
tails can consult the scores. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1893 Winckler, Sammlung 1 p. 29 (ex. 3, copy) 
1902 King, AKA pp. 120-21 (ex. 3, copy, edition) 
1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 no. 77 (ex. 2, copy) 
1926 Luckenbili, ARAB 1 §§434-35 (ex. 2, translation) 
1935 Weidner, AnOr 12 pp. 336-38 (ex. 1, study) 



1961 Borger, EAK 1 pp. 138 and 143 (exs. 1-3, study) 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxix 1 (exs. 1-3, translation) 

1985-86 Pedersen, Archives 1 p. 39; 2 p. 24 no. 83 (exs. 1-2, 

provenance) 



TEXT 



Obverse 
Lacuna 

I 1 ) [...]xlflTOj/(?)-X-[x] 

2^ [...] x [x x] x [...] x-ia ugu x ru na [x] 

J) [...] X wbh-Su [...] X // mes a li tu 

4 1 ) [...] hal-sa-ni-su-nu [...]-a-nu-ti(l)-$u-nu sa 

kur hi-me 
5') [„..] a-mi-lu-ta u [...] x sa ki-ma mul.mes 

AN-e 
6') [...] nap-har uru.mes-sw-«« sa kur hi-me 
7) [...] ul e-zib ltj.meS en.meS VRV.ME^-Su-nu 

a~ku~u[$] 
8') [...] i-na ugu uru.me§-1w-«« ma-[dute{l) 

MmQt(l) umman8ti\-$u-nu sa i-na tu-sa-ri 
W) [...] i-na gis.tukul.meS u-Sam-qi-tu a~na x 

[...]-/V-/ff-te.ME5 ar-sip 
l(y) tnuq-tab-H £rin.mes Gis.TUKUL.rMEiP [... ana 

/a]-i"a(?)i mi-na ti-ne-pil 
IT) gi-mil KVR-ia sa a-[...] vs.MES-su-nu a x (x) 

sap-pu^u-ta 



Lacuna 

V-\Y) [...] of the land Ifimme [...] against/upon 
... {...] his city [...] ... [...] their fortresses, their 
[...], of the land Himme, [/ conquered and 
destroyed /plundered}. Men and [sheep] which, 
like the stars of heaven, [had no number, J car- 
ried off]. All of their cities, of the land Himme, [/ 
conquered and destroyed]. I did not leave [a sin- 
gle warrior alive]. I flayed the men, their city- 
rulers, [...]. Over against their numerous cities I 
built [into mounds the corpses of] their [warriors] 
which I had felled with the sword in the 
battlefield [...]. Soldiers, armed troops, [...] 
without number I blinded. {Thus) I achieved 
vengeance for my land which [...] ... their 
blood/corpses ... 



obv. 1' kur hi(l)-x-[x]: this might be Himme (see obv. 4') but 
the signs are too broken to be certain, obv. 5' Cf. A.0. 101.1 
i 88 and iii 43 (Asn. n). obv. 8' The reconstruction and 



restoration of this line is very uncertain. After VRV.ME§-su-nu 
ex. 3 has a broken sign which begins with a horizontal wedge 
and thus cannot be m[a-..,]. 



Assur-bel-kala A.0.89.1 



89 



12') a-na kur hab-hi al-lik uru ha-sa [...] x x ul- 

tu uru ds~ku~x 
13') [...] uru.mes-w sa kur hab-hi ak-^ucP [...] 

ro~i-/ia uRU-/a as-sur u[b-la\ 

14') m G&Jukul-ti- d me-er man kur mfi-n ...] x 

15') [...] /-n<7 <7*-fc[/Y] Vw [de/r/a ...] al-lik kur 

16') [...] x x [.„]-* §u\-nu as-su-[ha] 
17') [...] x-na(l) & dis x x x 
18') [...']xfcxxl(x)] 

19') [...] x x 5-su-nu lu e-[x-(x)] 

Lacuna 

Reverse 

Lacuna 

1') [-.]xU| 

2') [...]x$wx[...] 

3') [..,] x /« bur su x [...] 

4') [...] ds-gu-up-su-nu-^ti(ip 

5') [...]-£« /wa-ra(?)-r/(?)i ku.gi r D fc-u5"i 
6') [...] a x-ri-a-tu ak-si-ir 

7) [. . . ]-«-ta Mu-sam-ma EGm-su-nu 

8') [,.. d M]AS w d iGi.DU sa smGA-ti-ia i-ra-mu 

9') [,..].MES tf-rfw£ «DUK» ANSE.EDIN.NA.MES 

l(y) [... #-*]/ u-ma-mi x an-ne-e 
11') [...]-iae(l)-tap-pa-d$ 

12') [...] x /-A-™* /«(?) i[b}~ba-la-ka-tu 
13') [...] Zw*(?) kal lugal x [...] x-er-$u 

14') [..Jxx[..J 

15') [...] Mfl [...] 

16') [...]x[...] 



12'- 13') I marched to the land Habhu. The cities 
Hasa, [...] from the city Asku ... [...], cities of 
the land Habhu, I conquered. I [carried off ...] to 
my city ASSur. 

14'-16')TukultI-Mer, king of the land M[ari ...] 
great, entered. [...] By the command of the god 
Assur, [my lord], I marched [to the land Mari 
(...)]. The land Mar[i ...] I uprooted their [peo- 
ple]. 
17'-19') (Too broken for translation) 



Lacuna 

Lacuna 

rev. l'-3') (Too broken for translation) 



rev. 4') [,..] I planted/erected them. 

rev. 5-6') [... with ...] //Van-wood (white cedar), 
(and) gold I made. [...] ... I blocked up. 

rev. 7-11') [...] annually, after them [...] the gods 
Ninurta and Nergal, who love my priesthood, 
[gave to me the wild beasts]. I killed [...] wild 
asses [...] with these animals my [...] I was 
doing/making. 

rev. 12-13') [...] ... and keep rebelling [...] king 
[...] 

rev. 14-16') (Too broken for translation) 



This version of the annals on clay tablets from Assur is later in time 
than A.0.89.1, as explained there. In this text earlier campaigns nar- 
rated in A.0.89.1 are described. In addition, a second campaign 
against Mari (ii 5') and a second campaign against Himme (iii 15') are 
narrated, For further details on the annals see the commentary to 
A.0.89.1. 



rev, 1-4' The verb in line 4' indicates that this passage 
described the planting of (exotic) trees (see the introduction to 
A.0.87.1) or the erection of statues (cf. A.0. 101.1 iii 89). rev. 
7-8' Hunting passages of the period (see the introduction to 



A.0.87.1) usually begin immediately with Ninurta and Nergal. 
rev. 10' Cf. A.0.89.7 iv 31-34a and the note. rev. 12-13' The 
reading and interpretation of these lines is very uncertain. 



90 






Assur-bel-kala A.0.89.2 
















CATALOGUE 










Museum 


Ass 


Ass ph 


Assur 


Dimensions 


Lines 




Ex. 


number 


number 


number 


provenance 


(cm) 


preserved 


cpn 


1 


A 696 


17132 


5173 


Ruins of old Assyrian 
ASsur temple, iB3iv 


22x13.4 + 


i l'-36' 
iii V-35' 


c 


2 


VAT 9657 


- 


- 


- 


7.8x7.2 + 


i6'-18' 


c 


3 


VAT 9486 


6796b 


957 


SW of Anu-Adad 
temple, eA6n 


11.6x6,9 + 


ii i'-ir 

i 7-27' 


c 


4 


VAT 9590 


17184 


5328 


Western part of gate room 
of old Assyrian Assur 
temple, iB3iv 


6.8x5.8 + 


iii 6'-22' 


c 


5 


VAT 9601 


20570 


6372 


City area 


5.6x5.1 + 


iii 30'-35' 


c 



COMMENTARY 



The identification of these exs. as one text and the text's 
reconstruction are not entirely certain. As recon- 
structed, however, three separate parts of the text are 
preserved on the various exs. with lacunae in between. 

The three parts have been labelled *i\ ( ii\ and 'iii', but 
this has nothing to do with columns (none of the exs, is 
divided into columns). The position of the rev. of ex. 2 
is uncertain since it is not duplicated by any of the 



other exs. It must, however, appear before iii since iii 
has concluding portions of the text, and so it is labelled 
ii and put between i and iii. The master text, for pur- 
poses of line numbering, is ex. 1, except for part ii 
where, of course, it is ex. 2. The actual reconstruction 
of the master text is based on all exs. where preserved. 
The reader interested in details can check the scores. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 nos. 75 and 144 (exs. 3, 5, copy) 

1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §334 (ex. 3, translation) 

1930-31 Weidner, AfO 6 pp. 78-93 (exs. 1, 3-4, copy, edition) 



1935 Weidner, AnOr 12 pp. 336-38 (ex. 2, study) 
1961 Borger, EAK 1 pp. 135-44 (exs. 1-5, study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxix 1 (exs. 1-5, translation) 



TEXT 



c coL r 

Lacuna 

1') [...].mes Aa-[...] 



2') [mar assur]-SAG~i-s[i sar kissati sarri danni 

sar mat assur] 
3') [mu-S]ek-nis [la magirl . . . ] 

4') [mar] mu-tak-kil- d nusku [sar kissati sarri 

danni sar mat assurma] 
5') [num]un sio-ti-su i-n[a(l) ...] 

6') LUGAL MAN.MES EN E[N,ME§ ...] 

7') numun da-ru-ii $a l[ugal(? )-//(?) ...] 

8') i-na sur-ru MAN-thia [ina mahre paieia sa ina 
Gis.Gu].rzA(?yi [sarrute rabis usibu] 



Lacuna 

i 1') (Too broken for translation) 



i 2-3') [Son of Assur] -resa-is[i (i), king of the 
universe, strong king, king of Assyria], subduer 
of [the insubmissive ...]; 

i 4-7') [Son of] Mutakkil-Nusku, [(who was) also 
king of the universe, strong king, king of Assyria] 
his priestly progeny [,.,] king of kings, lord of 
lords, [...], eternal royal seed [...]: 



i 8'- 18') In my accession year [(and) in my first 
regnal year, after I nobly ascended the royal] 



i 2' Cf. A.0.89.10 line 3. i 5' See Borger, EAK 1 p. 143. 
I € These must be titles of Assur-bel-kala - cf. Borger, 
EAK 1 p. 143; Seux, ERAS p. 55 n. 63; Grayson, ARI 2 p. 47 



n. 200. i 7' See Borger, EAK 1 p. 143. i 8' Cf. A.0.89.5 line 
2' and the note to A.0.87.1 i 62. 



Assur-bel-kala A. 0.89.2 



91 



9') i-na e-mu-qe si-ra-a-t[e sa assur beliia alik 

pariiia ina(l) ... sa ninurta] 
10') a-lik im-ni-ia i-na lib-be qar-di sa d is[KUR 

alik sumelfiaC!)] 
IT) gis.gigir.mes u ERiN.Hi.A.MES-/a a[d-ki ge- 

r]i.MES pa-ds-qu-te [...] 
12') [sla a-na me-teq gis.gigir.mes u 

erin. [hi. a. me^ la Sa]-ak-[nu p]er-ke la-a e-ti- 

[qu] 
13') pe-re-ek-su-un muSen.meS AN-e [muttapriSUte] 

la-a e-ti-qu pe~re[k-sun] 
14') §a lugal ia-um-ma nun-m [alik] ipa-nH-ia 

l[a]-a il-U-ku a-x-[.„] 
15') ger-ra su-a-tu as-bat kur hi-ni-[... sade] ia- 

a-at-ku-un iti.mes- [s««w marsute nerebete] 
16') pa-ds-qa-te si-mi-la-at KUR-su-nu \i\-na ak- 

kul-lat zabar lu a[h-si\ 
17') a-na me-teq Gis.GiGiR.MES-/a u-ti-ib r^wr(?)i- 

[sa]-«/.MES sa-t[u-nu] a-na per-ke ab-bal-kit 
18') i[d] x-x-ub-da id sa-ma-nu-na lu-u e^bir^ a- 

na qe-r[eb mat uruatri erub] 



throne, with the exalted strength [of the god 
Assur, my lord, who goes before me, with the ... 
of the god Ninurta], who goes at my right hand, 
with the martial spirit of the god Ad[ad, who 
goes at my left hand], I [mustered] my chariots 
and troops. Difficult roads [...] which for the pas- 
sage of [my] chariots and troops were not suit- 
able, routes which were impassable, whose bar- 
riers even the [winged] birds of the sky could not 
pass, the barriers through which no king or prince 
who preceded me had marched [...] I took that 
road. Mounts Hini[... and] latkun, [their rugged] 
paths [and] difficult [passes], the terraces of their 
mountains — with bronze picks I hacked out a 
good way for the passage of my chariotry. I 
marched right through those mountains. I crossed 
over the Rivers [...]ubdu (and) Samanunu. [I en- 
tered the land Uruatri], 



19') uru qu-qi-a-ba uru a-mu-^ra-ds(l)^-ka uru 

du-na-sa-x [...] 
20') uru e-ri-du-un uru is-ta-ia-un uru ik-ki-a 

URU X [...] 

21') uru su-su-ku uru sal-la-gi-du uru tar-ra-ba 

uru zur-zu-ra [...] 
22') uru li-gu-nu uru is-ku-ut-nu uru e-li-da uru 

is-ta-am-ni-a uru a-ra-[...] 
23') uru a-ri-nu-un uru sa-sal-hi-a uru ha-ru-ru 

[.-■] 
24') [uru] x-si-u-ru uru pa-ni-ra-su uru pa-ni- 

25') [u]ru hi-ri-is-tu uru ul-mi-iS uru na-ba-la 

u[ru ...] 
26') [ur]u hi-ip-pu uru ha-ra-ri-a uru a-pa-ru-nu 

ur[u ...] 
27') [uru z\i~qu-nu uru ha-ar-di-a uru e-la-qu- 

u[S ...] 
28') [uru ,..]-x-a-/w uru ia-ab-li-u-nu uru x-[...] 

29') [URU ...-l]l-tU URU.GESTIN-rta uru.mas-x-[...] 

30') [uru ...] x uru ia-ab-li-u-nu uru x-[...] 
31') [,..]-ku fkP nap-liar URU.MES-m sa x [...] 
32') [..,] x sal-la-su-nu bu-sa-s[u-nu ...] 



i 19'-36') The cities Quqiaba, Amuraska 
Dunasa[...], Eridun, Istaiaun, Ikkia, [...] 
Susuku, Sallagidu, Tarraba, Zurzura, [...] 
Ligunu, Iskutnu, Eiida, Istamnia, Ara[...] : 
Arinun, Sasalhia, Haruru, [,..]siuru, Panirasu 
Pani[..., HiJriStu, Ulmis, Nabala, [...], Hippu 
Hararia, Aparunu, [...], Ziqunu, Hardia, Elaqus 
[...]alu, labliunu, [...i]ltu, GESTiN-na, Masgun (or 
Bargun) [...], labliunu, [...], all the cities of [...] 
their booty, possessions [...] their cities [I burnt 
.,.] 1 covered [with ...] cities, villages, [...] on the 
bank of [the River] Hariia [...] 
Lacuna 



i y-10' Cf. A.0.89.5 lines 3'-4'. i ll'-lS'a Cf. A.0.89.5 lines 
4'b-8'a. i 12' Cf. A.0.99.2 line 82; A.0. 101.1 ii 60-61; 
A. 0. 101.19 line 61 etc. i 13'. 1 The lacuna is too small for a 
syllabic writing of muttaprisuti (as in A.0.89.5 line 6); the 
logogram dal.dal.mes was probably used. Cf. Weidner, AfO 
6 p. 82 n. 33. i 14-18' For ex. 1 in these lines some traces 
copied by Weidner in the break on the right side are no longer 
preserved on the original. Nevertheless we have included the 
traces in the scores, i 15'b-18' Cf. A.0.89.5 lines 8T)-11'. i 
15% Note the writing iti.meS for arhani 'paths' not 'months', i 



15 For the restoration of nerebete see A. 0.87.1 iv 53. Borger, 
EAK 1 p. 143, suggests instead hula, i 23-28' The exact 
reconstruction of the text is uncertain since the two preserved 
exemplars, exs. 1 and 3, are badly broken and vary in the 
order of listing at least one place-name. labliunu appears in i 
28' in ex. 1 and so it is given in the master text, but in ex. 3 
(which breaks off at i 27') the following line appears between i 
22-23' and i 25': uru ia-ab-li-u-nu uru rf[ff-...]. The interested 
reader can consult the scores for full details. 



92 



Assur-bel-kaia A.0.89.2 



33') [...] VRV.MES-ni-su-nu Una i[zi asrup ...] 

34') [..J-x-zi U'tam-me-r e r{iyi [...] 

35') [...] uru.mes-/?/ kap-ra~a-n[i ...] 

36') [...] gu rfoi Afl-n-to [...] 

Lacuna 

«Col. ii' 

Lacuna 

1') [...]-rW(?)./(?)i [x] x-sa-ni-su [...] 

2') [...] sum(l)-su-[x] ki numun(?).mes a-/i[a(?) 

3') [... as\-sur-e-tel-lu dumu man dumu 

m r*a(?r»-[...] 
4') [... s\u(1)-nu-te sag.du. MES-te-su-n[u ...] 

5') [(...)] sa-nu-te-ia a-na kur md-r[i ...] 
6') [(...)] lugal.mes uru qat-na-a-ia.MEs 

LU[GAL(?) ...] 

7') [...-&]//(?) *i-/m-fe & ab-ba-fu(lp [...] 
8') [...] X-5U w dam(?).mes-5W /a x [...] 
9') [. . . i\-na si-id-di ii-ga-[ri . . . ] 

1C) [...] tf-tf/ SES.MES-SW X [...] 

11') UxxxU 

Lacuna 

'Col. Hi' 

Lacuna 

V) ibx[..,] 

2') &x[...J 

3') a-na e-«w-[...J 

4') lu is-sak-nu [...] 

5') /-/i# e-mu-qe si-[ra-a-te sa assur beliia .,.] 

6') it-te-su-nu l[u amdahis ...] 

7) ma-^a-at-ta sa ku[r ...] TerinI.hi.a.mes r/^i 

[... URU...] 

8') ak-su-su sal-la-su [busasu ... hubta m\a-a-da 

lu ds-l[u-ul\ 
9') sal-ma-at qu~ra-d[i-su ...] 
10') us.MES-5w-/7M hur-ri na-at-b[a~ki Sade lu 

umalli ...] 

11') SAG.DU. ME§ &RIN.MES GIS.TUKUL.M[ES ,..] X U 

li ri du x [...] 
12') su-a-tu i-na e a-sa-[... lu] a-ku-us i-na g[a-si- 

s7(?) ... uzaqqip{l)} 
13') sa-lam UAN-ti-ia sur-b[a-a epus li-ta~a]t man- 

ti-ia 
14') i-na qer-bi-su al-t[u-ur .,.] 

15') sa-nu-ut-te-ia a-na kur hi-im-m\i lu allik ...] 
16') i^ kur MAS-gu-un ak-s[ud(l) hurasu(!) 
k]u.babbar sal-la-su b[u-sa-su lu aslul ana 



Lacuna 

ii l'-4') [...] ... progeny [... As]sur-etellu, son of 

the king, son of Sg[.,.] them. Their heads [/ cut 

off-] 



ii 5-11') [(...)] A second time [I marched] to the 
land Mar[i ...]. The kings of the people of the 
city Qatnu, the king(s) [of ...] the family whose 
fathers [...], his [...] and his wives [...] at the edge 
of the plain [...] together with his brothers [...] 
Lacuna 



Lacuna 

iii 1 -140 ..« [..-] which [...] to [...] were placed 
[..,], With the exalted strength [of the god Assur, 
my lord, ... I fought] with them [...] extensive 
[...] of the land [...] troops [...] I conquered him. 
His booty, [possessions, ...] extensive [booty] I 
carried off. The corpses of [his] warriors [... I 
filled] the hollows and ravines [of the mountains] 
with their blood [...] the heads of the troops, the 
weapons [...], him I flayed in the house of ... [... 
(and) impaled his corpse] on a stake. [I made] a 
colossal royal statue of myself (and) wrote 
thereon (a description of) my royal victories [...] 



iii 15-210 A second time [I marched] to the land 
Himme [...] of the land Masgun (or Bargun) I 
conquered. [I carried off gold], silver, his booty 
(and) [possessions]. I entered [...] I [traversed] 



ii 1-4' The identity of the guilty men mentioned in this 
passage and their crime is unknown but it appears their 
punishment was decapitation, ii 3' The name Assur-etellu is 
otherwise unknown, iii 5' Cf, i 9'. iii 12' Weidner restored E 



a-sa-[ak-ki ...] Taboo House 7 but, as observed in CAD 1/2 
(A) p. 327, this context would be 'atypical', iii 13-14' Cf. iii 
2(y-21; A, 0.89. 3 lines 2' and 4'. iii 16' mas' can be read mas- or 
bar-. 



A§Sur-bel-kala A.0.89.2 



93 



17') e-ru-ub kur hi-ru-a a[b~balkit uru] riP-ru- 

ni-ds sa k[ur himme] 
18') sa i-na na-gab KUR-e n[a-du ... ana meteq 

narkabatf-i\a la na-tu-u 
\¥) al-lik uru su-a-tu a[l-mi aksud sallassu 

busasu ana la mi\-na 
2(F) u-se-si-a uru su-[a-tu ina isati asrup salam 

sarrutlia epus] 
210 U-ta-at UAN-ti-ia [ina qerbisu altur ...] 

22') i-na 4-te sa-at-te ^sa i-na^ [kusse sarrute 

usibu ...] 
23') sa ku.gi e-pu-u[s ...] 
240 u-se-zi-iz i-na [...] 
25') NUN-y a-lik pa-[ni-ia ...] 
26 1 ) a-na si-hfr-ti-s[u ...] 

27') KASKAL.MES-a^ kur a-r[i-me madate zairut 

assur sa ina mat ...] 
28') ah-tab-ba-tu [...] 

29') d MAS w d [/?a//7 jtf sangutl irammu bill $iri 

usatlimunimma epe§ btPuri iqbunimma] 
30') 5 su-si ur.ma[h.mes ... ina mSziz q]ar-du-t[i- 

ia ...] 
31') 6(?) pu-hal g[u 4 .me§ dan-n]u-te su-ut qar-ni x 

[. . . ina narkabtlia(l) (...)] 
320 u i-na gir. [iwa lasmati ina] sa-ni-im-ma 

ba[la-i# ... ina mulmultiia] 
330 na-ah-zu-te k-x-[... stfef umame ma>di{l)\ 
340 w musen.m[es] AN-e mut-tap-r[i-sa bWur seri 

epset qatTia] 
350 \SumatTsu-ri\u it-ti u-ma~m[e anne la satra] 
Lacuna 



Mount Hirua (and) marched [to the city] Urunias 
of the land [Himme], which is situated in the 
heart of the mountains, [rugged mountains which] 
were impassable [for] my [chariots]. I [sur- 
rounded] that city [(and) conquered it]. I brought 
forth [its booty and possessions without] number 
(and) [burnt] that city. [I made a royal statue of 
myself (and) wrote thereon] (a description of) my 
royal victories [...] 

iii 22'-26') In the fourth year after [I ascended the 
royal throne] , I made [a royal statue of myselj] in 
gold (and) erected (it) [in Esarra, the house of my 
succour, before Assur, my lord]. When [the ... 
which] a prince who preceded [me had built be- 
came dilapidated, I] entirely [reconstructed (it) ...] 

iii 27-280 O n [numerous] campaigns against the 
land of the Ar[amaeans, the enemies of Assur, 
who in the land ...] I continually plundered [...] 

iii 29-350 The gods Ninurta and [Nergal, who 
love my priesthood, gave to me the wild beasts 
and commanded me to hunt]. 300 lions [... with 
my fierce] valour [...] six strong [wild] virile 
[bulls] with horns [... from my ... chariot] and on 
[my swift] feet, [in my] second regnal year, [... 
with my] sharp [arrows] I [... The remainder of 
the numerous animals] and the winged birds of 
the sky, [wild game which I acquired, their names 
are not written with these] animals, [their 
numbers are not written with these numbers], 
Lacuna 



This fragmentary version of the annals, on a piece of clay cone from 
Assur, preserves two passages. The first passage (lines 1-90 is a con- 
densed narrative of the campaigns described in more detail in A.0.89.2 
iii 13-35'. The second passage contains a description of the recon- 
struction of a gate, presumably the Step Gate (see RIM A 1 pp. 90-92 
A. 0.61.1 and 3), previously worked upon by Puzur-Assur in and a 
later king whose name is broken. 



ill IT Cf. A.O.89.3 line 3'. iii 18' na-gab: Cf. the references in 
CAD 11/1 (N) p. ill sub nagbu B c. iii 20'-21' See the note 
to iii 13-14', iii 23' In the translation I have suggested a 
restoration based on A. 0.89. 3 line 5'. This seems plausible 



since A, 0.89. 3 follows closely the order of events as narrated 
in iii 13'-35\ iii 27-28' Cf. A.0.89.3 line 6'. iii 31' 6(?): the 
numeral might be 5. iii 32'-33' Cf. A.O.89.3 line 8'. 
iii 33'b-35' Cf. A.0.89.7 iv 31-34a and the note. 



94 



Assur-bel-kala A.0.89.3 
COMMENTARY 



Regarding the annals see the commentary to A.0.89.1. 

The clay cone fragment (VA Ass 2269, Ass 9008, Ass 
ph 1327) was found on the south slope of the stone 



foundation of the Istar temple, eC6in. It measures 
8,5x7.8+ cm and the inscription has been collated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1930-31 Weidner, AfO 6 pp. 86-88 and 91 (copy, edition) 
1961 Borger, EAK 1 pp. 136-38 (study) 



1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxix 3 (translation) 



TEXT 



Lacuna 

1') [...] x x (x)-a-te lu am-fda(ip-[has(l) ...] 

2') [salam sarrutiia sur]-fbtP-a du-us li-ta-at 

MAN-ti-ia i-na ^qer^~[blsu altur (...)] 
3') [... sadd hirua] ab-bal-kit uru u-ru-ni-ds sa 

kur hi-im-me [...] 
4') [...] sa-lam man-Ij-kt dv-us li-ta-at lugal-/[/- 

ia ina qerbisu altur] 
5') [... epus ina e-s\dr-m e tu-kul-ti-ia i-na pa-ni 

a§-sur E[N-/a useziz (...)] 
6') [... harranat mat a-r]i-me ma-da-a-te za-i-ru- 

ut as-sur sa i-na kur [... ahtabbatu (..,)] 
7') \...-i\e i-na me-ziz qar-du-ti-ia i-na 2-e 

BA[LA-ia ...] 
8') [... ina mu\l~mu-li-ia na-ah-zv-te [...] 
9') [... sumatisunu i]t-ti u-ma-mi an-ne-e la-a 

sat-ru [...] 

W) [ina umisuma abullu ... sa (...) puzur-as-s\ur 
dumu as-swr-ERiN-TAH e-pus e-na-ah m as- 
s[ur-*.,] 

1 1') \mi\-lu it-bal-si ka.gal si-a-ti a-[na sihirtlsa 

12') [...] a-na u*-um sa-a-te nun-m [arku ...] 
13') [ana as-r]i-su-nu lu-ter a[s-sur ikriblSu 
isemme munekkir sitrlia u sumTia ...] 



14') [... kussdsu] li-ki-mu-s[u ...] 



Lacuna 



Lacuna 

V-9) [...] I fought [...] I made a colossal [royal 
statue of myself (and) wrote] thereon (a descrip- 
tion of) my royal victories. [...] I traversed 
[Mount Hirua, conquered and burnt] the city 
Urunias of the land Himme. I made a royal statue 
of myself (and) [wrote thereon (a description of) 
my] royal victories. [I made (another) royal statue 
of myself (and) erected (it) in Esjarra, the house 
of my succour, before Assur, my lord. [...] On 
numerous [campaigns against the Arjamaeans, the 
enemies of Assur, who in the land [...I continu- 
ally plundered ... 300 lions ...] with my fierce 
valour, in [my] second regnal year [... with] my 
sharp arrows [... their names] are not written with 
these animals [...] 



Iff- 11') [At that time the ... Gate - Puzur-Ass]ur 
(hi), son of Assur-naran (i) had built (it and 
when) it became dilapidated Ass[ur-.,. rebuilt (it) 
— it had again become dilapidated], the flood had 
washed it away. [I completely reconstructed] this 
gate. 

12-13'a) [In the future], in days to come, [may a 
later] prince [when this gate becomes old and dila- 
pidated, restore its weakened portions]. May he 
restore [my monumental inscriptions to] their 
[places]. (Then) Afssur will listen to his prayers]. 
1313-14') [As for the one who removes my inscrip- 
tion and my name]: May [Assur ...] take away 
from him [his throne]. 
Lacuna 



2' For the restorations see line 4' and A. 0.89. 2 iii 13-14'. 
3' Cf. A.0.89.2 iii 17'. 4' Cf. line 2' and A.0.89.2 iii 20'-21'. 
5' Cf. A.0.89.2 iii 23'-24\ 6' Cf. A.0.89,2 iii 27-28'. 7 Cf. 
A.0.89.2 iii 3a. 8' Cf. A.0.89.2 iii 32'-33 ( . The last preserved 
part of line 8' is erased. 9' Cf. A. 0.89.7 iv 31 -34a and the 
note. 10' There is no evidence on which royal name to restore 



at the end of the line. Borger, EAK 1 p. 144 suggests ASsur- 
bel-nise§u. 11' For the end of the line cf. A.0.89.2 iii 26' and 
Borger, EAK 1 p. 144. 14' Cf. RIMA 1 p. 238 vi 5, p. 246 
line 117, and passim in Asn. n and later. See Meltzer, Con- 
cluding Formulae 2 pp. 450-51. 



ASsur-bel-kala A.0.89.4 



95 



This introduction to annals of Assur-bel-kala is preserved on two clay 
tablet fragments from Assur. As explained in the commentary to 
A.0.89.1, it could be part of any of the AsSur annals fragments 
(A.0.89.1, 2, 5, or 6). It would have been followed by the king's 
genealogy (cf. A.0.89.2 i l'-7'). 



CATALOGUE 





Museum 


Ass 


Ass ph 


AsSur 


Dimensions 


Lines 




Ex. 


number 


number 


number 


provenance 


(cm) 


preserved 


cpn 


1 


UiiJocated 


16308k 


4777 


0.4-0.5 metre deep, late 
Assyrian level, forecourt of 
ASsur temple, iD3v; 
Pedersen, MA archive, M5 




Obv. 1-14 
Rev. 1' 


n 


2 


VAT 11240 


18268 


- 


Fill, iC4ivM 


4.2x3.3 + 


Obv. 1-7 


c 



COMMENTARY 

Ex. 1 (rev. 1') is dated to the fourth or fifth regnal year — see Brinkman, PKB 
p. 142 n. 859. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1915-19 Ebeling, KAR no. 126 Fragment 2 (ex. 2, copy) 
1917 Schroeder, OLZ 20 305 (ex. 2, study) 
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §341 (ex. 2, translation) 
1930-31 Weidner, AfO 6 pp. 78-93 (exs. 1-2, copy, edition) 



1961 Borger, EAK 1 pp. 135-44 (exs. 1-2, study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxix 1 (exs. 1-2, translation) 
1985 Pedersen, Archives 1 p. 56 (ex. 1, provenance) 



TEXT 



Obverse 

1) v m i d a -sur-EN-ka-l[a sarru rabu sar k]is lugal 
kur d a-sur 

2) [l]ugal la-a $a-na-a[n sar kullat kibrat 
arba y i(l) za}-nin e-kur bi-bfl lib-bi d a-sur 

3) [gir].arad en kur.kur.meS [sa ina tukulti 
assur(l) it-t]al-la-ku i-sa-pa-nu ge-^rP-gu 

4) [sa d ]a-sur d BAD [.«. ep]-se-tu-su ti-bu la-a 
nu-u\h-h]u 

5) [sa b]e-lu-ui kur d a-s[ur ana qailsu 
umel{l)]-lu mug-h[ar-mit] 

6) [nap-ha]r kur.kur.mes [nakrati(l) ina isai] 
T d ~iGiBiL6(NE.Gi) mu-l[a-it la magirJ(l)] 



1-14) Assur-bel-kal[a, great king, king of the] 
universe, king of Assyria, unrivalled king, [king 
of all the four quarters], provider for Ekur, select 
of the god Assur, appointee of the Lord of the 
Lands, [who] acts [with the support of the god 
As$ur] in laying low his enemies, [whose] deeds 
the gods Assur (and) Enlil [...], the unconquer- 
able attacker, [the one to whom was entrusted] 
dominion of Assyria, the one who disintegrates 
[all enemy] lands [with the fire of] Girru (fire 
god), controller [of the insubmissive], the one 
who breaks up [the forces of the rebellious], the 



1 Sarru rabu is perhaps a better restoration than sarru dannu. 
Cf. A.0.89.8 line 1; A.0.89.11 line 2; and see Borger, EAK 1 
pp. 142-43 and Seux, ERAS pp. 296 and 300. 3 Cf. sakkanak 
assur be! matati 'appointee of ASSur, Lord of lands' in 



A.0.101.40 line 9. 'Lord of lands' was originally a title of Enlil 
and so this epithet is similar to sakkanak eniii 'appointee of 
EnliP. 4 nuhhu: See the note to A. 0.87.1 iv 47. 5 Cf. RIMA 
1 p. 233 i 7-8. 



96 



Assur-bel-kala A.0.89.4 



7) [mu]-pa-ri-[ir kisri multarhi mu]-ne-er 
[aiiabTSu] 

8) [Sa ... i-n\a~ad-di ut~ta-* ka^-[ru ,..] 

9) [...-ft]«x[...] 

10) [Sa ... ina qab{l)]-li li-sah-hi-pu gi-mir mal- 
kiM[E§\ 

11) [Sa ... mQtati] Sa kiS-Sa-faP 

12) \nise(l) istu babili Sa mQt ak-ka]-de-e a-di 
a.ab.ba e-te-w-f[e] 

13) [sa mat amurri u tamti Sa mat na-i-r]i qa-as- 
su ik-Su-d[u] 

14) [Sa ...] taq-rin-^te D-pe-lu gim-ra 

Lacuna 
Reverse 
Lacuna 

T) [ITI ... UD X.KAM iTmu] md a-Sttr- AG A-UN.ME&- 

Su 



one who defeats [his enemies, ...] throws down, is 
changed [the one who ... in battle] has over- 
whelmed all princes, [... the one who ...] has con- 
quered the [lands] of all [people from Babylon of 
the land Akka]d to the Upper Sea [of the land 
Amurru and the sea of the lands Nair]i, [the one 
who ...] ... has become lord of all; 



Lacuna 

Lacuna 

rev. V) [Month of 

A§sur-rem-nisesu. 



.th day, eponymy of] 



This is yet another fragmentary version of the annals on a piece of 
clay tablet from AsSur. The first preserved portion (2-1 T) duplicates 
the narrative of the campaign towards Uruafri found in A. 0.89. 2 
(i 8'-18'). The next section (12 ; -16') is an abbreviated version of the 
campaign described in A.0.89.2 i 19'-36% while the final section 
(17'-20') is too broken for any identification. 



COMMENTARY 



Regarding the annals see the commentary to A.O.89.1. 

The clay tablet fragment (VAT 9595, Ass 17148, Ass 
ph 5328) measures 9.4x5.9+ cm and was found in the 



north-east part of the gate room of the Old Assyrian 
Assur temple, iB3rv. Cf. the provenances of A.0.89.2 
exs. 1 and 4. The inscription has been collated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 no. 74 (copy) 
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §333 (translation) 
1930-31 Weidner, AfO 6 pp. 78-93 (edition) 



1961 Borger, EAK 1 pp. 135-44 (study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxix 1 (translation) 



TEXT 



Lacuna 

r) [...]x[.»] 



2 f ) [ina Surru SarrQtTia (ina mahre paleia) Sa ina] 



Lacuna 

F) (Too broken for translation) 



2-16') [In my accession year (and in my first 



A.0.89.4 line 7 [mu]-ne-er. See Seux, ERAS p. 198. 

A.0.89,4 line 10 See Seux, ERAS p. 257, 



A.0.89.4 lines 11-13 Cf. A.0.89.7 iv 37b-39 and Borger, 
EAK 1 p. 141. A.0.89.5 lines 2'-ll' For restorations and 



A5Sur-bel-kaIa A.0,89.5 



97 



gis.gu.za L[uGAL~te rabis usibu] 
3') [ina emuqe sirate sa assur beliia alik pamia 

ina(l) ...]-x sa d nin-u[rta alik immia(l)] 
4') [ina libbe qardi sa adad alik(l) sume-l\i-ia 

gis.gigir.[mes u ummanafiia adki] 
5') [gem pasqute{l) ... sa ana me-te]q 

gis.gigir.mes u £rin.[hi.a.mes la saknu (?)] 
6') [perks IS etiqU pereksun(l) musen.me]s AN-e 

mut-tap-ri-s[u-te la etiqu] 
7) [pereksun sa sarru aiiumma rubu alik (?)] 

pa-ni-ia la il-li-[ku ...] 
8") [gerra suatu asbat(l) ...] ar-ha-ni-su-nu mar- 

[su-te ngrebete] 
9') [pasqate simmilat sadesunu(l) ina] ak-kul- 

Oat) zabar lu-^tP [ahsi] 
10') [ana m$teq narkabutlia utib hursanisunu sa- 

tu\~nu a-na pe-er-ke a[b-balkit] 
1 1') [x-x-ubda samanuna lu ebir{7) ana qel-reb 

kur u-ru-at-ri [grub] 
12') [... k]ur MAs-gu-un kur mi-il-d[i ...] 
13') [... di-ik]-ta-su-nu ma- } a~ta I[u aduk ...] 
14') [... ki-m]a im-ba-ri vGv-su-[nu ...] 
15') [.,. ana e]s-ut-te as-bat as-su [...] 
16') [... ina g]a-si-se ugu URU-s[u-nu lu alul ...] 



regnal year) after I nobly ascended the] royal 
throne, [with the exalted strength of the god 
ASsur, my lord, who goes before me, with the ...] 
of the god Ninu[rta, who goes at my right hand, 
with the martial spirit of the god Adad, who goes 
at] my left hand, [I mustered my] chariots [and 
troops. Difficult roads ... which for the] passage 
of my chariots and troops [were not suitable, 
routes which were impassable, whose barriers 
even the] winged birds of the sky [could not pass, 
the barriers through which no king or prince who] 
preceded me had marched [... / took that road 
.,.], their rugged paths [and difficult passes, the 
terraces of their mountains — with] bronze picks 
I [hacked out a good way for the passage of my 
chariotry]. I [marched] right through those 
[mountains. / crossed over the Rivers ...ubdu 
(and) Samanunu, I entered] the land Uruatri. 
[The lands ...] Masgun (or Bargun), Mildu ... [I 
brought about] their extensive defeat [.., like] a 
cloud upon them [...] I reorganized. In order to 
[... on] stakes over their cities [I hung them ,,,] 



17') [...] x pa-na nun-w [. 
18') [...]x-niii-k[a-...] 
19') [...]x-sw-x[...] 
20') [...] x [...] 
Lacuna 



.] 



17'-20') (Too broken for translation) 
Lacuna 



This annals fragment on a piece of clay tablet from Assur has the 
remains of five paragraphs. The first and last paragraphs are too bro- 
ken for identification. In the second and third paragraphs (lines 2-5') 
is a hunting narrative very similar to A.0.89.7 iv 26-30 although the 
division into two paragraphs suggests there was some variation from 
A.0.89.7. The fourth paragraph (lines 6-15') has a description of a 
campaign west of the Euphrates (involving presumably conquest of the 
city Pitru) and is very similar to, but not an exact duplicate of, a pas- 
sage in A.0.89.9 (lines 3'- 10'). Restorations have been made on anal- 
ogy with that text as well as with a text of Tiglath-pileser i (see the 
note to lines 7-9'). 



commentary see A. 0.89. 2 i 8-18'. 12' mas- can be read mas- 
or bar-. 15' Cf. Borger, EAK 1 p. 143. Instead of as-su 'in 



order to* Weidner suggested ina §u-[i«] 'with [my (own)] hand', 
which is also possible. 



98 



AsSur-bel-kala A.0.89.6 
COMMENTARY 



Regarding the annals see the commentary to A.0.89.1. 

The clay tablet fragment (VAT 9539, Ass 6796a, Ass 
ph 957) was found south-west of the Anu-Adad temple, 



eA6n. It measures 10.5x9.8+ cm and the inscription 
has been collated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1930-31 Weidner, AfO 6 pp. 88-92 (copy, edition) 
1961 Borger, EAK 1 pp. 135-38 (study) 



1970 Millard, Iraq 32 pp. 168-69 (study) 
1976 Grayson, AR1 2 lxxxix 4 (translation) 



TEXT 



Lacuna 

10 [...]x[...] 



Lacuna 
1') [...] . 



[...] 



2') [... udrate].ME§ rte-£e~i-[nLtoEs 
3') [... sugul-I\a-te-su-nu [...] 



4') [... paguta] GAL-ta ^nam-su^-[ha ...] 
50 [... k]ur mu-us-re-e rti^-[sgbila ...] 



6') [ina si-qi]r d a-sur a a-nim u d i[sKUR(?) ...] 
7') [.., eg]ir kur a-ra-me Sa mu I.kAm r2(?)i- 

[su puratta lu etebir istu (?)] 
8') [al a-n]a-at sa kur su-hi u ur[u tadmar u adi 

al rapiqi sa mat kardunias(l)] 
90 [da-ab-d]a-su-nu ds-kun gun r#i [tamarta 

ana allia assur ubla] 
1 0') [. . .]- y a-da-ia. mes su-te 9 -e. me [s . . . ] 
11') [„.-/w]/-ra-/a.ME§ sa i-na gIr kur [labnQni ...] 

12') [„.] X GIS.MA.MES fa KUS DUH.SI-[e.MES (...) 

puratta lu gtebir al . . . ] 
13') [so] gir.mes am-ma-te H&n [nar pu]-*~ra(iyi- 

[at-ti(l) (...) lit aksud ina umesuma] 
1 40 [siddi a]h-la-mi-i s[a . . . ] 
150 !•».] x uru m/-x-[...] 

160 [-Jx[...] 

Lacuna 



2-30 We despatched merchants (and) they ac- 
quired burhis, dromedaries, (and)] tesenu. [He 
formed (herds) of dromedaries, bred (them), (and) 
displayed] herds of them [to the people of his 
land]. 

4-50 [The king] of Egypt sent a large [female 
monkey], a crocodile, [(and) a 'river-man', beasts 
of the Great Sea. He displayed (them) to the peo- 
ple of his land] . 

6-150 [By the] command of the gods Assur, Anu, 
and A]dad, the great gods, my lords, ...] in pur- 
suit of the Aramaeans, which twice in one year [I 
crossed the Euphrates]. I brought about their [de- 
feat from the city An]at of the land Suhu and the 
city [Tadmar as far as the city Rapiqu of 
Kardunias. I brought their] tribute and [tax to my 
city Assur. The ...]-daiu, Sutu, [...Jmiraiu, who 
[live] at the foot of Mount [Lebanon ... in] rafts 
(made of inflated) goatskins [I crossed the 
Euphrates. I conquered the city ... which (is) on] 
the opposite bank of [the Euphrates, (on the 
River Saggurru). At that time the region of the 
A]hlamu which [...] the city Mi[...] 



160 [.-] ... [...] 

Lacuna 



€ In A.0.89.9 line 3' Anu is omitted. 7-9' The precise 
reconstruction of these lines is uncertain. For line T cf. 
A.O.89.9 line 4'. For the entire passage cf. A. 0.87. 4 lines 
34-36. Regarding 'twice' see the note to A.0.87.3 line 30. 
W-15' Cf. A.0.89.9 lines S'-IC. 12' Cf. A.0.89.7 ii 22. 
ir-13' Cf. A.0.89.9 lines 6'b-8'. As Millard, followed by 
Kessler, Nordmesopotamien pp. 191-92, observed the event 



described here seems to be reflected much later in texts of 
Shalrn. in, such as 3 R pi. 8 ii 85-86: uru m aS-sur-ut-tir-as-bat 
sd gir am-{ma)-te sd id.a.rad Sa ugu id $a-gu-ri sd LU.ME^-e 
kur hat-ta-a-a uru pi-it-ru i-qa-bu~§u-nL Thus the conquered 
city in the Assur-bel-kala texts is presumably Pitru. As for 
restorations, however, there would hardly seem to be room in 
either text for the full description given by Shalm. in. 



A§sur-bel-kala A.0.89.7 99 



This text is inscribed on a stone stele, commonly called the 'Broken 
Obelisk 1 , which was found at Nineveh but originally must have been 
erected in A5sur. On the front of the stele, between the first two 
columns of the inscription, a relief has been engraved showing the 
king, leading prisoners by nose rings, and various divine symbols. The 
stele was almost certainly made during the reign of AsSur-bel-kala, as 
shown by close parallels between passages in its text and in the annals, 
The text itself was never finished for there are blanks in the long hunt- 
ing passage (col. iv) where the numbers of beasts should have been in- 
scribed, and the left side of the stele is blank. It probably dates to at 
least the fifth or sixth regnal year, if not later (see the commentary to 
A. 0.89.1). Essentially the text is annalistic but the author was not very 
good at composition and has extracted passages from various sources, 
including Assyrian chronicles, with little attempt to blend them to- 
gether. 

The most striking feature of this text is the lengthy and detailed 
description of the hunt (col. iv). Hunting passages begin to appear in 
Assyrian royal inscriptions with the texts of Tiglath-pileser i (see the 
introduction to A. 0.87.1), and this text has many similarities to those 
earlier passages, but none of the earlier passages are so long. 

The object must originally have come from Assur since the building 
description largely concerns projects at this city. It is a matter of great 
interest in this text that several different structures, not just one, in 
Assur are described as well as construction in three other cities. At 
AsSur the king rebuilt palace storehouses, 'the house of the sahuru of 
Eriba-Adad (i)\ and 'the large terrace on the north side which Assur- 
nadin-ahhe" had built' (v 1-6). While it is known that Tiglath-pileser i 
worked on 'the house of the Sahuru' (see A.0.87.4), no building 
records of Erlba-Adad i or As^ur-nadin-ahhe" i or n have been 
preserved. Assur-bel-kala continued Tiglath-pileser i's work (A.O.87.3 
lines 36-44) on the moat, gates, and wall of Assur (v 7-14). Assur- 
bel-kala also continued work on the various rooms of the palace made 
of different woods. The scribes of Tiglath-pileser i (see A. 0.87. 4 lines 
59-66 and 72-76) spoke of boxwood, cedar, and terebinth. In the Bro- 
ken Obelisk (v 14-15) tamarisk is also mentioned, a wood that occurs 
in a fragmentary text of Tiglath-pileser i (A.0.87.5). Also note the 
various woods used by Ashurnasirpal n in his palace at Calah 
(A.0.101.23 lines 18-19 and 30 lines 25-32). In further emulation of 
Tiglath-pileser i (A. 0.87. 4 lines 67-71), Assur-bel-kala placed animal 
figurines of stone at the entrances to the palace (v 16-19), one of 
which has been recovered (A. 0.89. 11). Another project at A§sur was 
the excavation of a canal, which Assur-dan i had earlier made (no 
building records of this king have been preserved) and the planting of 
a garden (v 20-23). The quay by the Tigris Gate, to which Adad- 
naran i had dedicated so much effort (RIMA 1 p. 128), was rebuilt 
(v 24-27). The large terrace of the 'New Palace' of Tukultl-Ninurta i 
(see RIMA 1 p. 231) was reconstructed (v 24-31). Palaces were erected 
at other cities, namely Sikkatu, Saqa, and Apqu (v 32-37). In the last 
place, the palace had been previously created by Assur-resa-isi i (cf. 
RIMA 1 p. 319A.0.86.10). 



100 



ASsur-bel-kala A.0.89.7 



COMMENTARY 



Rassam says he found this stele (BM 118898, 
56-9-9,59), which measures 65.4+ cm high and 40.6 
cm square, at Nineveh in a ditch about halfway 
between the palaces of Senn. and Asb. A stone female 
torso, with an inscription of Assur-bel-kala (A. 0.89. 10), 
was found in the same ditch. The text, which has been 
collated, is divided into five cols.: cols, i and ii are on 
the front, col. iii is on the right side, and cols, iv and v 
are on the back. The left side is uninscribed. The condi- 
tion of the stele's surface has deteriorated badly since 
its discovery. An early, unpublished, copy by George 
Smith of the first col. (cf. Weidner, AfO 12 [1937-39] 
p. 377a and Borger, EAK I pp. 138-39), to which we 
have not had direct access, is said to have more text 
than the later published copies. In turn, the published 
copies have more text than now appears on the origi- 
nal. In this edition we have included the readings from 
Smith's copy (as reported by Borger) and from the pub- 
lished copies although no specific notes of this have 
been made since this would involve excessive annotation 
and discussion. 

The beginning of the first col. (i 1-11) is an invoca- 
tion of gods, similar to introductory passages in other 
texts in this volume (see the introduction to A. 0.87.1). 
The gods may be identical with the symbols engraved 
on the stele (see Borger, EAK 1 pp. 138-39). There fol- 



lows (i 12ff), as usual, the name and epithets of the 
king. 

As noted in the introduction, the text has been com- 
piled by a scribe who took little trouble to blend his 
various sources together. The text of the first four cols, 
is in third person, but in the fifth col. (the building 
description) it is in the first person. Clearly at least two 
different sources were used here. The unprecedented 
concern with precise dates (eponymy and month) for 
each event narrated in cols, ii and iii, and the succinct 
repetitive phrases describing the encounters with 
Aramaeans, are strong evidence that this part of the 
text comes from an otherwise unknown Assyrian chron- 
icle. 

The various woods used in the construction of the 
palace at ASsur (v 14-15) have already been remarked 
upon in the introduction. Since each wood is preceded 
by the word e.gal 'palace*, some scholars have mistak- 
enly concluded that these are separate buildings. But in 
A.0.101.26 lines 58-59 £.gal appears only once, at the 
beginning of the list of woods. Morever, in A. 0.101. 23 
line 21 the singular suffix -sa its (doors)' refers to the 
£.gal. The plural suffix -sunu 'their (doors)' in our text 
(v 19) refers to the various rooms or wings of the 
palace as does the numeral 'eight* in A.0.101.30 line 26. 
See Weidner, AfO 18 (1957-58) p. 356b and Schramm, 
EAK 2 p. 37. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1861 1 R pi. 28 (cols, iv-v, copy) 

1870 3 R pi. 4 no. 1 (col. iii, copy) 

1889 Peiser, KB 1 pp. 122-29 (cols, iv-v, edition) 

1897 Rassam, Asshur p. 9 (provenance) 

1902 King, AKA pp. Ii and 128-49 (photo, edition) 

1904-1905 Streck, ZA 18 pp. 186-95 (study) 

1914 Bezold, ZA 28 p. 406 (study) 

1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§385-95 (translation) 

1926-27 Luckenbill, AJSL 43 p. 225 (study) 

1928 S. Smith, EHA pi. 17 (between pp. 298-99) (photo) 



1936 Gadd, Stones p. 123 (provenance) 

1961 Borger, EAK 1 pp. 135-42 (study) 

1968 Brinkman, PKB pp. 383-86 (study) 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxix 2 (translation) 

1980 Kessler, Nordmesopotamien pp. 52, 61, 84, and 167 

(study) 
1982 Borker-Klahn, Bildstelen no. 131 (photo, study) 
1982 Miglus, ZA 72 p. 269 and n. 25 (v 24-25, study) 
1986 Miglus, MDOG 118 pp. 209-10 (v 2-5, 15-16, study) 



TEXT 



Col. i 

1) fassur belu rabti] man gim-rat dingir.mes 

GAL.MES-te 

2) (traces) 

3) [...] MAN NAM.MES Q-bU DINGIR.MES [..,] 

4) [...] d e-a [...] man ap-si-i [...] 
5-9) (traces) 

10) [...] DINGIR.MES M-qU-tU 

11) (traces) 

12) (traces) 

13) sd[...] 



i 1-11) [God Assur, great lord], king of all the 
great gods, [...J king of destinies, father of the 
gods, [...]; god Ea [...], king of the apsu, [...] the 
high gods [...] 



i 12-21) [Assur-bel-kala ..., who acts] with the 



Assur~bei-kala A.0.89.7 



101 



14) ina giL tukul-ti [...] 

15) TunT.mes [...] 

16) [...] 

17) I d AMAR.UTU-SUMl-SES.MES MAN KUR URI.KI 
[-] 

18-21) (traces) 
Lacuna 
Col. ii 

1) 1 LIM ERIN.MES KUR X [...] &/?-[...] 

2) 4 lim sal-la-su-nu is-su-ha a-na kur d a-sur 

3) u-se-ri-rdaOTi [...] 

4) /-[.-.] 

5) a-na kur [...] 

6) [X X] KUR [...] 

7) ran [...] 

8) [...] ITI.GAN 

9) [...] 

10) ina r/Mfli-ri-I...] 

11) ina Mu-ma [si]-a-ti ina rn.rSui uru [...] 

12) AfKURr/niifi-[A:i(?)...] 

13) [...] ina itlsig 4 li-me m as-sur-[...] 

1 4) li-ib- [...]-£/. mes [. . . ] e d a-nim 

15) u d iSKUR a-na fe^-\pe-si\ a-na uru.sa-uru 

16) [ubla] ina Mu-ma si-a-ti ina iti.ki.min-/wct 

17) [...] na-a-ku-sd.ME$ 

18) [... mat him(l)]-me u kur [...] 

19) ih-ta-bat ina mu- ma si-a-ti ina iti.gan 

20) [x x x x x] ^iS^-tu ugu fD ha-bur kur har- 
i Jfcfi 

21) a-di uru kar-ga-mis sd ha-at-te ih-ta-bat 

22) [arkisunu ina] gis.ma.mes KUS.DUH.si-e 

23) [puratta lu ebir ...] 

24) [...] 
Lacuna 
Col. iii 

1) ina mu -ma si-a-ti ina itlklmin-zw^ kaskal sd 
kur a-ri-me ina uru M-si-ri sd ^pa^-ha-at 



2) uru [x x x x] im-ta-ha-as ina Mv-ma si-a-ti 
ina iti.su kaskal sd kur a-ri-me 

3) /wa i~uru"I [x x (x)] sd kur [x x (x)] rsiGi-as 
ina iti.g[u 4 ] li-me md a-sur-AGA-uN.MEs-su 

4) uru tu-ur-[x]-ta kur mu-us-ri ik-ta-^sa<D ina 
Mu-ma si-a-ti ina iti.ziz 

5) gis.gigir.mes ii [...]-/:a.MES is-tu uru.sa-uru 
riP-[likuma] uru x-[x]-in-di-su-la 



support of [the god Assur ...] people 
Marduk-nadin-ahhe, king of Akkad [...] 
Lacuna 



[...] 



ii 1-10) 1,000 troops of the land [...] 4,000 hos- 
tages from them he uprooted and brought down 
into Assyria [...] to the land [...] and [...] the 
month Kislev [...] 



ii 11-12) In that year, in the month Tammuz, the 
city [...] of the M\xl[ku ...] 

ii 13- 19a) In the month Sivan, eponymy of 
Assur-[... he brought ...] to Inner City (Assur) to 
rebuild the temple of the gods Anu and Adad. In 
that year, in the same month, [...] ... [... the land 
Him]me and the land [...] he plundered. 

ii 19b-24) In that year, in the month Kislev, [...] 
from the River Habur of/and the land Harku (or 
Hir/Hur/Kin/Mur-ku) to the city Carchemish of 
the land Hatti he plundered. [He crossed the Eu- 
phrates after them in] rafts (made of inflated) 
goatskins. 
Lacuna 



iii l-2a) In that year, in the same month, on cam- 
paign against the Aramaeans, he fought (with 
them) at the city Sasiru, which is in the district of 
the city [...] 

iii 2b-3a) In that year, in the month Tammuz, on 
campaign against the Aramaeans, he fought (with 
them) at the city [...] of the land [...] 
iii 3b-4a) In the month Iyyar, eponymy of Assur- 
rem-nisesu, he conquered the city Tur[...]tu of the 
land Musri. 

iii 4b-8a) In that year, in the month Shebat, the 
chariots and [...] went from Inner City (Assur) 
[and] conquered the cities [...]indisulu and 
f...]sandu, cities which are in the district of the 



EAK 



i 14 Cf. A.0,89,4 line 3, A.0.87.3 lines 2-3, and Borger 
1 p. 139. i 17 Cf. Weidner, AfO 12 (1937-39) p. 377a, 
Borger, EAK 1 p. 139, and Brinkman, PKB p. 125 n. 729. 
ii 2-3 Cf. A.0.87.2 line 19. ii 3 -^da(l)k cf. Borger, EAK 1 



p. 139 n, 3, King read -r/cfi, ii 20 har- can be read har- y hir-, 
frur-, kin~ f or mur-« ii 22 Cf. A.0.87.1 v 57-58, A.0.87.2 lines 
28-29, A.0.89.6 line 12', A.0.89.9 line 7. iii 3 iti.g[u 4 ]: so 
older editions — cf. Borger, EAK 1 p. 139 n. 2. 



102 



Assur-bel-kala A.0.89.7 



6) u uru x-[x-x-(x)]-sa-an-de-e uru.mes-w sd 
pa-ha-at URU.Bkv- m ku-ri-gal-zu 

7) ik-tal-du m ka-dds-man-bur-ia-ds(*) dumu ki- 

r d AMAR"l.[UTU]-rTl"I.LA l^tH sd-kth KUR-//- 

su-nu 

8) is-sab-tu ina Mu-ma si-a-ti ina 1T1.GU4 kaskal 
sd kur a-ri-me ina uru pa-u-za 

9) 5a gir kur kase-ia-ri im-ta-ha-as ina mu-ma 
si-a-ti ina ni.Ki.MiN-/wa 



10; 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 

17 
18 
19 

20: 
21 
22 
23 
24 



kaskal 5a kur a-ri-me ina ri-is uru na-bu-la 

[(...)] im-ta-ha-as ina mv-ma si-a-ti 

ina ITI.SIG4 Lu.riRiN^.MES sd kur mu-us-ri [x] 

^iP-ta-sah ina mv-ma si-a-ti 

ina iti.ki.min-/w0 kaskal ia kur a-ri-me 

final uru [x]-li-dw(?)-a sa ugu id.idigna 

im-ta-ha-as ina mv-ma si-a-ti ina itlne 

kaskal sd kur a-ri-me 

ina uruTmeP-wi s« m ii-sur-sa-ta- d a-sur sd 

pa-ha-at uru si-na-mu im-ta-ha-as 

ina mv-ma si-a-ti ina rn.Ki.MiN-ma uru su- 

*~tP-[x]-ra sd kur ha-ni-gal-bat it-tas-ha 

uru hu-^uP-za sd MURUB 4 kur ka-si-ia-ri u 

uru e-re-sd sd kur hab-hu.MEs 



u-kal-[iu-ni] ik-ta-sad 3 lim(?) §[alO)]-la-ta 
ul-te-si-a ina mv-ma si-a-ti 
ina itlkin kaskal sd kur a-ri-me ina uru 
mu-ra-ar- i~r/(? )-/>(? )~i 5a kur sub-re-e 
im-ta-ha-as ina mv-ma si-a-ti ina iti.[api]n 
a- v ra-ma^ is-tu kur ma-hi-ra-a-ni 



a-di uru rsup i -pa-a M kur. kaskal-/*/ ih-ta- 
*~baP [...] itlgan li-me m DiNGiR-suM-wa 
kaskal sd kur a-ri-me ina uru ma-ag-ri-si sd 
kur [/]a-n im-ta-ha-as ina mu-ma 
si-a-ti ina rn.Ki.MiN-ma kaskal sd kur a-ri- 
me ina vmj. MAD-kat-li-mu im-ta-ha-as 
ina Mu-ma si-a-ti ina iTi.Ki.MiN-/na \a-ra-m\a 
ina tar-si uru sa-an-ga-ri-te 
[sa kisad] in pu-rat-[te imtahas ina sattimma 
si\-a-ti ina m.Ki.MiN-ma 



city Dur-Kurigalzu. They captured Kadasman- 
Burias, son of Itti-Marduk-balatu, governor of 
their land. 



iii 8b-10a) In that year, in the month lyyar, on 
campaign against the Aramaeans, he fought (with 
them) at the city Pauza, which is at the foot of 
Mount Kasiiari. In that year, in the same month, 
on campaign against the Aramaeans, he fought 
(with them) at the head of the city Nabula. 
iii 10b- 13a) In that year, in the month Sivan, he 
uprooted the troops of the land MusrL In that 
year, in the same month, on campaign against the 
Aramaeans, he fought (with them) at the city 
[...Jtibua, which is on the Tigris. 

iii 13b-17a) In that year, in the month Ab, on 
campaign against the Aramaeans, he fought (with 
them) at the cities (under the rule) of Lisur-sala- 
Assur, which are in the district of the city 
Sinamu. In that year, in the same month, he 
uprooted (the inhabitants of) the city Su[...]ru of 
the land Hanigalbat. He conquered the city 
Hulzu, which is within Mount Kasiiari, and the 
city Eresu, which the people of the land Habhu 
held. He brought out 3,000 captives. 
iii 17b- 19a) In that year, in the month Elul, on 
campaign against the Aramaeans, he fought (with 
them) at the city Murarr/V of the land Subru. 

iii 19b-20a) In that year, in the month 
[Arahjsamnu, he plundered the Aramaeans from 
the land Mahiranu to the city Suppu (or Rupu) of 
the land Harran* 

iii 20b-25) In the month Kislev, eponymy of IlT- 
iddina, on campaign against the Aramaeans, he 
fought (with them) at the city Magrisu of the land 
Iaru. In that year, in the same month, on cam- 
paign against the Aramaeans, he fought (with 
them) at the city Dur-katlimmu. In that year, in 
the same month, [he plundered the Aramae]ans 
opposite the city Sangaritu [which is on] the 
Euphrates. [In] that [year], in the same month, 
[on campaign against the A]ramae[ans], he fought 



iii 7 Instead of -as the text mistakenly has -gal. Cf . King, 
AKA p. 133 n. 6. iii 7 Itti-Marduk-balatu: see Brinkman, 
PKB p. 94 n. 490 and p. 143 n. 861. iii 9 kas 6 -: for the sign 
value see von Soden and Rollig, Syllabar p. 24 no. 130. 
iii 10 ina ri-is; the meaning of this phrase is still uncertain. 
See Grayson, ARi 2 p. 53 n. 229. iii 12 uru [x]-ti-buO)-a: or 
-ti-gu-a. Cf. King, AKA p. 134 n. 5. iii 14 -sa-la; so King, 
AKA. Older publications had ha.la = zittu. Cf. Borger, EAK 
1 p. 140. iii 17 u-kal-llu-ni]: cf. A.0.99.2 line 114, A.0. 100,5 



line 35, A.0. 101. 19 line 94. See Lewy, OLZ 26 198-99 n. 4 
and Borger, EAK 1 p. 140. iii 17 um(?) s[a/{?)]-: the two signs 
are squeezed together and appear to be gu. Cf. Borger, EAK 1 
p. 140. iii 19 iti.[api]n a-^ra-ma^: see Borger, EAK 1 p. 140. 
iii 20 sup- can be read Sup- or ru-. iii 20 m nmGm-svu-na: it is 
just possible that the name should be read Ami-iddina rather 
than llT-iddina. See Borger, EAK 1 p. 142. iii 23-26 For the 
restorations see Borger, EAK 1 p. 139 n. 2 and p. 140. 



Assur-bel-kala A.0.89.7 



103 



25) [harrana sa mat d\-ri-m[e ina ...]-/e im-ta- 
ha-as 

26) [ina sattimma si\-a-\ti ina rn.... harrana sa 
mat arimi] ^ina^ kur gu^uD-gu-li rslG-asi 

27) [...](-)fl/-x-f si-ka^ kur ha-^a^-ni 



28) [... /no] MU-ma s/-a-// ina iti.apin 

29) [. . . ] -x-iz r a^-di mas-qe-e 

30) [... ina iTi].Ki.MiN-Awa kaskal sd kur a-ri-me 

31) [...] x bu-na-a-ni 

32) [...] xSd ur-^a-x [...] 
Lacuna 

Col. iv 

1) d nin-urta u d iGi.Du sa sanga-sw i-ra-mu bu- 
>u-ur EDIN 

2) u-sd-at-li-mu-su-ma ina gis.ma.mes sa kur 
ar-ma-da-a-ia 

3) ir-kab na-hi-ra ina a.ab.ba GAL-te i-du-uk 

4) (blank) am.mes sun.mes su-tu-ru-te ina uru 
a-ra-zi-qi 

5) 5# /?a-a« kur ha-at-te it ina gir kur lab-na- 
a-ni i-duk 

6) (blank) mu-ri.UES bal-tu-te sd am.mes u-sa- 
ab-bi-ta 

7) su-gulAa-a-te-su-nu ik-sur (blank) am.si.mes 
ina GiS.BAN-.fw 

8) li-sam-qit (blank) am.si.mes bal-tu-te u-sa- 
ab-bi-ta 

9) a-na uru-sw d a-sur ub-la 2 su-si ur.mah.mes 
ina lib-bhsu 

10) ek-di ina qi-it-ru-ub me-et-lu-ti-su ina 
Gis.GiGiR-fw pa-at-tu-te 

1 1) ina gir.mes-5w ina gis pa-as-hi i-duk (blank) 
ur.mah.mes 

12) ina gis ndr-^a-am-te u-sam-qit hur-sd-a-nu 
sd-qu-u-tu 

13) e-pe-esis bu-^u-ri-su-nu iq-bi-u-ni-su ina 

UD.MES-tff 

14) ku-us-si hal-pe-e su-ri-pi ina UD.MEs-a/ ni-pi-ih 

15) mul.gag.si.sa sd ki-ma urudu i-su-du ina 
kur e-be-eh 

16) kur u-ra-se kur a-za-me-ri kur an-kur-na 
kur pi-zi-it-ta 

17) kur vv-za-gis kur ka-si-ia-ri KUR.MES-m sa 
kur d a-fwr kur ha-a-na 

18) 5/rf-d/ kur lu-lu-me-e it kur.mes-«/ sa 



(with them) [at ...] 

iii 26) [In] that [year, in the month ..., on cam- 
paign against the Aramaeans], he fought (with 
them) in the land Gulgulu. 

iii 27) [In that year, in the month ..., he ... the 
Aramaeans at the city (...)] at [...]$iku of Mount 
Hanu. 

iii 28-32) In that year, in the month Arahsamnu, 
[he ... the Aramaeans ...] together with the 
drinklng-plaees. [In that year, in] the same 
[month], on campaign against the Aramaeans, [he 
fought (with them) at ...] faces [...] ... [...] 
Lacuna 

iv l-34a) The gods Ninurta and Nergal, who love 
his priesthood, gave to him the hunt and in boats 
of the land Arvad he rode (and) killed a nahiru in 
the Great Sea. He killed ... superb wild bulls and 
cows at the city Araziqu (iv 5) which is before the 
land Hatti and at the foot of Mount Lebanon. He 
captured ... live calves of wild bulls (and) formed 
herds of them. He felled ... elephants with his 
bow. He captured ... live elephants (and) brought 
(them) to his city Assur. He killed from his ... 
chariot (and) on foot with the spear 120 lions 
with his (iv 10) wildly vigorous assault. He felled 
... lions with the mace. In the high mountains 
they (the gods Ninurta and Nergal) commanded 
him to do their hunt. At the time of cold, frost, 
(and) ice, at the time of the ascension of (iv 15) 
Sirius when it is red like molten copper, he ar- 
ranged (and) formed herds of ... gazelles (and) 
ibex (and) ... na/a/u-deer (and) (iv 20) a/a/w-deer 
in Mounts Ebih, Urase, Azameru, Ankurna, 
Pizitta, Udzagis, Kasiiari, mountains of Assyria; 
Mount Hanu in the district of the land of the 
Lullumu; and the mountains of the lands Nairi. 
He bred (them) and numbered their offspring like 
the offspring of sheep. He killed ... panthers, ... 
tigers (midinu), ... bears, two wild boars of the 
marshes, (and) ... ostriches. He felled ... wild 
asses (iv 25) and deer, ... wolves, (and) ... 
simkurrQ. He despatched merchants (and) they ac- 
quired burhis, dromedaries, (and) tesenu. He 
formed (herds) of dromedaries, bred (them), (and) 
displayed herds of them to the people of his land. 
The king of Egypt sent a large female monkey, a 



iii 31 King restored [... sa-la]m bunGm '[an image] in his 
likeness', and Borger, EAK 1 p. 140 suggested that this 
referred to the erection of this very stele. Another possibility is 
that this passage refers to mutilation of the face of an enemy 
(cf. the passage in Asb. reconstructed in CAD 2 [B] p. 318a), 



iv 4 A blank space has been left for the number of animals. 

See the commentary, The same thing happens in iv 6-8, 11, 
19, and 22-25. iv 17 ud-: King, AKA p. 140 n. 4 suggested 
changing ud- to pi- but I know of no other reference to this 
GN with either reading and thus any emendation is unjustified. 



104 



Assur-bel-kala A.0.89,7 



kur.kur na-i-ri 

19) (blank) ar-me.MES tu-ra-a-hlvml (blank) na- 
a-li. mes 

20) ia-e-lL mes ina sa-di-ra-a-te.MES u-te-em-me-eh 

21) su-gul-la-a-te-Su-nu ik-sur u-Sd-lid mar-si-su- 
nu 

22) ki-ma mar-si-it udu se-e-ni. meI im-nu (blank) 
nim-ri.MES 

23) (blank) mi~di-ni.ME$ (blank) a-si.UES 2(?) 

SAH.GIS.GI.MES 

24) (blank) ga.nuu.musen.mes i-duk (blank) 

ANSE. EDIN. NA. ME§ 

25) u mas.da.mes (blank) ur.bar.ra.mes (blank) 
si-im-kur-ri. mes 

26) li-Sam-qit bur-hNS ud-ra-a-te. mes te-Se-ni.MES 
lu.dam.gar.mes 

27) /s-/?wr il-qe-u-ni ud-ra-a-te. mes Mr-^wr u-Sd-lid 

28) su-gul-la-a-te-Su-nu un.mes KUR-ti-Su u-se- 
eb-ri 

29) pa-gu-ta GAL-ta nam-su-ha l6 m u-ma-a-mi 
Sd a.ab.ba 

30) GAL-te man kur mu-us-re-e li-Se-bi-la un.mes 
kur-sh u-Se-eb-ri 

31) si-te-et u-ma-a-me ma-tf-di u mtjsen.mes AN-e 
mut-tap-ri-Sd 

32) bu^u-ur edin ep-se-et qa-ti-Su mu.MES-Su-nu 
it-ti u-ma-me 

33) [an-ne]~^e^ la Sat-ru mi-nu-su-nu it-ti mi-nu- 
te an-ni-te 

34) [la sat]-ru e-zib kur.kur. MES-te ki-sit-ti qa- 
ti-su kaskal.mes kur. mes 

35) [madatu sa a.s]a dtjg.ga ina gis.gigir-sw u 
mar-sa ina gir.mes-s« 

36) [arklsunu it\4al4a-ku-ma dab-da-su~nu is- 
ku-nu 

37) [itti epse-t]i-su an-na-a-te la Sd-ti-ir 
kur.kur.mes-?m 

38) [Sa kissat nise(l).ME]s is-tu uru.ka.dingir sd 
[mm ak]~ka~di-i 

39) [adi tamti elenite] r&f kur [a]-mur-ri [u 
tamti Sa] 

Lacuna 
Col. v 

1) e a-bu-sa-te sd e.gal EN-ti-ia sd ri-^iS^ 

2) ha-mi-luh-hi it tam-li-a qal-la Sd e-na-hu-ma 

3) iS-tu uS-Se-su a-di gaba-dib-bi-su e-pu-^us^ 



crocodile, (and) a 'river-man', beasts of the (iv 30) 
Great Sea. He displayed (them) to the people of 
his land. The remainder of the numerous animals 
and the winged birds of the sky, wild game which 
he acquired, their names are not written with 
these animals, their numbers are not written with 
these numbers. 



iv 34b-39) (This) is apart from (other) lands he 
conquered (and) [numerous] foreign campaigns 
[upon which he] pursued [his enemies] by chariot 
in favourable terrain and on foot in rough terrain 
and brought about their defeat — (such) are not 
written (here) [with] these deeds of his. [He con- 
quered] the lands [of all people] from Babylon of 
[the land Ak]kad [to the Upper Sea] of the land 
Amurru [and the sea of the lands Nairi]. 
Lacuna 



v 1-19) I rebuilt from top to bottom the 
storehouses of my lordly palace which are at the 
head of the hamiluhhu and the small terrace (and) 



iv 20 ina sadirate utemmeh: the meaning is still uncertain. Cf. 
Grayson, ARI 2 p. 55 n. 234. In CAD 15 (S) p. 1 8b it is 
translated: 'he drove(?) ... into roped-off areas' but there is 
still no supporting evidence for this kind of interpretation. 
iv 21 su-gul-la-: King's copy mistakenly has su-gui-at-. His 
transliteration is correct, iv 23 2(1): as King, AKA p. 141 n. 3 
observes, the two vertical wedges are inscribed in the middle 
of a large space, iv 31-34a Cf. A,0.89.2 iii 3313-35'. Also note 



A.0.89.1 rev. ltf, A.0.89.3 line 9', and A.0.89.9 lines l'-2 r . See 
Borger, EAK 1 p. 136. iv 34b-37a Cf. A.0.87.1 vi 49-54 and 
Borger, EAK 1 p. 141. iv 37b-39 Cf. A.0.89.4 lines 11-13 
and Borger, EAK 1 p. 141. v 2 re$ hamiluhhi 'the head of the 
h*: the phrase also occurs in an Assyrian ritual. See CAD 6 
(H) p. 66a and von Soden, AHw p. 338. Von Soden connects 
it with the Hurrian word hawaihu/halahwu which in Nuzt 
texts means 'an enclosed area*. 



Assur-bel-kala A.0.89J 



105 



4) 
5) 

6) 

7) 

8) 
9) 
10 
11 
12 

13 

14' 
15 

16 

17 

is; 

19 

2o; 

21 

22; 

23 

24; 

25; 

26 

27 
28 
29 

30 
31 

32; 

33 

34 

35 

36; 

37 



£ Sd-hu-ri Sd m su- d i§KUR it tam-li-a gal-IVI 

M pa-an im.si.sA Sd md a-£«r-suM-SES.MES man 

kur d a-Sur 

e-pu-Su e-na-hu-ma e-pu-uS ha-ri-sa 

Sd uRu-/a d a-sur. ki Sd P-ab-tu-ma sahar.mes 

im-lu-u 

iS-tU KA.GAL TIBIRA Q-dl KA ID.IDIGNA ah~rU~US 

gkLig.meS kA.gal tibira maS-ra-a-te u-ni-ki-ir 

gi5.ig.meS gis a-Su-hi si-ra-a-te e-pu-uS 

ina me-ser zabar ti-re-ki-is bad qkl-u 

Sd VRu-ia d a-Sun ki a-na si-hir-ti-Su a-na 

GWit-ut-te 

ar-sip si-pi-ik sahar.mes a-na li-me-ti-Su 

a-na e-le-nu ds-pu-uk e.gal gis e-re-ni 

e.gal gis. tug e.gal gis bu-ut-ni £.gal gi& 

tar-pe-^e 

ina URU-ia d a-sur .ki du-ws 2 na-hi-re.MEl 4 

bur-hi-iS. mes 

4 UR.MAH.MES S0 NA4.AD.BAR 2 d ALAD. d LAMMA 

sa NA4 pa-ru-te 2 bur-hi-iS.MES sd na 4 pi-li 

BABBAR-e 

ab-ni-ma ina ka.mes-sw-/*« u-Se-zi-iz 

id «f md a-Sur-KAL-an man kur d a-5wr ih-ru-u 

re-eS Id &f-a-ti P-a-bit-ma 30 mu.meS a.mes 

//ifl lib-bi-Sd 

ul il-li-ku re-es id Sd-a-ti u-Se-eS-ni-ma ah-ri 

a.me§ ff-«a qer-bi-Sd ad-di gis.kiri 6 .mes as- 

ki-si-ir-ta sd a-sa-it-te GAL-te sd kA id.idigna 

Sff md ISKUR-ERIN.TAH MAN KUR d aSur e-pu-Su 

e-na-ah-ma 

P-a-bit is-tu ugu a.mes nag-bi-Sd ina ku-up-ri 

u a-gur-ri 5 GiR.MES ul-li tam-li-a gal-o 

Sd t. gal GiBiL-/e Sd pa-an kisa-la-a-te 

sd m Gis. tukul-ti- d nin-urta man kur d a-Sur e- 

pu-Su 

a-na si-id-di 1 us 3 ku-ma-a-ni a.sA e-na-ah-ma 

P-a-bit iS-tu uS-Se-Su a-di gaba-dib-bi-Su ar- 

si-ip 

e.gal-/*? ina uru.RjIs~i.kak Sd ri-iS hu-li Sd 

uru.sa-uru a[r-sip\ 

E.GAL-la GmiL-ta ina [uru s]a-a-qa e-pu-[uS\ 

t.GAL-ia Sd uru ^ap^-qiSd [ md a]-Sur-SAG-i-Si 

[xx] 

e-pu-Su la-a u-[Seklil\ 

TbadI [...] ri [...] 

a-[...] 



which had become dilapidated. I rebuilt the house 
of the Sahuru of ErTba-Adad (i) and the large ter- 
race (v 5) on the north side which Assur-nSdin- 
ahhe, king of Assyria, had built (and which) had 
become dilapidated. I dug out the moat of my 
city Assur which had fallen in and become filled 
with earth from the Craftsman's Gate to the 
Tigris Gate. I removed the worn doors of the 
Craftsman's Gate, (v 10) made high doors of fir, 
(and) made (them) fast with bronze bands. I com- 
pletely reconstructed the great wall of my city 
Assur. I piled up earth around and on top of it. I 
built the palace of cedar, (v 15) boxwood, tere- 
binth, (arid) tamarisk in my city Assur. I made 
(replicas of) two nahiru, four burhiS, (and) four 
lions in basalt, two genii in /wwta-alabaster, 
(and) two burhis in white limestone and stationed 
(them) at their doors. 



v 20-31) The canal which Assur-dan (i), king of 
Assyria, excavated — the source of this canal had 
fallen in and for thirty years water had not flowed 
therein. I again excavated the source of this canal, 
directed water therein (and) planted gardens. The 
facing of the great tower of the Tigris Gate, 
which Adad-nararT (i) king of Assyria had built, 
had become dilapidated and fallen in. I raised (it) 
five 'feet* above water level with bitumen and 
baked brick. The large terrace of New Palace 
which is before the forecourts, which Tukultf- 
Ninurta (i) king of Assyria had built, had become 
dilapidated and fallen in over an area of 63 
kumanu. I reconstructed it from top to bottom. 



v 32-37) I constructed a palace in the city Sikkatu 
which is at the head of the road to Inner City 
(AS§ur). I built a new palace in [the city S]aqa. 
The palace of the city Apqu, which [A]ssur-resa- 
isi (i) [my father] had built (but) not [completed], 
the wall [...] ... [...] 
Lacuna 



Lacuna 



v 11 miser siparri 'bronze bands': see the introduction to 
A.0.101.51. v 33 [uru s]a-a-qa: see Borger, EAK 1 p. 142. 



106 



Assur-bel-kala A.0.89.8 



8 



Only portions of the introductory genealogy and part of the date at 
the end are preserved in this fragmentary inscription on a piece of clay 
tablet from Nineveh. It is possible that A.0,89.9 is a part of this same 
text. 



COMMENTARY 



Regarding the annals see the commentary to A.0.89.1. 

The clay tablet fragment (BM 122628, 1930-5-8,17) 
measures 7.2x9.3+ cm and the inscription has been 



collated. The fragment is clay, not stone as erroneously 
stated by Thompson. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1933 Thompson > AAA 20 pp. 115-16 and pi. lxxxviii no. 98 

(copy, edition) 
1961 Borger, EAK 1 pp. 142-44 (study) 



1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 14 (study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxix 5 (translation) 



TEXT 



Obverse 

1) [ md as]-^sur^-EN-ka-la Tlugal gal lugal^ 
[kiSSati ...] 

2) [sar k]ul-lat kib-rat 4-/ na-mad as-sur x {...] 

3) [...] x [„.-n]i-Su gi-x [...] 

4) [...]xr/«(?)i /*#*/[...] 

5) [mar m tukultT-mi\LA-e-sar-ra [. . . ] 

6) [mar m assur]-$AG-rD-[s\i [...] 

7) [ina siqir(l)] r^?)^?)]-^*?)"! a-n[u(l) 
...] 

Lacuna 

Reverse 

Lacuna 

l 1 ) [...]x[...] 

2 1 ) [...]x-/ni-ro[...] 

3') [... a]m-mar lib-be x [...] 



1-6) [A]ssur-bel-kala, great king, king of [the 
universe, ..., king of] all the four quarters, loved 
one of Assur, [... son of Tiglath]-pileser (i) [..., 
son of Assur] -resa-Tsi (i) [...] 



7) [By the command oj] the gods Assur, Anu [...] 

Lacuna 

Lacuna 

rev, l'-3') (Too broken for translation) 



4 r ) [...] iti.kin ud S.kAm l[i-mu ...] 



rev. 4') [...] Month of Elul, fifth day, eponymy 
[of...] 



©bv. 1 Cf. A.0.89.4 line 1 and A.0,89.11. obv. 2 namad 
assur: cf, RIM A 1 p. 289 A.0.78.39 line 2, A.0.87.1 vii 56, 



Borger, EAK 1 p. 142 n. 1, and Seux, ERAS p. 184. 
obv. 7 Cf. A.0.89.6 line 6'. rev. 3' Cf. A.0.10L28 line 5. 



A3Sur-bel-kala A.O.89.9 



107 



9 



This annals fragment is inscribed on a piece of clay tablet found at 
Nineveh. Parts of four paragraphs are preserved but the first and last 
are too broken for identification (only the dividing line at the end of 
the first is preserved). The second paragraph (lines 1-20 has a hunting 
narrative which agrees verbatim, as far as it is preserved, with pas- 
sages in other texts of ASsur-bel-kala (A.0.89.2 iii 33'-35\ A.0.89.3 
line 9', and A.0.89.7 iv 31-34). But the version here was almost cer- 
tainly abbreviated for otherwise the two lines would have been ex- 
tremely long. The third paragraph (lines 3-1O0 has a narrative of a 
campaign to the west (involving presumably conquest of the city Pitru 
on the Euphrates) and is very similar to, but not an exact duplicate of, 
a passage in A.0.89.6 lines 6'-15\ The introduction to A.0.89.9 might 
be represented by A. 0.8 9. 8. 



COMMENTARY 



Regarding the annals see the commentary to A.O.89.1. 
The clay tablet fragment (BM 134497, 1932-12- 



12,492) measures 5.7x5.3+ cm and the inscription has 
been collated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1970 Millard, Iraq 32 pp. 168-69 and pi. xxxm (copy, edition) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxix 4 (translation) 



TEXT 



Lacuna 



Lacuna 



1') si-te-et u-ma-mi m[a-&-di ...] 
2') Mu»MES-5w-r«i/i it-ti ^tD-[mami 



l'-2') The remainder of the numerous animals 
[and the winged birds of the sky, wild game 
which he acquired], their names [are not writlen] 
with [these] animals, [their numbers are not writ- 
ten with these numbers]. 



i-na siq-ri d a-sur d iSKUR [... arki] 

kur a-ri-mi. mes sa mu n~i.[KAM 2-su puratta 

lu etebir(l)] 

su-te 9 -e.MEs kur /ifl-na~i-[.,.] 

sa i-na gir kur lab-na-a-ni x [... eleppeti] 

Sa KUS DUH.SI-e.MES MAN [...] 

sa ugu to sa-gu-r[a (...) lu aksud (...)] 
i-na UA-me-su-ma si-di [ahlame sa ...] 



3'- 10') By the command of the gods Assur (and) 
Adad, [the great gods, my lords, ...in pursuit of] 
the Aramaeans, which [twice] in one year [/ 
crossed the Euphrates], The Sutu, Naa[...] who 
[live] at the foot of Mount Lebanon [... in rafts] 
(made of inflated) goatskins [I crossed the 
Euphrates. I conquered the city ... which (is) (on 
the opposite bank of the Euphrates)], on the 
River Saggurru. At that time the region of [the 
Ahlamu which ...] numerous [...] 



3' In A.0.89.6 line 6' Anu appears between Assur and 
A[dad(?)J. 4' Cf. A.0.89.6 line 7 and the note to lines 7-9'. 



5'-l(K Cf. A.0.89.6 lines 1(M5\ 6b-8' See the note to 
A.0.89.6 lines 12'-13\ 7 Cf. A.0.89.7 ii 22. 



108 



Assur-bel-kala A.0.89.9 



11') (traces) 
Lacuna 



11') (traces) 
Lacuna 



10 



This unusual text is inscribed on the back of a stone female torso 
found at Nineveh. 



COMMENTARY 

The statue (BM 124963, 56-9-9,60) was found by Rassam in the same ditch as 
the Broken Obelisk (A.0.89.7). The inscription has been collated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1861 1 Rpl. 6 no. 6 (copy) 

1897 Rassam, Asshur p. 9 (provenance) 

1902 King, AKA pp. 152-53 (copy, edition) 

1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§339-40 (translation) 

1926-27 Luckenbill, AJSL 43 p. 222 (study) 

1928 Hall, Sculpture pi. lx (photo) 



1928 RLA 1 pi. 34a (photo) 

1933 Schott, OLZ 36 520 (study) 

1936 Gadd, Stones p. 124 (study) 

1961 Borger, EAK 1 pp. 138 and 144 (study) 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 ixxxix 6 (translation) 



TEXT 



1) e.gal m as~sur^E^-[kala sar kiSsati Sarru 
dannu sar mat as-s\ur 

2) dumu gis AukulAi-h-e-Mr-ra * man ' [kissati 
sarru] \ dan^-[nu sar mat assur] 

3) dumu d a-sur-sAG-i-si man ki§ [Sarru dannu 
sar mat] as-sur-ma 

4) a-lam-ga-a-te an-na-te qi-[reb] na[m.me]S 
uru.meS 

5) u ub~ru-te*MES ina muh-hi si-a-hi e-ta-p[a-d]s 

6) mu-ne-kin sit~ri-ia u uv-ia d iM[iN.Bi] 
dingir.meS 

7) kur.mar.tu me-he-es se-ri i-ma-ha-su-u§ 



1-3) (Property of) the palace of Assur-bel-[kala, 
king of the universe, strong king, king of 
As]syria, son of Tiglath-pileser (i), king of [the 
universe], strong [king, king of Assyria], son of 
Assur-rgsa-isi (i) (who was) also king of the 
universe, [strong king, king of] Assyria: 
4-5) I made these sculptures in the provinces, cit- 
ies, and garrisons for titillation. 

6-7) As for the one who removes my inscriptions 
and my name: the divine Sibitti, the gods of the 
West, will afflict him with snake-bite. 



1-3 While one cannot be certain about the restoration of 
epithets, the traces indicate the restorations suggested. Cf. 
A.0.90.1 line 1 and Seux, ERAS p. 296. 4-5 This inter- 
pretation, originally given in Grayson, ARI 2 p. 59 n. 248, is 
still plausible I think. 7 For mehes sSri 'snake-bite' see von 



Soden, AHw p. 642a (sub mehsu 4) and CAD 10/2 (M) p. 61 
(sub mihsu 3). I still think this is preferable to 'defeat on the 
battlefield', an interpretation which goes back to Luckenbill 
(cf. CAD 16 [5] p. 146b and 10/2 [M] p. 61b sub mihsu 4c). 



ASsur-bel-kala A.0.89.11 109 



11 



This text is inscribed on a stone figurine found at Assur. Gadd has 
suggested that the small object is a sculpture of a type of murena. 
This is probably one of the animal figurines made for Assur-bel-kala's 
palace (see the introduction to A. 0.87. 4 and A. 0.89. 7). 



COMMENTARY 

The object (E§ 7850, Ass 5651, Ass ph 708) was found SW courtyard and surrounding rooms. The figurine is 6 

in the Assur temple courtyard, hE4i, in what Pedersen cm long, 3 cm wide, and 3 cm thick. The inscription 

describes as the Assur temple library and archive, Nl, has been collated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1905 Andrae, MDOG 28 p. 20 (provenance) 1948 Gadd, Iraq 10 pp. 21-25 and pi. vi (photo, study) 

1927 Nassouhi, MAOG 3/1-2 p. 5 no. 1 (photo, copy, edition) 1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxix 7 (translation) 

1928 RLA 1 pL 33a (photo, copy) 1986 Pedersen, Archives 2 p, 12 n» 5 (provenance) 
1930-31 Weidner, AfO 6 p. 76 (study) 



TEXT 

1) £.gal m as-sur-EN-ka-l[a] 1-2) (Property of) the palace of Assur-bel-kala, 

2) man gal man kis man kur as-s[ur] great king, king of the universe, king of Assyria. 



12 



Hundreds of fragments of a stone sarcophagus with a five-line inscrip- 
tion of Assur-bel-kala were found in a tomb at A§sur. Unfortunately 
only the beginning of the inscription has been published. In the same 
tomb a complete limestone sarcophagus was also discovered but it was 
uninscribed and thus it is unknown to whom it belonged. 



COMMENTARY 

The basalt fragments and the limestone sarcophagus originals for collation. The uninscribed sarcophagus is 

were found in Tomb 3. No further details about the Ass 6792 and photos appear in RLA 1 pi. 33b (between 

fragments (excavation numbers, photo numbers, dimen- pp. 208 and 209) and Haller, Graber (see the bibliogra- 

sions) are known and we have been unable to locate the phy). 



110 



1914 Andrae, MDOG 54 pp. 43-45 (study) 

1954 Haller, Graber pp. 176-77 and pi. 43 (study) 



Assur-bel-kala A.0.89.12 
BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 ixxxrx 8 (translation) 



TEXT 



1) e.gal m as-sur-BN-k[a-la ...] 
2-5) ... 



1-5) (Property of the) palace of Assur-bel-k[ala 



13 



On a fragmentary stele (VA Ass 2017, Ass 15270) found in the row of 
steles at Assur only one sign, la, is preserved at the end of the first in- 
scribed line. Andrae, followed by Borger, has presented cogent argu- 
ments for identifying this stele as belonging to Assur-bel-kala. Obvi- 
ously not enough is preserved to warrant an edition. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1913 Andrae, Stelenrelhen pp. 35-36 and pi. xvi no. 17 
(photo, study) 



1967 Borger, HKL 1 p. 8 (study) 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 lxxxix 9 (translation) 



1001 



Fragmentary remains of an inscription are preserved on a piece of clay 
cone from Assur (A 3574, Ass 15436) which I tentatively ascribed to 
Assur-bel-kala because of [... ku]r(?) pi-zi-ta (line 2') possibly being 
the same as kur pi-zi-it-ta in the Broken Obelisk (A.0,89.7 iv 16). 
However, Rollig (and cf. Deller) later suggested Assur-uballit i 
although he noted that a spelling [Assur-u-ba\-lit is otherwise unat- 
tested in that king's royal inscriptions. Not enough of the fragment is 
preserved to warrant an edition. 

Rollig further suggested that another fragmentary inscription on a 
clay cone (A 3562, Ass 13243) published by Donbaz and Grayson 
(RICC A no. 251) might belong to Assur-bel-kala's reign because 
A§§ur-rem-niSe5u, whose name appears in the fragment, was an epo- 
nym of his reign, However, I doubt this since the name is not immedi- 
ately preceded by Umu but by sa y indicating that the king Assur-rem- 
nisesu is being cited as a previous builder. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1984 Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA no. 119 (copy, study) 

1985 Rollig, WO 16 p. 167 (study) 



1988 Deller, JAOS 108 p. 516 (study) 



AS§ur-b5l-kala A.0.89.2001 



111 



2001 



This is a dedicatory inscription of TukultT-Mer, king of Hana, who is 
probably identical with the man of the same name who was defeated 
by Assur-bel-kala (A. 0.89.1 obv, 14'). The text is inscribed on an ob- 
ject (BiM 93077, 82-7-14,1750) found at Sippar. Pinches described the 
object as 'an oblong instrument, the greater part of green stone, rather 
flat, rounded off at the broader end, and having the edges also 
bevelled off. It tapers gradually from the broader end, and is fixed 
into an ornamental bronze socket, cast or worked into the form of a 
ram's head, the eyes of which are inlaid with some white composition, 
the nose terminating in a small ring, from which something formerly 
hung. At the end to which the bronze part is fixed, and partly covered 
by it, is engraved, upon one of the broader surfaces, six lines of in- 
scription, in two columns.' Millard has suggested that it is a (ceremo- 
nial) whetstone. The inscription has been collated, and Lambert also 
kindly put his collations at the author's disposal. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1883-84 Pinches, PSBA 6 pp. 13-14 (translation) 

1885 Pinches, TSBA 8 pp. 351-53 and pi. between pp. 182-83 
(photo, copy, edition) 

1885-88 Hommel, Geschichte Babyloniens und Assyriens (Ber- 
lin) pp. 558-59 (translation) 

1891 Jensen, ZA 6 pp. 343-44 (edition) 

1922 BM Guide p. 238 no. 223 (study) 

1924 Thureau-Dangin and Dhorme, Syria 5 pp. 279-80 (copy, 
edition) 

1926 Luekenbill, ARAB 1 p. 137 n. 1 (study) 



1928 S. Smith, EHA pi. xvm (photo but inscription not visi- 
ble) 

1935 Weidner, Deimel Festschrift p. 336 (study) 

1968 Brinkman, PKB p. 138 n. 830 (study) 

1970 Millard, Orientalia ns 39 (1970) p. 450 (study) 

1976 Grayson, AR1 2 lxxxix 10* (translation) 

1980 Millard, JAOS 100 p. 369 (study) 

1980 Walker and Collon in de Meyer (ed.), Tell ed-D6r 3 p. 
104 no. 72 (study) 



TEXT 



1) [a]-na d UTU man an u ki man(?)-[£m(?)] 

2) [ m Gi]s Jukul-ti-me-er man kur ha-na 

3) [DUMU] m DINGIR-NIG.BA MAN KUR ha-fta 

4) a-na rsi(?),sA(?)~i kur-sw 

5) u na-sa-ar bala-su 

6) i-qi-is 



1-6) To the god Samas, king of heaven and un- 
derworld, [his] king, TukultT-Mer, king of the 
land Hana, [son] of Ill-iqlsa, king of the land 
Hana, dedicated (this object) for the well-being of 
his land and the protection of his reign. 



1 man(?)-[sw(?)]: another possible reading is UMUN(?)-r$ M '(?)n 
'his lord. Lambert observes that the signs look like a dittog- 
raphy of u ki. 4 a-na rsi(?).sA(?)i kur: cf. ana suAe-sur kur 



as-sur RIM A 1 p. 312 line 2. Lambert thinks ^sa-larn^ is just 
possible for *si(?).sa(?) i. 



112 



ASSur-bel-kala A.0.89.2002 



2002 



This private text was engraved on a lapis lazuli bead found in Egypt in 
a pharaonic tomb and the original date of the piece is very uncertain. 
Borger suggested, on palaeographic and orthographic grounds, that 
the period of Tiglath-pileser i to Assur-bel-kala seemed most plausible. 
Since it is known that the Egyptian pharaoh sent exotic animals to 
Assur-bel-kala as gifts (A.0.89.6 lines 4'-5' and A.0.89.7 iv 29-30), 
perhaps the object dates to his reign. The bead has not been located 
or the inscription collated. For an edition and earlier bibliography see 
Borger, EAK 1 pp. 20-22 and Grayson, ARI 2 p. 2 n. 12. 



TEXT 



1) sd ""LgAl-dingir sukkal gal ana tin na-pul- 

te DUMU.MUNUS-5W GAL-te 

2) Sd Aga du-ws sd aS-Sur d BAD d NiN.LiL 

DINGIR.MES SU-Ut URU bal-til 

3) LU NU KAM NU TUM MU DINGIR U LUGAL NU 

Mu-ma nu ti 



1-3) (Property) of Ibassi-ilu, chief vizier. For the 
life of his eldest daughter, whom he loves, he 
made (this object). (Property) of the gods Assur, 
Enlil, (and) Ninlil, the gods of the city Baltil 
(Assur). No one must covet (it), take (it) away, 
(or) swear (falsely) by god and king and take pos- 
session of (it). 



Enba-Adad n 



A.0.90 



Enba-Adad n (1055-1054 BC) is the first in a series of obscure 
monarchs who ruled Assyria from the end of the second millennium 
to the early part of the first millennium (c. 1055-935 BC). Little direct 
information is available for any of these kings and their activities but 
it is easy to deduce from events preceding and following this dark cen- 
tury that the Aramaeans were now the superior power and occupied 
much of what had once been regarded as Assyrian territory. 

The only royal inscriptions of Enba-Adad n preserved are two frag- 
mentary display texts from Nineveh and one label on a stele from 
Assur. No information is available about his building enterprises. 
There is reference to a certain Enba-Adad in a fragmentary literary 
text (BM 98941 = Th 1905-4-9,447 published by King, CT 34 pis. 
15-16) and his appointment to the vice-regency (sm-ut) of ASSur. The 
text may have described the removal of Enba-Adad n from the throne 
by SamsT-Adad iv, an event noted in the Assyrian King List (see 
J. Lewy, Goldhizer Memorial pp. 323-24 n. 46; Borger, EAK 1 p. 145 
and HKL 1 p. 231; and Grayson, ARI 2 p. 63 n. 261). Enba-Adad n 
does appear in various king lists (see Grayson, RLA 6 pp. 86-135). 



This text is attested on two fragments of a clay tablet found at 
Nineveh. The major preserved portion consists of royal epithets while 
the building section and date are badly broken. 



COMMENTARY 

The two fragments (K 2693 and Rm 2,261) do not actu- K 2693 measures 9.5x9.2+ cm and Rm 2,261 meas- 

ally join but from the point of view of content, script, ures 3.5x4.5+ cm. The inscription has been collated. 



and clay they certainly seem to be from the same tablet. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1891 Bezold, Cat. 2 p. 467 (study) 1926 Meissner, IAK p. 37 n. 5 (study) 

1901-1906 Winckler, AOF 3 p. 248 (copy) 1961 Borger, EAK 1 pp. 144-45 (study) 

1904-1905 Streck, ZA 18 pp. 151-52 (study) 1976 Grayson, ARI 2 xc 1 (translation) 

1909 Schnabel, OLZ 12 54-55 (study) 1988 Millard, ARRIM 6 pp. 33-34 (copy) 
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§344A-B (translation) 



113 



114 



Enba-Adad n A.0.90.1 



TEXT 



Obverse 

1) m su- d iSKUR lugal k[is sarru dannu sar mat 
assur(l)] 

man kul-lat kib-rat 4 bi-bi[l libbi assur 
sanguO)] 

el-lu ti-ri-is qa-at d MAS [{sarru) ms] 
igi.mes d BAD et-lu qar-[du mulaHt] 
la ma-gi-^ri mu^-pa-ri-[ru kisri multarhi] 
gis-gi-nu- r u darO-nu sa x [...] 
al-tu-te *W a-r/iflfi ti-ib [mhazisu danni] 
ub.meS ^ul-ta-nap^-Sa-qa [ihillU] 
hur-sa-n[i] u al-(u-te [nakiresu kima qane] 
me-he-e zi-qi-qis [ummi musaprid] 
la ka-ni-^se mu-ne^-e[r aiiablsu] 
r d ei-a d xx [...] 
[...]x[...] 

Lacuna 

V) [...]x[...] 

2') a-ga-sdx [...] 

3') KUR.KUR.MES /-[...] 

4') suk-nu-se rw(?)~» [...] 



2) 

3) 

4) 

5) 

6) 

7) 

8) 

9) 

10) 

11) 

12) 

13) 



1-13) Enba-Adad, king of the universe, [strong 
king, king of Assyria], king of all the four quar- 
ters, select [of the god Assur], holy [priest], under 
the protective hand of the god Ninurta, [(the king 
who is) the] choice of the god Enlil, valiant man, 
[controller of] the insubmissive, who breaks up 
[the forces of the rebellious], strong gisginu, who 
[...] dangerous people, at whose [strong bellig- 
erent] attack the quarters (of the world) are in 
dire distress, the mountains [are convulsed], and 
[he has turned his] dangerous [enemies] into 
ghosts [like reeds in] a tempest, [who puts] the in- 
subordinate [to flight], who defeats [his enemies 
(...)] the gods Ea, ...[...] 
Lacuna 

¥-4*) (No translation warranted) 



5') dumu as-$ur-EN-[kala ...] 

6') dumu GiSK.m~t[i-apiI-esarra 

7) [...]x[...] 

Lacuna 

Reverse 

Lacuna 

1') x[...] 

2') *[...] 

3') &x[...] 

4') bur-l..] 

5') SID-X-[...] 

6') lunW)...] 

7) x[...l 

Lacuna 

1") xft[fl..J 

T) ka-lak-kuxl..] 

3") a-na me-nu-te x [...] 

4") u lim(7yhur~su H-no* [...] 

5") e-hur-sag-kur-kur-r[a ...] 



5'-T)Son of Assur-bel-[kala ...] son of Tiglath- 

[pileser (i) ...]... [...] 

Lacuna 



Lacuna 

rev. 1-7') (No translation warranted) 

Lacuna 



6") run [x] x [...] 



rev. l"-5") ... [...] storeroom [...] for number [...] 
and may he receive his prayer [...] Ehur- 
sagkurkurra [...] 



rev. 6") Month of ..., [...th day, eponymy of ...] 



1 k[is] not g[al] is certain. Cf. A.0.90.3 and Seux, ERAS p. 
309. For the restorations see the note to A. 0.89. 10 lines 1-3. 

2 bi-bi[l libbi assur]: see Seux, ERAS p. 60 and n. 86. 

2-3 [sangu(J)] el-lu: this is a well attested epithet beginning 
with Asn. i (see the references in Seux, ERAS p. 287) and a 
better restoration than [rubfi] ellu (so Seux, ERAS p. 252), 



which is known only for one Assyrian king, Adn. i. 
3-4 [(Sarru) m$] igi.meS d BAD: cf. Borger, EAK 1 p. 144 and 
Seux, ERAS p. 207. 4-5 [mulaHt] ...: see Seux, ERAS p. 149 
and n. 16. 7-10 See Seux, ERAS p. 100. 10-11 [musaprid] la 
ka-ni-r$e*: see Borger, EAK 1 p. 145 and Seux, ERAS p. 220. 
11 fmu-ne^-e[r aiiQbTSu]: see Seux, ERAS p. 198. 



Enba-Adad n A.0.90.2 



115 



This fragmentary text, on a piece of clay cone from Nineveh, can al- 
most certainly be ascribed to Enba-Adad n. 



COMMENTARY 



The identification of this fragment with Enba-Adad n is 
based on the epithets which were studied in detail by 
Seux. The restorations in this edition are based on that 
study and, in particular, note the parallel to line 4 



found in A.0.90.1 lines 7-8. 

The fragment (BM 123467, 1932-12-10,410) was 
found in the 'dump' at Nineveh. The text has been col- 
lated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1932 Thompson, AAA 19 p. 102 and pi. lxxii no. 101 (copy) 

1961 Borger, EAK 1 p. 105 (study) 

1967 Seux, ERAS pp. 92 n. 90, 198, and 220 (study) 



1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 27 (study) 
1972 Grayson, ARI 1 §§984 and 987 (study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 xc 3 (study) 



TEXT 



1) [ertba- d adad(l) m]an kis man ktjr as-sur a 
[assur-bel-kala(l) ...] 



2) [Sar kiSSati sar k]ur [a$]-$ur-ma et-lu qar-\du 

3) [musaprid la] ka-ni-se ^mu^-n[e-er aiiabisu 

4) [sa ana tib tahazisu danni kibratu u]l-ta- 
na\p-sa-qa ...] 

5) [,..]XPAX[...] 

6) [„.]xx[...] 

Lacuna 



l-2a) [ErTba-Adad\, king of the universe, king of 
Assyria, son of [Assur-bel-kala, king of the 
universe, king of Assyria, son of Tiglath-pileser 
(i)] (who was) also [king of the universe (and) 
king of] Assyria; 

2b-6) Valiant man [... encircler of the] insubmis- 
sive, who defeats [his enemies ..., at whose strong 
belligerent attack the quarters (of the world)] are 
in dire [distress, ...] ... [...] 
Lacuna 



This text appears on a stone stele found in the row of steles at Assur. 
Despite the lack of genealogy, there can be little doubt that this in- 
scription belongs to Enba-Adad n rather than i. 



116 



ErTba-Adadn A.0.90.3 
COMMENTARY 



The stele (VA Ass 1197, Ass 17819) is 90 cm high, 68 cm wide, and 28 cm 
thick. The text has been collated from the published photo. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1913 Andrae, Stelenreihen p. 41 and pi. xix no. 27 (photo, 

copy, edition) 
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §54 (translation) 
1948 J. Lewy, Goldziher Memorial p. 323 n. 44 (study) 



1961 Borger, EAK 1 p. 145 (study) 

1967 Borger, HKL 1 p. 8 (study) 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 xc 2 (translation) 



TEXT 



1) sa-lam 

2) m SU-[ d ]lSKUR 

3) MAN KIS 



1-3) Monument of Eriba-Adad, king of the 
universe. 



Samsi-Adad iv 



A.0.91 



None of the sparse remains of royal inscriptions from this reign 
(1053-1050 BC) speak of military matters and obviously Assyria's po- 
litical eclipse was continuing. SamsT-Adad iv worked on the IStar tem- 
ples at Assur (A. 0.91.1) and Nineveh (A.0.91. 2-3). A fragment pub- 
lished by Thompson (AAA 19 no. 219) is possibly part of a text of 
Adad-nSran in. An inscription from Byblos of an official of 'SamST- 
Adad, king of Assyria' (see ARI 2 p. 64 n. 262) will be included under 
SamsT-Adad v. SamsT-Adad iv is included in various king lists (see 
Grayson, RLA 6 pp. 86-135). 



This text is reconstructed from several fragmentary clay cones from 
Nineveh. It is possible that more than one text and one building enter- 
prise is represented by these fragments. As reconstructed, this text 
concerns work on the towers of the Assyrian Istar temple. 



CATALOGUE 





Museum 


Registration 


Nineveh 


Dimensions 


Lines 




Ex. 


number 


number 


provenance 


(cm) 


preserved 


cpn 


1 


- 


56-9-9,172 


- 


7.6x8.6 1 


1-7 


c 


2 


- 


56-9-9,179 


_ 


6,4x8,9 + 


1-7 


c 


3 


BM 122661 


1930-5-8,94 


C 16 


10x7.3 + 


1_7 


c 


4 


- 


56-9-9,198 


- 


5.1x7.2 + 


1_6 


c 


5 


BM 123510 


1932-12-10,453 


IStar temple 
CC. + 3.64 


6.7x7.2 + 


1 4 


c 


6 


- 


56-9-9,157 


_ 


8.2x8.5 + 


1-6 


c 


7 


BM 128387 


1932-12-10,644 


IStar temple 
MM. Fill 


5.8x6.5 + 


1-5 


c 


8 


BM 122659 


1930-5-8,92 


Asn. Palace A.l 
Surface 


9.5x5 + 


1-5 


c 


9 


- 


56-9-9,196 


- 


5.1x7 + 


1-5 


c 



COMMENTARY 



The numerous exs. complement each other well except 
in line 5 (see the note), and thus they have been treated 
as one text. The master text is a conflation and in- 
terested readers may check the scores for details. The 
copy of ex. 2 published as 3 R pi. 3 no. 9 shows much 
more text than is preserved on the original. There is no 



evidence of modern deterioration and the copy must in- 
clude text from other fragments. See the note to line 6. 
The copy of ex. 9 published as 3 R pi. 3 no. 1 shows & 
d i§s-tdr in the last preserved line (after si-f ftfr*-ti-$[u] in 
the preceding line) but only illegible traces appear on 
the original. 



117 



118 



SamsT-Adad iv A.0.91.1 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1870 3 R pi. 3 nos. 1-2 and 9 (exs. 2, 6, 9, copy) 
1902 King, AKA pp. 150-51 (exs. 1-2, 4, edition) 
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§342-43 (exs. 1-2, 4, edition) 
1932 Thompson, AAA 19 pp. 98 and 104 and pis. lxxiii, 
lxxv, lxxvii, and ixxx nos. 118, 151, 172, and 257 (exs. 



3, 5, 7-8, study, copy) 
1961 Borger, EAK 1 pp. 145-46 (exs. 1-6, 8-9, study) 

1967 Borger, HKL 1 p. 31 (ex. 7, study) 

1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. pp. 17, 31, and 65 (study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 xci 1 (exs. 1-9, translation) 



TEXT 



1) m sam-si- d isKVK man dan-nu man kis man 
kur as-sur 

2) dumu gis. tukul-ti-mTLA-e-sdr-r[a] man kis 
man kur as-sur 

3) dumu as-sur-$AG-i-si man kis man kur as- 
sur-ma 

4) e-nu-ma e na-me-r[i sa bit istar] ds-su-ri-te 

NIN-/G 

5) sa nun-w a-lik pa-ni-ia [... ana] si-^hfr^-thSu 
ak-se-er 

6) r NA4 i,[ NA .RTj.A.MES «(?)] ^sik^-ka-te.MES ai- 
tu-ur i-na qer-bi-su [askuri] 

7) [iti ...] r W4 i-me 8.kam li-mu [ m samsT- d adad 
sar mat(l)] as-sur 



1-3) SamsT-Adad, strong king, king of the 
universe, king of Assyria, son of Tiglath-pileser 
(i), king of the universe, king of Assyria, son of 
Assur-resa-isi (i) (who was) also king of the 
universe (and) king of Assyria: 

4-5) At that time the towers [of the temple of] the 
Assyrian [Istar], my mistress, which a prince who 
preceded me [had built, had become dilapidated 
(and)] I entirely rebuilt them. 

6) I inscribed monumental inscriptions and clay 
cones (and) [deposited] (them) therein. 

7) [Month of ...], eighth day, eponymy of 
[SamsT-Adad* king of] Assyria. 



This broken text, on a piece of clay cone from Nineveh, concerns 
work on the Istar temple. 



COMMENTARY 

The fragment (56-9-9,169) measures 5.7x7.1+ cm and the inscription has 
been collated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1870 3 R pi. 3 no. 11 (copy) 

1902 King, AKA p. 150 n. 1 (study) 



1961 Borger, EAK 1 p. 146 (study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 xci 3 (study) 



1.8 has man gal 'great king' before man kal 'strong king'. 

1.9 has [man gaJl 'great king' before man dan-nu 'strong 
king'. 1.6 omits man kis. 5 The end of the line in ex. 6 (only 
exs. 3 and 6 are preserved) is a mystery: ex. 3 [... si-h]ir-ti-§u 
ak-se-er, ex. 6 [... sihiM]i-^su^ a-Bi [...]. 6.2 has nothing 
preserved at the beginning of the line, despite the copy in 3 R 



pi. 3 no. 9. Thus the var. ana UmS ruqUti 'for distant days* 
(Borger, EAK 1 p. 146 and Grayson, ARI 2 p. 64 n. 264) does 
not exist. 7 fu^-me 8.kam: preserved only in ex. 3. The 
writing, instead of ud 8.kam, is unusual but clear. A reading 
ud 28.kam is not possible. 



Samsl-Adad iv A.0.91.2 



119 



TEXT 



1) [ m $ams7- d ]i§KUR man kal [sar kissati sar mat 
assur(l)] 

2) [...] ni-sit ^as^-sur r^i [samas{!) ...} 

3) [...] x-nu AGA-am d [...] 

4) [....m]es-5w dumu GiSKiM-A-e-sdr-[ra ...] 

5) [... ih-td\r uru ni-nu-a nin-/^ sa m [...] 

6) [...] x-t/(?) i-ttir e-na-ah-m[a ...] 

7) [...] x e-na-ah-ma u tam-la-su x [...] 

8) [... ana es-s\u-ut-te ar-sip u-[se\k-lil u[gu ...] 

9) [...] sam 3-at ra ka ni sa ut x [...] 

10) [...] xx xxx r/flr(?) */(?)! [...] 
Lacuna 



1-4) [§amsI]-Adad, strong king, [&//?g o/ //?e 
universe, king of Assyria ...], chosen of Assur 
and [Samas, ...] beloved of the gods, [...], his 
[lords]; son of Tiglath-pileser (i) [...]: 

5-10) [The ... of Ista]r of Nineveh, my mistress, 
which [... had previously restored] had again be- 
come dilapidated and [... rebuilt it and again] it 
had become dilapidated. Now its terrace [...] I 
built anew (and) finished (it) [...] ... [...] 
Lacuna 



This is another fragmentary text, on a piece of clay cone from 
Nineveh, concerning work on the Istar temple and it may come from 
the same object, although there is no physical join, as A. 0.91. 2. The 
reference to two lions reminds one of texts of Assur-resa-isi i (RIMA 1 
pp. 309-313 A.0.86.1 and 2). 



COMMENTARY 

The fragment (BM 123468, 1932-12-10,411) measures 8.6x8.5+ cm and was 
found in the Istar temple, U. 3. The text has been collated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1932 Thompson, AAA 19 p. 104 and pi. lxxix no. 222 (copy, 

edition) 
1959 Weidner, Tn. p. 54 (study) 



1961 Borger, EAK 1 p. 146 (study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 xci 4 (study) 



TEXT 



Lacuna 

10 [...]xx[...]x 

2') [... e-na]-ah 2 ur.mah.mes sa zag u gub 

3') [...] x d is$-tdr nin-/# u-sal-ba-ru^ ma^ 

4') [...] x a-na ds-ri-su lu-ter x [x] 

5') [... sarrussu li]s-ki-pu mu-su u numun-[sw] 



Lacuna 

1-2') [...] ... [... had become] dilapidated. Two 
(monumental) lions on right and left [...] 
3'~4') [When the ...] of the goddess Istar, my mis- 
tress, becomes old and [dilapidated], may [a fu- 
ture prince] restore it. 

5-6'a) [As for the one who does not restore it], 
may [the gods A§Sur and I§tar] overthrow [his 
sovereignty and destroy] his name and [his] seed 
[from his land]. 



A.0.91.2 line 2 nffit aSSur u [§amaS\: cf. Seux, ERAS p. 208. 



120 



Samsl-Adad iv A.0.9L3 



6') [ina matisu luhalliqu m ... ud ... hmu 
m slam-£i- d isKVR man kur [as] 



6%) [Month of ..., ...th day, eponymy of S]amsT- 
Adad, king of Assyria. 



This dedicatory text appears on a piece of limestone, probably a pes- 
tle, found at Assur. A similar dedicatory text is A. 0.92. 1001. 



COMMENTARY 



The limestone object (Ass 17558) has not been located 
and no photo is available. Thus it has not been col- 



lated. Schroeder says it is a 'knob* (Knauf) and the 
word abattu in line 5 suggests, then, that it is a pestle. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 no. 79 (copy) 
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §344 (translation) 



1961 Borger, EAK 1 p. 146 (study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 xci 2 (translation) 



TEXT 



1) a-na as-sur be-[li-su ...] 

2) m sam-$i- d iSKVR g[ar enlil issak assur] 

3) a GisJukul-ti-A-fei-[$arra sakin enlil issak 
assur] 

4) a as-sur-sAG-rp-[si sakin enlil issak assurma] 

5) a-bat-tu a-ri- [ik-tu(l) . . . ] 

6) a-na ti-su silim n[umun(?)-sw ...] 

7) i-qis e-em te-li[l-te . . . ] 

8) lu a-na t dingir l\u ...] 

9) lu a-na e hu-u[r-se ...] 

10) i-la-qe w-x-[...] 

1 1 ) [a-n]a aS-ri-sd [...] 

12) [...]xxU 
Lacuna 



l)To_ Assur, [his] lord, [...]: 
2-4) Samsl-Adad, appointee of [Enlil, vice-regent 
of Assur], son of Tiglath-pilefser (i), appointee of 
Enlil, vice-regent of Assur], son of AS£ur-re"sa-i[si 
(i) (who was) also appointee of Enlil and vice- 
regent of Assur] : 

5-7) dedicated (this) long pestle [...] for his life, 
the well-being of [his] seed, [...]. Whither 
purification [...] 

8-12) [If someone] takes (it) either to (another) 
temple, or [to ,..], or to a storehouse, [or to ,.. 
and does not return it] to its place [...] 
Lacuna 



This text is on a stele, found in two pieces (VA Ass 2015 
and 15272). from the row of steles at Assur (hD/Elli). 



Ass 15259 



Samsl-Adadiv A.0.91.5 121 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1909 Andrae, MDOG 40 pp. 24-25 (provenance, edition) no. 15 (photo, copy, edition) 

1913 Andrae, Stelenreihen pp. 24-30 and pis, xv and xvi 1976 Grayson, ARI 2 xci 5 (translation) 



TEXT 

1) sa-lam 1-5) Monument of Samsi-Adad, king of Assyria, 

2) m &w-5/"- d iSKUR son of Tiglath-pileser (i) (who was) also king of 

3) man kur as-sur Assyria. 

4) a m GiSKiM-A-e-Mr-ra 

5) man kur as-sur-ma 



Ashurnasirpal i 

A.0.92 



Confusion is the key word for this reign (1049-1031 BC) since it is not 
certain which Ashurnasirpal this is. He is usually regarded as the first 
king of this name but a son of TukultT-Ninurta i called Ashurnasirpal 
seems to have been recognized briefly in some quarters as the Assyrian 
king between TukultT-Ninurta i and Assur-nadin-apli. No royal in- 
scriptions of this Ashurnasirpal are known, with the possible exception 
of a broken stele from the row of steles at Assur (Andrae, Stelen- 
reihen no. 10), and his existence as a king rests only on one exemplar 
(which may be in error) of the Assyrian King List (see Weidner, Tn. 
p. 42 note to lines 10-11; Borger, EAK 1 p. 98; and Grayson, ARI 1 
pp. 134-35 §876). For practical purposes, the king whose few royal in- 
scriptions are edited here has been regarded as the first of this name. 

A second problem with this king is the attribution of the 'White 
Obelisk* since it has been suggested that this object belongs to 
Ashurnasirpal i rather than some other king, including 
Ashurnasirpal n. In this volume the text has been edited as 
A. 0.101. 18. Apart from the White Obelisk, there is no evidence of 
military or building activities of Ashurnasirpal i. There are some 
prayers or hymns addressed to Istar by an Ashurnasirpal, possibly the 
first king of this name (see von Soden, AfO 25 [1974-77] pp. 37-49). 
His name might be restored in a literary text (BM 98941) discussed in 
the introduction to the reign of Erlba-Adad n (A. 0.90; cf. Grayson, 
ARI 2 p, 63 n. 261). He appears in some king lists (see Grayson, 
RLA 6 pp. 86-135) and parts of an eponym list for his reign are 
preserved (see Grayson, ARI 2 pp, 67-68 §§323-25). 



This is a brick inscription from Assur. 



COMMENTARY 

There is some confusion about this brick inscription. tails about provenance and dimensions given by 

Schroeder (KAH 2 no. 80) said there were two exs. and Schroeder match the bricks of Asn. n. We have been 

gave them the Ass numbers 19515a and b (see his note unable to locate this brick. The photo published in 

on p. 107), But Ass 19515a (VA Ass 3255) and 19515b Andrae, Festungswerke pi. xci is of A.0.101.129. 
are exs. of a text of Asn. n (A.0.101.129) and the de- 



122 



Ashuraasirpal i A. 0.92.1 
BIBLIOGRAPHY 



123 



1922 Schroeder, 
1926 Luckenbill 



KAH 2 no. 80 (copy) 
ARAB 1 §345 (translation) 



1932 Unger, MAOG 6/1-2 p. 16 (edition) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 xcn 1 (translation) 



TEXT 



1) t. GAL m AS-PAP-A MAN SU 

2) MAN KUR A§ A UTU-.ft'- d 10 

3) man kur A^-ma 



1-3) (Property of) the palace of Ashurnasirpal, 
king of the universe, king of Assyria, son of 
SamSl-Adad (iv) (who was) also king of Assyria. 



1001 



This fragmentary text appears on a piece of clay cone (A 3382, 
Ass 3128) found at Assur. It is similar to a text of SamsT-Adad iv 
(A.0.91.4) and that king's name appears in the genealogy, apparently 
at the end. Both factors suggest that our text belongs to 
Ashurnasirpal i (cf. the genealogy in A. 0.92.1). But one cannot rule 
out Shalmaneser n as a possible candidate. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1984 Donbaz and Grayson, R1CCA no. 120 (copy, edition) 



TEXT 



Lacuna 

1') [... iSSak\ a$-$ur a m sam-si-\adad sakin en HI 
issak aSSurma] 

2') [ana bala(T]-su silim numun(*)-sw [...] 



Lacuna 

V) [... vice-regent] of A§§ur, son of SamsT-[Adad 
iv, (who was) also appointee of Entil (and) vice- 
regent of Assur]: 

2') [he dedicated (this) for] his [life], the well- 
being of his seed, [...] 



A.0.92.1001 line 2' numun actually looks like mu. 



Shalmaneser n 



A.0.93 



Assyria's obscurity continues with this reign (1030-1019 BC) for which 
there is no record of military or building activities. Shalmaneser n did 
make an endowment for the Assur temple at Assur (Schroeder, KAV 
no. 78 edited by Ebeling, SVAT pp. 20-23 no. 6) and a literary text 
from AsSur has been ascribed to his reign by some scholars; but others 
prefer Shalmaneser in (Ebeling, KAR no. 98; see Lambert, AnSt 11 
[1961] p. 157; Borger, HKL 1 p. 99; and Schramm, EAK 2 p. 95). 
Given the shadowy character of this reign and the lack of royal in- 
scriptions, texts with the name Shalmaneser but no further indication 
of which king of that name are included either under Shalmaneser i 
(for example, R1MA 1 pp. 211-12 A.0.77.23) or Shalmaneser m (ex- 
amples; Schroeder, KAH 2 no. 81 — cf. Grayson, ARI 2 p. 69 n. 276; 
Rost and Marzahn, VAS 23 no. 171 - cf. Gaiter, ZA 76 [1986] p. 
304). Shalmaneser n appears in king lists (see Grayson, RLA 6 pp. 
86-135) and an eponym list for his reign is partially preserved (see 
Grayson, ARI 2 p. 69 §332). 



This text (VA Ass 1201, Ass 15271, Ass ph 4364 and 4461) is inscribed 
on a stele from the row of steles at Assur. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1909 Andrae, MDOG 40 pp. 27-29 (provenance, edition) 
1913 Andrae, Stelenreihen pp. 23-24 and pi. xiv no. 14 
(photo, copy, edition) 



1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §347 (translation) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 xcm 1 (translation) 



TEXT 



1) sa-lam 

2) md 5w/-ma-«w-MAS 

3) MAN GAL MAN KIS MAN KUR ClS-SUr 

4) a as-sur-PAP-A man kur as-sur 

5) a sam-si-10 man kur as-sur-ma 



1-5) Monument of Shalmaneser, great king, king 
of the universe, king of Assyria, son of Ashur- 
nasirpal (i), king of Assyria, son of Samsl-Adad 
(iv) (who was) also king of Assyria. 



124 



Assur-naran iv and Assur-rabi n 



A.0.94 and A.0.95 



No royal inscriptions are known for either Assur-naran iv (1018-1013 
BC) or Assur-rabi n (1012-972 BC) although they are included in king 
lists (see Grayson, RLA 6 pp. 86-135) and there is an eponym list for 
their reigns (see Grayson, ARI 2 pp. 70-71 §§335 and 338). A stele 
from the row of steles at Assur (Andrae, Stelenreihen no. 13) must be- 
long to one of these kings (no inscription is preserved) since it was 
discovered between the steles of Shalmaneser n and Assur-re$a-i$i n, 



125 



Assur-resa-isi n 



A.0.96 



Although the dearth of royal inscriptions for this reign (971-967 BC) 
indicates the ongoing weakness of Assyria, the fact that a local ruler, 
Bel-eris, of a state on the Habur River admits to being an Assyrian 
vassal (see A.0.96.2001) indicates that Assyria's political influence 
stretched that far west. Assur-resa-isi n is included in king lists (see 
Grayson, RLA 6 pp. 86-135). 



This text is engraved on a stele (VA Ass 1202, Ass 15549, Ass ph 
4526) found in the row of steles at Assur. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1913 Andrae, Stelenrdhen p. 22 and pi. xiv no. 12 (photo, 1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §348 (translation) 

copy, edition) 1976 Grayson, ARI 2 xcvi 1 (translation) 



TEXT 

1) sa-^lam^ 1-5) Monument of [ASsur-r]esa-isi, king of 

2) [ m as-sur-s]AG-i-si Assyria, [son of As]sur-[rlabi (n), king of Assyria. 

3) man Tkur"! as-sur 

4) [mar as\-sur-[G]KL 

5) MAN KUR AS 



2001 



This text, found on a broken clay cylinder at Assur, records the deeds 
of a certain Bel-eris who was an Assyrian vassal (Vice-regent') ruling 
at Sadikanni on the banks of the Habur during the time of Assur- 
rabi n and Assur-resa-isi n. In the inscription, which is in the style of 
an Assyrian royal inscription, Bel-eris records reclamation of fallow 
land along the river and the reopening of an irrigation canal to grow 
crops. He also narrates work on the old temple of his god Samnuha. 



126 



Assur-resa-isi n A. 0.96.2001 

COMMENTARY 

The clay cylinder (E§ 6702, Ass 1758) is 9.9 cm long and 6.5 cm in diameter. 
The inscription has been collated. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 



127 



1927 Nassouhi, MAOG 3/1-2 pp. 6-10 no. 2 (copy, edition) 
1932 Ebeling, RLA 1/6 p. 474 (study) 
1954 Frankena, Takultu pp. 89-90 and 110-11 (study) 
1961 Borger, EAK 1 pp. 106 and 125 (study) 



1970 Millard, Iraq 32 p. 173 (study) 
1972 Grayson, ARI 1 p. xxi n. 8 g (study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 xcvi 2* (translation) 



TEXT 



1) 

2) 
3) 
4) 
5) 
6) 
7) 
8) 
9) 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16; 

17 
18 

19; 

20 

21 

22' 
23 

24' 
25 
26 
27 



a-na-ku md EN-APiN lu.sid s[a ...] 

ra-H-mu sa d sa-[amnuha ...] 

i-na tar-si m as-sur-GAL [...] 

[x] + 3 mu.mes rfr/1 [...] 

[aS\-Sur a-na Sa-ra-^mD [...] 

ri-ncf* u 4 -mi~Su-ma d s[a-amnuha ,..] 

Sid-di Id ha-bur iS-t[u(l) . . . ] 

i-na qa-ti-Su lu is-bat [...] 

Sid-di fr> ha-bur lu.si[d ,..] 

i-na UA-mi-su-ma d sa-am-nu-[ha ...] 

i-na Lues-su si-ra-te 3 li[m ...] 

a-tap-pu na-di-tu sa is-tu kur [...] 

i-na Ub-bi-sa la it-tal-ku-ni x [...] 

ki-si-ru sa ak-sir a.gar.mes n[a-duti ...] 

a.mes tAr.kil uru Sd-di-kan-nu [...] 

i-na tar-si m as-sur-SAG-i-Si man kur as-sur 

dum[u ...] 

e d sa-am-nu-ha sa AD.MES-ii-ia [...] 

la rip-bir i-na la-ba-ri la e-nis i-na [...] 

i-na a.mes si-ra-te sa d sa-am-nu-ha en-/[# ...] 

ERiN.GAL,MES-i7e"i-5« ma-a>-da-te lu ad-ki 

sig 4 .[mes ...] 

gis taNa-ka-te.MES lu ds-pur i-na id pu-[ratti 

.-.] 

e hi-da-(te) ri-sa-te it si-ha-te a-na rd_1 [...] 

dingir.mes gal.mes en.mes-/^ a-na da-ra-te 

e-nu-ma e su-a-tu u-sal-ba-ru-[ma ...] 
lu.Sid EGiR-ii an-hu-su lu-ud-[dis ..,] 
i.giS.mes lip-Su-uS tam-me-ni-ia is~tu [..,] 
mu Sat-ru la-a tu-hal-laq Sa mu Sat~ru u- 
[hallaqu ...] 



1-23) I, Bel-eris, vice-regent of [...], lover of the 
god Sa[rnnuha ...], at the time of Assur-rabi (n), 
[king of Assyria, son of Ashurnasirpal (i)], [N] + 3 
years [... (5) As]sur for delineation [...], at that 
time the god Sa[mnuha ...] the bank(s) of the 
River Habur, from [... to ,,,] he took possession. 
[...] the bank(s) of the River Habur the vice- 
[regent ...]. (10) At that time the god Samnu[ha 
...] with his exalted strength, 3,000 [...]. The 
abandoned canal which [goes] from the land [... 
to ...] (and) in which [water] no longer flowed, 
[...] I constructed a facing for (the quay wall). 
The abandoned meadows [...] (15) water, the 
mooring-pole of the city Sadikanni [...]. At the 
time of Alsur-reSa-isi (n), king of Assyria, son of 
[Assur-rabi (n) (who was) also king of Assyria], 
the temple of the god Samnuha which my fore- 
fathers [had built ...] had not become dilapidated, 
with age it had not deteriorated, with [...], With 
the exalted strength of the god Samnuha, my 
lord, [...] (20) I mustered his numerous workers. 
Bricks [... in] wooden carts, I sent. In the 
Euphrates ...]. A temple of joy, rejoicing, and 
pleasure [I built] for the gods [Samnuha (and) 
Gubaba], the great gods, my lords, forever. [...] 



24-28) When this temple becomes old [and dilapi- 
dated ...], may a later vice-regent restore its weak- 
ened (portions). May he anoint with oil [my clay 
inscriptions ...]. My clay inscriptions from [,..]. 
You must not destroy (my) inscribed name. He 



1 l&sid; note the same title in lines 9 and 25. In the latter 
references the Assyrian form of the sign ltj is used whereas in 
line 1 the Babylonian form is used. 15 tAr.kIl = tarkullul 
20 erin. gal: from collation the erin (not kA) is clear and at 



the end of the line ad-ki (not -di) is clear (against Grayson, 
ARI 2 p. 72 nn. 288-89). 21 giS tal-la-ka-te.m&: cf. Fales, 
Cento Lettere Neo-Assire 1 p. 177. 



128 Assur-resa-isi n A.0.96.2001 

28) d $o-am-nu-ha d gu-ba~ba dingir.mes who [destroys] (my) inscribed name, [may] the 
rGAL\[ME§ ...] gods Samnuha (and) Gubaba, the great gods, [my 

lords, curse/kill him], 

29) m ma-nu -ici-rniNGiiO [...] 29) Mannu-pan-ili [the scribe (...)] 



Tiglath-pileser n 

A.0.97 



Nothing of importance is known of this king (966-935 BC) who is 
mentioned in king lists (see Grayson, RLA 6 pp. 86-135) and for 
whose reign there is a fragmentary list of eponyms (see Grayson, 
ARI 2 p. 74 §353). 



This fragmentary text appears on a stele (Ass 15550) found in the row 
of steles at Assur. Since it was found near the stele of Assur-resa-isi n 
it probably should be ascribed to Tiglath-pileser n. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1913 Andrae, Stelenreihen pp. 20-22 and pi. xiv no. 11 (copy, 1961 Borger, EAK 1 p. 147 (study) 

edition) 1967 Borger, HKL 1 p. 8 (study) 

1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §315 (translation) 1976 Grayson, ARI 2 xcvii 1 (translation) 



TEXT 

1) sa-lam 1-4) Monument of Tiglath-pileser, [king of 

2) m [Gi]s Aukul-t[i\-A.-e-$dr-[rd\ Assyria, son of ASs]ur-[resa]-isi (n), [king of 

3) [sar mat assur mar m as-s\ur-[resa}-i-M Assyria]. 

4) [sar mat assur] 



2001 



On a stele (Ass 17707) in the row of steles at Assur appear traces of a 
non-royal eponymy whose name seems to be Marduk-muballit ( d MES- 
ti.la-[(x)]), an official of Tiglath-pileser ( m rGisKiM(?)-A(?)~i-[x-x]- 
*>a(?)"9, king of Assyria, son of Ninurta-apla-iddina ( d MA$-A-suM-na), 
son of Erlba- Assur (su- d a-s«r), (who was) also governor of the city ... 
The Assyrian king might be Tiglath-pileser n. Not enough of the text, 
which has been collated from the published photo, can be deciphered 
for a proper edition. 



129 



130 Tiglath-pileser ii A. 0.97. 2001 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1913 Andrae, Stelenreihen pp. 58-59 and pi. xxi no. 57 1974 Saporetti, Assur 1/2 pp. 7-8 (study) 

(photo, copy, edition) 1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 73 n. 292 (study) 

1938 Ungnad, RLA 2 p. 439a (study) 



Assur-dan n 



A.0.98 



With Assur-dan n (934-912 BC) the Neo-Assyrian imperial period can 
be said to begin. This monarch regained territory captured and held 
for more than a century by Aramaeans (see the introduction to the 
reigns of Tiglath-pileser i and AsSur-bel-kala) and returned fugitive 
Assyrians to these lands (for a history of the reign see Grayson, CAH 
3/1 pp. 248-49). These events, together with campaigns in other re- 
gions and against other peoples, are described in the fragmentary an- 
nals (A.0.98. 1-2), the first preserved annalistic texts since the reign of 
Assur-bel-kala. 

A text once tentatively ascribed to Assur-dan n (cf . Grayson, ARI 2 
pp. 80-81 §§388-93) has been edited as A.0.101.21. Regarding BM 
115021 see A.0.99.7. A private text, on a bronze statue, dedicated to 
A3sur-dan is probably from the reign of the first king of that name 
(see RIMA 1 pp. 307-308 A.0.83.2001). Assur-dan n did some major 
construction at Assur: the 'New Palace' of Baltil (A.0.98. 1), the 
Craftsman's Gate (A.0.98.3 and 5), and the Assur temple (A.0.98. 4). 
He also did some construction at Kalzu (A. 0.98. 6). Assur-dan n is in- 
cluded in king lists (see Grayson, RLA 6 pp. 86-135) and there are 
traces of two eponyms from his reign in an eponym list (see Grayson, 
ARI 2 p. 81 §394). 



1 



This text, on clay tablet fragments from ASSur, is the best preserved 
version of the annals of Assur-dan n. A badly broken variant version 
is represented by A.0.98. 2. The military narrative is largely concerned 
with the Assyrian king's successful attempts to regain territory lost to 
such people as the Aramaeans and restoring this land to the Assyrians 
who had fled. The building section describes work on the 'New Palace* 
at Baltil, the oldest sector of the city Assur. 



131 



132 






Assur-dg 


In ii A.0.98.1 














CATALOGUE 










Museum 


Ass 


Ass ph 


ASSur 


Dimensions 


Lines 




Ex. 


number 


number 


number 


provenance 


(cm) 


preserved 


cpn 


1 


A 19 


4312a + 
4489a + 
4585 (not 4535) 


564-65 


NW wall of SW 
court of AsSur 
temple, hD3v; 
Pedersen - As5ur 
temple library and 
archive, Nl 


28.7x14 + 


1-87 


c 


2 


A 39 


mm 


5866 


Palace area, 50 cm 
deep, gC5iv 


8.7x6.7 + 


27-34, 
51-57 


c 


3 


VAT 9562 


10182 


1613 


SW slope of great 
ziqqurrat, gC4iv 


7.2x6.3 + 


65-73 


c 



COMMENTARY 



The master text is ex. 1 with minor restorations from 
the two small fragments, exs. 2-3. The reader who is 
interested in details can check the scores. The last Ass 
no. of the pieces joined to form ex. 1 is more probably 



4585 (not 4535 as given in Weidner and Grayson) as 
Pedersen has observed. This solves a problem since Ass 
4535 is RIMA 1 pp. 321-22 A.0.86.14.1. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1905 Andrae, MDOG 26 pp. 58 and 60 (ex. 1, provenance) 

1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 no. 78 (ex. 3, copy) 

1926 Weidner, AfO 3 pp. 151-61 (exs. 1-3, copy, edition) 

1926 LuckenbilL, ARAB 1 §337 (ex. 3, translation) 

1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 1 (exs. 1-3, study) 



1976 Grayson, ARI 2 xcvni 1 (exs. 1-3, translation) 
1986 Mights, MDOG 118 p. 216 (ex. 2, provenance) 
1986 Pedersen, Archives 2 pp. 21 and 28 no. 30 and critical 

note (ex. 1, provenance) 



TEXT 



1) [ m assur-dan sarru dan]-nu lugal ki§ lugal 
kur as-sur ni-bit as-sur 

2) [sa ... ultu] ul-la-a as-sur uv-Su ib-bu-ti 

3) [sa ... u] a-ga-a si-i-ru ii-sat-me-hu 

4) [Sa ... ana Sarffit] kur as-sur ra-bi-is u-kin- 
nu-su 

5) [mar m tukultT~apil-esarra sar kiSSati Sar mat 
as\-sur dumu as-sur-SAG-i-si man kis man 
kur as-sur-ma 



6) [ina surrat SarrutTia ina mah-r]e-e bala.mes- 
ia sa i-na gis.gu.za MAN-te 

7) [rabts usibu ...] erin.mes kur ia-u-sa-a-ia e- 
li'U 

8) [... ana e-m]u- r uq^ ra-ma-ni-su~nu it-ta-at- 
ki^lu^ 

9) [... su-n]u u-bi-ul i-na GisJukul-ti as-sur en- 
i[a] 



1-4) [Assur-dan], strong [king], king of the 
universe, king of Assyria, designate of Assur, 
[whose] name Assur called [... from] of old, into 
[whose] grasp [Assur] placed [the just sceptre and] 
the exalted crown, [whom Assur ...] grandly 
established [for sovereignty over] Assyria; 

5) [son of Tiglath-pileser (n), king of the universe, 
king of As]syria, son of Assur-resa-isi (n) (who 
was) also king of the universe (and) king of 
Assyria: 

6-15) [In my accession year (and) in] my Irst reg- 
nal year, after [I nobly ascended] the royal 
throne, [...] the troops of the lausu came 
up(stream), [...] they trusted in their own 
strength, they brought their [..,]. With the sup- 
port of Assur, my lord, [I] mustered [... my 
chariots (and) troops]. I plundered their settle- 
ments from the city Ekal-pl-nari [(...) to ...] (and) 



9 u-bi-ul: is this in error for ub{i)lu1 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 1 
suggested that \...]-nu-u-bi-ui might be the end of a place- 
name. 



Assur-dan n A. 0.98.1 



133 



10) [,.. narkabati ummanatTia a\d-ki iS-tu 

rURU^,E.GAL-p/-/-ID 

[... m]aS-kan-na-te.MES-su-nu ah-bu-ut 

[... dlktaSunu ma-^a-at-t]a a-duk si-ta-te-su- 

nu u-qa-at-t[a] 

[... alpe]-Su-nu udu se-ni.MEl-Su-nu a-na 

ria-a~i ma-[ni] 

[aslul ... uru(?).m]es-5w-hw dumu.mes-s^-ww 

i-na izi. [mes] 

[asrup Sallassunu(l) kabitta(l) i]S-tu sa kur 

a-ri-mi u-se-li [(...)] 



[. . . Sa] iS-tu tar-si md sit I- ma- nu-% ag man [mat 

assur abiia] 

[nise(l) mat(l) assurO) ...] x u du-a-ki ig- 

mu-ru-u-n[i] 

\kullat(l) maresunu uuMU.Mu]NUS.ME$-su-mt 

a-na ku.babbar.mes bur,mes-m'-[«i] 

[ina siqir assur E]N-*a a-na hu-ub-ta-ni lu ah- 

tab-[ta] 

[diktasunu ma>atta] lu a-duk sal-la-su-nu 

nig.su. MBS-s{u-nu] 

[makkurSunu alpesunu ud]u se-ni.MES-su-nu 

ds-lu-la a-na uru-/[# assur ubla] 

[...]-// kur ru-qa-hu id za-ba Sa kur x-[x] 



[... kur i]a-ha-a-nu kur a-ru-mu sa ku~M 

KUR/?/-[x-X] 

[... sa iStu tarsi m as-sur-GAi]-bi man kur as- 

Sur AD-ia URu.MES-m Sa Sid-di [matlia] 

[... a-na ra-ma-n]i-su-nu ii-sab-bi-tu-u-ni 

gis.gigir.mes er[in.mes adki] 

[...] x di-ik-ta-su-nu ma-^a-at-ta a-d[uk] 

[alanf]- r su^-[nu appul aq-q\ur i-na izi.mes 

dS-ru-pu 

[sitat ummanatesunu sa is]-tu pa-an 

Gis.TUKUL.MEs-/tf ip-pdr-Si-du-u-[ni] 

[istu ... a-d]i uru hal-ha-la-uS sa kur sa-[x- 

x-(x)]-z/ 

[arkisunu artedi di-i\k-ta-su-nu ma-'a-at-ia 

a-du[k] 

[sallassunu makkursunu aslul s]i-ta-te-$u-nu 

a-su-ha i-na x [...] 

[... ana mi-si-i]r kur aS-sur am-nu-* su *-nu-[ti] 



inflicted [upon them a major defeat]. Those that 
survived I slaughtered. [I carried off] their [... 
herds] (and) flocks without number. [I] burnt [(... 
and)] their [cities] (with) their inhabitants. I 
brought up from the Aramaeans [valuable booty]. 



16-22) [... who] from the time of Shalmaneser, 
king of [Assyria, my forefather], had destroyed 
[people of Assyria by ...] and murder, had sold 
[all] their [sons (and) daughters]; [by the com- 
mand of Assur], my lord, I took prisoners, I 
inflicted [upon them] a major [defeat], I carried 
off their booty, possessions, [property, herds, 
(and)] flocks (and) [brought (them)] to my city 
[Assur ...] the land Ruqahu, the River Zab of the 
land [...] 



23-32) [... I]ahanu, the land of the Aramaeans, 
which is behind the land Pi[..., which from the 
time of Assur-ra]bi (n), king of Assyria, my fore- 
father, the cities of the district of [my land, ...] 
they captured for themselves; [I mustered] chari- 
ots (and) troops. [I plundered ...] (and) inflicted 
upon them a major defeat, [I destroyed], ravaged, 
(and) burnt their [cities. I pursued the remainder 
of their troops which] had fled from my weapons 
[from ...] to the city Halhalaus of the land 
Sa[...]zi. I inflicted upon them a major defeat 
(and) [carried off their booty (and) possessions]. 
The rest of them I uprooted, [settled them] in 
[...], (and) included them [within] the borders of 
Assyria. 



[ina] qi-bit aS-Su[r behia ana mat] ^kat-mu^- 
hi lu du-//: uru sa-ra-[>..] 



33-41) [By] the command of Assur, [my lord], I 
marched [to the land Kajtmuhu. The city Sara[... 



10 Ekal-pT-nari: but cf. Schramm, EAK 2 p. 1. 14 As stated 
in Grayson, AR1 2 p. 75 n. 299 a restoration 'their [wives] 9 
rather than 'their [cities] 9 is not supported by any parallel text 
known to me. 15 There was probably nothing inscribed in the 
small lacuna at the end of the line. 18-20 For the restorations 
at the beginning of these lines see A. 0.98. 2 lines l'-3\ 
18 BVK.MES-u-[ni] = ipsuruni: add this reference to von 



Soden, AHw p. 842 sub pasaru G3c. 19 ah-tab-[ta]: cf. 
Schramm, BiOr 21 (1970) p. 158. 22 Cf. Brinkman, PKB 
p. 176. 23 Perhaps one should restore mat uluzu ... from 
A.0.98.2 line 6 at the beginning of this line. 25-31 For 
restorations in these lines see A.0.98.2 lines 8-15. 29 Cf. 
Unger, MAOG 6/1-2 (1932) p. 25. 



134 



Assur-dan n A.0.98.1 



[... appul a]q-qur i-na izlmes ds-ru-up m ku- 

u[n-di-ib-ha-fje-e 

[sar mat katmuhi i-n\a murub 4 e.gal-sw qa- 

^a^-ti lu i[k-su-su] 

[... z]abar.mes an.na.mes n[a 4 ku]r-£ su- 

q[u-ru] 

[...] x.mes-5w sal-la-su TDUGUD^-Za a-na 

u[RU-/a] 

[assur ubla ...-s]il~la lu da-i giP pa-ni sa ra- 

ma-n[i-ia] 

[ina kussi belutisu usesib(l) m ]ku-un-di-i[b- 

ha-f]e-e man kur kat-mu-hi 

[ana mat assur ubla ina] arba-il lu ' a-ku^- 

[us] KUS-SU 

[dura sa uru x]-x-na-ds ^tP-ha-al-lip 



[ina qibit sa assur bellia dakut 

ummanateia(l)] ds-kun kur mu-us-ra-a-ia 

[sa ittiia ikkiruni(l)] ak-sud VRV.UES-su-nu 

[a]p-pu-ul aq-qur 

[ina isati asrup sallassunu ana l]a mi-ni u-se- 

sa-a 

[ana aliia as-s\ur ub-la 



[,..]- r e~i sa as-sur EN-ia sa is-tu 

[tarsi(l) ... m]a-da-tu a-na as-sur EN-ia 

[iklu ina tukulti assur(l) e]n-/# u d URi.GAL a- 

iik pa-ni-ia 

[... a-n]a ra-ma-ni-ia lu am-nu 

[...] EN GESTU DAGAL-ta NIG.BA 

[... E]s-ti-ia sa da-ra-a-te 

[...] X DINGIR,MES-/?/-/a E OS-SUr E d UTU 

[... usse(l)] E.GAL-lhia ad-di 



i-na qi-bit ^as^-s[ur bellia ana mat kir-r]i-u-ri 
lu a-lik uru su-hu uru [»,»] 
uru si-me-er-ra kur r/ w i_[_ uru.m]es~w & 
kur kir-ri-u-\~ri\ 

lu ak-sud sal-la-su-nu nig.su. MES-su-nu 
f nig^ . g[a. UES-su-n u] 

[alpTsunu senisunu] u-se-sa-a a-na VKU-ia as- 
sur ub-la 

[ilanisunu] ki-i qis-su-te a-na as-sur EN-ia lu 
a-qis 
[...] sa ds-sd-a a-na as-sur EN-ia lu a-qis 



[nise] kur as-sur an-ha-[te sa istu pan] ^su- 
uri^-qi ^bu-bu^-ie hu-sah-hi 
[alanisunu bltatlsunu u]-se-ru-u-ni a-na 
kur.kur.mes sa-n[i-a-te] 



I destroyed], ravaged, (and) burnt. I captured 
Ku[ndibhal]e, [king of the land Katmuhu], inside 
his palace. [...] bronze, tin, precious stones of the 
mountain, [...], his valuable booty [I brought] to 
[my] city [Assur. On the throne I set ...s]illa, a 
man loyal to me. Kundi[bhal]e, king of the land 
Katmuhu, [I brought to Assyria (and) in the city] 
Arbail I flayed (him and) draped his skin over 
[the wall of the city ...]nas. 



42-45) [By the command of Assur, my lord, I 
mustered my troops] (and) reached the land of the 
Musru [which had rebelled against me]. I des- 
troyed, ravaged, (and) [burnt] their cities. I 
brought forth [their booty without] number (and) 
carried (it) [to my city Ass]ur. 



46-53) [...] of Assur, my lord, which since [the 
time of ... had withheld] tribute from Assur, my 
lord; [with the support of Assur], my [lord], and 
the divine standard which goes before me [... to] 
my own [...] I counted. [Assur ... who] granted 
wisdom [... of] my durable dominion [... of] my 
gods, the temple of Assur, the temple of the god 
Samas, [... the foundations] of my palace I laid. 



54-59) By the command of Ass[ur, my lord], I 
marched [to Mount Kirr]iuru. I conquered the cit- 
ies Suhu, [...], Simerra, the land Lu[...], cities of 
Mount Kirriuru. I brought forth their booty, pos- 
sessions, property, [herds (and) flocks] (and) took 
(them) to my city Assur. I gave [their gods] as 
gifts to Assur, my lord. [...] which I carried off, I 
gave [...] to Assur, my lord. 



60-67) I brought back the exhausted [people] of 
Assyria [who] had abandoned [their cities (and) 
houses in the face of] want, hunger, (and) famine 
(and) [had gone up] to other lands. [I settled] 



48 d URi.GAL = urigaliu *dlvine standard' was the symbol of 
Nergal, god of war, in Assyria. In this volume it also occurs in 
A. 0.101.1 ii 25, 27, 50, and iii 52; A.0.101 .17 ii 84 and 90, 



and iii 30. 58 Cf. A. 0.99.1 obv. 16. 59.1 [Sa dS-s\a~a. 59.2 Sa 
ds-sa-a: see Schramm, BiOr 27 (1970) p. 158b. 60-63 For the 
restorations see A.0.101. 1 ii 7-10 and Schramm, EAK 2 p. 1. 



Assur-dann A.0.98.1 



135 



62) [elPuni] u-te-ra-su-nu VRU.UES-m-su-^nu 

E^.[MES-SU-nu} 

[natute usasbit]-su-nu sub-tu ne-eh-tu us-bu 

[ekallati ina sid-d]i KVR-ia ar-sip gis.apin.mes 

i-na sid-di KVR-ia 

[arkus se^u] tab-ka-a-ni ugu sa pa-no u-sa- 

te-er 

\at-bu-u\k anse.kur.ra.mes si-im-da-at gis 

ni-ri.MEs 

[... ana emuq] kur as-sur ar-ku-us 



[ninurta u palil\ sa sanga-?/ i-ra-mu bu-ul 

edin.mes u-sat-li-mu-ni-m[a] 

[epes bu^u-r]i iq-bu-ni-ma 2 su-si 

ur.mah.mes i-na qe-reb 

[... i]-na gis. GiGiR-ia pa-tu-te i-na gir.ii.mes- 

ia ia-sa-ma-t[e] 

[ina pashi] a-duk 1 um 6 me gu 4 .am.mes a- 

duk 2 nita.pu.hal rouA[AM.ME]s 

[dannute \-n\a sub-te u-sab-bi-ta 56 am.si.mes 

a-duk 



[enuma e.gal]-* lum Gmit^-[tu] sa uru bal-til 

sa i-\na pan ... issak assur] 

[mar ... issak assurma nu]n-w a-lik pa-ni-[ia 

epusu ekallum su^atu] 

[enahuma anhussa unekkir] a-sar-sa u-me-[si 

dannassa aksuda] 

[istu ussesa adi gaba-di\b-be-sa a[r-sip 

uiektil] 

[eli mahrite ussime ina umesuma m ]as-sur- 

KAL-an rsiD~i as-s[ur mar m tukultT-apil-esarra 

issak assurma} 

[... a]-na ^muh^-hi-sa /?-[...] 

[... dalati] gis a-su-hi si-[ra-a-te] 

[epus ina babatisa u\-re-et-te 

na 4 . na. ru. a. [mes-i a altur] 

[ina qerbisa askun nu]n-w egir-w i-na 

man.mes [mareia] 

[sa assur inabbusu(l) an~hu-u]t E.GAL-lim su- 

a-ti lu-u[d-dis(...)] 

[sum! satra ana asnsu later] as-sur ik-ri-bi-su 

i-se 20 -[me(...)] 

[sa nareia u] su-mi sat-ru i-pa-si-[tu-ma] 

[sumsu isaitaru ...] igi.ii.mes-.si/ U-ik-kal- 

m\u-su ...] 

[... sunqu] hu-sa-a-hu bu-bu-tu [ana mafisu 

hddi] 



[iti ... ud x.kam Umu m .„]-dan-na-ni sa igi 

£.ga[l-///w] 



them in cities (and) houses [which were suitable] 
(and) they dwelt in peace. I constructed [palaces 
in] the (various) districts of my land. [I hitched 
up] plows in the (various) districts of my land 
(and thereby) [piled up] more grain than ever be- 
fore. I hitched up [numerous] teams of horses [... 
for the forces of] Assyria. 



68-72) [The gods Ninurta and Nergal], who love 
my priesthood, gave to me the wild beasts (and) 
commanded me [to hunt]. 1 killed from my ... 
chariot (and) on my swift feet [with the spear] 120 
lions within [...]. I killed 1,600 wild bulls. I cap- 
tured two [strong] wild virile bulls by ambush. I 
killed 56 elephants. 



73-8 la) [When] New Palace of Baltil (Assur) 
which previously [..., vice-regent of Assur, son of 
... (who was) also vice-regent of Assur, a prince] 
who preceded [me, had built — (when) this palace 
had become dilapidated, I removed its debris], 
delineated its area [(and) reached its foundation 
pit]. I reconstructed (and) [completed] it [from 
top to bottom (and) decorated it better than be- 
fore. At that time] Assur-dan, vice-regent of 
Ass[ur, son of Tiglath-pileser (who was) also 
vice-regent of Assur, ...] upon it [... I made] high 
[doors of] fir (and) hung (them) [in its gateways. I 
inscribed my] monumental inscriptions [(and) 
deposited (them) therein] . 

81b-83) May a future prince from among the 
kings, [my sons, whom Assur will name], restore 
the damaged (portions) of this palace. [May he re- 
turn my inscribed name to its place]. (Then) 
Assur will listen to his prayers. 

84-86) [He who] erases [my monumental inscrip- 
tions and] my inscribed name [and writes his 
(own) name]: may [Assur ...] glare angrily upon 
him [with] his eyes; [... may he inflict upon his 
land hunger], want, (and) famine. 

87) [Month of ..., ...th day, eponymy of 
...]dannani, palace prefect. 



67.3 seems (cf. Schramm, EAK 2 p. 1) to have a var.: [... ana 
emuq mathija u[gu sa pan mater arkus] 'I hitched up 
[numerous] teams of horses, more than ever before, [for the 



forces of] my [land]'. See A.0.99.2 line 121. 73-77 The 
restorations are based on A. 0.98. 3 lines 5-12. 86 For the 
restorations see A.O.87.1 viii 85-86 and A.0.101.17 v 94-96. 



136 



Assur-dan n A.0.98.2 



This badly broken text, on a clay tablet fragment from Assur, comes 
from a version of the annals different from A.0.98.1. Portions of 
three paragraphs of the military narrative are preserved. 



COMMENTARY 



Lines 1-16' are restored from A.0.98.1 lines 18-32, 
although the restorations are not entirely certain since 
there are discrepancies: line 3' must have had more text 
and lines 7-9' have clear vars. Lines 17-22' describe a 
campaign against a man called Kundabhale who is ob- 
viously identical with Kundibhale, king of the land 
Katmuhu, in A.0.98.1 lines 33-41. But the two narra- 



tives are quite different. 

The clay tablet fragment (VAT 8890, Ass 4565k, Ass 
ph 564-65) was discovered at the NW wail of the SW 
court of the Assur temple, hD3v. It belongs to what 
Pedersen calls the Assur temple library and archive, 
Nl. It measures 7.8x6.8+ cm and has been collated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1968-69 Weidner, AfO 22 pp. 76-77 (copy) 
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 1 (study) 



1976 Grayson, ARI 2 xcvm 1 (translation) 

1986 Pedersen, Archives 2 p. 24 no. 93 (provenance) 



TEXT 



Lacuna 

V) kul-I[a(?)-at(?) maresunu maratisunu ana 

kaspi ipsuruni] 

Una s[i-qir assur beliia ana hubtdni iu 

ahtabta diktasunu] 

ma^a-[at-ta ...] 

a-duk sal-[lassunu namkursunu makkursunu 

alpesunu senesunu] 

ds-lu-ul-m[a ana aliia assur ubla ...] 



2') 

3') 
4') 



5') 



6') KUR U-lu-ZU-X [...] 

T) a-na a-bi-ia [...] 

8') a-na ra-ma-ni-su-[nu usabbituni (...) ina 

siqir/tukulti] 
9') sa ds-sur EN-la gis.g[igir.mes ummanatesunu 

adki ...] 
10') di-ik-ta-su-nu m[a->a-at-ta aduk (...) 

alanisunu] 
IT) ap-^pu^-ul aq-qur {ina isati asrup sitat 

ummanatesunu sa] 
12') ^is-tu^ pa-an rGis.TUKuiA[MES-ia ipparsiduni 

istu ...] 
13') a-di uru hal-ha-[la-us ... arkisunu] 
14') ar-te-di ^di-ik^-[tasunu mulatto aduk (...)] 
15') i saP~la-a-su-nu f NiG\s[u.MES-sw-/n/] ' ds(l}- 

/«(?) \-[ulma sittatesunu] 
16') ds-su-ha i-na x [...] 



Lacuna 

1-5') [had sold] ail [their sons and daughters]; by 
the command [of Assur, my lord, I took prison- 
ers], I inflicted [upon them a] major [defeat], I 
carried off [their] booty, [possessions, property, 
herds, (and) flocks] and [brought them to my city 
Assur ...] 



6-16') The land Uluzu ... [... which previously 
had paid tribute] to my forefather [... they cap- 
tured] for themselves; [(...) by the command/with 
the support] of Assur, my lord, [I mustered] 
chariots [(and) troops ... I inflicted] upon them a 
major defeat. I destroyed, ravaged, (and) [burnt 
(...) their cities]. I pursued [the remainder of their 
troops which had fled] from my weapons [from 
...] to the city Halha[laus ... I inflicted upon them 
a major] defeat. [(...)] I carried off their booty 
(and) possessions [and the remainder of them] I 
uprooted (and) [settled] in [...] 



Assur-dan n A.0.98.2 



137 



IT) m r ku^-un-da-ab'ha-le-^e^ [sar mat katmuhi 

18') Tgun"! ma-da-tu a-na [, .] 
19') si-ra-a-te i-na x [...] 
20') [s]a d iSKUR vin [,..] 
21') ad-ki[...] 
22') x [...] 
Lacuna 



XT-IT) Kimdibhale, [king of the land Katmuhu, 
... rebelled and\ the tax (and) tribute for [Assur, 
my lord, he withheld ...] lofty [...] of the gods 
Adad and [...] I mustered [...] 
Lacuna 



This text, preserved on several clay cones from Assur, records the re- 
building of the Craftsman's Gate by Assur-dan n. 



CATALOGUE 





Museum 


Ass 


Ass ph 


ASSur 


Dimensions 


Lines 




Ex. 


number 


number 


number 


provenance 


(cm) 


preserved 


cpn 


1 


VA Ass 2053 


10524 


1691-95 


South corner outside 

Craftsman's Gate on 
rock slope, bA7u 


22.5x15.9 + 


1-21 


C 


2 


VA 5633 


10561 


1727-31 


Same as ex. 1 


31.5x16.5 + 


1-21 


c 


3 


A 3515 


10331 + 1033k + 
10345 


1689 


City side of Craftsman's 
Gate, bB7i 


14.5x14.8 + 


1-20 


c 


4 


VA Ass 2054 


11518 


2519 


Near south corner of 
inner wall tower, bC8n 


16x10,4 + 


1-17 


c 


5 


Unlocated 


10583(?) 


- 


Same as ex. 1 


- 


1-13 


p 


6 


VA Ass 2055 


10583 


— 


South corner of 
Craftsman's Gate, bA7n 


9.6x9.3 + 


1-11 


c 


7 


A 3493 


10178 


1689 


Craftsman's Gate, bA5v 


8.4x6.8 + 


1-8 


c 


8 


A 3636 


19698 


6314 


Palace court south of 
well, fE5n 


10.5x7 + 


1-8 


c 


9 


A 3471 


9467 


1418 


East side of outer 
'hook 1 (Hake), cA4v 


6.4x4.7 + 


1-3 


e 


10 


VA Ass 2057 


11327 


- 


bD8m 


7.2x6.5 + 


3-10 


c 


11 


VA Ass 2056 


11049 


- 


City area 


7.5x7 + 


6-14 


c 


12 


A 3496 


10219-10306 


1689 


Craftsman's Gate, bA7i 


16x9.5 + 


14-21 


c 



COMMENTARY 



Ex. 1 has been used as the master text since it is the 
only ex. completely preserved. It contains several scrib- 
al errors, however, which have been corrected in the 
master text on the basis of ex. 2. 

Exs. 5 and 6 are a problem since they both have the 
excavation no. Ass 10583 but clearly are two different 
cxs., since they partially overlap. A photo of ex. 5 with 
the no. Ass 10583 was published by Andrae, 
Festungswerke. A copy of ex. 6, also with the no. Ass 



10583 (VA Ass 2055), was published by L. Jakob-Rost 
We have been unable to locate ex. 5 but could collate it 
from the published photo. Ex. 5 varies somewhat in 
that it seems to omit line 7, and possibly (in error) line 
8. It also has a var. in line 6 which does not appear in 
any other ex. 

Regarding the eponym in line 21 see Weidner, AfO 
13 (1939-41) p, 123 n. 32. 



138 



ASSur-dami A.0.98,3 
BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1906 Andrae, MDOG 32 pp. 15, 18-19, and 24 (exs. 1-3, 5, 7, 
12, provenance) 

1913 Andrae, Festungswerke pp. 10 and 36 (exs. 1, 3-5, 9, 
provenance), 166 (ex. 1, copy, edition), and pi. xcv (exs. 
1, 3-5, 9, 12, photo) 

1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§349 and 351-53 (ex. 1, transla- 
tion) 

1926-27 Luckenbill, AJSL 43 p. 222 (ex. 1, study) 



1967 Borger, HKL 1 p. 7 (ex. 12, study) 
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 1-2 (exs. 1-5, 7, 9, 12, study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 xcvie 2 (exs. 1-5, 7, 9, 12, translation) 
1982 Rost, FuB 22 nos. 29-34 (exs. 1-2, 4-6, 10-11, copy, 

study) 
1984 Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA nos. 121-24 (exs. 3, 7, 9, 

12, study) 



TEXT 



1) 
2) 

3) 
4) 



m as-sur-KAL-an man dan-nu man kis man 
kur as-sur 



dumu gis Jukul-ti-A-e-sdr-ra man dan-nu man 

kis man kur as-sur 

dumu as-sur-sAG-i-si man dan-nu man kis 

man kur as-sur 

dumu as-sur-GAL man dan-nu man kis man 

kur as-sur-ma 

e-nu-ma ka.gal tibira su-a-tu 

sa i-na pa-an m GiL tukul-ti-A-e-Mr-ra Sid aS- 

sur 

dumu a$~$ur-SAG-i-$i §id as-Sur dumu mu- 

tak-kil- a nusku sid as-su[r-ma] 

nun-h a-lik pa-ni-ia e-pu-us ka.gal su-a-tu 

e-na-hu-ma an-hu-su ti-ne-kir 6 

a-ser-sa u-me-si dan-na-sa ak-su-da 

11) is-tu us-se-sa a-di gaba-dib-bi-sa ar-sip 

12) u-sek-lil ugu mah-ri-te u-si-me i-na u 4 -me- 
su-ma 
dug qu-mas-a-tu dug sa-ak-ki e-pu-su i-na 

SAG KA.GAL URU-/# 

u-si-me a-na egir u 4 -me a-na u 4 -um sa-a-tu 
e-nu-ma ka.gal tibira u-sal-ba-ru-ma 
e-na-hu nun-« egir-w an-hu-sa 
lu-ud-dis mu sat-ra a-na ds-ri-su lu-te-er 
as-sur d i§KUR d 30 u d UTU d is-tar dingir.mes 
GAL-re 

19) ik-ri-bi-su i-se-mu-u 

20) ITI.DUe ud Lkam U-mu 

21) m ub-ru-tu dumu na-zi-muru-tds 



5) 
6) 

7) 

8) 
9) 
10) 



13) 

14) 
15) 
16) 

17) 
18) 



1-4) Assur-dan, strong king, king of the universe, 
king of Assyria, son of Tigiath-pileser (n), strong 
king, king of the universe, king of Assyria, son of 
Assur-resa-iSi (n), strong king, king of the 
universe, king of Assyria, son of Assur-rabi (n) 
(who was) also strong king, king of the universe, 
(and) king of Assyria: 

5-14a) When this Craftsman's Gate — which pre- 
viously Tigiath-pileser (i), vice-regent of Assur, 
son of Assur-resa-isi (i), vice-regent of Assur, son 
of Mutakkil-Nusku (who was) also vice-regent of 
Assur, a prince who preceded me, had made — 
(when) this gate became dilapidated, I removed its 
weakened (portions), delineated its area, (and) 
dug out its foundation pit. I rebuilt (and) com- 
pleted it from top to bottom. I decorated it better 
than before. Then I made capitals (and) ... (and) 
decorated the top of the gate of my city (with 
them). 

14b-19) In future days, in days to come, when the 
Craftsman's Gate becomes old and dilapidated, 
may a later prince restore its weakened (portions 
and) return my inscribed name to its place. (Then) 
the gods Assur, Adad, Sfn, Samas, (and) Istar, 
the great gods, will listen to his prayers. 

20-21) Month of Tisri, first day, eponymy of 
Ubrutu, son of Nazi-Maruttas. 



3.2 omits man dan-nu 'strong king'. 4.2 omits man dan-nu 
man kis 'strong king, king of the universe'. 6.5 for sa i~na 
pa-an has [sa ina] mah-ri-te x x [...]. 7-8.5 omits? See the 
commentary. 10 a-Ser-Sa: §er (not sar) is clear in exs. 1-2. It 
seems also to be in ex. 4 but the sign is broken. It is not 
preserved in any other ex. 12.2 for ugu ... u-si-me 'I 



decorated it better than before' has ugu mah-ri-sa u-se-zi-zi 'I 
made it stand (firmer) than it had previously done'. 14.2 li-si- 
mi for u-si-me: thus my suggestion in Grayson, ARI 2 p. 78 
n. 315 to read u-se-sib is impossible. 18.2 has d en-lfl and 18.3 
has d BAD (= d enlit) before d iSKUR. 18.2 (all other exs. broken) 
omits d i$-tar. 



Assur-dan n A. 0.98. 4 



139 



This text records the dedication of clay cones to the god ASSur. The 
clay cones, of which two fragments have been discovered, adorned the 
great courtyard of the Assur temple at Assur. Curiously, the text be- 
gins with the king speaking in the third person (line 1) but later he 
speaks in the first person (lines 6-7). 



CATALOGUE 



Ex. 


Museum 
number 


Ass 
number 


Ass ph 
number 


As$ur 
provenance 


Dimensions 
(cm) 


Lines 
preserved 


cpn 


1 

2 


A 3381 
A 3442 


3127 
6276 + 6311 


323 


SW court of Assur temple, 
hD3v 


15x11 + 
5.4x9 + 


1-8 
2-6 


c 
c 



COMMENTARY 



The text is really attested on only one fragment, ex. 1. 
The second fragment, ex. 2, is very tiny, and in RICCA 
Donbaz and I listed it under 'Unidentified Fragments'. 
However, it might be a duplicate of this text. The mas- 
ter text is based on ex. 1 with minor restorations from 
ex. 2. A third fragment, Ass 19698, has been edited as 



ex. 8 of A, 0.98. 3 since it is obviously a duplicate of 
that text and not of A. 0.98. 4 as suggested by Weidner, 
AfO 3 (1939-41) p. 151 n. 2. Cf. Schramm, EAK 2, 
and Grayson, ARI 2, who followed Weidner's sugges- 
tion. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1905 Andrae, MDOG 26 p. 25 (ex. 1, provenance) 

1911 Messerschmidt, KAH 1 no. 20 (ex. 1, copy) 

1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§349 and 354 (ex. 1, translation) 

1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 2 (ex. 1, study) 



1976 Grayson, ARI 2 xcvm 3 (ex. 1, translation) 
1984 Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA nos. 125 (ex. 1, study) and 
280 (ex. 2, copy) 



TEXT 



1) a-na d as-sur a-bu dingir.mes GAL-te tenI-M 

2) md as-sur-KAL-an GAR-an d BAD sid d as-sur 

3) dumu [ m G]isJukuI-ti-iBiLA-e~sdr-ra GAR-r^/fi 
d BAD sid as-sur 

4) r DU Mu asi-sur-SAG-i-si GAR-an d B[AD] sid 
d as-sur 

5) [mar assur-G]AL GAR-an d BAD sid d as-sur-[ma] 



6) [ana balat napsatiia] gid UD.MES-r/a(?)~i 

7) [sumud sanatTia] Tsilim"! [zert\-^ia^ 

8) [(u) matlia (...)] dingir x [...] 
Lacuna 



1-5) To the god Assur, father of the great gods, 
his lord: Assur-dan, appointee of the god Enlil, 
vice-regent of the god Assur, son of Tiglath- 
pileser (n), appointee of the god Enlil, vice-regent 
of Assur, son of Assur-resa-isi (n), appointee of 
the god Enlil, vice-regent of the god Assur, [son 
of Assur-ra]bi (n) [(who was) also] appointee of 
the god Enlil (and) vice-regent of the god Assur: 
6-8) [I dedicated (this) for my life], that my days 
might be long, [my years many], (for) the well- 
being of my seed [(and) land]. 
Lacuna 



140 



Assur-dann A.0.98.5 



This text is inscribed on three bricks found in a row inside the city 
wall right by the Craftsman's Gate at Assur (bB7i). Thus they formed 
part of the reconstruction of that gate, which is narrated in A. 0.98.3. 
In addition, a fragmentary clay cone from ASsur preserves the begin- 
nings of four lines of a text which duplicate this text. 



CATALOGUE 



Ex. 



Museum 
number 



Ass 

number 



Ass ph 
number 



cpn 



VA Ass 4299b 
Unlocated 
VA Ass 4299a 

A 3475 



10346 
10347 
10348 
9891 



1686 
1686 
1687 
1418 



COMMENTARY 

The clay cone fragment, ex. 4, is an exact duplicate except for the omission of 
-/I in line 1: HTi.gal m a[s-sur-...]. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1906 Andrae, MDOG 32 pp. 19-20 (exs. 1-3, provenance, edi- 
tion) 

1913 Andrae, Festungswerke p. 30 (exs. 1-3, provenance, edi- 
tion) 

1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 no. 82 (exs. 1-3, copy) 

1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§349-50 (exs. 1-3, translation) 



1926 Weidner, AfO 3 p. 151 n. 1 (ex. 4, study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 xcvm 4 (exs. 1-4, translation) 
1984 Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA no. 126 (ex. 4, copy, edi- 
tion) 
1984 Marzahn and Rost, Ziegeln 1 nos. 268-69 (exs. 1, 3, 
study) 



TEXT 



1) E.GAL-ll m as-sur-KAL-an man dan-nu man ki§ 
man kur aS-sur 

2) dumu gis Jukul-ti-iBiLK-e-sdr-ra man dan-nu 

MAN KIS MAN KUR QS-SUr 

3) dumu as-sur-sAG-i-si man dan-nu man kis 
man kur as-sur 

4) dumu as-sur-GAh man dan-nu man kis man 
kur as-sur-ma 



1-4) (Property of) the palace of Assur-dan, strong 
king, king of the universe, king of Assyria, son of 
Tiglath-pileser (n), strong king, king of the 
universe, king of Assyria, son of Assur-resa- 
isi (n), strong king, king of the universe, king of 
Assyria, son of Assur-rabi (n) (who was) also 
strong king, king of the universe (and) king of 
Assyria. 



This text is on a clay cone found at Kalzu (modern Qasr Shemamok). 



Assur-dan n A.0.98.6 
COMMENTARY 

The object has not been located. 



141 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1933 Furlani, Rendiconti della R. Accademia Nazionale dei 
Lincei, Classe di scienze morali, storiche e filologiche Ser, 



6 Vol 9 pp. 685-90 (photo, copy, edition) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 xcvm 5 (translation) 



TEXT 



1) Te.gal(?) m as-sur(l)-KAO-an lugal gal-w lu- 
gal dan-nu lugal kis lugal kur as-sur 

2) dumu m GisJukul-ti-miLA-e-sdr-ra lugal kis 
lugal kur as-sur-ma 



1-2) (Property of) the palace of Assur-dan, great 
king, strong king, king of the universe, king of 
Assyria, son of Tiglath-pileser (n) (who was) also 
king of the universe (and) king of Assyria. 



1001 



This fragmentary text, on a piece of clay cone found at Assur, could 
be a duplicate of A. 0.98. 4 except that the lengths of the lines would 
not match. 



COMMENTARY 



The fragment (A 3439, Ass 5998) has only the begin- 
nings of two lines preserved. It can hardly be a dupli- 
cate of A. 0.98. 4, for the first line (missing) would be 
far too short (ana assur abu) before dingir.mes gal.mes 



in line V. Line V would, in turn, have to be inordi- 
nately long to include the names and titles of Assur- 
dan's two predecessors. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 
1984 Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA no. 127 (copy, edition) 

TEXT 



Lacuna 

1') DINGIR.MES GAL.MES [...] 

2') dumu m as-sur-SAG-i- [si . . . ] 
Lacuna(?) 



T-2') No translation warranted. 



Adad-naran n 



A.0.99 



Adad-naran n (911-891 BC) capitalized upon Assur-dan n's reasser- 
tion of Assyrian might and launched campaigns in almost every one of 
his twenty-one years on the throne (for a history of the reign see 
Grayson, CAH 3/1 pp. 249-51). He had three major regions as targets 
for these military expeditions, the western territories held by the 
Aramaeans, the north which included Habhu and the Nairi lands, and 
Babylonia. He was so successful in these endeavours that he was able 
eventually to march through one area, part of the Jezireh, and collect 
tribute without any signs of resistance, a 'show of strength* campaign 
(see A.0.99.2 lines 105-119). He also established supply depots for fu- 
ture campaigns, thus sowing the seed of the later provincial adminis- 
trative system. 

The annalistic texts range in date from 909 BC (A.0.99.1) to 893 BC 
(A. 0.99. 2-5) and come from Assur or Nineveh. Two annals fragments 
(Schroeder, KAH 2 nos. 87-88) sometimes associated with this king 
have been edited as A. 0.101. 21-22. Two fragmentary texts which may 
come from this reign, but do not seem to be royal inscriptions and 
therefore are not edited here, give some details relevant to historical 
geography (see Grayson, ARI 2 pp. 94-95 §§449-54). Adad-naran n's 
clashes with Babylonia are narrated both in the annals and in chroni- 
cles (Grayson, Chronicles pp. 166-67 iii 1-21 and p, 181 rev. 2). He is 
included in king lists (see Grayson, RLA 6 pp. 86-135) and the se- 
quence of the eponymies for his reign can be reconstructed from epo- 
nym lists (see Grayson, ARI 2 pp. 95-96 §455). 

As to Adad-naran n's building operations, it is known that he did 
work at Assur (A. 0.99. 1-4 and 6), Nineveh (A.0.99.4-5 and 7), 
Apqu-sa-Adad (Tell Abu Marya) (A.0.99.2), and Sibaniba (Tell Billa) 
(A. 0.99. 8). Few details about work at each of these sites have been 
preserved but it is attested that at Assur he reconstructed the Gula 
temple (A.0.99.2) and the quay wall (A.0.99.1). 



This text, preserved on two clay tablet fragments from Assur, is the 
earliest known edition of the annals of Adad-naran n. It is dated to 
the eponymy of Se^i-Assur (909 BC), the third regnal year. Only parts 
of the campaign narratives are extant but the building section is fully 
preserved. It concerns the quay wall at the entrance to the city under 
the Assur temple. 



142 









Adad- 


•nararl ii A. 0.99.1 






143 








CATALOGUE 








Ex. 


Museum 
number 


Ass 
number 


Ass ph 
number 


Assur 
provenance 


Dimensions 
(cm) 


Lines 
preserved 


cpn 


1 


VAT 9640 


44891 


459, 564, 567 


Gate room in NW wall of 
great courtyard of Assur temple, 
hD3v; Pedersen, Assur temple 


19x14.6 + 


Obv. 1-20, 1' 
Rev. l'-21 J 


c 


2 


VAT 9637 + 9641 


3023 + 4489r + 
4565a 


564, 567 


library and archive, Nl 
West part of great courtyard 
of Assur temple, hD4i; 
Pedersen, ASsur temple 
library and archive Nl 


19.8x17.4 + 


Obv. 1-16 
Rev. 6-21' 


c 



COMMENTARY 



The master text is ex. 1 with a few minor restorations 
from ex. 2. The paragraph division (horizontal line) 



between obv. 9-10 does not appear in ex, 2, and this is 
more usual. 



BIBLIOC3RAPHY 



1905 Andrae, MDOG 26 p. 59 (ex. 1, provenance) 

1905 Andrae, MDOG 27 p. 9 (exs. 1-2, study) 

1906 Delitzsch, MDOG 32 p. 20 note (ex. 1, study) 

1911 Messerschmidt, KAH 1 no. 24 (ex. 2, copy of Ass 3023) 
1913 Andrae, Festungswerke p. 167 no. 9 and pi. xcvi (ex, 1, 

photo , edition) 
1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 no. 83 (ex. 1, copy) 
1925 Baumgartner, ZA 36 p. 129 n. 3 (ex. 1, study) 



1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§378-84 (ex. 1, translation) 
1926-27 Luckenbill, AJSL 43 p. 225 (ex. 1, study) 
1935 Seidmann, MAOG 9/3 pp. 36-41 (exs. 1-2, edition) 
1967 Salvini, Nairi pp. 83-84 (obv. 6-8, edition) 
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 6-7 (exs. 1-2, study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 xcix 1 (exs. 1-2, translation) 
1986 Pedersen, Archives 2 pp. 20 no. 14 and 23 no. 69 (exs. 
1-2, provenance) 



TEXT 



Obverse 

1) md ISKUR-ERIN.TAH LUGAL GAL-tt LUGAL dUH-HU 

MAN KIS MAN KUR a§-SUr 

man kiil-lat kib-rat A-i bi-bil lib-bi as-sur 
nun-m na-a-du sa i-na G\lJukul-ti as-sur u 

d MAS DINGIR.MES GAL.MES 

en.mes-sm it-tal-la-ku-ma u-sam-qi-tu ge-ri-su 



2) 
3) 

4) 



5) dumtj as-sur-KAL-an lugal kis man kur as- 
sur 

6) dumu gis. tukui-ti-iBiLA-e-sdr-ra lugal kis 
man kur as-sur 

7) dumu as-sur-s ag- i-si lugal kis man kur as- 
sur-ma 

8) i-na sur-rat lugal- ti-ia i-na mah-re-e bala-ig 

9) sa i-na gis.gu.za lugal-// ra-bi-iS ti-Si-bu 

10) i-na qi-bit as-sur en GAL-e en-/# gis.gigir.mes 
erin.hi.a,mes-/# ad-ki 

1 1) a-na kur qu-ma-ne-e lu uv-ik dagal.mes 
kur qu-ma-ne-e lu ak-sud 

12) m i-lu-ia man kur qu-ma-ne-e i-na qa-bal 

E.GAL-SU 



1-4) Adad-nararT, great king, strong king, king of 
the universe, king of Assyria, king of all the four 
quarters , select of Assur, attentive prince, who 
acts with the support of Assur and the god 
Ninurta, the great gods, his lords, and (thereby) 
has felled his foes; 

5-7) son of Assur-dan (n), king of the universe, 
king of Assyria, son of Tiglath-pileser (n), king of 
the universe, king of Assyria, son of Assur-resa- 
isi (n) (who was) also king of the universe (and) 
kinu of Assyria: 



8-9) In my accession year (and) in my first regnal 
year, after 1 nobly ascended the royal throne, 

10-19) by the command of Assur, the great lord, 
my lord, I mustered my chariotry (and) troops. I 
marched to the land of the Qumanu (and) con- 
quered the land of the extensive Qumanu. I cap- 
tured Iluia, king of the Qumanu, within his 
palace. I slaughtered his brothers in heaps. I 



144 



Adad-nararT ii A.0.99 1 



13) qa-a-ti lu ik-su-su ses.mes-sw a-na gu-ru-ni lit 
sm-as 

14) GAZ.MES-su-nu ma-^a-tu GAZ-ak sal-la-su-nu 

NIG.SU.MES-SM-flW 

15) NIG.GA.MES-SW-rtW GU 4 .MES-SU-nU UDU S€- 

ni.MES-su-nu 

16) a-na VRU-ia as-sur ub-la dingir.mes-/7/-5w-«w 
ki-i qi-s[u]-te 

17) a-na as-sur en-w* nig.ba si-ta-at 

ERIN.HI.A.MES-r5 W "l-//w \$ a istu] 

18) pa-an Gis.TUKUL.MES-/a ip-pdr-[si-du~ni] 

19) i-tu-r[u-n]i su-ub-tu ne-e[h-tu u§@§iMunu] 

20) x x [...] x [„.] 
Lacuna 

V) [...]xra/>(?)/jfl[...] 

Lacuna 

Reverse 

Lacuna 

1') x [... id].idigna [...] 

2') 40 uru.[mes ...] x re-e [...] 

3') 3 URU.MES-r«/-5W-/7W"l [a]/-to-/2a GAZ.MES-SW- 

w[m ma^attu aduk] 
4') DiNGiR.MES-m-5W-rw sal-la-su-nu nig.su. mes- 

su-nu nig.g[a.mes-5W-«w] 
5') GU 4 .MES-5w-/iw udu se-ni MES-su-nu u-se-sa-a 

a-na VRV-i[a assur ubla] 

6') i-na iti.gan ud 4.kam a-na kur hab-hi lu 

du-i'A: 
7) kur ba-a-za kur sa-ar-ba-li-a kur di-du-a-la 

a-di uRU.MES-m 
8') set si-di id ru-u-ru sa kur me-eh-ri ak-sud 
9') sal-la-su-nu nig.su.mes-5w-a?w u-se-sa-a a-na 

xjRU-ia as-sur ub-la 

10') e-nu-ma ki-sir-tu sa si-pi uru sap-la e as-sur 

11') &7 md ISKUR-ERlN.TAH SID aS-SUT DUMU GfD-fife- 
e/I-DINGIR §ID a$-$Ur NUN-W 

12') a- //A: pa-ni-ia e-pu-su e-na~ah-ma Pa-bit 
13') an-hu-su ud-dis dan-na-sa u-me-si is-tu us-si- 

su 
14') tf-fitf gaba-dib-bi-su ar-sip u-sek-lil ugu raa/i- 

re-e 
150 u-si'im na 4 . na.ru. a.meS-w al-tu-ur i-na qer- 

bi-^su^ 

16') ds-kun nun-w egir-w an-hu-sa lu-ud-dis 



inflicted upon them a major defeat (and) brought 
their booty, possessions, property, herds (and) 
flocks to my city Assur. I gave their gods as gifts 
to Assur, my lord. The remainder of their troops 
[which] had fled from my weapons (but then) re- 
turned [I settled] in peaceful dwellings. 
Lacuna 



V) {the city A\rrapha 
Lacuna 



rev. 1-5') Tigris [...] forty cities [...] three of their 
cities I uprooted. [I inflicted] upon them a [major] 
defeat. I brought forth their gods, booty, posses- 
sions, property, herds (and) flocks (and) [brought 
(them)] to my city [Assur], 



rev. 6'-9') In the month Marchesvan, the fourth 
day, I marched to the land Habhu. I conquered 
the lands Bazu, Sarbaliu, (and) Didualu together 
with the cities on the banks of the River Ruru of 
the land Mehru. I brought forth their booty (and) 
possessions (and) brought (them) to my city 
Assur. 

rev. 10-16'a) At that time the facing (of the quay 
wall) at the entrance to the city, which is below 
the temple of Assur, which Adad-nararT (i), vice- 
regent of Assur, son of Arik-dln-ili, vice-regent of 
Assur, the prince who preceded me, had built — 
(this quay wall) had become dilapidated and fal- 
len in. I restored its weakened portions. I delin- 
eated its foundation. I rebuilt (and) completed it 
from top to bottom. I made (it) more ornate than 
before. I inscribed my monumental inscriptions 
(and) deposited (them) therein, 
rev. 16'b-18') May a later prince restore its 



obv. 16-17 Cf. A.0.98.1 line 58; Weidner, AfO 3 p. 158 
n. 11; and CAD 13 (Q) p. 158 sub qasu ld3\ obv. 17-18 For 
the restorations see A.0.98.1 line 28. obv. 20 Schramm, BiOr 
27 (1970) p. 158 (note to line 20), suggests i"Lu.GAL^.[MES-a ...] 
on analogy with A.0.100.5 line 20 and A.0.101.1 i 83. 



obv. T Seidmann suggests reading Arrapha. 
rev. 7.2 sar* (sud)- b[a]-H-a, rev. 9'. 2 omits, in error, usesa 'I 
brought forth' and adds gis me-eh- r rP-[$u\-nu ak-ki-is ds-sd-a 
'I cut down (and) carried off their mehru-trees' . 



Adad-nararT ii A.0.99.1 145 

17') su-mi sat-ra a-na ds-ri-su lu-ter as-sur en weakened portions (and) return my inscribed 

gal-u name to its place. (Then) Assur, the great lord, 

18') ik-ri-bi-su i-se 2 Q-me will listen to his prayers. 



19') iti.gan ud 6.kam li-mu m se- :> i-as-sur sd-kin rev. 19') Month of Kislev, sixth day, eponymy of 

kur uru kal-zi §e>i-Assur, governor of the land of the city Kalzi. 

20') m gab~bi-ia-a-na~as~sur sd-kin kur uru. sa- rev. 20'-21') Gabbiia-ana-Assur, governor of the 

uru "MO-pap-as M ugu uru land of Inner City (Assur), (and) Adad-aha-iddin, 

21') qi-pu-tu sd ki-si-ir-te mayor — officials (in charge) of the facing (of the 

quay wall). 



This, the longest preserved version of Adad-nararT n's annals, is 
preserved on one virtually complete clay tablet from Assur. Three 
small clay tablet fragments, also from Assur, duplicate parts of the 
main exemplar and have been included in this edition although one of 
them represents a different text (A.0. 99. 3). Another fragmentary an- 
nals version from Assur, A.0.99.4, is very similar to A. 0.99. 2 
(A.0.99.4 obv. l'-17'a // A.0.99.2 lines 15-25). The inscription is 
much later in date than A.0.99.1; the latter is dated to the third regnal 
year (909 BC) while A.0.99.2 is dated to the nineteenth year (893 BC). 

The text opens (lines 1-4) with an invocation of gods, similar to the 
annals of Tiglath-pileser i (A. 0.87.1) and the later annals of Tukultl- 
Ninurta n (A.0. 100.1). Then comes the royal name and epithets (lines 
5-22). The military narrative which follows begins with a brief sum- 
mary, undated, of the earlier campaigns (lines 23-35) and this sum- 
mary concludes with a succinct description of the rebuilding of the 
city Apqu (lines 36-38). 

This part of the text is, then, copied from a display inscription com- 
posed for Apqu. After this the narrative of military events begins in 
earnest with a more detailed and dated description (lines 39-104) of 
the later campaigns, years eleven to eighteen (901-894 BC). The mili- 
tary section concludes (lines 105-19) with a description of a new type 
of campaign, a 'show of strength' expedition along the Middle 
Euphrates and Habur Rivers. The Assyrian army encountered little or 
no hostility marching through the territories and simply collected trib- 
ute. Similar expeditions would be undertaken by Tukultl-Ninurta n 
(A.0. 100.5 lines 41-127) and Ashurnasirpal n (A.0.101.1 ii 91-96, 
iii 1-25, iii 56-83 and A.0.101.19 lines 25-66). 

After the military narrative there is a passage about the improve- 
ment of the land (lines 120-21) and a passage about hunting (lines 
122-27), both of these attested in the annals of earlier kings (see the 
introduction to A. 0.87.1). 

The building narrative (lines 128-30) concerns the restoration of the 
Gula temple at Assur. It is said that Tukultl-Ninurta i had done previ- 
ous work on this temple and, although no such building inscription of 
Tukultl-Ninurta i has yet been discovered, the statement is confirmed 



rev. 18'. 2 adds at end of line: sd mu i-pa-si-tu-ma m[u-sm i- erases (my) name and writes [his] own name; may his name 

§d\-ta-ru uv-su numun-sw ina kur [/*]-r haP-ii-qu 'He who (and) seed be destroyed from the land*. 



146 



Adad-nararl ii A. 0.99. 2 



by the close parallelism of the present text (lines 128-33) with texts of 
the earlier king (e.g., RIMA 1 p. 247 lines 27-42). The annals con- 
clude with blessings, curses, and the date (lines 131-34). 



CATALOGUE 



Ex. 



Museum 

number 



Ass 
number 



Ass ph 
number 



Assur 
provenance 



Dimensions 


Lines 




(cm) 


preserved 


cpn 


31.5x28.5 + 


1-134 


c 


14,2x9.5 + 


1-15, 131-33 


c 


9.2x7.3 + 


3-21 


c 


8.8x5.2 + 


61-71 


c 



VAT 8288 



VAT 9632 
VAT 11318 



VAT 11316 



18497 



1017 
4533t 



5657-58 East of Prothyse, iD4v; Pedersen - 

Assur temple archive and library, Nl 

— As ex. 1; iD5i 

- NW facade of courtyard of A§sur 
temple, hD3v; Pedersen - ASsur 
temple archive and library, Nl 



COMMENTARY 



The master text is ex, 1, the only relatively complete 
clay tablet inscription. Occasional restorations have 
been made from other exs. and the interested reader 
can check the scores for details. Ex. 1 is very worn and 
extremely difficult to read in some places. In such in- 
stances, if the traces resemble what is clearly present in 
ex. 2, then ex. 1 has been transliterated to match but in 
half brackets. Schroeder's copy boldly shows much that 
is not clear and what he puts in shading is frequently 
not visible at all on the tablet; in these cases the pas- 
sage has been placed in square brackets. 

Exs. 2-4 are only small fragments. Ex. 2 actually 
represents a text distinct from ex. 1 and is listed as 
A, 0.99,3 in this edition. The beginning of the obv, of 
ex. 2 is a duplicate of ex. 1 lines 1-15. The rev. of ex. 2 
has just the broken ends of several lines and the last 
part is a duplicate of the concluding formulae in ex. 1, 
lines 131-33. But the traces of several lines on the rev. 
of ex. 2 before that final part do not match ex. 1, thus 
showing it had a different text for the building passage. 
Indeed, it may have described work on a different 
building. This portion is edited as A. 0.99. 3. 

The other fragmentary exs., 3 and 4, are duplicates 
of ex. 1 insofar as they are preserved but of course they 



too could represent different texts or a text identical 
with ex. 2. 

Word dividers appear a number of times in ex. 1: 
lines 16, 20, 23, 27, 33-34, and 38. A word divider ap- 
pears once in ex. 3: line 17. These are noted in the 
scores as *:\ 

The text has a number of grammatical curiosities and 
more than one scribal error. The scribal errors have 
been pointed out in the notes to the lines, as have some 
of the grammatical anomalies. One passage, the early 
campaign summary (lines 23-35), is particularly 
noteworthy in this regard. Here there is use of the 
infinitive as a finite verb (lines 33, 35, and possibly 28 
— M-ak-ni for sakani), a phenomenon which is known 
(see Lambert, BWL pp. 316-17 and Aro, Infinitiv p. 
73) but rare. Moreover, the main verb seems to have 
been omitted at the end of the passage (line 35). Yet 
another curiosity is the change from first to third per- 
son (line 30) and then back to first person (line 32). 
There are many signs, then, that the scribe who 
prepared this condensed version of the campaigns was 
not too skillful, or, as is more likely, he was working in 
haste and had no time to polish his composition. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 no. 84 (exs. 1-4, copy) 
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§355-77 (exs. 1-4, translation) 
1926-27 Luckenbill, AJSL 43 pp. 222-25 (exs. 1-4, transla- 
tion) 
1935 Seidmann, MAOG 9/3 pp. 5-35 (exs. 1-4, edition) 
1957 Kupper, Nomades pp. 120-21 (exs. 1-4, study) 
1967 Salvini, Nairi pp, 27, 33, and 84 (lines 23-25, 30, 91-96, 
edition) 



1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 3-6 (exs. 1-4, study) 

1974 Postgate, JESHO 17 pp. 233-36 (exs. 1-4, study) 

1975 Grayson, Chronicles p. 205 (lines 26-29, edition) 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 xcix 2 (exs. 1-4, translation) 

1978 Rollig, Orientalia ns 47 p. 422 (lines 111-15, edition) 

1985 Russell, Iraq 47 p. 66 (lines 100-102, edition) 

1986 Pedersen, Archives 2 pp. 19 no. 3, 24 no. 84, and 27 no. 
146 (exs. 1-3, provenance) 



Adad-nararl ii A.0.99.2 



147 



TEXT 



1) [...] (traces) dingir (x) [...] x en nam-ri-ri 

2) [samas daiian] rAN(?)-e(?) w(?) Ki(?)~i-te mu- 
ma^e-er gim-ri ^amar.utu ap^-kal 
dingir. TmesT en ^te^-re-te r d nirfi-[urta 
qarrad] 

3) * d NUNTGAL,MES u d a-nun-na-ki d u.GUR git- 
ma-lu man tam-ha-ri d nusku na-si gis.gidru 
mij-te dingir mul-[ta-iu] 

4) d NINj lit hi-ir-ti d BADl ama dingir, mes 
gal.mes d is%-tdr SAG-r/fi AN-e r« KfWe sa 
pa-ra-as qar-du-ti suk-lu-la 

5) [diIngir.Tmes gal.mes -1 ga-me-ru-ut es.bar 
mu-sim-mu d NAM.MES m 10-^RiN.TAH nun na- 
a-du ki-nis ib-nu-ni [...] 

6) ^nab-ni-te^ a-na nab-ni-ti en-// us-te-en^-nu-u 
siskin bu-na~nD-ia i-se-ris u-sek-li-lu-ma 

7) zu-mur ES-ti-ia is-pu-uk ^ta^-si-im^ta^ egir 
dingir. mes gal.mes i-si-mu-ma gis.gidru 
mu[r-te-^a-at] 

8) Tun.mes"! atrial qa-ti-ia u-me-el-lu-u ugu 
MAN.MES-/7/' ^su^-ut a-ge-e is-su-u-ni me-lam- 
me man-// 

9) i-pi-ru-ni siq-ri sur-ba-a ugu nap-f~har(l) 
en.mes tD-sd-te-ru su-mu kab-ta 

10) m 10-ERIN.TAH MAN KUR AS ib-bu-Hl MAN dan- 

^nu man kur as~i man kib-rat 4-/ d sam-su 
kis-sat un. mes a-na~ku 

11) i dumu i m as-$ur-KAL-an gar d BAD sid as-sur 
sd kul-lat za-e-ri-su i-ne-ru-ma dumu sd 
m GiSKiM'A-^-sdr-ra m[an mSt assur] 

12) lit-tu el-lu-tu M m as-sur-SAG-i-si man da-pi-nu 
mu-di-iS tar-gU-giA 

13) ina vu.UES-su-ma ina pi-i dingir.mes 
gal.mes man-// en-// riif\-sa-a a-na M-la-la 
nig.ga.mes kur.kur.mes mu ib-bu-u 

14) sar-ra-ku be-la-ku ges-^ra-ku kab-ta-ku na- 
da-ku sur-ru-ha-kift dan-na-ku dan~dan-na- 
ku ds-ta-ku 

15) na-mur-ra-ku u sur-ba-ku r ur-scTi-na-f ku 
qar-ra{l)-da(l)-ku(l) lab-bd^-ku ii zi-ka-ra-ku 
a-sd-re-da-ku si-ra-^kifi sit-mu-ra-ku 



1-4) [God Assur, ...; god Enlil, ...]; god [Sin, 
king of the lunar disk], lord of brilliance; [god 
Samas, judge of] heaven and underworld, com- 
mander of all; god Marduk, sage of the gods, 
lord of oracles; god Nin[urta, warrior of] the 
Igigu and Anunnaku gods; god Nergal, perfect 
one, king of battle; god Nusku, bearer of the holy 
sceptre, circumspect god; goddess Ninlil, spouse 
of the god Enlil, mother of the great gods; god- 
dess Istar, foremost in heaven and underworld, 
who is consummate in the canons of combat; 

5-10) Great gods, who take firm decisions, who 
decree destinies; they properly created me, Adad- 
nararl, attentive prince, [...], they altered my sta- 
ture to lordly stature, they rightly made perfect 
my features and filled my lordly body with wis- 
dom. After the great gods had decreed (my des- 
tiny, after) they had entrusted to me the sceptre 
for the shepherding of the people, (after) they had 
raised me above crowned kings (and) placed on 
my head the royal splendour; they made my al- 
mighty name greater than (that of) all lords, the 
important name Adad-nararT, king of Assyria, 
they called me. Strong king, king of Assyria, king 
of the four quarters, sun(god) of all people, I; 



11-12) son of Assur-dan (n), appointee of the god 
Enlil, vice-regent of Assur, who defeated all his 

enemies, son of Tiglath-pileser (n), king of 

[Assyria], holy offspring of As§ur-re§a-i$i (n), 
martial sovereign, tr ampler of criminals; 

13-15) at that time, by the edict of the great gods, 
my sovereignty (and) dominion were decreed 
(and) they named me to plunder the possessions 
of the lands. I am king, I am lord, I am power- 
ful, I am important, I am praiseworthy, I am 
magnificent, I am strong, I am mighty, I am 
fierce, I am enormously radiant, I am a hero, I 
am a warrior, I am a virile lion, I am foremost, I 
am exalted, I am raging; 



1 en nam-ri-ri ; preserved only in ex. 2: cf. A.0. 100.1 line 5 
and Michel, WO 2 (1954-59) p. 28 line 7. 2 For the resto- 
ration of the beginning of the line see the note to A. 0.100.1 
line 7. 2 Regarding the titles of Marduk, see the note to 
A. 0.100.1 line 8. 2 For the restoration of the end of the line 
see A. 0.100.1 line 9. 3.1 The traces at the beginning of the 
line are very faint and it is not clear that they match ex. 2, 
which is used as the master text here. 3 For the restoration of 



the end of the line see the note to A. 0.100,1 line 11.4 For the 
beginning of the line see A.0. 100.1 line 12. 4 sag-I7P: see the 
note to A,0. 100.1 line 13. 7 For the restoration at the end of 
the line see A.0.101.1 i 45. 11.2 dumu dumu sd m GiSKiM-A-e- 
Mr-fra^ 'grandson of Tiglath-pileser (n)\ 12.1 Although there 
is a break in this ex. after targigT with a space for about three 
signs, this must have been blank. 15 For the middle of the 
line see A.0.101.1 i 32-33. After siraku there are illegible 



148 



Adad-nararl ii A.0.99.2 



16) [ m ] d ISKUR-ERIN.TAH MAN dan-HU MAN KUR 

as-sur man kib-rat A-i mu-ne-er a-ia-bi-su 
ana-ku man le-^u-u murub 4 sa~pi-in 
uru.ur[u] 

17) mu-sah~ me- 1 i kur.mes sa kur.kur.mes ana- 
ku zi-ka-ru qar-du mu- la-it ^ ds-tu^-te-su hi- 
it-mut rag-gi ii se-ni ana-\ ku^ 

18) [k]i-^ma^ d Gis.BAR a-ha-mat gim a-bu-be a- 
sa-pan x x x x x (x)-^sa^-te ^mu^-ne-ha ul i- 
su 

19) [ki\-ma su-bu-ri da-pi-^na-ku^ gim gir sal- 
ba-be u-ra-sa-pa ^se^-en-ni ^oiu-ma^ ti-ib 
sd-^a^-h ez-zi-qi 

20) [ki\-^ma ari^-hu-li sit-^mu^-ra-^ku^ gim x x x 
xxx sd pa-a-^rD li-na-sah 

21) [ki-m]a su-us-kal-li a-sa-hap gim hu-ha-ri *~a- 
kat-tarrfi a-^na^ za-^kar su^-mi-ia dan-ni 
mal-ki kib-rat A-tim 

22) \ki-m\a gi me-he-e i-su-bu a-na sa-bat ger-ri- 
ia rGis.TUKUL~i-5w-/7t/ ^ki-ma ki-is(*)-kP-te-e 
i-su-du 

23) ^et-lvP qar-du sd ina i~gis. tukuP-ti d a-sur 
en-5« is-tu ^e^-ber-ta-an id za-be ^su-pa^-li-i 
si-di kur lu-lu-mi-^P 

24) kur hab-hi kur za-mu-a a-di ne-ri-bi sd kur 
nam-ri //-//-' ku-ma* kur qu-ma-ni-^P 
BAGAL-ta a-di kur me-eh-ri 

25) kur sa-lu-a u kur u-rat-h a-na roiR.u.MES -1 - 
iw u-§ek-ni-su 

26) kur kat-mu-hi a-na pat gim-ri-sd i-pe-lu-ma 
a-na mi-sir KUK-ti-su u-te-ru ka-sid kur kar- 
du-ni-ds ana pat gim-ri-sd ddb-da-^su^ [sa] 

27) md sd-mas-mu-siGs man kur kar-du-ni-ds(*) 
is-tu kur ia-al-man a-di id tur-an is-ku-nu 
is-tu uru la-hi-ri 

28) a-rf/ A.GAR.URU-sa-/«m a-«a mi-sir kur d a-sur 
sd-ak-ni kur uru de-e-ri a-na pat gim-ri-sd 
ak-sud 

29) uru ar-rap-hi uru lu-ub-da bi-ra-a-te.ME$ 
kur kar-du-ni-ds a-na mi-sir kur as-sur u- 
rter^ 

30) w A-te-su a-na kur. kur na-i-ri il-U-ku-ma 
kur hab-hi sa be-ta-ni uru na-hu-{ur(l)) 



16-18) Adad-nararl, strong king, king of Assyria, 
king of the four quarters, the one who defeats his 
enemies, I, the king capable in battle, overwhelm- 
er of cities, the one who scorches the mountains 
of (foreign) lands, I, the virile warrior, the one 
who controls those opposed to him, who is 
inflamed against the evil and wicked, I, I scorch 
like the god Girru (fire god), I overwhelm like the 
deluge, [...], I have no successful opponent; 



19-22) I am belligerent like ..., I strike the wicked 
like the fierce dagger, I constantly blow like the 
onslaught of the wind, I rage like the gale, I 
uproot (people) like [hair] of the skin, I over- 
power like the net, I enclose like the trap, at the 
mention of my strong name the princes of the 
four quarters sway like reeds in a storm, at the 
onset of my campaign their weapons melt as 
though in a furnace; 



23-25) valiant man who marched with the support 
of the god Assur, his lord, from the other side of 
the Lower Zab, the district of the Lullumu, the 
lands Habhu (and) Zamua, as far as the passes of 
the land Namru and subdued the extensive land 
of the Qumanu as far as the lands Mehru, Salua, 
and Uratru, 



26-29) (who) became lord over the entire land 
Katmuhu and brought (it) into the boundaries of 
his land; conqueror of the entire land Kardunia§; 
who brought about the defeat of Samas- 
mudammiq, king of Kardunias, from Mount IaJ- 
man to the River Turan (Diyala?); (the region) 
from the city Lahiru to Ugar-sallu was added to 
the boundaries of Assyria; I conquered the entire 
land of the city Der; I brought back the cities Ar- 
rapha (and) Lubdu, fortresses of Kardunias, into 
the boundaries of Assyria; 



30-33) (who) yet a fourth time marched to the 
lands Nairi and conquered the interior of the land 



traces in ex. 1 but ex. 3 clearly has sit-mu-ra-ku. 18 munehha: 
see the note to A. 0.87.1 iv 47. 19 su-bu-ri: meaning unknown. 
su is more likely than ku (cf. Seidmann). 19.1 ^Giu-mah the 
reading is clear. 22 ^ki-i§(*ykP-te-e: for the reading see CAD 
8 (K) p. 454a. For -is- the text has -ti-. 27.1 There is no mes 
after id tur-an and this, 1 think, lends support lo Postgate's 



suggestion in Sumer 40 (1984) p. 156 to regard this as the 
River Turnat = Diyala. 29 u-ter: see Brinkman, PKB p. 178 
n. 1096 (p. 179). 30.1 uru na-hu-iurtf)) uru ds^na-kuO)k 
cf. Borger, ZA 62 (1972) p. 136 (to 'S.4T). But Kessler, 
Nordmesopotamien pp. 223-24 is sceptical of this emendation. 



Adad-nararl n A.0.99,2 



149 



uru ds-^na-kuO)^ qa-a-su ik-su-du 

it KUR.MES-rt/ dan-nu-tu.MES it-ta-ta-bal-ki-tu 

uru. mes-/?/ sd kur na-at-bi ik-su-ud u kur 

al-zi 

a-na si-hir-ti-sd gim DU6 a-bu-be ds-hu-pu li- 

tf.MES-su-nu as-bat gun u ta-mar-ta jjgu-su- 

nu ti-rkirO 

BAD5.BAD5 erin.mes edin kur ah-la-me-e 

kur ar-ma-a-ia, mes sd-ak-nu ma-da-tu sa 

kur su-hi ma-ha-ri 



uru /-rfw uru zaq-qu bi-ra-a-te.MES sd kur 
d a-sur a-na mi-sir kur- ti-su u-te J er^-ru 
uru a-ri-nu uru tu-ur-hu uru za-du-ri rfcfi- 
■f/'-fw sff kur sub-re-e is-tu kur as-sur na-sa-hi 



uru a/7-/ru mah-ra-a sd man. mes- m a-li-ku 

pa-ni-ia e-pu-us e-na-ah-ma a-na DUe kar-me 

i-tu-ru uru su-a-^tu^ 

a-na es-su-ut-te ab-ni is-tu us-se-su a-di 

gaba-dib-{bi)-su ar-sip u-sek-lil u-si-im u- 

ser-rih 

ugu mah-re-e u-ter e.gal be-lu-ti-ia su-tur-ta 

i-na qe-reb-su ar-sip 



ina li-me m Bkr>-KUR- d a-sur a-na kur Aa-/i/- 
gal-bat DAGAL-/e /w #-///: m /?w-wr- d iSKUR kur 
te-ma-na-a-a erin.hi.a.'"mes^- 1 sw ^icH-ka-a 
ina uru pa-^u-zi sd gir kur kas-ia-ri si-dir-ta 
lu-u ni-is-ku-nu it-ti a- ha- is lu-u ni-im-da-hi-si 
is-tu uru pa-^u-zi a-di uru na-si-pi-na 
BAD5.BAD5-5W ds-ku-nu gis.gigir.mes-sw ma- 
^a-tu.MES #-se-e D 



mff //-me m r>mGiR-e-(mu)-qa-a-ia 2-te-su a- 
rna~i kur ha-ni-gal-bat r/t/~i #-//£ /«<? na-s/- 
/w-/?/ it- ti-su lu am-da-hi-si 
us. mes qu-ra-di.MES-su edin i /w 1 as-ru-up a- 
r«ai uru ia-ri-di f /wi e-ru-ub se.kin.tar.mes 

KUR-SW 

e-si-di uru sa-^ra^-ku a-na ra-ma-ni-^ia lu 1 
am-nu se.am.me§ r^ se.inXnu.mes />ia sa /« 



/w //-me m ni-nu-a-ia 3-te-su a-na kur r &# i- 
ni-gal-bat lu a-lik uru hu-zi-ri-na as-ba-at 
bad a-na na-al-ban lu al-bi-su uru. mes-/?/ sa 



Habhu, the cities Nahur (and) Asnaku; indeed 
(who) was constantly traversing the mighty moun- 
tains; (who) conquered the cities of the land 
Natbu; indeed I (who) entirely destroyed the land 
Alzu (so that it looked) like ruin hills (created by) 
the deluge; I (who) took hostages from them 
(and) imposed upon them tribute and tax; (I who) 
brought about the defeat of the field troops of the 
aWamw-Aramaeans; (I who) received the tribute 
of the Suhu; 

34-35) (who) brought into the boundaries of his 
land the cities Idu (and) Zaqqu, fortresses of 
Assyria; (who recaptured) the cities Arinu, Turhu, 
(and) Zaduru, conquered regions which the land 
Subru had torn away from Assyria: 

36-38) The ancient city Apqu, which kings who 
preceded me had built, had become dilapidated 
and turned into ruin hills, I rebuilt this city, 
reconstructed it from top to bottom, completed 
(it), decorated (it) in a splendid fashion, (and) 
made it bigger than before. I constructed therein 
my enormous lordly palace. 



39-41) In the eponymy of Dur-mati-Assur I 
marched to the extensive land Hanigalbat. Nur- 
Adad, the Temannu, mustered his troops (and) 
we drew up in battle formation at the city Pauza 
at the foot of Mount Kasiiari. We fought with 
one another; I brought about his defeat from the 
city Pauza to the city Nasipinu (and) destroyed 
his numerous chariots. 

42-44) In the eponymy of IlT-emuqSia I marched 
a second time to the land Hanigalbat. I fought 
with him at Nasipanu. I dyed the countryside red 
with the blood of his warriors. I entered the city 
laridu. I reaped the harvest of his land. I re- 
garded the city Saraku as mine (and) heaped up 
the barley and straw therein. 



45-48) In the eponymy of Ninuaiia I marched a 
third time to the land Hanigalbat. I captured the 
city Huzirina. I completely surrounded the wall. 



33 Wtfmw-Aramaeans': see the note to A. 0.87.1 iv 46. 
35 rkn-si'-tu: note ki-si-tu also appears in A, 0.99. 4 obv. 20'. I 
first proposed this reading in ARI 2 p. 87 n. 353. Although the 
value si is otherwise attested only in OA (to which Borger has 
drawn my attention in a private communication), I still believe 
this is the best reading and interpretation. 35 This passage is 



difficult and the main verb seems to have been omitted. The 
use of the infinitive as a main verb, which is so common in 
this text (see the commentary), does not satisfactorily solve the 
problem. 46 at-bi-su: see Reiner, AfO 23 (1970) pp. 89-91. As 
I noted in ARI 2 p. 88 n. 358 this interpretation of the passage 
means an awkward sequence of events, capture before 



150 



Adad-nararT n A.0.99.2 



gir kur kas-ia-ri sd m ma-am-Ii kur te-man- 

na-a-a 

is-ba-tu GiR.n.MES-/a r/«i is-bu-tu e.gal.mes- 

sii a-na ra-ma-ni-ia r/wi am-nu 

ina UA-me-su-ma pa-gu-ta GAL-tu pa-gu-ta 

Ttur^w"! se-bu-ul-tu sd kur nuMU-a-di-ni a- 

hi sd id pu-rat-te GAK-^nu lu am-huf^ 



ina li-me m lik-be-ru 4-te-sil a-na kur ha-ni- 
gal-bat lu a-lik e-nu-ma m mu-qu-ru kur te- 
man-na-a-a 

ma-mi t djngir.mes gal.mes e-tiq-ma a-na 
murub 4 u me ig-ra-ni a-na uru dan-nu-ti-su 
gis.ban-sw dan-ni-ti 

ERIN.HI.A.MES-5W DAGAL.MES U KUR a-fl-me 

it-ti-kil-ma it-ti-ia ib-bal-kit gis.gigir.mes 

ERiN.Hi.A«ME§-/a ad-ki 

a-na uru gi-da-ra sd kur a-ru-mu.MES uru 

ra-qa-ma-tu i-qa-bi-su-u-ni sd ta m GiSKiM-A- 

e-sdr-ra 

dumu as-sur-SAG-i-si man kur as-sur nun a- 

iik pa-ni-ia kur a-ru-mu ina da-na-ni e-ki- 

mu-ni 

a-lik ina hi-sa-at tib-bi-ia sd ina man.me§-w 

AD.MES-ia la ba-su-u uru.mes-«/ bat-tu-bat- 

te-su 

ad-di vru-su a-na na-al-ban hi-ri-sa lu ih-ru- 

«su»-us is-tu pa-an gis.tukul,mes-/# ez-zu-te 

Mi.-ia sit-mu-ri k.MEs4a dan-na~te.ME$ ip-la~ 

hu-ma 

ina si-pi-si da-na-ni a-na uru ra-dam-ma-te 

e-ru-ub a-na su-a-su ina murub 4 e.gal-su u- 

se-ri-su 

nig.ga-M na 4 kur-/ su-qu-ru gis.gigir.mes 

ANSE.KUR.RA.MES DAM.MES-SW DUMU.MES-SW 

dumu.munus.mes-sw sal-la-su DUGUD-ta 
a-na pa-ni-ia lu e-sur a-na su-a-su a-di 
ses.mes-M ina bi-ri-te zabar lu-ra-pi-iq-su-nu 
a-na vmj-ia as-sur ub-la li-i-ta u da-na-na sd 
as-sur EN-ia ugu kur ha-ni-gal-bat al-tdk-kan 



ina li-me "IO-paf-as sd-kin uru.sa-uru 5-te- 
sti a-na kur ha-ni-gal-bat r/wi a-lik ma-da-tu 
sd kur.kur.mes lu am-hur x x x 



ina li-me md iSKUR-KAL-ff« ina su-us-mur 
gis.tukul.mes-/# dan-nu-te 6-te-sii a-na kur 



The (people of) the cities at the foot of Mount 
Kasiiari, which Mamli the Temannu had cap- 
tured, submitted to me. I regarded his palaces as 
mine. At that time I received a large female mon- 
key (and) a small female monkey, a shipment 
from the land Blt-Adini which lies on the bank of 
the Euphrates. 

49-60) In the eponymy of Likberu I marched a 
fourth time to the land Hanigalbat, At that time 
Muquru, the Temannu, broke the oath of the 
great gods and belligerently sought against me 
war and battle. Trusting in his fortified city, his 
strong bow, his extensive troops, and the 
Aramaeans, he rebelled against me. I mustered 
my chariotry (and) troops (and) marched to the 
city Gidara, which the Aramaeans call 
Raqammatu (and) which the Aramaeans had 
taken away by force after the time of Tiglath- 
pileser, son of Assur-resa-isi, king of Assyria, a 
prince who preceded me. In my cunning (55) I 
placed redoubts around it (the city), (a tactic) 
which had never been used by (lit. 'did not exist 
among') the kings my fathers. (Although) he had 
dug a moat around his city they took fright in the 
face of my fierce weapons, my raging battle, (and) 
my strong forces and I entered with force (and) 
violence the city Raqammatu. That fellow I 
brought down from his palace. I personally in- 
spected his property, precious stone of the moun- 
tain, chariots, horses, his wives, his sons, his 
daughters — (all) his valuable booty. That fellow 
together with his brothers I fastened in bronze 
clasps (and) brought (them) to my city Assur. 
(Thus) have I constantly established the victory 
and strength of Assur, my lord, over the land 
Hanigalbat. 



61) In the eponymy of Adad-aha-iddina, governor 
of Inner City (Assur), I marched a fifth time to 
the land Hanigalbat. I received the tribute of the 
lands. 

62-79) In the eponymy of Adad-dan, with the 
rage of my strong weapons I marched a sixth time 



encirclement. But it has been adopted in this edition. 49 m lik- 
be-ru: it is uncertain how to read this name. 50 ig-ra-ni: 
'belligerently sought against me': from gerii. See Schramm, 
EAK 2 p. 5 and CAD 13 (Q) p. 243. This is preferable to 
deriving the form from qeru and translating 'challenged me', 



as I did in ARI 2 §427 and n. 362. 57 uru ra-dam-ma-te: in 
line 52 this name appeared as uru ra-qa-ma-tu. Cf. Millard, 
JAOS 100 (1980) p. 369b. 61. 1 The traces at the end of the 
line may simply be left after an erasure. 



Adad-nSrarl n A. 0.99. 2 



151 



ha-ni-gal-bat lu a-lik 

"zalagAskur kur te-man-na-a-ia ina uru 

na-si-bi-na viiH e-si-ir-su 7 uru.mes-/?/ bat- 

tu-bat-te-su f lu^ ad-di 

m as-sur-di-ni-a~mur lu tar-ta-nu ina sa lu-se- 

sib hi-ri-sa sd ina pa-na la ba-su ki-sir KUR-e 

dan-ni li-me-tu-su lu ih-ru-us 9 ina 1 kus lu- 

ra-pis a-na su-pa-li dan-na-su 

a.mes lu-si-ik-si-di bad ina ugu hi-ri-si 

UR.SAG.MES-/a ki-ma nab-li hi-ri-sa-su u-sal-bi 

i-sa-su-u ugu-su ri-ig-mu ser-ri gim a-bu-bu 

na-ds-pan-te dan-nu gis-pdr-ri ugu-s« 

[...] d NisABA lu-za-ma-su i-na qi-bit d a-sur en 

gal EN-ia i-na sa uru-sw 

[..«.m]eS-S« KU.GI-SW NIG.GA.MES-SW NA 4 KUR-£ 

su-qu-ra dingir.mes-w-$w gis.gigir.mes si- 

im(*)-da-at 

[nmsu ...]-ri-ia si-bir u-nu-ut me-M 

GIS.GU.ZA.MES KU.GI GIS.BANSUR.MES KU.GI 

eb-ba-te 

[nematte sa tam-ii]-ti uh-hu-za-a-te 

gis.tukul.mes ws(*)-.s/.me§ ma-hi-ru-tu kul~ 

tar ku.gi si-mat MAN-ti-sii 

[...] x-z/.mes sa Ki.LA-su-nu la as-bat u 

NIG.GA E.GAL-M DAGAL-I7al d§-lu-^la^ 

[...] x r/i man^ ki[s\ X [x].MES X.MES-rftP X X 

x x x-M ina gis.gu.za EN-ti-su it-ta-sab 

lib-b[i sa p\a-rak-k[i-s\u udu.siskur.mes 

ku.mes u-pa-li-ka gu 4 .mes ^i(l)-ta^-na-qi ku- 

ru-na kas.mah u-ser-di 

gestin. ^mes"! ku du-su-pa sd KUR-e u-sal-lim 

ruBui.sisicuR.MES-^w is(*)-ku-na u is-tu ta- 

na-ti su-ta-ru-hu-ti-sii 

^us^-ta-^rifO j>t-si-na kur.kur.mes 

man.mes-wi us-ta-nap-sd-qu kur.mes i-sub-bu 

man a-na lu.gal.mes-sw 

su-ku-ni-is iq-bi ^et-liP sd as-sur ta-na-ti 

qar-du-ti-su su-ta-ru-hu ep-si-su sd d da-gan 

man mu-ser-bu-ii ta-na-ti-su m ZALAG- d iSKUR 

a-di erin.hi.a.mes-5w dagal.mes ki-ma sal- 

la-ti 

a-na pa-ni-ia u-te-ra-su uru.mes-/?/ is-tu 

un.mes kur as-sur ds-ruq-sii-nu mi-nu-su 

am-nu 



to the land Hanigalbat. I confined Nur-Adad, the 
Temannu, in the city Nasibina (and) established 
seven redoubts around it. I stationed therein 
Assur-dTnT-amur, the commander-in-chief. (65) He 
(Nur-Adad) had dug a moat, which had not previ- 
ously existed, in bedrock all around it (the city). 
He had made (it) nine cubits wide and had dug it 
down to water-level. The wall was next to the 
moat. I encircled his moat with my warriors like a 
flame (and) they (the enemy) screamed like chil- 
dren about it. [I laid] traps as strong as the de- 
structive deluge for him (and] deprived him of 
grain. By the command of the god Assur, the 
great lord, my lord, I carried off from his city his 
[...], his gold, his property, precious stone of the 
mountain, his gods, chariots with teams of 
[horses], ..., (70) a staff, his battle-gear, a gold 
throne, polished gold dishes, decorated [couches 
with] inlay, weapons, ... arrows, a gold tent 
befitting his sovereignty, [...] the weight of which 
I did not determine, and the extensive property of 
his palace. [Afterwards ...] ... ascended his lordly 
throne. Within his sanctum he slaughtered holy 
sacrifices, offered oxen, made a libation of best 
beer, (and) (75) completed the offering with holy 
sweet wine of the mountain. (Thus) he made his 
offerings and had himself exalted with elaborate 
praise: 'In all lands kings are in sore distress (and) 
mountains shake!' The king spoke humbly to his 
nobles: The young man of Assur, praise of his 
warriorship is exalted; his deeds are of the god 
Dagan; the king who magnifies his praises!' I 
brought back in my presence Nur-Adad together 
with his extensive troops as hostages. I granted 
cities with people to Assyria (and) counted them. 



80) ina li-me v-ma ina ger-ri-ia-ma sd m ZALAG- 
d iSKUR kur te-man-na-a-a a-di 
^rin.hi.a.mes-su dagal.mes ki-ma M-la-te 



80-90) In this same eponymy, on that campaign 
of mine on which I brought back in my presence 
Nur-Adad, the Temannu, together with his 



63.4 URU.MES-/7/ sa U-mi-[ti-Su ..,]. 66 li-sal-bi: See Reiner, 
AfO 23 (1970) pp. 89-91. 67 The interpretation of Schramm, 
EAK 2 p. 5 is preferable to the one I gave in ARI 2 p. 89. 
61 gis-pdr-ri: there is no need to interpret this as a bizarre 
writing for Girru 'fire' as proposed in CAD 5 (G) p. 94a (cf. 
Luckenbill). 71 For the restoration see A. 0.101.1 iii 74-75 and 



note the further references in Schramm, EAK 2 p. 5. 72 A 
restoration \ku]n{l)-zi. mes leather bags', proposed by 
Seidmann (cf. CAD 8 [K] p. 549a) 5 does not fit the context. 
74 For a different restoration of the beginning of the line see 
Schramm, EAK 2 p. 5. 79 This line is still (cf. ARI 2 p. 89 
n. 373) difficult and my interpretation is uncertain. 



152 



Adad-naran ii A.0.99.2 



81) a-na pa-ni-ia u-te-ra a-na kur-/a ub-la-su et- 
na uru ni-nu-a u-se-(ri)-ba-su gis.gigir.mes 

ERIN.HLA.MES 

82) ad-ki ger-(ri) pa-ds-qu-te kur.mes gig.mes sd 
a-na me-teq gis.gigir.mes-/^ erin.hi.a.mes la 
sd-ak-nu 

83) ina man.mes-«/ ad.mes-/a ma-am-ma a-na 
qe-reb-su la it-hu-u u musen AN-e mut-tap- 
ri-sd 

84) ^qe^-reb-su la H-ru a-na uru si-kur uru sa- 
pa-ni sd is-tu tar-si m GiSKiM- d MAS man kur 
as-sur 

85) dumu d sul-ma-nu-SAG man kur as-sur-ma 
nun-m a-lik pa-ni-ia gun ma-da-tu a-na as- 
sur EN-/a 

86) ik-lu-u lu a-lik uru si-kur uru sa-pa-a-nu lu 
al-mi it-ti-su-nu am-da-hi-si 

87) dhik-ta-su-nu ma-^a-tu lu a-duk Sal-la-su-nu 

NIG.SU\MES-SW-/2W NiG.GA.MES-SW-rttt GU 4 .ME§- 

su-nu 

88) udu se-ni-su-nu u-se-si-a a-na VRU-ia as-sur 
ub-la uru.mes-w sd pa-ha-at uru si-kur 

89) uru sa-pa-a-ni a-na si-hir-ti-su-nu ak-sud si- 
ta-te-M-nu is-tu pa-an Gis.TUKUL.MES-/tf dan- 
nu-te 

90) rjp^-par-si-du ur-du-u-ni GiR.u.MES-ia is-bu- 
tu ma-da-tu am-hur-su-nu gun it ta-mar-ta 
u-dan-nin VGV-^su-nu u-kin^ 



extensive troops as captives, I brought him to my 
land (and) into Nineveh. I mustered chariotry 
(and) troops (and) marched over difficult roads 
and rugged mountains which were unsuitable for 
the passage of my chariotry (and) troops, into 
which none of the kings my fathers had 
penetrated and wherein no winged bird of the sky 
flew — (I marched) to the cities Sikkur (and) 
Sappanu which since the time of TukultT-Ninurta 
(i), king of Assyria, (85) son of Shalmaneser (i) 
(who was) also king of Assyria, a prince who pre- 
ceded me, had withheld tax (and) tribute from 
Assur, my lord. I surrounded the cities Sikkur 
(and) Sappanu (and) fought with them. I inflicted 
a major defeat upon them. I brought forth their 
booty, possessions, property, herds, (and) flocks 
(and) brought (them) to my city Assur. I con- 
quered all the cities in the district of the cities 
Sikkur (and) Sappanu. The remainder of their 
(inhabitants, who) had fled before my strong 
weapons, came down (and) submitted to me. I re- 
ceived from them tribute (and) imposed upon 
them stringent taxes and dues. 



91) r/na"! H1.SIG4 ud 15 li-me m i-na-j>mGiR-ia-a- 
lak a-na ne-ra-ru-ut-te sd uru ku-um-me lu 
a-lik udu.siskur.mes 

92) a-na pa-^ari^ d isKUR sd uru ku-^unO-me en- 
ia lu e-pu-us uru.mes-w sd kur hab-hi 
kur.mes-M sd uru ku-um-^me^ 

93) *~ina izi gibil~i se.kin.tar.mes Ku[R-f]/-sw lu 
e-si-di gun u ta-mar-ta u-dan-nin VGV-Su-nu 
u-kin 

94) ina iti.bara li-me md u[TU-A]D-/# 2-te-sti a-na 
ne-ra-ru-tu sd uru ku-um-me lu a-lik uru 
sa-at-ku-ri 

95) uru f~ia(?)7-sa-racD-du ^vru ku^-un-nu uru 
iab-si-a uru.me§-«/ sd kur hab-hi Sd li-mi-it 
uru ku-um-me 

96) anse.kur.ra.mes si-im-da-at gis ni-ri-ia lu 
i[k-f\u~u uru.meS-w su-a-tu-nu ak-sud ina \z\ 
gibil ap-pu-ul aq-qur 

97) ^i-na qi-biO as-sur en gal en-/a r«i d r/5 8 - 
tdf^ be-lit murub 4 r u me~i a-lik-at pa-na-at 



91-93) In the month Sivan, the fifteenth day, epo- 
nymy of Ina-ilTia-allak, 1 marched to the assis- 
tance of the city Kummu. I made sacrifices before 
the god Adad of the city Kummu, my lord. I 
burnt the cities of the land Habhu, enemies of the 
city Kummu. I reaped the harvest of his land 
(and) imposed upon them stringent taxes and 
dues. 



94-96) In the month Nisan, eponymy of Samas- 
abuia, I marched a second time to the assistance 
of the city Kummu. I conquered, burnt, ravaged, 
(and) destroyed the cities Satkuru, Iasaddu, 
Kunnu, Tabsia, cities of the land Habhu in the 
environs of the city Kummu (which) had withheld 
my (tribute of) teams of horses. 



97-104) By the command of Assur, the great lord, 
my lord, and the goddess Istar, mistress of battle 



94 For the restoration of the name of the eponym see the 
eponym canons reconstructed in ARI 2 §455 and Brinkman, 



PKBp. 181 n. 1115. 



Adad-nararT ii A.0.99.2 



153 



ERIN.HI.A,ME§-/« DAGAL,ME§ 

98) ina iti.' sig 4 i-ncP li-me an-ni-ma 5-te-su a-na 
kur ha-ni-gal-bat lu a-lik ma-da-tu sd kur 
ha-ni-gal-bat 

99) ^e^-lis v u sap^-lis lu am-hur kur ha-ni-gal- 
bat DAGAL-tu a-na pat gim-ri-sd lu a-pel a-na 
mi-sir KVR-ia 

100) ^lu-te-ef^ \-en pa-a u-se-esy^ kP-su-nu-ti id 
ha-bur lu e-bir a-na uru gu-za-a-ni 

101) sd m a-bi-sa-la-mu dumu ba-hi-a-ni u-kal-lu- 
u-ni lu a-lik ana uru si-ka-a-ni 

102) sd r//2tf~i sag e-ni sd id ha-bur GAR-nu-ni lu 
ku 4 -w6 ina e-mu-qi si-ra-a-te sd d sd-mas en 
ku-lu-li-ia 

103) TagaI SANGA-^/-r/ai gis.gigir.mes-sw ma- 
^a^-tu anse.kur.ra.mes si-im-da-at gis ni-ri 
ku.babbar ku.gi 

104) nig.ga Te.gal-5W lu am-hur^-su ma-da-tu 
xjgv-su u-kin 

105) Una ger-ri-ia-ma e-^lP si-di Hfcn ha-bur ^~lu "i 
as-bat i~na uru ar-na-ba-ni lu be-dak 

106) /s-fw uru ar-na-ba-ni at-tu-mus ina uru ta- 
&/-re be-dak i$~tu uru ta-bi-te 

107) at-tu-mus a^na^ uru M-di-* kan(*)^-ni lu e- 
ku 4 ~ub gun ma-da-tu gis.gigir ku.gi /*v am- 

108) /s-ta uru sd-di- v kan(*yi-ni at-tu-mus ina uru 
ki-si-ri be-dak is-tu uru si-ki-ri 

109) at-tu-mus a-na uru qa-at-ni KV 4 -ub m iL- 
d iSKUR uru qa-at-na-a-ia lu cto-gtf /mt-ah 

110) NIG.GA rE~1.GAL-//-5M GIS.GIGIR 

ANSE.KUR.RA.MES gis.mar.gid.da.mes 
gu 4 .mes /w am-hur-su ma-da-tu vgu-su u-kin 

111) /s-ta ("uru"! qa-^aO-ni at-tu-mus ina KUR-e 
bu-u-si ina ugu id ha-bur GAR-an be-dak 

112) /s-ta Tkur-^t bu-u-si at-tu-mus a-na 

URU.BAD-a-^tt/:-l.LIM KU 4 -Ub URU.BAD-tf- 

duk- d uu 

113) a-rta ra-ma-ni-ia r/w~i am-nu ta uru.bad-a- 
fifw/c-l.LiM at-tu-mus a-na kur la-qe-e 

1 14) #-«a uru zu-u-ri-ih m ba-ar-a-ta-ra dumu f £a- 
lu-pe-e u-kal-lu-u-ni 

115) /t/ a-///c gun w ma-da-tu lu am-^huf^-su a-na 
uru 5# m ha-ra-a-ni lu e-tiq gun ma-da-tu 

r am-hur^ 

1 16) a-rtff uru si-ir-^qP sd TgirI am-ma-te sd id 
pu-rat-te sd-ak-nu-u-ni sd m mu-da-ad-da 



and strife, who goes at the head of my extensive 
army; in the month Si van, in this same eponymy, 
I marched for a fifth time to the land Hanigalbat. 
I received the tribute of the land Hanigalbat 
above and below. (Thus) I became lord of the ex- 
tensive land Hanigalbat to its entire extent (and) 
(100) brought (it) into the boundaries of my land. 
I brought them under one authority. I crossed the 
River Habur (and) marched to the city GuzSnu 
which Abi-salamu, a man of Blt-Bahiani, held. I 
entered the city Sikanu which lies at the source of 
the River Habur. By the exalted strength of the 
god Samas, lord of my turban, lover of my priest- 
hood, I received from him his numerous chariots, 
teams of horses, silver, gold, the property of his 
palace. I imposed upon him tribute. 



105-119) On this same campaign of mine I made 
my way along the banks of the River Habur. I 
spent the night in the city Arnabanu. Moving on 
from the city Arnabanu I spent the night in the 
city Tabitu, Moving on from the city Tabitu I en- 
tered the city Sadikannu. I received tribute, tax, 
chariots, (and) gold. Moving on from the city 
Sadikannu I spent the night in the city Kisiru. 
Moving on from the city Kisiru I entered the city 
Qatnu. 1 allowed to remain (there) Amll-Adad, a 
man of the city Qatnu, (my) vassal, (110) I re- 
ceived from him the property of his palace, chari- 
ots (and) horses, wagons (and) oxen. I imposed 
upon him tribute. Moving on from the city Qatnu 
I pitched camp (and) spent the night in the moun- 
tains of busu (which) are by the River Habur. 
Moving on from the mountains of busu I entered 
the city Dur-aduklimmu. I regarded the city Dur- 
aduklimmu as mine. Moving on from the city 
Dur-aduklimmu (115) I marched to the land 
Laqu, to the city Zurih (which) Baratara, a man 
of Blt-Halupe, held. I received from him tribute 
and tax. I passed on to the city of the man 
Haranu (and) received tribute (and) tax. I 
marched to the city Sirqu which lies on the other 
bank of the Euphrates (and) which Mudadda, the 
Laqu, held. I received tribute, tax, the property 
of his palace, oxen, a^a/w-donkeys, tribute and 
tax of the land Laqu to its entire extent above 



98 5-te-su 'a fifth time*: scribal error for 'a seventh time'. See 
Seidmann, MAOG 9/3 p. 68. 108 uru si-ki-ri is a scribal 
error for uru ki-shri. 111-12 KUR-e bu-u-si 'mountains of 
busu*. This is more probable than 'the land Ebusu*. See 



CAD 2 (B) p. 349b, Schramm, EAK 2 p. 5, Rollig, Orientalia 
ns 47 (1978) pp. 424 and 428 and Kessler, Nordmesopotamien 
pp. 215 and 230-33. 



154 



Adad-narart n A. 0.99.2 



117) kur la-qa-a-^ia^ u-kal-lu-u-ni r/wi a-lik gun 
ma-da-tu nig.ga e.gal-sw gu 4 .mes 

118) anse a-ga-Ii. mes Tqun"! ii ma-da-tu sd kur 
la-qe-e a-na pat gim-ri-sd e-lis 

119) f U sap^-tis r /w^ am-^huf^ ma-da-tu sd uru 
hi-in-da-a-ni lu am-hur a-na URU-/a as-sur 
ub-la 

120) e.gal.meS ina si-di KUR-ia ar-sip gis.apin.mes 
ina si-di KVK-ia ar-^ku^-us se.um.meS tab- 
ka-a-ni 

121) ugu sd pa-an ^iD-sd-ter at-bu^uk 
anse^.kur.ra.mes si-im-(da)-at gis ni-ri ina 
e-^muq} kur-/# ugu sd pa-na u-sd-^ter ar- 
ku-us^ 

122) d nin-urta d iGi.DU sd SASGA-ti ^i-ra^-mu 
TmaLanseI edin u-sat-li-mu-ni-ma e-pes ba- 
^a-ri iq-bu-ni 

123) 6 su-si ur.mah.mes ina rGis~i.GiGiR-/tf pa-at- 
tu-te ina fqP-it-ru-ub me-et-lu-ti-ia ina 

GiR.II.MES-/fl 

124) i~la^-as-ma-te ina r pa-ds(iyi-hi a-duk 4 su-si 
gu 4 .a[m].mes a-duk 9 gu 4 .pu.hal gu 4 .am.mes 
dan-nu-te 

125) fsu^-ut ^qar^-ni ti.la.mes u-sab-bi-ta 6 
am. si. mes ina mi-it-hu-s[i] a-duk ina munus 
sub-te 

126) r/w~i ad-di 4 Tam1.si.mes ti.la.mes as-bat 5 
ina kip-pi as-bat ur.mah.mes gu 4 .am.mes 

127) am. si. mes dara.mas.mes dara.mes 
anse. ebin.na. mes mas. da. mes 
gA.nuh.musen.mes su-gul-iiMiDU (ina) sa 
uru f'ek-suri 

128) e-nu-ma e d gu-la NiN-/a mah-ru-u sd i-na pa- 
na m GiSKiM- d MAS a-bi sid as-sur e-pu-us 

129) e su-u e-na-ah-ma an-hu-su u-ne-kir 6 dan- 
na-su ^ak^-sud e sd-a-tu 

130) ugu mah-re-e ma-di-is ut-te-er ii u-^ser^-be 
r ifP-tu us-se-su a- r dP gaba-dib-bi-su 



131) u-sek-lil ii na-ri-ia as-^ku^-un nun-w egir-w 
an-hu-su ^lu^-dis mu sat-ra 

132) Una as-ri-su lu-te-er as-sur u d gu-la ik-ri-be- 
su i-se-mu-ii mu-ne-kin sit-ri-ia 



and below. I received the tribute of the city 
Hindanu. I brought (this) to my city Assur. 



120-121) I constructed palaces in the (various) 
districts of my land. I hitched up plows in the 
(various) districts of my land (and thereby) piled 
up more grain than ever before. I hitched up 
more teams of horses than ever before for the 
forces of my land. 



122-127) The gods Ninurta (and) Nergal, who 
love my priesthood, gave to me the wild beasts 
and commanded me to hunt. I killed 360 lions 
from my ... chariot, with my valorous assault, 
(and) on my swift feet with the spear. I killed 240 
wild bulls. I captured alive nine strong wild virile 
bulls with horns. I killed six elephants in a 
conflict; I drove four elephants into an ambush 
and captured (them) alive. I captured five 
(elephants) by means of a snare. In Inner City 
(Assur) I formed herds of lions, wild bulls, 
elephants, aialu-deei f ibex, wild asses, deer, (and) 
ostriches. 



128-1 3 la) At that time the ancient temple of the 
goddess Gula, my mistress, which previously 
TukultT-Ninurta (i), my forefather, vice-regent of 
Assur, had built — this temple had become dila- 
pidated and I removed its debris down to the bot- 
tom of the foundation pit. I greatly enlarged this 
temple beyond previous extent. I completed it 
from top to bottom and deposited my monumen- 
tal inscriptions. 

131b-132a) May a later prince restore it (and) re- 
turn my inscribed name to its place. (Then) Assur 
and the goddess Gula will listen to his prayers. 
132b-133)As for the one who removes my in- 
scriptions and my name: may Assur and the 



121 ina e-^muq^, not ina e-li: see von Soden, OLZ 55 (1960) 
488. 122 TmAs.ansfT = bulu is clear from collation. 124 The 
numeral before go^.pu.hal is 9, not 7. 125 For the 
restoration at the beginning see Borger, EAK 1 p. 137. 



125-26 For the reading and interpretation see Grayson, 
Studies Oppenheim p. 93 and TSTS 1 p. 4. 131 Ex. 2 has the 
remains of several lines before line 131 which do not match 
ex. 1. See A.0.99.3. 



Adad-naran ii A.0.99.2 



155 



133) it Mu-ia as-sur u d gu~la uan-su iis-i~kD-pu 
mv-su numun-51/ ina kur lu-hal-li-^ qu^ 



134) ITI.TneT UD 17.KAM ^IH-mU m DINGIR-ZI-PAP 
SCI SAG M md ISKUR-ERIN.TAH MAN KUR QS-SUr 



goddess Gula overthrow his sovereignty (and) des- 
troy his name (and) his seed from the land. 

134) Month of Ab, seventeenth day, eponymy of 
IlT-napistT-usur, eunuch of Adad-naran, king of 
Assyria. 



This fragmentary text, on a piece of a clay tablet from Assur, is a ver- 
sion of the annals similar to A. 0.99. 2 and probably dates to about the 
same time, 893 BC, It has, however, a building section which is 
different from that of A.0.99.2. 



COMMENTARY 



The fragment (VAT 9632, Ass 1017) has been discussed 
in the commentary to A.0.99.2 as 'ex. 2' and it is in- 
cluded in the bibliography and catalogue of that text. 
Duplicate passages are edited there. As noted there, 
despite passages which duplicate parts of A.0.99.2, this 



fragment clearly has a different building passage and 
may well concern a structure other than the Gula tem- 
ple at Assur. Only this broken building passage is 
edited here. 



TEXT 



Obverse 

1-19) (See A.0.99.2 lines 1-15) 

Lacuna 

Reverse 

Lacuna 



1') 

2') 
30 
4') 
50 
60 
70 
80 
90 
10') 



]x 

].ME§ 

]X 

] X.MES 

Yta 

i/ak)~sud 
] x MAH 
] x-be-sti 

] ru~i-sal-ba-ru-[.. 
] a-na sap-lis 



1-19) (See A.0.99.2 lines 1-15) 
Lacuna 

Lacuna 

rev, I'-lOO No translation warranted. 



11'- 14') (See A.0.99.2 lines 131-33) 



rev. ir-14 1 ) (See A.0.99.2 lines 131-33) 



134 llt-napisti-usur. there is difficulty in correlating this 
eponymy with the canonical lists. See Grayson, ARI 2 §455 



and Gurney, AnSt 3 (1953) pp. 15-17. 



156 



Adad-nararT n A.0.99.4 



This fragmentary version of the annals is from late in the reign and it 
may date to about 893 BC, the same year as A.0.99.2. The reasons are 
that both texts include the seventh campaign against Hanigalbat and 
they are sometimes exact duplicates. But there are major differences 
and clearly this fragment is a separate text. The main exemplar is on a 
piece of clay tablet from Assur. The building section is not preserved 
but may well have been different from that of A. 0.99.2. A duplicate 
appears on a clay tablet fragment from Nineveh, A. 0.99. 5, and the 
parallel passages have been edited together here although the Ninevite 
text must have concerned a different building enterprise. 

The beginning of our text is broken away but it probably was the 
same as the beginning of A. 0.99.2 (lines 1-14) for when A.0.99.4 is 
first preserved it duplicates the introductory portions of A. 0.99. 2 
(A.0.99.2 lines 15-25 // A.0.99.4 obv. l'-17'a). After this our text 
departs from A.0.99.2, adding further details about the campaign 
against the Lullumu and others (obv. 17'b-20'). It continues with a 
narrative (obv. 21-26') about campaigns against Katmuhu and other 
regions which is quite different from A.0.99.2. The final fragmentary 
paragraph preserved on the obverse (obv. 27-34') seems to begin with 
a narration of the defeat of Samas-mudammiq (cf. A.0.99.2 lines 
26-27). 

On the reverse after the first section (rev. 1-4'), which cannot be 
identified, there is a description of the defeat of Suhu (rev. 5-7, cf. 
A.0.99.2 line 33). This is followed by a narrative of the seventh cam- 
paign to Hanigalbat (rev. 8'- 17, cf. A.0.99.2 lines 39-90 and 97-104). 
Then the text breaks off. 



CATALOGUE 





Museum 


Ass 


ASiur 


Dimensions 


Lines 




Ex. 


number 


number 


provenance 


(cm) 


preserved 


cpn 


1 


VAT 9630 


1007+1016 


East of Prothyse, iD4v; 
Pedersen, Assur temple 
archive and library, Nl 


15x9 + 


Obv. l'-26' 


c 


2 


BM 121044 
= A.0.99.5 


— 


~ 


~ 


Obv. 13-34' 
Rev. l'-18' 


c 



COMMENTARY 



The master text for most of the obv. (obv. l'-26'), and 

therefore the line numbering, follows ex, 1. For the 



remainder of the text 'ex. T (A. 0,99. 5) is the only 

source preserved. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 no. 84 (ex. 1, study) 

1935 Seidmann, MAOG 9/3 pp. 5-35 (ex. 1, study) 

1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 3-6 (ex. 1, study) 



1976 Grayson, ARI 2 xcix 2 (ex. 1, study) 

1986 Pedersen, Archives 2 p. 19 no. 2 (ex. 1, provenance) 



Adad-narafin A.0.99.4 
TEXT 



157 



Obverse 

Lacuna (cf. A.0.99.2 lines 1-14) 

10 [...] qar-ra-da-ku la-[abbaku ...] 



20 [ m ] ISKUR-ERIN.TAH MAN datl-HU MAN K[UR 



30 
40 
50 

60 



assur sar kibrat arba y i muner auabTsu anaku] 

man le^u-u murub 4 sa-\pi-in alani musahmeti 

sade sa matati anaku] 

zi-ka-ru qar-du [mula^it astutisu hitmut 

raggt\ 

u se-ni ki-ma d Gis,BAR [ahammat kima abube 

asappan ...-sa-?e] 



mu-ne-ha ul i-su [kima buri dapinaku kima 

patre] 
70 sal-ba-be u-ra-sa-pa [senni kima tib sari 

ezziqi] 
80 ki-ma an-hu-li sit-[muraku kima ...] 
90 M pa-a-ri u-na-sah [kima suskalli asahhap 

kima huhari\ 
Iff) a-kdt-iam a-na za-kar su-mi-[ia danni malki 

kibrat erbettim] 
1 F) ki-ma ^ai me^-he-e i-su-b[u ana sabat gernia] 
120 Gis.TUKUL.MES-5w-nw ki-ma ki-i[s(l)-kite 

isudu] 

130 e t~lu qar-du sd i-na gis. tukul-ti d a-sur [belTsu 

istu ebertan zabe] su-pa-l[i\- 
140 ' si-di kur lu-lu-me-e kur hab-hi kur 

[zamua] a-di ne-[ri-bi] 
150 sd kur nam-ri il-[l\i-ku~ma kur [qumanf\ 
160 dagal.mes a~di kur me-eh-ri Tkur^ [salua u 

mat uratri] 
170 a-na gIr.ii.mes-M ti-Mk-nis fa~i-[na kur ...] 
180 ^w a-lik udu.siskur.mes a-na pa-a\n d ...] 
190 ^ u e-pu-us si-ta-at kur [...] 
2ff) i-na gis.tukul.mes u-sam-qit(*) ki-si-t\e ...] 

2T) kur kat-mu-hi a-na pat gim-ri-sd i-p[e-lu-ma 

220 r w~ l 4-te-su a-na kur x [...] 
230 [matati] na-i-ri lu a-l[ik ...] 
240 [..-] X.MES-Ztf u-x [...] //-?/-[...] 



Lacuna 

T) [I am enormously radiant, I am a hero], I am 
a warrior, [I am a virile] lion, [I am foremost, I 
am exalted, I]; 

2-5'a) Adad-nararl, strong king, king of [Assyria, 
king of the four quarters, the one who defeats 
his enemies, I], the king capable in battle, 
overwhelmer [of cities, the one who scorches the 
mountains of (foreign) lands, 1], the virile war- 
rior, [the one who controls those opposed to him, 
who is inflamed against the evil] and the wicked, 
[I scorch] like the god Girru (fire god), [I 
overwhelm like the deluge, ...], I have no success- 
ful opponent; 

5'b-120 [I am belligerent like a young bull], I 
strike [the wicked like] the fierce [dagger, I con- 
stantly blow like the onslaught of the wind, I] 
rage like the gale, 1 uproot (people) [like hair] of 
the skin, [I overpower like the net], I enclose [like 
the trap] , at the mention of [my strong] name [the 
princes of the four quarters] sway like reeds in a 
storm, [at the onset of my campaign] their 
weapons [melt] as though in a furnace; 



13-200 valiant man who marched with the sup- 
port of the god Assur, [his lord, from the other 
side of] the Lower [Zab], the district of the land 
of the Lullumu, the lands Habhu (and) [Zamua], 
as far as the passes of the land Namru and sub- 
dued the land of the extensive [Qumanu] as far as 
the lands Mehru, [Salua, and Uratru], I marched 
to [the land ...]. 1 made sacrifices before [the 
god(s) ...]. The remainder of the land [...] I felled 
with the sword (and) the booty [I brought to my 
city Assur] . 

21-260 (Who) became lord over the entire land 
Katmuhu [...]. Yet a fourth time I marched to the 
land [... the lands] Nairi [...] ... [...] tribute [...] 



obv. I 1 See A. 0.99.2 line 15 for the probable reconstruction of 
this line, obv. 1J-14' In ex. 1 the supali begins at the end of 
line 13', [su-pa-li], and concludes at the beginning of line 14', 
-i (si-di ...). This is very unusual, obv. 16'. 2 DAGAL-ta (as 



A. 0.99. 2 line 24), changing the translation to 'the extensive 
land of the Qamanu*. obv. 20M (ex. 2 broken) -git: text -be. 
obv. 20'. 2 ki-rsf(fp-tu. 



158 



Adad-naran n A .0.99.4 



25 # ) l..]x-da-at[...] 

26') [...]xxma-da-a[t(l)-tu 



27) dab-da m > d ^[samas-mudammiq 



28') ax [...] 

29') ur[u ...] 

30') /-imfi [...] 

31') a-[..,] 

32') »[...] 

33') r/-/ifln [...] 

34') x [...] 



27 - rev. 18') (The remainder of the text is too 
broken for translation.) 



Reverse 

V) xx [x]xx [...] 

2') i-nax [...] 
3') /i-x[...] 
4') /s-r[w ...] 



5') [k]ur su-hi a-d[i ...] 

6') BAD5.BAD5 [...] 

I 1 ) mar-s[i(l)-su-(nu) ...] 



a-na kur ha-ni-ga[I-bat ...] 

/5-fM U[RU(?) ...] 

Iff) w7 [...] 
11') sap-su-[ti ...] 

DAGAL-te X [...] 

rsfi-im-d[a-at riifisu ...] 

m /?w-wr- d is[KUR ...] 
15') ma-a-di gis [...] 
16') a-na sal lu [...] 
17') ii-i-t[a ...] 



8') 
9') 



12') 
13') 
14') 



18') [x] xxx [...] 
Lacuna 



This is a fragmentary version of the annals, on a piece of clay tablet 
from Nineveh, identical so far as it is preserved with a fragmentary 
version from Assur, A. 0.99.4, with which text it has been edited. 
Nevertheless, the provenance shows that the building passage of this 
text, which is not preserved, would have been quite different. 



COMMENTARY 

The fragment (BM 121044, 1929-10-12,40) measures 9x4.8+ cm. The in- 
scription has been collated. 



1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 6 (study) 

1970 Millard, Iraq 32 pp. 170-71 and pi. xxxvi (copy, study) 



Adad-nararT ii A.0.99.5 
BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1976 Grayson, AR1 2 xcix 3 (study) 



159 



This broken text is inscribed on a fragment, which appears to be from 
a stone vase, from Assur. 



COMMENTARY 

The object (Ass 6730) is known only from a photo (Ass ph 1100) from which 
the inscription has been collated. 



TEXT 



1) [(ekal) adad-tRm.T]AH man dan-ni man ki[s 
sar mat assur] 

2) [apil assur~KAL]-an man kis man kur as 

3) [apil tukulti\~A-e-Mr-ra man ki[s sar mat 
assurmal 

4) [...]xxx[...] 

Lacuna 



1-3) [(Palace of) Adad-nar]irT, strong king, king 
of the universe, [king of Assyria, son of Assur- 
d]an (n), king of the universe, king of Assyria, 
[son of Tiglath]-pileser (n) (who was) also king of 
the universe [and king of Assyria]: 

4) [...] 
Lacuna 



This text is inscribed on several stone slabs and two hollow cylindrical 
stones (exemplars 8 and 9). All the stones were found at Nineveh with 
the exception of one slab (exemplar 6) which was found at Babylon. 
While this may be testimony to Adad-nararT n's building activity at 
Babylon, it is more likely that it is a piece of booty carried off by one 
of the Neo-Babylonian kings after the fall of Nineveh. 



CATALOGUE 





Museum 


Registration 


Arch. 


79 


AAA 19 


Bab ph 




Ex. 


number 


number 


number 


number 


number 


cpn 


1 


BM 121149 


1929-10-12,158 


12 




- 


- 


c 


2 


U nlocated 


_ 


13 




- 


- 


n 


3 


Unlocated 


- 


14 




- 


- 


n 


4 


Unlocated 


_ 


15 




_ 


- 


n 


5 


Unlocated 


_ 


16 




- 


_ 


n 


6 


Unlocated 


_ 


- 




- 


1168 


P 


7 


BM 115021 


_ 


- 




- 


_ 


c 


8 


BM 90853 


- 


- 




- 


- 


c 


9 


Unlocated 


- 


- 




266 


- 


n 


10 


Unlocated 


_ 


20 




_ 


_ 


n 



160 



Adad-naran ii A.0.99.7 



COMMENTARY 



All of the inscriptions are exact duplicates except for 
minor variants on the two stone cylindrical objects: on 
these the text is inscribed in three, rather than six, lines; 
as is used for as-sur throughout; in line 5, Gil.tukul-ti- 
is used instead of giskim-. 

Winckler said that BM 115021 was the inscription in- 
correctly assigned to Mutakkil-Nusku by G. Smith, 



Assyrian Disc. p. 251 (and see p. 142), an error re- 
peated by Thompson, Century pp. 53 and 119. See 
Weidner, AfO 7 (1931-32) p. 279 (to 'S.119'). The text 
has also been ascribed mistakenly to Assur-dan n — see 
Weidner, AfO 3 (1926) p. 151 n. 4, who founded this 
view on BM Guide p. 72. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1887 Winckler, ZA 2 p. 311 (ex. 8, copy) and pi. 3 no, 5 (ex, 

7» copy) 
1889 Winckler, KB 1 pp. 48-49 (ex. 8, edition) 

1902 King, AKA p. 154 (ex. 8, copy, edition) 

1903 Weissbach, Miscellen p. 15 no. 5 and pi. 6 no. 1 (ex. 6, 
copy, study) 

1914 Koldewey, WEB p. 163 (ex. 6, photo) 
1922 BM Guide p. 72 no. 251 (ex. 7, study) 
1924-25 Unger, AfK 2 p. 24 (ex. 6, study) 



1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §396 (ex. 8, translation) 

1929 Thompson, Arch. 79 p, 119 and pi, xlii nos. 12-16 and 

20(exs. 1-5, 10, copy) 
1932 Thompson, AAA 19 p. 107 and pi. lxxxhi no. 266 (ex. 

9, copy) 
1968 Brinkman, PKB p. 179 n. 1101 (ex. 6, study) 
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 8 (exs. 1-10, study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 xcix 4 (exs. 1-10, translation) 



TEXT 



1) E.GAL md ISKUR-ERIN.TAH 

2) MAN KIS MAN KUR aS-SUr 

3) a as-sur-KAL-an 

4) MAN KIS MAN KUR aS-SUr 

5) a GiSKiu-A-e-sdr-ra 

6) man kis man kur as-sur-ma 



1-6) (Property of) the palace of Adad-naran, king 
of the universe, king of Assyria, son of Assur-dan 
(n), king of the universe, king of Assyria, son of 
Tiglath-pileser (n) (who was) also king of the 
universe (and) king of Assyria. 



8 



This label appears on the top of a broken clay cone found at Sibaniba 
(Tell Billa). 



COMMENTARY 



The broken clay cone is now in the University Museum, 
Philadelphia, excavation no. B3-320 and museum no. 
33-4-144. It measures 14x9.8x6+ cm and was found 



in square W6 in stratum I. The inscription has been 
collated. It will be published by Gaiter in JCS 41 
(1989). 



TEXT 



1) E.GAL m 10-ERIN.TAH MAN GAL-W 

2) man dan-nu man i~kis~i man kur as-sur 

3) dumu m as-sur-KAL-an [sar kissati] man kur 
as-sur 

4) dumu m GilJukul-t[i-apil-esar]-^ra^ 

5) man kis [sar mat assurma] 



1-5) (Property of) the palace of Adad-naran, 
great king, strong king, king of the universe, king 
of Assyria, son of Assur-dan (n), [king of the 
universe], king of Assyria, son of Tiglath-[pileser 
(n) (who was) also] king of the universe (and) 
[king of Assyria]. 



Adad-nararl n A.0.99.1001 161 



1001 



At Nineveh Thompson discovered numerous fragments of black stone 
with traces of scenes in relief and inscriptions. These may be the 
remains of an obelisk of Adad-nararl n similar in form to the Black or 
Rassam Obelisk of Ashurnasirpal n from Calah (A.0. 101.24). Particu- 
larly relevant to this suggestion is the fact that the inscription seems to 
have consisted of a number of texts, each beginning with The tribute 
of ,.,' (madattu sa .,.) followed by a list of such luxury items as silver, 
gold, bronze, tin, timber, and garments. But the fragments are far too 
small to be certain of any coherent reconstruction or of the reading of 
even a single proper name, Thompson believed he could decipher 
traces of the personal names Gabbar, Datana, and Muquru. The first 
two are otherwise unknown but Muquru was a Temannite ruler in the 
time of Adad-nararl n (A, 0,99, 2 line 49). Thompson also believed he 
could read the geographic names Mehru and Que. Mehru appears in 
texts of Tiglath-pileser i (A.0.87.2 line 30), Adad-nararl n (A.0.99.1 
rev. 8', A.0.99.2 line 24, A. 0.99. 4 obv. 16'), and Ashurnasirpal n 
(A.0.101.40 line 28). Que appears in royal inscriptions beginning with 
Shalmaneser in. But none of these readings is certain, with the possi- 
ble exception of Mehru. Thus the original obelisk may have belonged 
to Adad-nararT n or Ashurnasirpal n and the former seems more prob- 
able. Given the bad state of preservation of the fragments, no edition 
can be given. The objects are in the Birmingham City Museum and all 
bear the number BCM 898 '37. The inscriptions have been collated but 
with little success at decipherment because of their broken state. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1937 Thompson, Iraq 4 pp. 43-46 and figs. 1-2 (copy, study) 1979 George, Iraq 41 pp. 123, 139, and fig. 7 (copy, study) 

1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 49 (study) 1982 Borker-Klahn, Bildstelen no. 156-60 (photo, study) 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 115 n. 468 b iii (study) 1984 Frame, ARRIM 2 p. 19 (study) 



1002 



This badly broken text was inscribed on a mutilated stone stele found 
in the row of steles at Assur. The excavator, Andrae, suggested that 
Adad-nararl n was the most probable king to be identified with this 
stele although there is no certainty. 



COMMENTARY 

The stele (Ass 15739) has not been located or collated. According to Andrae it 
measured 255 cm high but originally it must have been c. 300 cm high. 



162 



Adad-nararT n A.0.99.1002 
BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1913 Andrae, Stelenreihen pp. 14-18 and pi. xu no. 9 (photo, 
copy, edition) 



1967 Borger, HKL 1 p. 8 (study) 

1976 Grayson, AR1 2 xcix 5 (translation) 



TEXT 



1) Isalam] 

2) md [adad'nararJil) sarru] dan-n[u] 

3) man k[is sar k]ur as 

4) a A§(?)-K[AL(?)-fl7i(?) sar kissatii?.) sar mat] 

AS(?) 

5) a Gi[sKiM-apil-e-sdr-r]a{l) 

6) Tman"! [kissati(?) sar k]ur AS-ma 



1-6) [Statue of Adad-nararf\, strong [king], king 
of the universe, [king of] Assyria, son of Assur- 
d[an (ii), king of the universe, king of] Assyria, 
son of Ti[glath-piles]er (n) (who was) also [king 
of the universe (and) king of] Assyria. 



1003 



Traces of the name Adad-nararT — [...] 10-erin.tA[h ...] — appear on 
a fragment of a vase with flowers found at Assur (Ass 8911 and 
18251) and published by Andrae, Coloured Ceramics p. 9 and figures 
1-2. Andrae thought this was Adad-nararT i but 1 believe it is later 
than that. The earliest coloured ceramics found at Assur are of 
TukultT-Ninurta i's time and thus Adad-nararT n (or possibly in) is 
more likely. Of course, the name on the fragment might have been 
within a genealogy and this would open up a number of possibilities. 



Tukulti-Ninurta n 



A.0.100 



Tukulti-Ninurta n (890-884 BC) continued to campaign like his imme- 
diate predecessors but during his brief reign not much territory was 
actually added to Assyria (for a history of the reign see Grayson, 
CAH 3/1 pp. 251-53). Campaigns for each of the years 889-85 (in- 
clusive), his second to sixth regnal years, are attested (A. 0.100.5) and 
these cover most of his reign. He also led a 'show of strength' expedi- 
tion in the Jezireh as his father had done (see A.0.100.5 lines 41-127). 
A new motif in the annals is the cause for a campaign, provocation by 
the enemy, being cited. 

TukultT-Ninurta n resided at different times at Nineveh and Assur 
and he sponsored building projects in both cities. The known works at 
Assur were the wall of Baltil (A.0.100.2), the palace terrace (A. 0.100.3 
and 5), the Enpi temple (A.0. 100.7 and 14), and possibly the Anu- 
Adad temple (A.0.100. 15). No details are available about what work 
he did at Nineveh (cf. A.0.100. 12-13 and 17). He also did some con- 
struction at centres outside the Assyrian heartland: Nemed-Tukultl- 
Ninurta (A.0. 100.6), Kahat (A.0. 100.9), and possibly Terqa 
(A.0.100. 1004). TukultT-Ninurta ii is included in king lists (see Gray- 
son, RLA 3 pp. 86-135) and a chronicle (see Grayson, Chronicles 
p. 182 rev. 3). A complete list of the eponymies for his reign can be 
reconstructed from eponym lists (see Grayson, ARI 2 p. 113 §525). 

Ashurnasirpal ii records (A, 0.101.1 i 104-105) discovery of images 
of Tiglath-pileser (i) and TukultT-Ninurta (ii) at the source of the River 
Subnat; see the introduction to A.0.87.15. A tablet fragment (VAT 
10136) with a text of TukultT-Ninurta n has been mentioned in print 
(Borger, EAK 1 p. 73; Schramm, EAK 2 p. 10; Grayson, ARI 2 p, 97 
n. 401). Wafler (AOAT 26 pp. 204-209) has proposed that a fragment 
of a stone stele found at Nineveh by Thompson (Iraq 4 [1937] 
pp. 43-46) be ascribed to this monarch. But the scant traces of an in- 
scription preclude any positive reading or identification. The private 
dedicatory text inscribed on a small stone (BM 89156 = 1835-3-9,4) 
and dedicated to Tuku[ltT-Ninurta] should be ascribed to the first king 
of that name (so Deller, NABU 1987/4 no. 101) and not the second 
(so Gaiter, ARRIM 5 [1987] pp. 11-30 no. 7). Two other texts some- 
times identified with TukultT-Ninurta ii have been edited under 
Ashurnasirpal ii (A.0.101.100 and A.0.101. 115.42). A text published 
by Schrader (Sebeneh-su pp. 18-19 and KB 1 pp. 50-51; cf. Scheil, 
Tn. pp. 3-4 and Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§684-86) is a text of 
Shalmaneser in (see Schramm, EAK 2 p. 85 and Grayson, ARI 2 
pp. 97-98 n. 401). 



163 



164 



Tukultl-Ninurta ii A.0. 100.1 



1 



This Is a standard introduction to inscriptions of Tukultl-Ninurta i at- 
tested on three different texts (A.0. 100.2-4). All of the texts come 
from Assur and a fourth annalistic text (A.0. 100.5), which also comes 
from Assur, may have had an introduction like this. This introduction 
is the same in form as the introduction to the annals of Adad-nararl n 
(A.0.99.2) which, in turn, is similar to the introduction to Tiglath- 
pileser i's annals (A. 0.87.1). These parallels assist greatly in recon- 
structing and restoring this badly preserved passage. 



CATALOGUE 





Museum 


Ass 


ASSur 


Dimensions 


Lines 




Ex. 


number 


number 


provenance 


(cm) 


preserved 


cpn 


1 


VAT 9631 


- 


City wall 


10.8x9.2 + 


1-19 


c 


2 


VAT 9550 


13261 


On floor of 2nd Assyrian 
house layer, eE7i 


9.7x8.7 + 


3-35 


c 


3 


VAT 9477 


9945 


- 


5.4x4,3 + 


8-21 


c 



COMMENTARY 



Given the broken state of all three exs., it has been 
necessary to conflate them to reconstruct a meaningful 
master text. Interested readers can consult the scores 
for details. The line numbering follows ex. 1 as far as it 



is preserved (line 19) and then ex. 2. This means that 
the lines of the master text become longer here since ex. 
2 had much longer lines. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1919-23 Ebeling, KAR no. 349 (ex. 3, copy) 
1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 nos. 89-91 (exs. 1-3, copy) 
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §|418-23 (ex. 2, translation) 
1935 Seidmann, MAOG 9/3 pp. 8-9 (exs. 1-3, study) 



1957 Deller, Orientalia ns 26 pp. 268-72 (exs. 1-3, study) 
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 9-10 (exs. 1-3, study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 c 2 (exs. 1-3, translation) 



TEXT 



1) [ d { assur sar g]im-rat dingir.mes [rabuti] 

2) [ d anu sar] r d iNUN.GAL u d a-nun-[na-ki] 

3) r d n EN kur.kur d BAD si-i-ru a-bu 

DINGIR. [MES] 

4) [ d ea sar z]u.ab mu-sim-[mu simati] 



1-13) [God Assur, king of] all the [great] gods; 
[god Ami, king of] the Igigu and Anun[naku] 
gods; lord of the lands, god Enlil, exalted one, fa- 
ther of the gods; [god Ea, king of] the ap$u> who 
decrees [destinies; god Sin, king of the] lunar 



1 Restored from A.0. 101. 17 i 1. Also see A.0.101.20 line 1, 
A.0. 101.47 line 1, Layard, ICC 87 lines 1-2, and Michel, WO 
1 (1947-52) p. 456 i 1. 2 Restored from 3 R 7 i 1, Layard, 
ICC 87 lines 2-3, and Michel, WO 1 p. 456 i 1-2. Also note 
A.0.101.20 line 2. 3 en kur.kur lord of the lands' is an 
epithet of Enlil. See, for example, A.G.87.1 i 4. Other 
instances of it appearing before the god's name are: 
A.0.101.20 lines 2-3, A.0. 101. 47 line 2, 3 R 7 i I, and Layard, 



ICC 87 line 3. 4a The beginning of the line is restored from 
A.0.101.17 i 3, A.0. 101 .47 line 3, Michel, WO 1 p. 456 i 3, 
WO 2 p. 28 i 6, 3 R 7 i 2, and Layard, ICC 87 line 5. Also 
note A.0.101.20 line 4. 4b The end of the line is restored 
from Layard, ICC 87 line 5. Parallel texts otherwise have bel 
nemeqi hasisi lord of wisdom (and) understanding*: 
A.0.101.17 i 4, A.0.101.20 line 4, A.0.101.47 line 3, Michel, 
WO 1 p. 456 i 3, WO 2 p. 28 i 6. 



TukultT-Ninurta ii A.0. 100.1 



165 



5) [ d sin sar a-g\e-e en [namrTri] 

6) d isKUR ges-ru su-tu-ru en [hegalli] 

7) ^ samas d]lkud AN-e u Ki-te [muma^er 
gimri(l)] 

8) [ d marduk] abgal dingir.mes [bet tereti{l)] 

9) d MAS qar-rad d NUN,GAL u d a-nun-[na-ki] 

10) [ d ]u.GUR git-ma-lu [sar tamhari] 

11) i~ d 7nu$ku na-a-si gis.gidru Kt-te [ilu mul- 
t]a-lu 

12) d NiN.LiL hi-ir-ti d BAD um-mi dingir.m[es 
rabuti] 

13) d iNANNA ShG-ti AN-e u Ki-te sa pa-ra-a[s 
qarduti suklulat] 

14) dingir.mes GAL.MES-/e ga-me-ru-ut es.bar-/ 
mu-sim-fmu* Siam.mes 

15) sa ti-bu-su-nu gis.lal sd-ds-mu mu-ser-bu- 
i~ifi [sarrut] 

16) m GiLtukul-ti~ d MAs NUN-a na-a-[da r&>u(l)] 

1 7) na-ram bi-\bil libbisun , . . ] 

18) sa ina sa.ttjr um-mi ki-ni-[is ...] 

19) n[ab]-ni-ti a-na nab-ni-ti en.mes us-[tennu 
(...)] x sid ki un.mes x [...] a hi KV-ti x [...] 

20) [...] ne-pe-su si-kin bu-na-ni-a i-se-r[is 
usekliluma] 

21) [...] kur su a i se ra m GiSKiM- d MAS man 
[dannu sar kissati(l)] 

22) [la sanan sar kibrat arbaH sar kal malkT bel 
bele utullu sar sarrani(l) i-sip-p]u na-a>-du sa 
(ina) mu d sd-mas gis.gidru ^KV^-[tu 
nadnatassumma] 

23) [nise ba?ulat enlil ultaspiru gimirta rPu 
kmu(?) sa zi]k-ri-su ugu ma-li-ki ne-bu-u sd- 
[tam-mu siru] 

24) [sa assur kakkesu usahhiluma ana mu^urut 
kibrat arba^iil) ana d]a-ris is-qu-ru su-me 
kab-ta [tukultT-ninurta(l)\ 



disk, lord of [brilliance]; god Adad, the excep- 
tionally strong, lord of [abundance; god Samas], 
judge of heaven and underworld, [commander of 
all\ god Marduk], sage of the gods [(and) lord of 
omens]; god Ninurta, warrior of the Igigu and 
Anun[naku] gods; [god] Nergal, perfect one, 
[king of battle]; god Nusku, bearer of the holy 
sceptre, circumspect [god]; goddess Ninlil, spouse 
of the god Enlil, mother of the [great] gods; god- 
dess Istar, foremost in heaven and underworld, 
who [is consummate] in the canons [of combat]; 



14-25) Great gods, who take firm decisions, who 
decree destinies, whose attack means conflict 
(and) strife, who make great [the sovereignty] 
of TukultT-Ninurta, attentive prince, beloved 
[shepherd, their select] one [(...)]J (the gods) who 
faithfully [noticed me] in my mother's womb 
(and) altered my birth to lordly birth; [...] people 
[...] holy [... they] rightly [made perfect] my 
features [...] ...; TukultT-Ninurta, [strong] king, 
[unrivalled king of the universe, king of the four 
quarters, king of all princes, lord of lords, chief 
herdsman, king of kings], attentive purification 
priest, [to whom] by command of the god Samas 
the holy sceptre [was given and who had complete 
authority over the people, subjects of the god 
Enlil, faithful shepherd, whose] name was called 
over the princes, [exalted] bishop, [whose weap- 
ons the god Assur has sharpened and whose] 
honoured name he has pronounced eternally [for 
control of the four quarters, ...; TukultT-Ninurta, 
king of Assyria, they called me. Strong king, king 
of Assyria, king of the four quarters, sun{god) of 
all] people, I; 



5 See A. 0.99 -2 line 1 and the note there. 6 Restored from 
A.0.101.47 line 4 and Layard, ICC 87 line 7. Also note 
A.0.101.20 line 6. 7 Restored from A. 0.99.2 line 2, 
A.0.101.17 i 9, A.0.101.47 line 5, and Layard, ICC 87 line 8. 
Also note A.0.101.20 line 7, In Michel, WO 1 p. 456 i 5 the 
text has bet gitnri lord of all*. 8 The parallels have two 
different formulae: apkaliu d bil timi A.0.101.17 i 5, apkal 
Hani bel tireti Michel, WO 2 p. 28 i 8, and Layard, ICC 87 
line 9. I have restored A.0.101.20 line 8 after A.0.101.17. 
9.2 for d MA§ has, in error, dingir.mes. See A. 0.99.2 lines 2-3, 
A.0.101.20 line 9, and Layard, ICC 87 lines 9-10. 9.3 for 
d MA§ has fnin\-urta. 10 Restored from A.0.99.2 line 3, 
A.0.101.17 i 8, A.0.101.20 line 10, and Layard, ICC 87 lines 
10-11. 11 Restored from A.0.99.2 line 3, A.0.101.17 i 7, 
Layard, ICC 87 lines 11-12. Also note A.0.101.20 lines 10-11. 

12 Restored from A.0.99.2 line 4, A.0.101.17 i 7-8, and 
Layard, ICC 87 lines 12-13. Also note A.0.101.20 lines 11-12. 

13 Restored from A.0.99.2 line 4, A.0.101.17 i 10, A.0.101.20 
lines 12-13, and Layard, ICC 87 line 13. 13 sag-// = rSStlti, 



also in A.0.99.2 line 4; A.0.101.17 i 10; A.0.101.20 line 12; 
and A. 0.1 01. 28 line 1; ex. 3 has, in error, res-it-ri. 14 Cf. 
A.0.99.2 line 5. The master text is a conflation of cxs. 1 and 3. 
Ex. 1 seems to have transposed the epithets putting muSimmu 
sim at i 'who decree destinies* before gdmerGt purussf 'who take 
firm decisions' (the latter epithet would have been in the 
break). Ex. 3 seems {mu§immu simati being in the break) to 
have had the sequence followed in the master text. 15-16a Cf. 
A. 0.87.1 i 16-17. Ex. 3 seems to omit sa tibusunu tuquntu 
sasmu 'whose attack means conflict (and) strife* as does 
A.0.99.2 line 5, A.0.101.17 i 11, and A.0.101.47 lines 5-6. 
Before \uN-a na-a-[da] it has (in error?): [(...)] x ta su d nin- 
urta. 16b-17 Cf. A.0.87.1 i 18-19 and Seux, ERAS p. 197. 
19a Restored from A.0.99.2 line 6. 19b x sid ki could be 
read [n]a 4 .kisib-£/ = kunukkT 'seals*. 21b-22a Restored from 
A.0.87.1 i 28-30. 22b-24a Restored from A.0.87.1 i 32-38. 
Cf. Seux, ERAS under the appropriate entries and especially 
p. 289 n. 138. Also see A.0.101.47 lines 12-13. 
24b-25 Restored from A.0.99.2 line 10. Cf . Seux, ERAS 



166 



TukultT-Ninurta ii A.0. 100.1 



25) [sar mat assur ibbuni sarru dannu sar mat 
assur sar kibrat arbaH{l) samsu kissat 
u]n.mes a-na-ku 

26) [mar adad-naran ... mar assur]-KAL-an 

GIR.ARAD DINGIR.MES GAL.MES S[lD(?) aSSUr] 

27) [mar tukulthapil-esarra ... mar as]-sur-SAG-i- 
si man da-pi-nu [mudfs targigT(l)] 



28) [ina umesuma ina pi Hani rabuti sarruti 
belu{l)]-ti u-sa-a sar-ra-^ku en(?)1-[A:w(?) . 

29) [... pa\l-ha-ku u sur-ba-ku ur-[sa-na~ku{l) 

30) [... mu-u]n-nar-ba-ku sd-lum-ma-[ku ...] 

31) [. . . ] si-ra-ku ra-sub-b[a-ku . . . ] 

32) [...] x-ku u M-pi-ra-ku [...] 

33) [...] r d HQna-mad d l..] 

34) [.,. mu-ma(l)]-^ei-er kib-[rat(l) arbaHtf) . 

35) [...]xx[...] 
Lacuna 



26-27) [Son of Adad-naran (n) f ..., son of 
Assur]-dan (n), appointee of the great gods, vice- 
[regent of Assur, son of Tiglath-pileser (n), ... son 
of As]sur-resa-isi (n), martial sovereign, [trampler 
of criminals] ; 

28-34) [At that time, by the edict of the great 
gods, my sovereignty (and) dominion] were 
decreed; I am king, [I] am lord, [...], I am enor- 
mously fearful, [1 am a] hero, [...], I am swift, [I 
am] magnificent, [..,], I am exalted, [I am] fright- 
ful, [...], I am [...] and I am in command, [... of] 
the god Sin, loved one of the god [...] com- 
mander of the [four] quarters. 



Lacuna 



This text, on a fragmentary clay tablet from Assur, records work on a 
wall, probably of Baltil, which was the oldest quarter of the city. An 
edition of the text's introduction is given under A.0. 100.1. The text is 
dated in the king's first year. 



COMMENTARY 



For full information on the fragment, VAT 9631, see 
A. 0.100.1 where it is listed as 'ex. 1\ The introduction, 
edited there, is on the obv. of the fragment. The pas- 
sage given here is on the rev. 

The text is very similar to A. 0.100.5 lines 136-45. 



Also note A. 0.87. 2 lines 5"~9" and A. 0,87,10 lines 
89-93. Restorations are based thereon. For the last few 
lines see, for example, A.0. 101.38 lines 28-37 and 
A.0. 101.50 lines 47-49. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 no. 89 (copy) 

1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§424-26 (translation) 

1957 Deller, Orientalia ns 26 pp. 268-72 (study) 



1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 9 (study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 c 3 (translation) 



p. 284 and n. 111. 27b For the restoration at the end of the 
line see A. 0.99. 2 line 12. 28 For the restorations see A. 0.99.2 
lines 13-14. 29 lpa]i-ha-ku f not \sur-r]u-ha-ku (so Seux, 
ERAS p, 333 and n. 368), is reasonably certain. For the whole 



line see A. 0.99. 2 line 15 and Seux, ERAS p. 354 and n. 5. 
30 [mu-u]n-nar-ba-ku\ see von Soden, AHw p. 673b and cf. 
Seux, ERAS p. 171 and n. 104. 3§ §d-lwn-ma-[ku]\ see Deller, 
Orientalia ns 26 (1957) p. 272 and Schramm, EAK 2 p. 9. 



TukuitT-Ninurta ii A.0. 100.2 



167 



TEXT 



(For the obverse see A. 0.100.1) 

Reverse 

Lacuna 

V) e-nu-ma bad sa uru b[al(l)]-til(l) rscfi [...] 

2') nun-w a-lik pa-ni-[ia] ^e^~pu-us [enahma] 

3') a-sar-su ti-me-s[i da]n-na-su [aksud istu 

ussesu] 
4') a-di gaba-dib-bi-su ar-sip u-sek-[lil eli mahre] 
5') u-si-im u-ser-rih na 4 .na.r[u.a aitur] 
6') [ina] qe-reb-su ds-kun nun-w eg[ir-w anhussu 

luddis] 
7') [«(?) N]A 4 .NA.RU.A-/a li-mur-ma Iii-[si samnT 

lipsus] 
8') [niqe] riP-qi ana Ki-sd lu-te[r assur belu 

rabu] 
9) [u istar be-l\at uru ni-na-a ik-[ribesu 

isemmu] 
10') [ina tahazT sa man.m]es-/w a~sar taq-ru-[ubte 

ammar libbisu] 
110 [lu sam-s]a(l)-[su(l)] 

12 ; ) [in x ud x.kam l\i-mu m as-sur-la-ki-nu- 
[ubasa] 



(For the obverse see A. 0.100.1) 

Lacuna 

rev. l'-ll') At that time the wall of Baltil (Assur) 
of [... which] a prince who preceded [me] had 
built [had become dilapidated and] I delineated its 
area (and) [dug down] to the bottom of its foun- 
dation pit. I reconstructed it [from] top to [bot- 
tom] (and) completed (it). I made its decoration 
more splendid [than before. I inscribed my] 
monumental inscription (and) deposited (it) 
therein. [May] a later prince [restore its ruined 
(portions)]. May he see my monumental inscrip- 
tion and read (it), [May he anoint (it) with oil], 
make sacrifices, (and) return (it) to its place. 
[(Then) Assur, the great lord, and the goddess 
Istar, mistress] of Nineveh, [will listen to his] 
prayers (and) [in wars with kings] on the 
battlefield [will cause him to achieve success}. 



rev. 12 ; ) [Month of 
Assur-lakTnu-[ubasa] . 



...th day], eponymy of 



This text is from the reverse of a clay tablet fragment found at Assur. 
The obverse has been edited with A. 0.100.1 ('ex. T) where full details 
on the fragment are given. The passages edited here are duplicates, as 
far as they are preserved, of the concluding paragraphs of A.0. 100.5 
(lines 132-46) and thus our text no doubt also described work on the 
large palace terrace (see the introduction to A 0.100.5). I have restored 
extensively from the parallel passages but this and the line division 
may be inaccurate in detail. There are traces on the bottom edge {ha a 
u) but whether of a date or something else is unknown (cf. Weidner, 
AfO 13 [1939-41] p. 318). If they are of a date, it is not the same as 
that of A. 0.100. 5. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 no. 90 (copy) 

1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§418-23 (translation) 



1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 9-10 (study) 



rev. 7' For the restoration at the end of the line see Schramm, 
EAK 2 p. 17 and n. 1. rev. 12' For the reading of the 



eponymy see Weidner, AfO 13 (1939-41) p. 310, Borger, BiOr 
28 (1971) p. 66a (to ( S.6ry), and Schramm, EAK 2 p. 9. 



168 



TukultT-Ninurta n A.0. 100.3 



TEXT 



(For the obverse see A. 0.100.1) 

Reverse 

Lacuna 

1') [...] x [...] 

2') [...]xx(x)[...] 



(For the obverse see A. 0.100.1) 
Lacuna 



3') [ekallati ina siddl mania arsip epinnati ina 
siddi matTia arkus se.a]m,mes tab-ka-f*a~i-[ni 
ana eristi] 

4') [matTia eli sa pan usatir atbuk eli m&t aSSur 
mata eli v^Jum^-sa un.me[s uraddi] 



5') [ninurta u palil sa sangutJ irdmu but seri 
usatlimUnima e-pe]s ba-^u-ri iq-[buni ...] 

6') [dannuti ina narkabatTia pattuti ina libbiia 
ekdi ina qit-r]u~ub me-^et-lu^-ti-^a^ [ina 
pashi aduk] 

7) [enuma duru sa tamle rabe sa ekal belutlia sa 

i$\-tu pa-na man.mes-i~w ma(p-[rQte alikut 

panlia] 
8') [epusu enahma assur-bel-kala issak assur 

Du]~r«jn i-tur e-na-ah-ma [tukultT-ninurta] 
9') [issak assur apil adad-nararT issak assurma 

asarsu ii-me]-si dan-na-su ik-sud u[s-sesu ina 

muhhi kisir] 
10') [sade danni addi 3 me tibki ana 20 libnati 

rapsati i]s~tu ki-i-di ugu mah-r[i-i-su 

muhhTsu] 
11') [uraddi ukabbir istu ussesu adi gabadibblsu 

arsip u-se\k-lil ugu mah-ri-i u-[si-me usarrih] 
12') [nare askun nare sa sarrani A]D.MES-/a mah- 

ru-ti Lmes f ap^'[su~us niqe aqqi] 



13') [ana asrisunu uter rubu egir]-w e-nu-ma bad 

Su-u u-s[al-baruma ennahu] 
14') [anhussu luddis nare istu d\s-ri-sti-nu la-a it- 

sam-sak [samne lipsus] 



15') [niqe liqqi ana asrisunu luter assur adad i]k- 
ri-be-su i-se-^em{p.)-{x)-mu^-[u sa sunii satra] 

16') [ipassitu u nare istu asrisunu] ^iD-sam-sa- 
r^iii as-sur [adad sumsu] 

1 7') [u zerasu ina mati] lu-hal-li-q[u] 



rev. 3 / -4 / ) [I constructed palaces in the (various) 
districts of my land. I hitched up plows in the 
(various) districts of my land (and thereby) piled 
up more] grain [than ever before for the needs of 
my land. To Assyria I added land and to] its 
[people I added] people. 

rev. 5'-6 7 ) [The gods Ninurta and Nergal, who 
love my priesthood, gave to me the wild beasts 
and] commanded [me] to hunt. [I killed sixty 
strong lions from my ... chariot with] my [wildly] 
vigorous assault [with the spear]. 

rev. 7'-13'a) [At that time the wall of the large 
terrace of my lordly palace which] previously [ear- 
lier] kings [who preceded me had built — (when) 
it became dilapidated Assur-bel-kala vice-regent 
of Assur had] rebuilt (it) — had again become di- 
lapidated and [I, TukultT-Ninurta, vice-regent of 
Assur, son of Adad-nararT (n) (who was) also 
vice-regent of Assur], delineated [its area] (and) 
dug down to the bottom of its foundation pit. [I 
laid its foundation in bedrock. I made it wider by 
adding] from the outside [300 layers of brick to 
the (wall which was already) 20 broad bricks 
(wide). 1 reconstructed it from top to bottom and] 
completed (it). I made its [decoration] more splen- 
did than before. [I deposited my monumental in- 
scriptions]. I anointed with oil [the monumental 
inscriptions of the] earlier [kings], my forefathers, 
[made sacrifices, (and) returned (them) to their 
places]. 

rev. 13'b-15'a) [May a later prince], when this 
wall [becomes old and dilapidated, restore its 
ruined (portions)]. May he not remove my [monu- 
mental inscriptions from] their places (but) 
[anoint (them) with oil, make sacrifices, (and) re- 
turn (them) to their places. Then Assur (and) the 
god Adad] will listen to his prayers, 
rev. 15'b-17 7 ) [He who erases my inscribed name 
and] removes [my monumental inscriptions from 
their places: May] Assur (and) [the god Adad] 
destroy [his name and his seed from the land]. 



TukuItT-Ninurta ii A. 0.100.4 



169 



This text, on a clay tablet fragment from Assur, presumably recorded 
work on some structure at AsSur. Only the obverse is reasonably well 
preserved, however, and this has been edited with A.0. 100.1 (as 
'ex. 3'), where full details on the fragment are given. The reverse is 
virtually illegible. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1919-23 Ebeling, KAR no. 349 (copy) 
1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 no. 91 (copy) 
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§427-28 (translation) 



1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 10 (study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 c 4 (study) 



(For the obverse see A.0. 100.1) 


Reverse 




Lacuna 




1') [•-. 


x a x [...] 


2') [...: 


xasuC!) [...] 


3') [...: 


w(?) i-na xx [...] 


4') [.-. 


x a-na pa-ni [...] 


5') [•••] 


x i-na t dingir [...] 


6') [... 


-a-tisd ud [...] 


7') [...: 


x a x [...] 


8') [...: 


|xx[...] 


9) [...: 


ga ru [...] 


io) [...; 


x is [...] 


ii') [...: 


]x[...] 


Lacuna 





TEXT 

(For the obverse see A.0. 100.1) 

rev. l'-ll') No translation warranted. 



This is the most extensive version of the annals of TukultT-Ninurta n 
and it is inscribed on a reasonably well-preserved clay tablet, which 
originally came from Assur. 

This text begins in media res and thus one or more tablets, with an 
introduction and earlier events, must have preceded it. The portion 
that appears on the preserved tablet first narrates campaigns in the 
lands Nairi (lines 1-29) and Mount Kirriuru (lines 30-40). Then there 
is a lengthy passage (lines 41-127) in which an expedition is made 
down the Wadi Tharthar to Dur-Kurigalzu and Sippar in Babylonia 
and then up the Euphrates past Anat to the Habur. After marching up 
the Habur, the king swept across the Jezireh to Huzirina on the Balih 
and then back home to Assur. The narrative, which reads like an 
itinerary, is very monotonous in its repetition of the same phrases 



170 Tukultl-Ninurta n A.0.100.5 

such as 'Moving on from A I approached B. I pitched camp and spent 
the night in B.' Curiously, there is continuous fluctuation between first 
and third person in this itinerary, even within the description of one 
stage of the march. In the translation I have used the first person 
throughout for smoother reading and put an asterisk after the pro- 
noun when the text actually is in the third person. 

This itinerary, like parallel texts (see the introduction to A. 0.99.2), 
is an invaluable source for the study of historical geography. Like 
those parallel texts, no military clashes are reported for this lengthy 
expedition. Local rulers give the Assyrian king valuable gifts without 
any protest. Concerning this 'show of strength' campaign see the intro- 
duction to A. 0.99. 2. This passage also contains the first known refer- 
ences to reports of hostile acts being used as the justification for 
Assyrian attacks. This practice reappears in texts of Ashurnasirpal n 
(A.0.101.1 i 101-102, ii 23-24, and ii 49-50). 

After the lengthy itinerary, there follow three short paragraphs 
which describe, respectively, the total extent of Tukultl-Ninurta n's 
conquests (lines 128-31), his adding more land and people to Assyria 
(lines 132-33), and his hunting achievements (lines 134-35). For paral- 
lels see the introduction to A.0.87.1. 

The building section (lines 136-41 and cf. A.0. 100.1) concerns the 
reconstruction of the wall of the large palace terrace which had previ- 
ously been built by Assur-bel-kala. This is presumably the same as 'the 
large terrace of New Palace', the restoration of which is described in 
the Broken Obelisk (A.0J9.7 v 20-31). The text concludes with bless- 
ings (lines 142-44), curses (lines 145-46), and the date (line 147) for 
the sixth regnal year (885 BC). 



CATALOGUE 

Museum Dimensions Lines 

Ex. number (em) preserved 

1 AO 4655 26.5x19 1-147 

2 VAT 10422 10.3x8+ 32-49,80-100 



COMMENTARY 

The master text is ex. 1 with a few minor restorations badly worn in some places and the readings there are 

from the clay tablet fragment called ex. 2 in lines where very uncertain. In many cases it is not clear if the 

it is preserved. The tablet on which ex. 1 is inscribed is plural sign is me or mes\ 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1909 Scheil, Tn. (ex. 1, photo, copy, edition) 1963 Barnett, JHS 83 pp. 1-26 (ex. 1, study) 

1910 Winckler, OLZ 13 112-14 (ex. 1, study) 1970 Schramm, BiOr 27 pp. 147-60 and pis. i-vi (ex. 1, copy, 
1922 Horn, ZA 34 pp. 123-56 (exs. 1-2, study) edition) 

1924 Thureau-Dangin and Dhorme, Syria 5 pp. 277-79 (ex. 1» 1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 8-9 (ex. 1, study) 

study) 1976 Grayson, AR1 2 c 1 (exs, 1-2, translation) 

1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§400-17 (ex. 1, translation) 1980 Kiihne, Bagh. Mitt. 11 pp. 49-62 (ex. 1, study) 

1930 Forrer, RLA 1/4 pp. 296-97 (ex, 1, study) 1980 Kessler, Nordmesopotamien pp, 34, 62, and 230 (ex. 1, 
1953 Goetze, JCS 7 p. 58 n. 38 (ex. 1, study) study) 

1957 Deller, Orientalia ns 26 pp. 268-72 (ex. 1, study) 1983 Rollig, Damas. Mitt. 1 p. 282 (ex. 1, study) 



TukultT-Ninurta n A.0. 100.5 



171 



TEXT 



1) [//?«(?) K]VR-e Sd kur.kur na-i-ri k[u 4 (?) 
ku]r(?) sw(?)-e(?)-/<?(?) at-ta-bal-kat [...] x 

2) ^u-ScD-dS-ni ina ta-ia-dr-ti-ia ^sa^ iS-tu 
kur.kur na-i-ri uru r /r/(?)^-[...] x i/ia i[zi(?) 
ofrup(?) (...)] 

3) DUMU.MES-5W DUMU.MUNUS.MES-5W DAM.MES- 
SW NIG.GA E.GAL-ll-SU ANSE.KUR.RA.MES-SW d- 

s[u-ha ...] x x x x [...] 

4) ina gis. tukul-ti as-Sur EN-ia kur.kur.mes 
D\j-£i-fncn pu-ul-hi u-sa-hi-pi-si-na m bi-x- 
[.,*]~Su sd m am"me-b[a-tf-li\ 

5) a-na VGu-ia lu is-pu-ra ma-^a(l) m /;/(?)~i-a- 
la-si lu e-mu-qi-a a^'nd^ [muhhT]-su a-sa-pa- 
ra e[gir-5w(?) ...] 

6) is-tu uru u-di a-na uru sd-x [x] x na si li hi 
Su(?)-a-te ir-te-de-ma ibtla-su a-di en h[i-ti 

..J 

7) nig.ga-5w NiG.su.MES-5w Sal-at~s\u nisirti] 
e.gal-//-5w ma^a-tu dingir.mes-fw-sw ma(7)- 
rar(!)-si(l)-i-su r*&/(?)"i-[/tf(?) ...] 

8) /5-/w ki(l)-li-su r a - m ^ uru «/-[n]w-ff r/(?)- 
to(?)i-[a]6-/:M a-«a ugu-/c ub-lu-[u-ni] 

9) [£r /«# ki]S-Su-ti-ia Su-tu-ru-ti ina uru ni-nu-a 
us-ba-ku-u-ni r/w(?) ik(l)^-ki-ru-ni-ma(l) a- 
[na ...] x 

10) [x (x)] x x a-sa-pa-^ra^ en kur-i a.sa 
^nam^-ra-si i-du-ku-su ku.babbar-sw ku.gi- 
5w(?) nig.ga.mes-51/ [... ub-l]u-riP-ni 

11) [ m (?) x]-x-x-/a-a(?) r G iR(?).ARAD(?)~i /-wa u 4 - 
me-su-ma [a]-na ucu-/a is-pu-ur a-na 
kur.kur na-i-ri sap-s[a-te ...] 

12) a-na e-teq hur-sa-ni-su-nu i-ha-sa-ah Ilb-bu- 
Su Sd te x /// x x i-na gis. tukul-[ti ...] 

13) ina rn.siG4 ud I.kam li-me m uiNGm-mil-ku 
iS-tu uru ni-nu-a at-tu%-mus a-n[a] 
Tkur.kurC?)! [...] 

14) id su-ub-na-at a-na kur kaS~ia-r[i] at-ta-bal- 
TkaO a-na uru p[a]-ti^is(l)-kun(ip [...] 

15) dumu za-ma-a-ni aq-ti-rib ina ugu(?) xxsa 
x lu-^iD dS-^kuri^ (traces) [...] 

16) 2 URU.MES-m ina li-me-tu-Su ap-fpuD 

SE.TAM~t.MES SE.IN.NU.MES Sd KUR-Sll X X X X 



1-3) I [entered] the mountains of the lands Nairi. 
I crossed Mount Sueia. I changed [direction] 
(and) on my return from the lands Nairi [/ burnt 
...] the city Ki[...]. I [uprooted] his sons, his 
daughters, his wives, the property of his palace, 
(and) his horses [and brought them to my city 
Assur], 



4-8) With the support of Assur, my lord, I 
overwhelmed all their lands with my fear. Bi[..., 
son] of Amme-baplT], wrote to me: 'With regard 
to B/alasi, 1 have sent my forces against him. 
[They pursued him and] he went from the city 
Udu to the city §a[...]...' His son together with 
the (other) guilty men, [...] his property, his pos- 
sessions, his booty, the extensive [treasure of] his 
palace, his gods, his herds, as gifts [he (i.e. Bi...» 
son of Amme-ba>alT) took and] they were re- 
moved from his custody to Nineveh (and) brought 
before me. 



9-10) [While] I resided [with] my outstanding 
power in Nineveh, there was a rebellion and I sent 
my forces to [...]. They conquered him/it as far 
as the mountains, difficult terrain. His silver, 
gold, property, [... were brought] to me. 



11-29) [...]la, the governor at that time, wrote to 
me: To the fortified lands Nairi [...] his heart is 
set upon traversing their mountains ...' With the 
support [of Assur, my lord], in the month Sivan, 
the first day, eponymy of IlT-milku, I moved out 
from Nineveh. [/ marched] to the lands [Nairi ... 
at] the River Subnat I crossed to Mount Kasiiari. 
To the city P[a]tiskun [belonging to Ammeba^all], 
(15) a man of Blt-Zamani, I approached. 1 estab- 
lished ... against ... [...] I destroyed two cities in 
its environs. The grain (and) straw of his land, ... 
[...], the people of his land I carried off. I 
brought about their defeat. His sons [...] I felled 
many with the sword. I had mercy on him. His 
son ... [...]. To save his life he submitted to me 



6 uru sd-x [x]: Kessler, Nordmesopotamien p. 62 suggests 
uru sd-u{l)-[ra] but the traces are very uncertain. 
6-8 Schramm has proposed that these lines are direct speech 
but where does the speech end? 10 There is not enough room 



to restore all of lu e-mu-qi (so Schramm). 11 Does ispur 'he 
sent', without ma, introduce direct speech here? 15 After 
aqtirib the line is very difficult to read and Schramm's 
transliteration is questionable. 16 x x x x: Schramm read 



172 



TukultT-Ninurta ii A.0. 100.5 



un.mes kur-5W a-na hu-ub-ta-ni r/w-*i(?) n 
ah-ta-bai ddb-da-su-nu ^ds^-kun dumu.mes- 
sii x [...] 

ina gis.tukul u-sam-qit ma-a^-du-te fre-e- 
mu~i ar-ta-si-su dumu(?)-s«(?) x x x x x [...] 
a-na su-zu-ub zlmes-sw rGiR.ii.MEs _ i-/a is-ba- 
at rem-mu-ut-tu dS-kun-ds-su [...] 
LU.GAL.ME§-a i-na lib-b[i] (traces) [...] 

ZABAR.MES AN.NA AN.BAR DUG.MES X X X X 

[-] 

ANSE.KUR.RA.MES ANSE.GIR.NUN.NA.MES a-na 

IGI LU.GAL.MES-a €-H [...] 

a-na ra-me-ni-ia ds-sd-a m am-me-ba-a^-li 

rouMu(?)T m za-ma-a-ni re-mu-ut-tu ds-^kun- 

ds-siD uru.me[S-/i/] 

na-tu-te u-Sd-as-bi-it sub-tu ne-eh-tu u-se-si- 

ib-M-nu ma-rnit as-sur BN-ia ina ugu 

rALAM(?)l x [...] 

li-tam-me-M sum-ma at-tu-nu 

anse.kur.TraI.mes a-na KUR.MES-/a sa-al- 

me-ia ta-ad-nu-ni d 10 (i)-na(l) bi-ri-qu-su 

hul Kv[K~ka libriq] 

ina ut-me-su-ma m GisKiM- d MAS ib-na a-su- 

um-me-ni-su-te si-ru-te 2 6 ku-ri~be ina e.kur 

u-x-x~[x (,..)]-ni 

ina i-ga-re E.Ki-KisAL-mtf-/?/ Sd d n[un]-nam-nir 

ina ka d en-pi ul-te-zi-iz ku.babbar sd 

k[u]r.kur na-i-[r]i [...] 

sa ^am-me-ba-a^li dumu za-ma-a-ni ki-sit-ti 

qa-ti-ia sd al-qa-a 2-ta qa-ta a-na d [...] 

l-et qa-ta ina E,GAL-ii-ia ds-kun ina u 4 -me- 

su-ma 60 gal.musen.mes musen.mes 

udu.siskur.mes a-na as-sur en./<? [aqqi] 



ina iti.dus ud 17.kam is-tu uru.sa-uru at- 
tum 4 -M ina ne-re-bi sd kur {erasure) kir-ri- 
u-ri e-ru-bu is-tu ne-re-bi s[d kur kir-ri-u-r]i 
at-tu-mus ina sk-ti kur ur-ru-ub-nu kur is- 
ru-un KUR-e dan-nu-ti sd ina man.mes-w 
AD.MES-rwT qe-reb-\sunu ...] 
ma-am-ma ina iib-bi la-a e-pu-su u il-ka-ka- 
at kur as-sur ma-am-ma la-a e-x-x-ki x-[...] 
lu-u e-ru-ub ina qaq-qd-ri a.sa nam-ra-si 
i>v-ak-ma sap-sa-qf a-sar ina man.mes-w 
AD.MES-/[a mamma] 

ina lib-hi la-a e-te-qu ah-lu-up ina lib-^bP 
ds-tam-^dD-ih a-na uru.mes-/?/ sa kur la- 
da-a-ni sd kur ^a^-[ru-mu(l) u(l)] 



(and) 1 was merciful towards him. [...] (20) my 
officers inside ... Hostages [...]. Bronze, tin, iron, 
pots, ... [...]. Horses, mules before my officers 
[..,] I took away for myself. I was merciful to- 
wards Amme-ba 5 li, a man of Blt-Zamani. I estab- 
lished (them) in abandoned cities (and) settled 
them in peaceful dwellings. (25) I had him take an 
oath by Assur, my lord, before the statue of ... 
[...]: 'If you give horses to my enemies (and) foes, 
may the god Adad [strike your] land with terrible 
lightning.' At that time TukultT-Ninurta fashioned 
his tall steles, two kunbu-genii, (and) brought 
[them] into the temple. In the walls of the main 
forecourt of the god Nlun]namnh\ at the door of 
the god Enpi, I set up. Silver of the lands Nairi 
[...] of Amme-ba'lT, a man of Blt-Zamani, my 
own conquest which I had taken, two-thirds [I 
gave] to the god [...] (and) one-third I established 
in my palace. At that time [I sacrificed] 60 ducks 
(and) (other) fowl to Assur, my lord. 



30-40) In the month Tishri, seventeenth day, I 
moved out from Inner City (Assur) (and) entered 
the passes of Mount Kirriuru. Moving on from 
the passes of [Mount Kirriuru] I entered into 
Mounts Urrubnu (and) Isrun, mighty mountains 
within which no one among the kings my fore- 
fathers had done [battle] and no one had ... the 
caravans of Assyria [...]. I marched over difficult 
terrain and through rough territory where no 
[one] among the kings my forefathers had passed 
I glided (and) penetrated therein. I approached 
the cities of the land Ladanu which the 
A[ramaeans and] (35) the Lullu held. I conquered 
30 of their cities between the mountains. I carried 



an(?).bak zab[ar »,»] Iron, bronze' but the reading is very 
uncertain. 20 After lib-b[i\ there are illegible traces of several 
signs. Schramm read i u-se-rib //-/?(? ) 1 'I brought (my officers) 
inside. Hostages {...)' on analogy with A.0, 101.1 i 83. 24 na- 
tu-te: natu - nadu 'to abandon' in texts of Tn. n and Asn. n. 



See the note to A.0.101.1 ii 10. 25 d l() ... [libriq]: cf. RIMA 1 
p. 134 lines 61-62 and p. 153 lines 27-28; A.0.87.1 viii 83-84; 
A.0. 101. 40 line 43. 26 One expects a-su-um-me-ni-te-su si-ra- 
te. 



Tukulti-Ninurta ii A.0.100.5 



173 



35) kur lu-ul-lu ti-kal-lu-ni aq-ti-rib 30 

uru. um-ni-M-nu ina bir-ti KUR.MES-m kur- 
ad \i(\.MEl-su-nu 2-e [...] x 

36) ds-lu-ta UKU.MES-ni-rstfi-nu ap-piil aq-qur ina 
izi.mes ds-ru-up si-ta-te-su-nu i[g-d]u-ru 
kur- if mar-[su] 

37) i-sa-ab-tu ina 2-e UA-me ina KUR-e kur is-ru- 
un la-a ina gis.gigir.mes-0 la-a pit-hal-li it- 
{ta)-bal-rkn-t[u ...] 

38) ina gir.ilmes-/# a-na KUR-e kur is-ru-un a- 
sar wut-qi tis.musen «kur» AN-e mus-tap- 
ri-M qe-reb-M l[a-a Paru] 

39) ar-ki-M-nu lu-u e-li ta edin kur-/' kur is-ru- 
un a-di id za-ba sap-le-e ar-ki-M-n[u artedi] 

40) sal-la-su-nu a-na la me-ni u-te-ra re-hu-te-su- 
nu a-{na) su-zu-ub zi.uzs-su-nu id za-ba 
sap-le-e [...] 

41) ina iti.bar ud 26.kam ina li-me m na^i-di- 
dingir r/jn-ta uru.SA-uru at-tuntA-M ina 
mud-ba-ri(l) GAR-an be-de ta m[ud-ba-ri\ 

42) at-tu-mus id tar-ta-ra e-te-bir GAR-an be-de 
ki-ma ma-sil u 4 -me a.mes kul~{lat)-si(l)~na 
ih-tu-bu ba[t-tu-bat\-te 

43) 4 me 70 pu.mes uh- tap-pi ina gir.ii ina ugu 
pu(?) x mas mah e ta x (x) GAZ-ak ina 2-e 
u 4 -me ina ugu p[u(?) ... m]us 

44) a.mes mar-ru ka-ra-si la-a u-sab-bu-u is-tu 
ugu pu.mes it-tuz-^mus^ hu-ri-ib-te t~a^-[sa- 
bat] 

45) ina ugu id tar-ta-ra GAR-an be-de 4 u 4 -me 
si-di to tar-ta-^ra^ ir-te-di ina ger-ri-su sd 
sid-di rfD^ [tar-t]a-ra 

46) 8 gu 4 .am.mes GAZ-ak ina ugu pi-a-te sd id 
tar-ta-ra GAR-an be-de a.mes ih-tu-bu ta ugu 
pi-a-te 

47) sa id tar-ta-ra it-tu-mus ina sa ha-ma-te a.sA 
nam-ra-si ar-te-di ina a.sA mar-ga-ni 

48) id.mes a-ta-mar bat-tu-bat-te-si-na pu.mes 
uh-tap-pi-u a.mes hi.a.mes GAR-an be-de 
a.mes dxj ut-me u mu-se ih-tu-bu 

49) a-na ugu id.hal.hal aq-tf-rib-ma mas-ka- 
na-a-te sd kur u-tu-u^ a-di uru kap-ra-ni-Su- 
nu sd sit-ku-nu 'ugu i 

50) id.hal.hal ak-ta-sad GAz.MEs-M-nu a-duk 
sal-la-su-nu ma-^a-ta a-sa-la ina uru a-su-si 
GAR-an be-^de^ 

51) is-tu uru a-su-si at-tu-mus ina ud 3.kam ina 
la-a sa- f biO pa-ni la mu-de ge-ri sA gir.tir 
ar-te-di 

52) a-na uRU.BAD- m ku-ri-gal-zu aq-ti-rib GAR-an 



off their two [,,.]. 1 destroyed, razed, (and) burnt 
their cities. The rest of them were frightened off 
(and) took to difficult mountains. On the second 
day, (since) in the hills of Mount Isrun one could 
cross neither with my chariots nor with cavalry 
[...], I ascended after them on foot up the hills of 
Mount Isrun, a rough area wherein even the 
winged eagle of the heavens [cannot go. I pur- 
sued] them from the steppe of the hills of Mount 
Isrun to the Lower Zab. I took booty without 
number from them. The rest of them [crossed] the 
Lower Zab to save their lives. 



41-51) In the month Nisan, twenty-sixth day, epo- 
nymy of Naidi-ilT, I moved out from Inner City 
(Assur). I* pitched camp (and) spent the night in 
the desert. Moving on from the desert I crossed 
the Wadi Tharthar, pitched camp, (and) spent the 
night. By midday all the water was drawn (and) I 
had exhausted (lit. 'destroyed') 470 wells in the en- 
virons. I killed on foot at the well ... On the 
second day at the well [...] the water was too 
bitter to satisfy the troops. Moving on from the 
wells I [took to] the desert, (45) pitched camp, 
(and) spent the night by the Wadi Tharthar. For 
four days I* followed the banks of the Wadi 
Tharthar, On my* expedition along the banks of 
the Wadi [Tharth]ar I killed eight wild bulls. I* 
pitched camp (and) spent the night at the mouth 
of the Wadi Tharthar. Water was drawn. Moving 
on from the mouth of the Wadi Tharthar I con- 
tinued through the hamatu, difficult terrain. In 
the grasslands I sighted streams. The wells around 
them were fallen in (lit. 'destroyed'). (Neverthe- 
less) water was abundant (and) I* pitched camp 
(and) spent the night. Water was drawn all day 
and all night. I approached the Tigris and cap- 
tured the settlements of the land of the Utu to- 
gether with their villages, which were situated on 
the Tigris. I massacred them (and) carried off 
much booty from them, I* pitched camp (and) 
spent the night in the city Asusu. Moving on from 
the city Asusu, on the third day I continued 
through forest without a leader or guide. 

52-64a) I approached Dur-Kurigalzu, pitched 



38 Tig.MUSEN «kur» AN-e: probably over an erasure. Ex. 2 

has Tig.MUSEN-ri [...] indicating eh same (against Schramm, 



EAK 2 p. 9). 42 kul-(lat)-si(l)-na: the kul (not mu) is clear. 

Cf. Schramm. EAK 2 p. 9. 



174 



TukuItT-Ninurta ii A.0. 100.5 



be-de ^is-tu^ urv. bad-™ f~ku~i-ri-gal-zu r//- 
tU8~mu<n id pa-at-ti- d BKD 
e-te-bir GAR-an be-de is-tu to pa-at-ti- d BAi> 
at-tu-m[u\s ina uru si-ip-pu-ru-sd- d M-mas 
«uru si-ip-pu-[r]u-sd- d sd-^mas^» 
GAR-an be-de is-tu uru si-ip-pu-ru-sd- d sd-mas 
at-tum^-sd a-na sag id pu-{ra]t-te as-sa-bat 
ina uru sa-la-ti 

GAR-an be-de is-tu uru sa-ia-te it-tu-mus ina 
pu-[u]t uru.bad-ti.la gar-0[«] be-^de^ 
uru.bad-ti.la gir am-ma-te 
sd id pu-rat-te ^sa^-a-li I'iP-tu uru.bad-ti.la 
^it-tum4-s(D ina uru ra-hi-im-me sd Fpu-uP 
uru ^ra-pi-qiO 

GAR-an be-de uru ra-pi-qu gir a\m-m\a-\ te ' 
5a Id i p\u-rat-t\e ^sa-a-li is-tu^ uru ra-^hi- 
im^-me rit-tum4-sd } 

ina a.sa kab-si-te sd ugu id pu-rat-* te ' GAR- 
an b[e-de i]s-*~tu^ uru * kab \-si-^te in~tum 4 - 
Sd ina ^uru^i da-* ia-se^-ti 
GAR-an be-de is-tu uru da-ia-se-ti at-tu-mus 
ina pu-ut uru id ina sag e-ni sd ku-up-ri 
a-sur na 4 us-me-ta sd dinger, mes gal.mes ina 
iib-bi sa-zu-ni GAR-an be^-de uru id gir 
am-ma-te sd id pu-rat-[t]i 
sa-a-li is-tu uru id it-[i\u%-[m]u§ ina uru 
\h\ar-be-e GAR-an be-de uru har-be-e gir 
a[m]-ma-te 

sd id pu-rat-te sa-li ^is^-tu uru har-^be-e^ 
\at-tu-m\us ina u-sal-ii sd ugu id pu-^rat-te^ 
at-ta-{gi(l))-is 

a.mes mu-se du u 4 -me ih-tu-bu hu-ri-^ib^-tu 
sd kur-/ a-sar la-ds-sii u igi hi-it-ru-ub a. gar 
is-sa-bat 

ina kur-/ qaq-qar su-ma-me-te GAR-^an^ be- 
d[e] ^is^-tu qaq-qar su-ma-me-te it-tu%-mus 
ina u-sal-li 

sd uru hu-du-bi-li sd ugu i[d pu]-rat-te gar- 
[an b]e-fde~i is-tu uru hu-du-bi-li [i]t-tu%- 
[m]us ina bir-ti 

uru za-di-da-a-ni uru sa-bi-re-te GAR-an be- 
de uru sa-bi-ru-tu ina murub 4 id pu-rat-te 
sa-li 

^is-tu 1 uru za-^dD-da-a-ni it-* tum 4 -sd^ ina 
pu-ut uru su-u-ri uru tal-bi-is GAR-an be-de 
uru tal-mi-is 

ina [m]urub 4 id pu-rat-te sa-[(\i is-[t]u Turu"i 
su-u-ri [it]-tu%-mus a-na uru a-na-at sd kur 
su-hi 



camp, (and) spent the night. Moving on from 
Dur-Kurigalzu I crossed the Patti-Enlil Canal, 
pitched camp, (and) spent the night. Moving on 
from the Patti-Enlil Canal I* pitched camp (and) 
spent the night in Sippar-of-Samas. Moving on 
from Sippar-of-Samas I took (the way) towards 
the Euphrates, (55) pitched camp (and) spent the 
night in the city Salatu. Moving on from the city 
Salatu I* pitched camp (and) spent the night be- 
fore the city Dur-balati — Dur-balati lies on the 
other bank of the Euphrates. Moving on from 
Dur-balati I* pitched camp (and) spent the night 
in the city Rahimmu which is before the city 
Rapiqu — Rapiqu lies on the other bank of the 
Euphrates. Moving on from Rahimmu I* pitched 
camp (and) spent the night in the area of Kabsitu 
which is upon the Euphrates. Moving on from the 
city Kabsitu I* pitched camp (and) spent the night 
in the city DaiaSetu. Moving on from Daiasetu 
(60) I* pitched camp (and) spent the night before 
the city Idu, at the bitumen spring, where the 
stele of the great gods is erected — Idu lies on the 
other bank of the Euphrates. Moving on from the 
city Idu I* pitched camp (and) spent the night in 
the city Harbu — Harbu lies on the other bank of 
the Euphrates. Moving on from Harbu I tramped 
about in the meadow of the Euphrates. Water 
was drawn at night (and) all day. In a desolate 
mountainous region where there was no vegeta- 
tion I* set out for the most desolate part of the 
plain (and) pitched camp (and) spent the night in 
the mountains, a land of thirst. 



64b-73a) Moving on from the land of thirst I* 
pitched camp (and) spent the night in the meadow 
of the city Hudubilu which is upon the Euphrates. 
Moving on from Hudubilu I* pitched camp (and) 
spent the night between the city Zadidanu (and) 
Sabiritu — Sabiritu lies (on an island) in the 
Euphrates. Moving on from Zadidanu I* pitched 
camp (and) spent the night before the cities Suru 
(and) Talbis — Talbis (Talmis) lies (on an island) 
in the Euphrates. Moving on from Sum I ap- 
proached the city Anat of the land Suhu — Anat 
lies (on an island) in the Euphrates. I* pitched 
camp (and) spent the night before Anat. I re- 
ceived bountiful tribute (70) from Ill-ibni, gover- 
nor of the land Suhu: three talents of silver, 20 



60 na 4 us-me-ta - asumittu. See CAD 1/2 (A) p. 348a. 
60 sa-zu-ni is clear and a reading i-pi-su-ni is impossible 
(Deller, Orientalia ns 26 [1957] p. 272). It appears to be the 
third masc. (mistake for fern.) sing. S stative subjunctive of 



izuzzw. *sazzuzuni > sazzunni. 66-67 za-di-da-a-ni: za-> not 
ha-, is clear and there is no reason to amend the sign (Forrer, 
RLA 1 p. 284a and Schramm, EAK 2 p. 9). 



Tukultr-Ninurta ii A.0. 100.5 



175 



69) ^aq-tP-rib uru a-na-at ina Tmurub^ id pu- 
rat-te sa-li ina fpu^-ut uru a-na-at GAR-an 
be-de na-mur-[t]u hi.a.mes 

70) sd m mNGiR-ih-ni sd-kin kur su-hi 3 g[u]n 
ku.babbar 20 ma.na ku.gi gis ne-ma-ti si-ni 
3 gis.na5.mes si-ni 

71) 18 SIG4-MES sd an.na.mes 40 gis kab-la~te,ME$ 
sd gis mes-kan-ni gis.na gis mes-kan-ni 6 
gis.bansur.mes sd gis mes-kan-ni 

72) ndr-ma-ak-tu zabar tug lu-bul-tu tug. gad a 
tug lu-bul-tu bir-me sig.za.gin.mi gu 4 .mes 

UDU.MES NINDA.MES KAS.MEfs] 

73) am-hur-su r/jTMi/ uru a-na-at it-tum 4 -sd ina 
uru mas-qi-te GAR-an be-d[e is-t]u uru mas- 
qi-te fit-tus-musi 

74) ina uru ha-ra-da [GA]R-an be-de uru ha-ra- 
da gir am-^maP-te sd id pu-[ra]t-te sa-[l\i is- 

tu «URU» 

75) uru ha-ra-da it-tus-mus ina uru ka-i-le-te 
GAR-an be-de is-[tu ur]u ka-i-le-te v it-tu%- 
mus^ 

16) ana uru hi-in-da-ni aq-tf-rib 10 ma.na ku.gi 
U-iq-tu 10 ma.na k[u.bab]bar 2 Tgun"! 
an.na.mes 

77) 1 gun sim.ses 1 su-si bad.mes zabar 10 
ma.na u sa-di-du 8 t M a\na 

NA4.SIM. <BI>.ZI.DA 

78) 30 ud-ra-te 50 gu 4 .mes 30 anse.mes 14 

MUSEN.MES GAL.MES 2 ME UDU.MES NINDA.MES 
KAS.MES SE.IN.NU.MES SE ki-SU-tU. MES 

79) na-mur-tu sd m am-me-a-la-ba 1 kur"I hi-in- 
da-na-ia at-ta-har g ar-i l ari^ be-de uru he- 
en-da-nu 

80) ina gir am-ma-te sd id pu-rat-te sa-li ina da- 
ia-la-te-su sd hu-ri-ib-te lu-ur-me GAZ-ak 

81) dumu.mes lu-ur-me musen.mes ina su u-sab- 
bhta ina da-ia-la-te-su sd sid-di id pu-rat-te 
dara.masJ'mes'1 

82) GAZ-ak dumu.mes dara.mas.mes ina Hsu^ u- 
sab-bi-ta is-^tu^ kur hi-[i\n-da-ni fiP-tu&- 
mus 

83) ina kur-/ sa sag id ^pu^-rat-te ina ka-la-pa- 
texxx an. bar r/ M (?) u(iype^-es^si(7)-id(?) 
i(l)-ta(?)-bal(iykdt(ip 

84) final uru na-gi-a-te GAR-an be-de is-^tui 
uru na-gi-a-te ^iP-tu-mus ana u-sal-li sd uru 
a-qa-ar-ba-ni 

85) aq-tf-rib 2 me udu.mes 30 gu 4 .mes 

I~SEl.AM.MES SE.IN.NU.MES NINDA.MES KAS.MES 

na-mur-tu sd m mu-da-da kur la-qa-a-ia ^aO- 
ta-har 



minas of gold, an ivory couch, three Ivory chests, 
18 tin bars, 40 furniture legs of meskonnu-wood, 
a bed of meskannu-wood, six dishes of 
meskannu-wood, a bronze bath-tub, linen gar- 
ments, garments with multi-coloured trim, purple 
wool, oxen, sheep, bread, (and) beer. 



73b-85a) Moving on from Anat I* pitched camp 
(and) spent the night in the city Masqitu. Moving 
on from Masqitu I* pitched camp (and) spent the 
night in the city Harada — Harada lies on the 
other bank of the Euphrates. Moving on from 
Harada I* pitched camp (and) spent the night in 
the city Kailetu. Moving on from Kailetu I ap- 
proached the city Hindanu. I received tribute 
from Amme-alaba, a man of Hindanu: 10 minas 
of liqtu-go\d 9 10 minas of silver, two talents of 
tin, one talent of myrrh, 60 bronze ,.., 10 minas 
of antimony preparation, eight minas of antimony 
mineral, 30 dromedaries, 50 oxen, 30 asses, 14 
ducks, 200 sheep, bread, beer, straw, (and) 
fodder. I* pitched camp (and) spent the night. 
Hindanu (80) lies on the other bank of the 
Euphrates. I killed ostriches on my* hunting 
forays in the desert. I captured the young of the 
ostriches. 1 killed aialu-deer on my* hunting 
forays on the banks of the Euphrates. I captured 
the young of the aialu-dzzx. Moving on from the 
land Hindanu 1 cut into the mountains in the 
direction of the Euphrates with ... iron axes (and) 
passed through. I* pitched camp (and) spent the 
night in the city Nagiatu. Moving on from 
Nagiatu I approached the meadow of the city 
Aqarbanu. 



85b-95a) I received tribute from Mudadda, the 
Laqu: 200 sheep, 30 oxen, grain, straw, bread, 
(and) beer. I* pitched camp (and) spent the night. 
Moving on from Aqarbanu I approached the city 



83 The reading of the end of the line is very uncertain. In 
ex. 1 the three signs before an. bar cannot be zabar. Ex. 2 
may read [...] 1 w(?) an(?).bar(?) 1 u-pe-t si(?) '-[...]. Cf. 



RIMA 1 p. 272 lines 43-44 and King, CT 13 pi. 42 lines 14 
and 22. Also note RIMA 1 p. 267 line 7. 



176 



TukultT-Ninurta n A.0. 100.5 



86) GAK-an be-de is-*~tu uru~i a-qa-ar-ba-ni it- 
tum 4 ~sd ina uru su-up-ri at-ta-is 2 me 
udu.mes 50 g[u 4 ].mes ninda.mes kas.mes 

87) s[e].am.mes se.in.nu.mes na-m[ur]-tu sd kur 
ha-ma-ta-a-ia kur ia-qa-a-ia at-ta-har ki-ma 
ma-sil u 4 -me at-tu-mus 

88) ina uru ar-ba-te GAK-an be-de 2 me 

UDU.TMES"! 30 GU 4 .MES NINDA.MES KAS.MES 

se.am.mes se.in.nu.mes na-mur-tu sd m ha- 
^ra^-a-ni 

89) kur la-a-qa-a-ia at-ta-har is-[t\u [ur]u ar- 
[b]a-te it-tum A -sd ina a.sa ka-si GAK-an be-^de^ 

90) ris-tiP a.sA ka-si it-tu%-m[us ana ur]u sir- 
rqP aq-ti-rib 3 ma.na ku.gi 7 ma.na sar-pu 
ku.babbar [x g]un an.n[a.mes] 

91) 40 utul.mes zabar 1 gun s[im.ses] x me 

UDU.M[ES X] ME 40 GU 4 . r MES~l 20 ANSE 20 
MUSEN.MES NINDA.MES KAS.MES SE.AM.MES 

92) se.in.nu.mes se kisu-tu mes \~na-mur-tu^ sd 
m mu-d[a]-da uru tsir^-qa-a-ia at-ta-har ki-i 
ina si-di 

93) uru sir-qi us-ba-ku-ni n\a-mu]r-tu sa m ha- 
ra-a-ni kur la-q[a]-a-[i]a 3 Tma^.na ku.gi 10 
ma.na ku.babbar 

94) 30 utul.mes zabar 6 gun an.na.mes 5 me 
udu.mes 1 me [x] gu 4 .mes 20 r anse 1 it-ta- 
r^ar~i ina uru ^sir-qu^ GAK-an be-^de^ 

95) uru sir-qu gir am-ma-te sd id pu-rat-te sa-ii 
rifi-tu uru sir-^qi it-tum^-M ina u-sal-li 

96) sd id pu-rat-te sa uru ru-um-mu-ni-na a-sar 
pal-gu sd id fha(l)-bur(ip sa-la-an-ni GAK-an 
be-fde^ 

97) is-tu uru ru-um-mu-ni-na it-tum 4 -sd ana uru 
su-u-ri sd dumu ^ha-lu-pe-e^ sd ugu Hd ha- 
bur^ 

98) aq-ti-rib 20 ma.na ku.gi 20 ma.na 
ku.babbar 32 gun an.na.mes 1 me 30 g[un] 
zabar. Tmes 1 me! u-da-e 

99) sd zabar.mes l-en tap-hu 1 me 50 tug mi~ 
ih-si 1 gun sig.za.gin.mi na 4 .gis.nuh.gal 

n(?)T GUN X X (X) 

100) 4 ma.na u sa-di-du 2 gun an. bar i.gis 

DUG.GA 1 LIM 2 ME UDU.MES 1 TmE GUAMES 
2 m[e ...] 

101) MUSEN.MES GAL.MES 2 MUNUS.NIN.MES-SW i§-tU 

nu-ud-ni-si-na ma-a'-di na-[mu]r-[tu sa mat 
ha-ma-t]a-a4a 

102) kur la-qa-a-ia is-tu uru su-u-ri sd dumu ha- 

' lu ^pe-e i[t-tu-mus ana al usala] aq-ti-rib 



Supru. I received tribute from Hamataiia, (the) 
Laqu: 200 sheep, 50 oxen, bread, beer, grain, 
(and) straw. Moving on at noon I* pitched camp 
(and) spent the night in the city Arbatu. I received 
tribute from Harami, the Laqu; 200 sheep, 30 
oxen, bread, beer, grain, (and) straw. Moving on 
from Arbatu I* pitched camp (and) spent the 
night in the plain. (90) Moving on from the plain 
I approached the city Sirqu. I received tribute 
from Mudadda, a man of the city Sirqu: three 
minas of gold, seven minas of refined silver, [N] 
talents of tin, 40 bronze casseroles, one talent of 
myrrh, [N] hundred sheep, [N] hundred and 40 
oxen, 20 asses, 20 birds, bread, beer, grain, straw, 
(and) fodder. While I was in the district of Sirqu 
I* received tribute from Haranu, the Laqu: three 
minas of gold, 10 minas of silver, 30 bronze 
casseroles, six talents of tin, 500 sheep, 100 and 
[N] oxen, (and) 20 asses. I* pitched camp (and) 
spent the night in Sirqu — Sirqu lies on the other 
bank of the Euphrates. 



95b-103) Moving on from Sirqu I* pitched camp 
(and) spent the night in the meadow of the 
Euphrates by the city Rummunina where lies the 
canal of the River Habur. Moving on from 
Rummunina I approached the city Suru of Bit- 
Halupe which is upon the River Habur. 20 minas 
of gold, 20 minas of silver, 32 talents of tin, 130 
talents of bronze, 100 bronze utensils, one tub, 
150 woven garments, one talent of purple wool, 
alabaster, one(?) talent of ..., (100) four minas of 
antimony preparation, two talents of iron, fine 
oil, 1,200 sheep, 100 oxen, ..., [N] ducks, his two 
sisters with their bountiful dowry — (this was) the 
tribute from Hamat]aiia, the Laqu. Moving on 
from Suru of Blt-Halupe I approached [the city 
Usala. I] received tribute [from Usala]: 200 sheep, 
30 oxen, bread, beer, grain, (and) straw, I* 
pitched camp (and) spent the night. 



87 hamataiia, also in line 101: Russell, Iraq 47 (1985) p. 73 is 
probably correct in regarding this as a PN from the gentilic. 
88.2 has, in error, kur ha-ma-ta-^a^ (cf. line 87), for m ha- 
rra^-a-ni. 89-90 Add these references to CAD 8 (K) 
pp. 268-69 and von Soden, AHw p. 459a. 91.2 adds gal. mes 
after muSen.meS, changing 'birds' to Mucks'. 94.2 omits zabar 



'bronze'. 94.2 6 [me] udu.[mes] '600 sheep'. 96-97 ru-um- 
mu-ni-na is clear in ex. 2 but the ~na is not clear in ex. 1. 
97.2 at^tu^-mus (first person) instead of \i\i-tum4-sd (third 
person). 98 1 me 30 (not 40 - so Schramm) is clear. 
101 hamataiia: see the note to line 87. 



TukuItT-Ninurta ii A.0. 100.5 



177 



103 
104 
105 
106 
107 
108 

109 

110 
111 

112; 

113 

114; 

115 

lie; 

117 
118 

119; 

120 
121 

122 
123 



2 ME UDU.MES 30 GU4.MES NINDA.MES KAS.MES 

se.am.mes se.in\[nu.mes ri\a-mur-t[u sa al- 

usala a]t-ta-har GAR-an be-de 

is-tu uru u-sa-^la^-a it-turn a-M a-na 

uru \B[kD-kat-Ii]m-^mu^ a[q-tf-rib x x] x mu 

[x x (x)] sd kur la-ge-e 

a-na si-hir-ti-su TguAmes udu.mes sar-pu 

ku.b[abbar x m]es i.gis d[ug.ga 

ANSE.KUR]. r RA^.M[ES na]-mur-tu 

sd uKu.BkD-kat-Iim-mu 10 ma.na 

KU, BAB [BAR] 14 MA.TnA^ [x X G]UN 

an, [bar(?) x] Tgun u"i sa-di-du 

2 GUN SIM.SES 1 ME GIR.MES AN. BAR 10 kan- 

n[e ...] x x x x [... tug lu-bill-t]u bir-me x 

[a]t-^ta^har 

is-tu VR\j.BAX>-kat-lim-mu it-tum^sd ina 

u[ru(?) ... issakan bede istu uru(?) ...]- 

i"ma(?)"i it-tu^mus^ 

ana uru qat-ni aq-ti-rib na-mur-tu sd ku[r 

... lu-b\ul-tu bir-me 

11 Tgun.an.na.mes"! 50 u-da-e.ME$ sd za[bar 

...] X 1 ME MUSEN.MES GAL.MES 

kur-ke-e musen ninda.TmeP kas.mes 
se.am.mes se.in.n[u.mes ... attahar istu al 
qatni j\t-t~tum^-si 

ina uru la-ti-hi sd kur d[i]-ka-na-a-ia gar- 
a[n bede istu "al latihi ill(?)-rrww 4 (?)i-[5 r a(?)] 
a-na sd uru di-kan-ni aq-tf-rib 3 ma.n[a ...] 

ZABAR X X 

I -en tap-hu sd ku.babbar is-tu sd uru di- 

k[an-ni ittumsa ina uru iabete issakan be-d\e 

is-tu 

uRu.DUG.GA-e~te it-tus-mus ina uru ma-[ga- 

ri-si issakan bede is-tu uru ma-g]a-r[i~s]i it- 

tu^mus^ 

ina uru gu-re-e-te GAR-an be-de is-[tu al 

gurete ittumus ina uru ia\- * bi-te"\ GAR-an 

be-de 

iS-tu J uru i ta-bi-te /Y-' tu$-mus^ [ina al kahat 

issakan bede istu al\ ka-h[a-a]t ^iO-tUs-^mus^ 

ina uru na-[s]i-pi-na GAR-an be-de i[s-tu al 

nasipina ittumus ina] ur[u hu]-zi~ri-na 

GAR-an be-de is-tu uru hu-zi-ri-^na~^ [ittumus 

... ina ali] sd [ m Gis]KiM- d MAS 

a-na es-su-te is-ba-tu-ni GAR-a[n bede ...] x 

[KUR]-£ A.SA 

nam-ra-si du-ru-ku sap-sd-qi a[q-ti-rib ...- 

t\u-se sd kur mu-us-ki 

at-ta-lak ina ud 4.kam vrv pi-i-r[u ... sal- 

t\a-su-^nu^ 

NIG.SV. MES-SU-nU GU 4. ME §-£«-«« UDU Se- 

ni.[MEl-su-nu ... a]k-ta-sad 



104-1 15a) Moving on from Usala I approached 
the city D[ur-katli]mmu. ... of the land Laqu en- 
tirely — oxen, sheep, refined silver, [...], fine oil, 
horses. I received tribute from Dur-katlimmu: 10 
talents of silver, 14 minas of [...], [N] talents of 
iron, [N] talents of antimony [preparation], two 
talents of myrrh, 100 iron daggers, 10 potstands 
[... garments] with multi-coloured trim. Moving 
on from Dur-katlimmu [I* pitched camp (and) 
spent the night] in the [city ...]. Moving on [from 
the city ...] I approached the city Qatnu. [I re- 
ceived] tribute from [the Qatnu (and) the Laqu: 
...] garments with multi-coloured trim, (110) 11 
talents of tin, 50 bronze utensils, [...], 100 ducks 
(and) geese, bread, beer, grain, straw [...]. Mov- 
ing on [from Qatnu] I pitched camp (and) [spent 
the night] in the city Latihu of the Dikannu. 
Moving on [from the city Latihu] I approached 
Sadikannu. Three minas [of ...] bronze ..., one 
tub of silver (was the tribute). [Moving on] from 
Sadik[annu I* pitched camp (and) spent the night 
in the city Tabitu]. Moving on from Tabitu [I* 
pitched camp (and) spent the night] in the city 
Ma[garisu]. 



11 5b- 127) Moving on from [Mag]ar[is]u I* 
pitched camp (and) spent the night in the city 
Guretu. [Moving on] from [Guretu] I* pitched 
camp (and) spent the night [in the city Ta]bitu. 
Moving on from Tabitu [I* pitched camp (and) 
spent the night in the city Kahat]. Moving on 
[from the city] Kahat 1* pitched camp (and) spent 
the night in the city Nasipinu. [Moving on from 
the city Nasipinu] I* pitched camp (and) spent the 
night [in] the city [Hujzirina. [Moving on] from 
Huzirina (120) I* pitched camp (and) [spent the 
night in the city ...] which [Tuk]ultl-Ninurta had 
reorganized. I [approached ...J through moun- 
tains, difficult terrain, a rough region [...] of the 
land of the Musku I marched. On the fourth day 
the city Plr[u ...] their booty, their possessions, 
their oxen, [their] sheep, [... I] conquered. I mas- 
sacred them without number. I burnt their cities, 
[I cut down] the harvest of [their] gardens [,..], I 
allowed them to remain in possession of their cit- 



117 For the reading Kahat see Kessler, ZA 69 (1979) 
pp. 218-19. 



178 



TukultT-Ninurta n A.0. 100.5 



124; 

125 

126 

127 



128 
129 
130; 

131 



132 



133 



134' 



135 



136; 

137; 
138; 

139 

140 
141 



142 
143 



GAZ.UES-su-nu a-na la m[e\-ni u-x-[... 

u]ru. mes- w- i~siP- [nu] 

ina izi.mes a-sa-ra-p[a bu]rui 4 .mes 

gis. [kiri 6 .mes-sw-«w akkis ...] uru.Tmes '-/?/- 

su-nu 

u-sd-as-bi-su-nu [g]un ma-[da-tu ... uGu-iw]- 

nu ds-kun 

ina ger-ri sd-ne-e-ma x x [...] da as x , x x 



ies (but) imposed [upon] them tribute, tax, [{and) 
corvee]. On another campaign ... 



ta~na~ti kis-su-thia sd as-sur d UTU rd_, [...] x 

kur-£ sd-qu-te 

ta kur su-ba-ri-i a-di kur gil-za-a-ni u kur 

na-^~P-r[i ...] a ri sd mal-qe-tu 

sd al-ta-qu-u su.nigin 2 lim 7 me 2 

anse.kur.ra.m[es simdat gis] ni-r[i ...] x x x 

fe-muqi KUR-ia ugu sd pa-an 

^u-sa^-tir ar-ku-us 



e.gal.mes ina si-di KUR-/a ar-sip gis.apin.mes 
[ina S\i-rdP KUR-a ar-^ku-us se^.am.mes tab- 
ka-a-ni a-na e-ris-^tP 
KUR-ia ugu sd pa-an ^iP-sd-tir at-bu-^uk^ 
ugu kur as-sur ma-a-ta ugu UN.MES-sa' 
un.mes u-rad-di 



d MAS U d IGI.DU Sd SANGA-ti AGA : 

mas.anse.edin u-sat-li-mu-ni-ma e-pes ba-^u- 

ri iq-bu-ni 60(?) x x 

dan-nu-ti ina GikGiGiR-ia pa-at-tu-ti ina sA-a 

ek-di ina qlt-ru-ub me-et-lu-ti-ia ina gis pa- 
ds-hi r GAZ-ak i 



e-nu-ma bad fa tam-le-e GAL-e fa [£.ga]l en- 

//-/a fa /£-rw pa-art man.mes-w mah-ru-te a- 

li-ku-ut iGi-/[a] 

e-pu-su e-na-ah-ma m as-s[ur-bel-k]a-la ensi 

as-sur du-ws /-ft/r i-na-ah-ma m GisKiM- d MAS 

ensi as-sur a 10-erin.tah en [si assur ma] a- 

sar-su il-me-si dan-na-su ak-sud us-si-su ina 

ugu ki-sir 

KUR-e dan-ni ad-di 3 me [tipkT] a-na 20 

SIG4.MES dagal is-tu ki-di ugu mah-ri-i-su 

muh-hi-su 

ti-rad-di u-[k]ab-bir is-t[u us-si-s]u a-di 

gaba-dibi-su ar-^sip^ u-sek-lii ugu mah-ri-i 

u-si-me u-sar-rih NA 4 .N[A-Ru].rAi.MEs as-ku- 

Un NA4.NA.RU. A. MES Sd MAN.MES-m AD.MES-/a 

mah-^ru-ie^ 



i.mes ap-su-us udu.siskur.[mes aq-q\i a-na 
ds-ri-su-nu u-ter nun-w egir-' ~iP e-nu-ma 
bad su-u u-sal-ba-[ru-m]a e-na-hu an-hu-su 
lu-ud-dis na 4 . na.ru. a. mes 



128-131) The praises of my power which Assur, 
the god Samas, the god [...] high mountains from 
the land of the Subaru to the land Gilzanu and 
Nairi [...] revenue, which I continually received. 
Altogether 2,702 horses in teams [and chariots], 
more than ever before, I had in harness for the 
forces of my land. 



132-133) I constructed palaces in the (various) 
districts of my land. I hitched up plows in the 
(various) districts of my land (and thereby) piled 
up more grain than ever before for the needs of 
my land. To Assyria I added land and to its peo- 
ple I added people. 

134-135) The gods Ninurta and Nergal, who love 
my priesthood, gave to me the wild beasts and 
commanded me to hunt. I killed sixty strong lions 
from my ... chariot with my wildly vigorous as- 
sault with the spear. 



136-142a) At that time the wall of the large ter- 
race of my lordly palace which previously earlier 
kings who preceded me had built — (when) it be- 
came dilapidated Ass[ur-bel-k]aia vice-regent of 
Assur had rebuilt (it) — had again become dilapi- 
dated and I, TukultT-Ninurta, vice-regent of 
Assur, son of Adad-nararT (11) [(who was) also] 
vice-[regent of Assur], delineated its area (and) 
dug down to the bottom of its foundation pit. I 
laid its foundation in bedrock. (140) I made it 
wider by adding from the outside 300 [layers of 
brick] to the (wall which was already) 20 broad 
bricks (wide). I reconstructed it from top to bot- 
tom and completed (it). I made its decoration 
more splendid than before. I deposited my monu- 
mental inscriptions. I anointed with oil the monu- 
mental inscriptions of the earlier kings, my fore- 
fathers, made sacrifices, (and) returned (them) to 
their places. 

142b-145a) May a later prince, when this wall be- 
comes old and dilapidated, restore its ruined (por- 
tions). May he not remove my monumental in- 
scriptions from their places (but) anoint (them) 



TukultT-Ninurta ii A.0. 100.5 



179 



144) is-tu ds-ri-su-nu la-[a] ^u^sam-sak lmes ses 
udu.siskur liq-qi a-na ds~ri~su-mi 

145) lu-te-er as-sur d i§KUR ik-[ri\-bi-sti i-se-m[u\-u 
sd mu §at-ra i-pa^SH-tu u na4.na.ru. a. mes 

146) iS' f tu KO-M-(nu) u-sam-^ sa^-\ku as-s\ur 
d iSKUR Mu-Hftfi u numun-£w ina kur lu-hal- 
li-qu 

147) iti.apin ud 9.ka[m l\i-mu m na-^n-di-DiNGiR 
gar kur kat-mu-hi 



with oil, make sacrifices, (and) return (them) to 
their places. (Then) Assur (and) the god Adad will 
listen to his prayers. 

145b~T46) He who erases my inscribed name and 
removes my monumental inscriptions from their 
places: may Assur (and) the god Adad destroy his 
name and his seed from the land. 



147) Month of Marchesvan, ninth day, eponymy 
of Naidi-ilT, governor of the land Katmuhu. 



This text is from a stone slab found at Nineveh, although originally it 
came from Nemed-TukultT-Ninurta. The city is otherwise unknown 
but it no doubt had an older name, perhaps known to us, which 
TukultT-Ninurta changed when he made it into a special centre. No 
other information on this event has been preserved. Another example 
of monumental inscriptions being prepared in Assyria for use in a pro- 
vincial centre is known for Adad-nararT i, whose scribes engraved texts 
on stone at Assur for Taidu. These inscriptions, like the present one, 
were never sent and indeed our engraved stone was later used in the 
palace of Ashurnasirpal n at Nineveh. It is a display inscription and 
briefly describes the geographical extent of the king's conquests. The 
broken portion on the left of the text can, in part, be restored on 
analogy with inscriptions of Ashurnasirpal ii. 



COMMENTARY 



The location of the stone slab is unknown but it could 
be collated from photos in Thompson's notebooks in 
the British Museum. According to Thompson it was 
found in XVIII. C. 24, palace of Asn. and measured 



97x98x25 cm. Two tiny fragments which have been 
associated with this piece have been treated elsewhere: 
Thompson, Arch. 79 no. 19 - A.0. 100. 1001; Thomp- 
son, AAA 19 no. 122 = A.0. 100. 1002. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1929 Thompson, Arch. 79 pp. 117-18 and pi. xli no. 1 (copy, 

edition) 
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 10 (study) 



1976 Grayson, ARI 2 c 5 (translation) 
1984 Frame, ARR1M 2 p. 6 (study) 



TEXT 



1) [...] A 10-ERIN.TAH MAN SU MAN KUR AS A QS- 

sur-KAL-an man su man kur AS-ma 

2) [... gi]m-ri-sd man sa ta (e)-ber-ta-an 

ID, HAL, HAL Q-dl KUR hat-te 

3) [...]& kur. kur na-i-ri a-na pat gim-ri-sd 
kur su-hi a~di 



l-10a) [(Property of) the palace of TukultT- 
Ninurta, king of the universe, king of Assyria], 
son of Adad-nararT (n), king of the universe, king 
of Assyria, son of Assur-dan (n) (who was) also 
king of the universe (and) king of Assyria [..,] en- 
tirely, the king who from the other side of the 



180 



TukultT-Ninurta ii A.0.100.6 



4) [...] kur kir-ru-ri a-di kur gil-za-a-ni m a-pa-a 
man uru hu-ub-us-ki-a 

5) [... is(l)]-bat ta ne-re-be sa kur ba-bi-te a-di 

6) [... s\i-hir-ti-$d ta id za-ba ki.ta 

7) [...] el-Ia-an za-ban kur hi-ri-mu kur ha-ru-tu 

8) [...]-rfw-m-a? ta uru s«-5/ sa ugu id.hal.hal 
a-di 

9) [... B]kD-ku-ri-gaI-zi a-di uru si-pur-sd- d sd- 
mas uru si-pur- 



10) [... su-s]w ik-su-du sd e.gal-///w 5a uru ^e- 

/77eflf- m TUKUL- d MAS 



Tigris to the land Hatti [...] the lands Nairi en- 
tirely, the land Suhu to [the city Rapiqu ... from 
the passes of] Mount Kirruru to the land Gilzanu, 
Apa king of the city Hubuskia [... he] captured. 
From the passes of Mount Babitu to [...J entirely, 
from the Lower Zab [to the city Til-Bari which is] 
upstream along the Zab, the lands Hirimu (and) 
Harutu, [(...) fortresses of Kar]dunias, from the 
city Susu which is upon the Tigris to [...] Dur- 
Kurigalzu to the cities Sippar-of-Samas (and) 
Sippar-of-[AnunTtu (...)] he conquered: 
10b) (Property) of the palace of the city Nemed- 
Tukultl-Ninurta. 



This broken text, on a fragment of a yellow glazed clay plate, cer- 
tainly should be ascribed to TukultT-Ninurta n. The work described 
may be the towers at the door of the Enpi shrine in the Assur temple 
(cf. A.0.100.14). If so, then the fragment must come from Assur 
rather than Nineveh. But, of course, it could concern a building proj- 
ect at Nineveh. 



COMMENTARY 

The fragment (BM 99128 - Ki 1904-10-9,158) measures 14.1 x 10.7+ cm and 
the inscription has been collated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1914 King, Cat. p. 30 (study) 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 97 n. 401 (study) 



TEXT 



Lacuna 

V) [... as-s\ur a as-sur-K al sid as-sur-ma e-nu- 

ma na-me-[ri ...] 
2') [.,. tib]-ki lu ul-li 35 ti-ib-ki ana mah-ru-t[e 



Lacuna 



Lacuna 

l'-2') [(Property of) the palace of TukultT- 
Ninurta, vice-regent of Assur, son of Adad-nararT 
(n), vice-regent of Ass]ur, son of Assur-dan (n) 
(who was) also vice-regent of Assur: at that time 
the towers of [...] I raised (its height) [N layers 
of] brick [adding] thirty-five layers of brick more 
than before [...]. 
Lacuna 



Tukultl-Ninurta ii A.0. 100.8 



181 



8 



A stone amulet in the Louvre is said to have had an inscription by 
TukultT-Ninurta n dedicating the gem to Samas. No museum number 
is known and the object has not been located. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1924 Pottier, Antiquites assyriennes p. 121 no. 121 (study) 
1977 Brinkman, JCS 29 p. 60 (study) 



This text appears on two stone slabs discovered at Tell Barri and 
established the identity of that site as ancient Kahat. 



COMMENTARY 



The two stone slabs are in the Aleppo Museum (no 
numbers known) and the inscriptions have been col- 
lated. One slab is complete and measures 100x82 cm 



and the other, which is badly broken, no doubt was 
originally of the same size. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1961-62 Dossin, AAAS 11/12 pp. 197-206 and pi. n (exs. 1-2, 

photo, copy, edition) 
1962 Dossin, CRRA 11 pp. 4-5 (exs. 1-2, edition) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 c 12 (exs. 1-2, translation) 



1982 Salvini, Tell Barri/Kahat 1 p. 13 and front cover (exs. 
1-2, copy, edition) 

1983 Salvini, Akkadica 35 p. 25 (exs. 1-2, copy, edition) 
1985 Russell, Iraq 47 p. 67 (exs. 1-2, edition) 



TEXT 



1) E.GAL m GISKIM- MAS 

2) MAN SU MAN KUR AS 

3) a 10-£rin,tAh MAN SU MAN KUR AS 

4) A A^-KAL-an MAN §U MAN KUR AS- ma 

5) kun'4 Sd uru ka-ha-at 



1-5) (Property of) the palace of Tukultl-Ninurta, 
king of the universe, king of Assyria, son of 
Adad-n^rari (n), king of the universe, king of 
Assyria, son of Assur-d&n (n) (who was) also king 
of the universe (and) king of Assyria: stone slab 
of the city Kahat. 



10 



This text is engraved on a stone duck weight of unknown provenance. 



182 



TukultT-Ninurta ii A.0.100.10 
COMMENTARY 



The duck weight is in a private collection (J, Mariaud 
de Serres A 53) and the inscription has not been col- 
lated. The weight in modern terms is not given in the 
publication but its height is 5.4 cm and its length 9.8 



cm. The stone is said to be porphyry and probably the 
Akkadian name of the stone is at the broken end of 
line 4. The reading of this line is difficult. Should one 
read sd pf lit. € of the mouth'? 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1981 Gregoire, MVN 10 pp. 15, 28, and pi. 17 no. 57 (copy, edition) 



TEXT 



1) e.gal m GiSKiM- d rMAsT [sar kissati sar mat 
assur] 

2) A 10-ERIN.TAH MAN StJ MAN KUR AS 

3) A AS-KAL-tf/T MAN SU MAN KUR AS-[ma\ 

4) SANABI MA.NA SA KA NA 4 X 



1-4) (Property of) the palace of TukultT-Ninurta, 
[king of the universe, king of Assyria], son of 
Adad-nararT (n), king of the universe, king of 
Assyria, son of Assur-dan (n) (who was) also king 
of the universe (and) king of Assyria: two-thirds 
of a mina ... stone ... 



11 



This text is engraved on a small agate (white with orange speckles) 
found at Khorsabad (Dur-SarrukTn) and now in the Louvre, It is 
bored lengthwise and was a pendant, or one of several stones of a 
pendant, worn by the king around his neck. 



COMMENTARY 

The stone (N III 3399) measures 2x2,5x 1.4 cm and the inscription has been 
collated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1867 Place, Ninive et l'Assyrie 3 pi. 76 no. 32 (copy) 

1875 Lenormant, Choix no. 74 (copy) 

1889 Sehrader, KB 1 pp. 50-51 (edition) 

1909 Scheil, Tn. p. 3 (copy, edition) 

1923 Delaporte, Louvre 2 p. 180 and pi. 93 no. A 824 (photo, 



edition) 
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §433 (translation) 
1971 CAD 8 (K) p. 449a (study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 c 14 (translation) 
1987 Gaiter, ARRIM 5 pp. 11-30 no. 6 (edition) 



TEXT 



1) NA 4 .GU 
2) 

3) a 10-£rin,tAh 

4) MAN KUR A§ 



1-4) Necklace of Tukulti-Ninurta, king of 
Assyria, son of Adad-nararT (n), king of Assyria, 



TukultT-Ninurta ii A.0.100.12 



183 



12 



This text and A.0.100.13 are on pieces of clay cone found at Nineveh. 
They are very similar but the omission of 'great king' (sarru rabu) in 
A.0.100.13 shows that they are different texts. The titulary in 
A.0.100.12 can be restored from the titulary of Ashurnasirpal n (e.g. 
A.0.101.39). 



COMMENTARY 

The fragment (BM 139275, 1932-12-10,729) was found at Nineveh RR.6 and 
measures 7.1 x 5.1 + cm. The inscription has been collated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1932 Thompson, AAA 19 pp. 98-99 and pi. lxx no. 66 (copy, 
edition) 



1976 Grayson, ARI 2 c 9 (translation) 
1984 Frame, ARRIM 2 p. 13 (study) 



TEXT 



1) [...]-r d lMAS MAN GAL [...] 

2) [...] MAN GAL [...] 

3) [...] MAN GAL [...] 



1-3) [Tukultl]-Ninurta, great king, [strong king, 
king of the universe, king of Assyria, son of 
Adad-naran (n)], great king, [strong king, king of 
the universe, king of Assyria, son of Assur- 
dan (n) (who was) also] great king, [strong king, 
king of the universe (and) king of Assyria]. 



13 



This text, like A.0.100.12, is on clay cone fragments from Nineveh. 



CATALOGUE 



Ex. 



BM 

number 



Registration 
number 



Nineveh 
provenance 



Dimensions 
(cm) 



123461 
128187 



1932-12-10,404 
1929-10-12,843 



AP.C.12 
AP.C.14 



9x6.5 + 
6.4x5.6 + 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1932 Thompson, AAA 19 pp. 98-99 and pi. lxxvii no. 174 

(ex. 1 , copy, edition) 
1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. pp. 27 and 53 (exs. 1-2, 



study) 
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 10 (study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 c 10 (translation) 



184 



TukultT-Ninurta n A.0.100.13 



TEXT 



1) [ekai] m GisKiM- d MAs 

2) [sarri dan]-ni man su man kur as 

3) [apil adad\-ER\N. tah man su man kur as 

4) [apil assur]-KAL-an man su man kur as- ma 



1-4) [(Property of) the palace of] TukultT- 
Ninurta, strong [king], king of the universe, king 
of Assyria, [son of Adad]-nararT (n), king of the 
universe, king of Assyria, [son of As§ur]-dan (n) 
(who was) also king of the universe (and) king of 
Assyria. 



14 



This text, on two bricks from Assur, records the restoration of the 
towers at the door to the shrine of the god Enpi in the Assur temple. 
Work in the same area is described in A. 0,100.5 line 27. 



COMMENTARY 



Neither brick, Ass 18148 (ex. 1) and 18393 (ex. 2), has 
been located or collated. Ex. 1 was found at the south- 
east gate of the great court of the Assur temple, iB3iv, 



while ex. 2 was found in fill at the east wall of the east 

tomb, iK4rvW. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 no. 85 (ex. 1, copy) and p. 108 sub 
no. 85 (ex. 2, provenance) 

1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§429 and 431 (exs. 1-2, transla- 
tion) 



1933-34 Schwenzner, AfO 9 p. 47 (exs. 1-2, study) 
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 10 (exs. 1-2, study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 c 6 (exs. 1-2, translation) 



TEXT 



1) E.GAL m GISKIM- d MAS MAN KlS MAN KUR A§ 

2) a 10-6rin.tAh man kur as an-hu-ut e na- 
me-ri 

3) sd ka d en~pi ud-di§ 



1-3) (Property of) the palace of TukultT-Ninurta, 
king of the universe, king of Assyria, son of 
Adad-nararl (n), king of Assyria: I/he restored 
the ruined (portions) of the towers of the door of 
the god Enpi. 



15 



This text appears on three coloured glazed bricks or, better, tiles from 
Assur. The tiles are large, more than 100x30 centimetres, and have 
beautifully painted pictures which are reproduced in Andrae's 
Coloured Ceramics. They were found in the Anu-Adad temple, above 
the Shalmaneser in floor, which means they were reused. 



TukultT-Ninurta ii A.0.100.15 
CATALOGUE 



185 



Ex, 

1 

2 
3 



Museum 
number 

BM 115706 
BM 115705 
BM 115708 



Registration 
number 



1922-8-12,175 

1922-8-12,174 
1922-8-12,177 



Ass 
number 



7434 
7433 
7408 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1925 Andrae, Coloured Ceramics p. 25 and pis. 7-8 (exs. 1- 
provenance; exs. 1-2, copy; ex. 2, edition) 

1925 Meissner, DLZ 46 p. 421 (exs. 1-2, translation) 

1926 Schott, MVAG 30/2 p. 104 n. 1 (study) 
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 10 (exs. 1-2, study) 



1976 Grayson, ARI 2 c 7 (exs. 1-2, translation) 

1977 Andrae, WEA 2 pis. 170-71 (exs. 1-2, copy) 

1981 Walker, CBI no. 142 and p. 138 (ex. 3, copy; exs. 1-3, 
edition) 



TEXT 



1) E.GAL m GISKIM- d MAS MAN dan-HU MAN TrIS"! 
[Mr] KUR AS 

2) A m 10-ERIN.TAH MAN dafl-UU MAN KIS MAN 
KUR AS 

3) A m AS-KAL-tf/7 MAN KIS MAN KUR AS-ma 



1-3) (Property of) the palace of TukultT-Ninurta, 
strong king, king of the universe, [king of] 
Assyria, son of Adad-nararT (n) strong king, king 
of the universe, king of Assyria, son of As5ur- 
dan (n) (who was) also king of the universe (and) 
king of Assyria. 



16 



This text is inscribed on several bricks found in various locations 
(reused) at ASsur. 



CATALOGUE 





Museum 


Ass 




Ex. 


number 


number 


cpn 


1 


Unlocated 


18829 


n 


2 


Unlocated 


18398 


n 


3 


Unlocated 


9150 


n 


4 


VA Ass 3254a 


2096 


c 


5 


VA Ass 3254b 


_ 


c 



COMMENTARY 



The exs. are exact duplicates except: line 1, ex. 5 m tukul-[ti ...]; line 3, ex. 3 
as- for as-sur-. 



186 



TukultT-Ninurta ii A.0.100.16 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 no. 86 (exs. 1-3, copy) 

1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§429-30 (exs. 1-3, translation) 

1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 10 (exs. 1-3, study) 



1976 Grayson, ARI 2 c 8 (exs. 1-3, translation) 

1984 Marzahn and Rost, Ziegeln 1 nos. 270-71 (exs. 

study) 



4-5, 



TEXT 



1) E.GAL m GISKIM- d MAS MAN KIS MAN KUR AS 

2) A 10-ERIN.TAH MAN KIS MAN KUR AS 

3) a as-sur-KAL-an man kis man kur AS-ma 



1-3) (Property of) the palace of TukultT-Ninurta, 
king of the universe, king of Assyria, son of 
Adad-nararT (n), king of the universe, king of 
Assyria, son of Assur-dan (n) (who was) also king 
of the universe (and) king of Assyria. 



17 



This text, on a brick fragment from Nineveh, has a titulary different 
from the other labels of this king. 



COMMENTARY 

The brick, which is in the Birmingham City Museum (BCM 356 '79), was 
found at Nineveh (Ch.IV 7th course of pavement) and the inscription has been 
collated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1931 Thompson, AAA 18 p. 98 and pi. xx no. 52 (copy, edi- 
tion) 
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 11 (study) 



1976 Grayson, ARI 2 c 11 (translation) 
1981 Walker, CBI no. 143 (transliteration) 
1984 Frame, ARRIM 2 p. 12 (study) 



TEXT 



1 ) E . GAL m TUKUL-M AS M A [N . . . ] 

2) [apil adad'EK]m.jAH man ku[r ...] 
Lacuna 



1-2) (Property of) the palace of Tukultl-Ninurta, 
king [,.., son of Adad]-nararl (n), king of [As- 
syria, ...] 
Lacuna 



1001 



This tiny fragment is on a piece of a stone slab found at Nineveh. It 
just might be a duplicate of A. 0,100.6 but not enough is preserved to 
prove this and therefore it has been regarded as unidentified. 



Tukultl-Ninurta ii A.0.100.1001 
COMMENTARY 



187 



The fragment has not been located. It was found at Nineveh 'XIX.3* and 
measured 29 x 25 + cm. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1929 Thompson, Arch. 79 p. 117 n. 4 and pi. xm no. 19 (copy, study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 c 5 (study) 



TEXT 



1) E.GAL(?) ...] 

2) a as-sur-[KAL-an(l) ..»] 

3) gim-r[i ...] 

4) a-na x [...] 

5) fl-rf/KU[R(?) ...] 

6) x [...] 

Lacuna 



1-6) No translation warranted. 



1002 



This fragmentary text is on a piece of clay cone found at Nineveh. It, 
like A.0.100.1001, may be a duplicate of A.0. 100.6 but there can be 
no certainty, particularly since the two texts are inscribed on quite 
different objects. 



COMMENTARY 



The fragment (BM 123497, 1932-12-10,440) was found 
at Nineveh in the palace of Asn. n, *C.13\ It measures 



5 x 3.9 f cm and the inscription has been collated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1932 Thompson, AAA 19 p. 100 n. 11 and pi. lxxiv no. 

(copy, translation) 
1967 Borger, HKL 1 p. 527 (study) 



122 1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 30 (study) 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 c 5 (study) 
1984 Frame, ARRIM 2 p. 14 (study) 



TEXT 



Lacuna 



1') [. 


.] x-te [...] 


2') [. 


. s]u-hi a-d[i ...] 


3') [. 


. T>]V(,-ba-a-ri x [...] 


4') [. 


. Bk]i>-ku-ri-gal-zi x [...] 


5') [• 


.] x ana gir.ii.m[es ...] 


6') [. 


.] x dingir(?) [...] 


Lacun; 


i 



1-6') No translation warranted. 



188 TukultT-Ninurta ii A.0.100.1003 



1003 



This broken text is on a piece of clay cone which presumably came 
from Nineveh. Only Adad-nararfs name is preserved and he could be 
either the father or grandfather of the king, which means the text 
should be ascribed to either TukultT-Ninurta n or Ashurnasirpal n. 



COMMENTARY 

The fragment (K 8539) measures 5.5x5+ cm and the inscription has been col- 
lated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1893 Bezold, Cat. 3 p. 937 (study) 
1898 Winckler, OLZ 1 71 (study) 



TEXT 

1) e.gal [...] 1-3) No translation warranted. 

2) man kis man [...] 

3) a 10-erin.t[ah ...] 
Lacuna 



1004 



A stone stele discovered at Tell Ashara (Terqa) on the Middle 
Euphrates and now in the Aleppo Museum, 3165 (1), has a cuneiform 
inscription and various divine figures engraved in relief. The inscrip- 
tion is extremely difficult to read and interpret and there is consider- 
able uncertainty about its identification. Given these problems, an edi- 
tion is for the moment out of the question. The city name Laqu (uru 
la-qe-e) is clear in line 2 and Giiterbock's suggested decipherment of 
the names Adad-nararT (n) and his son TukultT-Ninurta (n) seems 
valid. The inscription has been collated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1952 Tournay and Soubhi, AAAS 2 pp. 169-90 and pis. i-iii 1957 Giiterbock, JNES 16 p. 123 (study) 

(photo, copy, edition) 1976 Grayson, ARI 2 c 13 (study) 



Ashurnasirpal n 

A.0.101 



The reign of Ashurnasirpal n (883-859 BC) is one of the most impor- 
tant eras in Mesopotamian history, a fact reflected in the large number 
of royal inscriptions for this king and the wealth of detail which they 
contain (see Grayson, CAH 3/1 pp. 253-59). Ashurnasirpal n cam- 
paigned at least once a year, sometimes twice, for as much as two- 
thirds of his time on the throne and there may well have been further 
expeditions about which no records have yet been recovered. His mili- 
tary advances went in all directions although he never actually 
penetrated Babylonia proper. He was one of the greatest builders 
among Assyrian monarchs, his crowning achievement being the 
transformation of Calah into a large metropolis. 

The royal inscriptions are important not only because of their 
number but also because they include the earliest examples of single 
reports of individual campaigns (A.0.101. 18, 19, and possibly 20). 
While such single reports must have been composed in previous reigns, 
no examples are actually attested before this time. Of course annalistic 
collections of reports of two or more campaigns are attested as early 
as the time of Tiglath-pileser i, as noted in the introduction to that 
reign. Another significant feature of Ashurnasirpal n's annals is that 
many of the texts were so long that they had to be engraved on a 
series of stone objects, such as slabs or bulls, which were placed adja- 
cent to one another in palaces and temples (see the introduction to 
A. 0,101.1 for details). Curiously these series are often collections of 
annalistic narratives (campaigns arranged in chronological order) and 
display narratives (campaigns arranged in geographic order), the two 
text types being patched together in a rather makeshift manner (see 
the introduction to A, 0.101.1 for details). 

The main building enterprise of Ashurnasirpal n was Calah, a site 
which seems to have had little previous importance. Work at Calah 
must have stretched over most of his reign and the majority of his 
royal inscriptions come from that city. People were brought to settle 
in Calah, a canal was dug, gardens were planted, a huge palace (the 
'North West Palace') and several temples were erected, and a wall was 
built around the city (A. 0.101.1 iii 132-36 with duplicates; A. 0.101. 17 
v 1-23; A.0.101. 29 lines 9'-17; A.0.101. 30 lines 20-78). Work on the 
palace is also described in A.0.101. 23, 26, 34-35, and cf. 102. The 
various temples are: the temple of Adad and Sala (A. 0.101. 28 v 8; 
A.0.101 .29 line 14' [restored]; A.0.101. 30 line 56), the temple of 
Sarrat-niphi (A.0.101. 1 ii 135; A.0.101. 28; A.0.101. 30 line 57; 
A.0.101. 32 line 9; and A.0.101. 39), the temple of Ea-sarru and 
Damkina (A.0.101. 28 v 8; A.0.101. 29 line 13' [restored]; A.0. 101.30 
line 55; A.0.101. 100), the temple of Gula (A.0.101. 1 ii 135; 
A.0.101. 28 v8; A.0.101.29 line 14'; A. 0.101. 30 line 56; A. 0.101.32 



189 



190 Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101 

line 9), the temple of Kidmuru (A.0.101.30 line 58; A.0.101.38, 98-99, 
109, and 132), the temple of Nabu (A.0.101.30 line 57), the temple of 
Enlil and Ninurta (A.0.101.1 ii 135; A.0.101.28 v 7; A.0.101.29 line 
13'; A.0.101.30 line 54; A.0.101.32 line 9; A.0.101.36, 101, 120-22, 
and 130), the temple of the Sibitti (A.0.101.30 line 57; A.0.101.1 10 
and 131), and the temple of Sin (A.0.101.1 ii 135; A.0.101.28 v 8; 
A.0.101.29 line 14'; A.0.101.30 line 56; A.0.101.32 line 9). A statue of 
Adad and a statue of Ea-sarru are mentioned in A.0.101.1 ii 135. 

Ashurnasirpal did some construction at other sites. In Nineveh he 
worked on the temple of Adad (A. 0.101.49 and 66) and the temple of 
Istar (A.0.101.18, 40, 43-46, 56-65, 111-12, 126, and 133-37) which 
included the BTt-nathi (see the introduction to A.0.101.18). In Assur 
he worked on the temple of Sin and Samas (A.0.10L52 and 67-69) 
and the temple of Assur (A.0.101.138). Imgur-Enlil (modern Balawat), 
a small site, received relatively much attention. The famous bronze 
gates of Ashurnasirpal were found here (A.0. 101.51 and 80-97) and 
this king boasts of renovating the city and building a temple for 
Mamu (A. 0.101. 50), Finally, at Apqu (modern Tell Abu Marya) he 
built or restored a palace (A. 0.101.54 and 70). 

The relative chronology of the royal inscriptions of Ashurnasirpal n 
has been much discussed in recent years. The main point of interest 
has been the attempt to date the display texts earlier or later in the 
reign on the basis of whether or not the military achievements include 
certain places, such as Carchemish, Mount Lebanon, and Urartu (see 
the notes to A.0.101.1 iii 121-22 for details). For discussion of the 
chronology of the building projects at Calah see de Filippi, Assur 1/7 
(1977) and Reade, Iraq 47 (1985) pp. 203-214. For a detailed study of 
the form of the royal inscriptions see Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 18-69. 

Ashurnasirpal n is mentioned in a chronicle (see Grayson, Chroni- 
cles p. 182 rev. 4) and king lists (see Grayson, RLA 6 pp. 86-135). A 
complete list of the eponymies from his reign can be reconstructed 
from various sources (see Grayson, ARI 2 pp. 210-11 §870). 

Research on the royal inscriptions of Ashurnasirpal n has been ham- 
pered by the fact that many of the larger texts from Calah are not 
available for collation. The reason is that Layard took paper squeezes 
of many huge stone objects (slabs, bulls, etc.) which he left at the site. 
The squeezes were deposited in the British Museum and used by 
Layard and subsequent editors to publish the inscriptions. Eventually 
the squeezes were destroyed and, short of re-excavating all the objects, 
such texts cannot now be collated. For further details see the commen- 
tary to A.0.101.1. 

Editing the texts of Ashurnasirpal ii presents a special problem be- 
cause of the large number of duplicate, parallel, and partially overlap- 
ping passages in a number of his inscriptions. Following one of the 
basic principles of the RIM Project, I have edited each text separately, 
when possible, noting the duplicates and parallel passages in the com- 
mentaries. Since all such overlappings involve the 'Annals' (A.0.101.1) 
in some way, I have given a complete list of them in the commentary 
to that text. It has not been possible, however, in every case to publish 
a separate edition for each text since some texts are no longer accessi- 
ble and were originally published only in a summary fashion (e.g. The 
obverse of our text is a duplicate of the Annals i 1-17'). For details 
see the commentary to each text. 

A text of Ashurnasirpal n on a 'wooden figure' found at Calah was 
mentioned in Iraq 38 (1976) p. 71. Fragments of a black stone obelisk 



Ashurnasirpal n A. 0.101 191 

found at Nineveh by Thompson have been included under Adad- 
nararTTi (A.0.99.1001). 

Some objects, with royal inscriptions of Ashurnasirpal n, excavated 
at Assur, have never been published and can no longer be found (see 
Grayson, ARRIM 1 [1983] pp. 15-18). These include fragments of a 
'lamassu' mentioned by Andrae, MDOG 21 (1904) pp. 16-17 (Ass 346, 
349 + 370, 350) and cf. MDOG 29 (1905) p. 41 (Ass 7341). Also note 
Ass 328 and 347 in Andrae, MDOG 21 p. 16. These problematical 
texts were mentioned in Grayson, ARI 2 pp. 115-16 n. 468 c v-vi. 

Excavations at Sibaniba (Tell Billah) are said to have uncovered in- 
scribed bricks and a 'prism' fragment of Ashurnasirpal n (see Speiser, 
BASOR 40 [1930] pp. 11-14 and 41 [1931] p. 19; cf. Schramm, EAK 
2 pp. 60-61). Our efforts to find these objects have been in vain. 

There are some literary texts from this reign. These include a 'dream 
text' (K 14884 — see Oppenheim, The Interpretation of Dreams in the 
Ancient Near East* in Transactions of the American Philosophical So- 
ciety ns 46/3 [1956] pp. 321-22 and cf. p. 275); royal hymns (Ebeling, 
KAR no. 342 - cf. Borger, HKL 2 p. 57; Ebeling, LKA no. 64 - cf. 
Schramm, EAK 2 p. 58; 79-7-8,66 - cf. Bezold, Cat. 4 p. 1704); and 
an incantation (Thompson, Arch. 79 p. 118 and pi. xli no. 3 — cf. 
Grayson, ARI 2 p. 115 n. 468 b iv and Borger, HKL 2 p. 284), 



This text is one of the longest and most important Assyrian royal in- 
scriptions known. It was inscribed on huge stone reliefs which lined 
the walls and floors of the Ninurta temple at Calah. The text is usually 
called the 'annals' of Ashurnasirpal n but the label is a misnomer since 
the inscription is really a mixture of various kinds of texts, some an- 
nalistic and some display texts. There are numerous duplicate and 
parallel passages in other texts and these have been listed in the com- 
mentary. 

The text begins with one of the longest introductions to any 
Assyrian royal inscription (i 1-42). This contains first a dedication to 
Ninurta (i 1-9), then the king's name, epithets, and royal commissions 
(i 9-31 and 40-42), with an insert about the king's appointment and 
Istar's decision to do battle (i 31-40). The same introduction, but with 
a dedication to various deities, appears in A. 0.101. 8. 

This introduction is followed by the first of two campaign narra- 
tives, which are given in annalistic form (i 43 - ii 124). This passage 
describes the campaigns of the accession to the fifth regnal year. The 
second campaign passage, which appears later (iii 1-112), concerns 
campaigns of the sixth to eighteenth regnal years. For a thorough 
analysis of the narrative structure of the campaign descriptions see the 
work by Liverani quoted in the bibliography. 

In between the two annalistic descriptions of the campaigns there is 
a passage which in reality is an independent text of the display type 
(ii 125-35), a virtual duplicate of a text recording work on the Ninurta 
temple (A. 0.101. 31). The last, concluding, portion of the text 
(iii 113-36) is yet another such independent display text, a virtual du- 
plicate of A. 0. 101.26. This latter passage is divided into two separate 



192 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101.1 



parts, the first (iii 113-25) being essentially a duplicate of the Standard 
Inscription (A.O.101.23). The second and final part (iii 126-36) is a 
general survey of construction at Calah. 

It is curious that there are no concluding formulae to the text, that 
is blessings and curses on future rulers who do or do not respect 
Ashurnasirpal's work and inscriptions. The absence of such formulae 
is also a feature of other texts of this king including the Kurkh 
Monolith, A.0.101.19. See the introduction to that text for further 
comment. 

A special feature of this text, as of several texts of Ashurnasirpal, is 
that it is so lengthy that it had to be inscribed on a series of adjacent 
objects, in this case huge stone slabs. There are several lengthy texts 
inscribed on a series of objects, namely A.O. 101. 1-16. Many of the in- 
scriptions making up these texts are poorly preserved and therefore 
there is much uncertainty about the distinction of different texts. But 
among these inscriptions at least seven different texts, which will be 
called 'annals series', can be distinguished. In all seven of these texts 
there are numerous passages which duplicate or parallel passages in 
other texts. They all have the common characteristic that they contain 
a mixture of annalistic and display narrative. 

Let us first look briefly at the six different annals series from Calah. 
These are A.0.10L1 (Le Gac's 'Annals A'), A.0.101.4 (Le Gac's 'An- 
nals B'), A.0.101.8-11 (10-11 are Le Gac's 'Annals C), A.0.101.13 
(first tablet in a series similar to A.0.101.8-11), A. 0.101. 2 (inscribed 
mainly on monumental bulls and lions), and A.O. 101. 3 and 5-7 (in- 
scribed on stone slabs engraved with mythological scenes). There are 
two further fragmentary inscriptions (A. 0.101. 12 and 14) which could 
be parts of one of the aforementioned series (A. 0.101.12 could be part 
of A.0.101.8-11; Le Gac regarded A.0. 101.14 as part of A. 0.101.1). 
The seventh annals series, which is very fragmentary, was found at 
Nineveh (A. 0.101.15). Further details about each text will be found in 
the editions. Some inscriptions which seem to belong to the same an- 
nals series (e.g. A.0.101.8-11) have, nevertheless, been given separate 
text numbers since there is still uncertainty about the distinction of the 
various annals series. A fragment of an annals series (from Assur?) 
has been included as A. 0.101.16. 



COMMENTARY 



The series of slabs upon which this text was inscribed 
was excavated by Layard in the middle of the 
nineteenth century. Paper squeezes were made of the 
inscriptions and brought back to the British Museum in 
London. Over the next half-century three major publi- 
cations of the text were prepared on the basis of these 
squeezes by Norris (1 R), King, and Le Gac (see the 
bibliography), Unfortunately the paper squeezes, which 
were probably rather tattered, were deliberately des- 
troyed some time after Le Gac's edition (see Gaiter, 
Levine, and Reade, ARRIM 4 [1986] p. 27). Thus in 
preparing this edition 1 have been forced to rely solely 
upon the older publications. Of the three, Le Gac's text 
is generally more reliable. The text of Norris is incom- 
plete and King's text contains numerous obvious errors 
which make one very suspicious of its soundness as a 



whole. One badly worn slab was rediscovered at Calah 
by Mallowan (Nimrud 1 p. 87). 

This edition, then, follows Le Gac's text. The vars. 
are quoted from Le Gac simply as 'van' (whether one 
or more). It is useless to give the number of the specific 
squeezes as they appear in Le Gac, since the squeezes 
no longer exist. There are frequent differences between 
the texts of King and Le Gac, Where it is an obvious, 
often typographical, error in King I have not usually 
noted the difference. There are also several implied 
differences in King's main text which are not confirmed 
anywhere by Le Gac and therefore have been ignored. 

Three fragmentary duplicates of this text have come 
to light since Le Gac's edition was published. One frag- 
ment (ex. 2) was published by Pohl in 1942-43 and two 
(exs. 3-4) by Lehmann-Haupt in 1906 (see the bibliog- 



Ashurnasirpal II A. 0.101.1 



193 



raphy). It would be ridiculous to give scores for the 
entire text merely for the sake of these tiny fragments. 
Therefore, contrary to the usual practice in the RIM 
series, scores have been given (on microfiche) only for 
the lines which these pieces duplicate (iii 114-29). None 
of these duplicates has been collated. Also, contrary to 
usual practice, it is impossible to give a catalogue of 
exs. It is not even known how many exs. there were. 

Both King and Le Gac cited in their notes vars. from 
parallel passages in other texts, viz. A.0. 101.3 and 5-7 
(King's <nos. 27-30'), A.0. 101.17 ('[Nimrud] Mon/), 
and A,0, 101.19 CKurkh Mon.'). I have followed this 
practice, with some modification, because of its useful- 
ness. Vars. are regularly cited in my notes from the fol- 
lowing texts: A.0.101.3, 4-7, 9-15, and 17 (i 12 - iv 
end). These parallel passages are not re-edited under the 
relevant texts, with the exception of A.0.101.3 and 17. 

In the following list of parallel passages in other 
texts ' = ' denotes an exact duplicate while 'cf.' denotes a 
similar passage: i 1-12 = A.0.101.6-7(?); i l-18a = 
A.O.101.3-5; i 9-18 cf. iii 113-19; i 18b - ii 125a = 
A.0.101.17 (i 12 - iv end); i 18-56 = A.0.101.8; i 



18-47 = A.0.101.4; i 18b-34 = A.0. 101 .20 (lines 
14b-47); i 18-28 cf. iii 126-29; i 26-33 = A.0,101.13 
obv.; i 52-59 = A.0.101.13 rev.; i 57-103 = 
A.0.101.9; i 59-60 = A.0.101.15; ii 1-29 = 
A.0.101.12; ii 86-101 = A.0.101.10; ii 86-125 cf. 
A, 0.10 1.19 (see the commentary); ii 90-91 = 
A.0.101.15; ii 110-17 = A.0.101.14; ii 125-35 = 
A.0.101.31 (lines 1-16); ii 125-32a = A.0.101.34 (lines 
1-26); ii 125 -31 = A.0. 101.38 (lines 1-18) and 
A.0. 101 .50 (lines 1-21); ii 126-32 = A.0.101.15; ii 
127-31 = A.0. 101.23 (lines 8-11); iii 56-76 cf. 
A.0.101.2 (lines 25-33); iii 63-67 = A.0.101.11; iii 
113-36 = A.0. 101 .26 (lines 1-57); iii 113-32 cf. 
A.0. 101.54; iii 113-28 cf. A.0.101.23; iii 113-27 = 
A.0.101.8 (ND 820) and cf. A.0.101.2 (lines 1-18) = 
A.0.101.23 (lines 1-13); iii 113-26a = A.0.101.51 (lines 
l-28a); iii J13-25a cf. A. 0.101. 30 (lines l-20a); iii 
113-19 cf. i 9-18; iii 114-25 = A.0.101.28 (ii 1 - iv 
13); iii 119-32 = A.0.101.5; iii 119-26 = A.0.101.3; iii 
123-28 = A.0.101.15; iii 126-29 cf. i 18-28; iii 131-34 
- A.0.101.2 and 28, and cf. A.0.101.23 (lines 14-17). 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1853 Layard, Discoveries pp. 352-56 (provenance, study) 

1861 1 R pis. 17-26 (copy) 

1889 Peiser, KB 1 pp. 50-117 (edition) 

1902 King, AKA pp. 254-387 (copy, edition) 

1906 Lehmann-Haupt, Mat. pp. 24-26 no. 11 (iii 117-29, 
photo, study) 

1907 Le Gac, Asn. pp. 1-122 (copy) 

1926 Ebeling, ATAT 2 pp. 339-40 (iii 78-89, translation) 
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§436-84 (translation) 
1942-43 Pohl, Rendiconti della Pontificia Accademia Romana 
di Archeologia 19 pp. 251-52 no. 18 (cf. Bezold, ZA 1 
[1886] p. 229 and 18 [1904-1905] p. 101) (iii 114-22, 
copy, edition) 
1967 Borger, HKL 1 p. 219 (study) 
1967 SaMni, Nairi pp. 65 and 85 (i 46-47, i 58-61, ii 19-20, 



ii 91-92, ii 112, iii 97-98, iii 103-104, edition) 
1969 Oppenheim, ANET 3 pp. 275-76 (iii 64-90, translation) 
1973 Grayson and Redford, Papyrus and Tablet pp. 97-99 

(ii 103-28, translation) 
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 18-31 (study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 ci 1 (translation) 
1980Kessler, Nordmesopotamien pp. 18, 32, 39, 43, 51, 55, 

67, 70-71, 103, 106, 179, and 230 (i 104-105, ii 7-8, 

ii 21-23, ii 87-88, ii 91-101, ii 104, iii 5-6, edition) 
1982 Liverani, et al., Vicino Oriente 5 pp. 13-73 (study) 

1984 Borger, TUAT 1/4 pp. 358-60 (iii 64-90, translation) 

1985 Russell, Iraq 47 pp. 66 and 72-74 (i 74-76, iii 2-4, 29-32, 
iii 37-38, edition) 

1986 Rollig, Saeculum 37 p. 117 (i 74-99, translation) 



TEXT 



Col. i 

1) ana d MAS ges-ri dan-dan-ni mah sag.kal 
dingir.mes ur.sag sar-hu gi't-ma-lu sd ina me 
la-a is-sd-na-nu ti-bu-su ibila 

2) res-tu-u ha-mim tuq-ma-te bu-kur d nu~dim- 
mud ur.sag i-gi-gl A. gal ma-lik dingir.mes 
i-lit-ti e-kur mu-kil mar-kas 

3) AN-e u Ki- ti pe-tu-u nag- be ka~bi-si Ki-ti 
DAGAL-ti dingir sd ina ba-lu-M es.bar AN-e u 

YA-tim NU KUD-SU 

4) mu-ndr-bu ek-du sd la-a e-nu-ii qi-bit ka-su 

SAG.KAL UB.MES na-dlft GIS.GIDRU U ES.BAR 

ana nap-har du uru.uru gu-gal-lu sam-ru 



i l-9a)To the god Ninurta, the strong, the al- 
mighty, the exalted, foremost among the gods, 
the splendid (and) perfect warrior whose attack in 
battle is unequalled, the eldest son who com- 
mands battle (skills), offspring of the god 
Nudimmud, warrior of the Igigu gods, the capa- 
ble, prince of the gods, offspring of Ekur, the one 
who holds the bond of heaven and underworld, 
the one who opens springs, the one who walks the 
wide underworld, the god without whom no deci- 
sions are taken in heaven and underworld, the 
swift, the ferocious, the one whose command is 



194 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101.1 



5) sd la ut-tak-ka-ru si-qir sap-tUsu a. gal rap-su 

ABGAL DINGIR. MES mU-tal4u d Ut-U 19 -lu EN 

en-{? sd kip-pat AN-e 

6) u Ki-tim qa-tus-su paq-du man tam-ha-ri a- 
H-lu sd tuq-ma-tu i-tdl-lu su-ul-lu-tu git-ma-lu 
en nag-be u a.ab.ba.mes 

7) ez-zu la pa-du-u sd ti-bu-su a-bu-bu sa-pin 
kur kur.mes mu-u-sam-qit tar-gi-gi dingir 
sar-hu sd la-a bal-u iS-tfs-su 

8) nu-ur AN-e Ki-tim muS-pdr-du qe-reb zu.ab 
mu-ab-bit lem-nu-te mu-sak-niS la ma-gi-ri 
mu-hal-liq za-ia-a-ri sd ina ukkin dingir. mes 



9) mv-su dingir ma-am-ma la bal-w qa-a-iS 

XL LA DINGIR REM-W M si-pU-SU DUG.GA a-Slb 

uru kal-hi en gal-? EN-/a m aS-sur-v ab-a man 
dan-nu 

10) man su man la sd-na~an man kul-lat kib-rat 
A-ta d sam-su kis-sat un.mes n't-sit c1 bad u 
d MAS na-ra-am d a-nim 

11) u 6 da-gan ka-su-us dfngir.mes gal. mes sah- 
tu na-ra-am sk-ka nun-w me-gir d BAD Sd 

SANGA-SU UGU 

12) dingir-//- ka gal-// i-ti-bu-ma tu-sar-si-du 
bal-sm et-lu qar-du sd ina gis Jukul-ti as~sur 
EN-.vai mj.Du-ku-ma ina mal-ki. mes 

13) sd kib-rat A-ta sd-nin-su la tuk-w sipa tab- 
ra-a-te la a-di-ru gis.lal e-du-u gap-Su Sd 
ma-hi-ra 

14) la-a tuk-w man mu-sak-nitf s la-a kan-Su-te-su 
sd nap-har kiS-Sat un.mes i-pe-lu nit a dan-nu 
mu-kab-bi-is 

15) gu a-a-bi-su da-is kul-lat kur.mes mu-pa-ri- 
ru ki-is-ri mul-tar-hi sd ina Gis.tukul-ti 

DINGIR. MES GAL. MES EN.MES-SW 

16) DV-ku-ma kur.kur.mes i>v-Si-na qat-su 
KVK-ud hur-Sd-ni pat gim-ri-Sii-nu i-pe-lu-ma 
bi-lat-su-nu im-hu-ru sa-bit 



unalterable, foremost in the (four) quarters, the 
one who gives sceptre and (powers of) decision to 
all cities, the stern canal-inspector (i 5) whose 
utterance cannot be altered, extensively capable, 
sage of the gods, the noble, the god Utulu, lord 
of lords, into whose hands is entrusted the cir- 
cumference of heaven and underworld, king of 
battle, the hero who rejoices in battles, the trium- 
phant, the perfect, lord of springs and seas, the 
angry (and) merciless whose attack is a deluge, 
the one who overwhelms enemy lands (and) fells 
the wicked, the splendid god who never once 
changes, light of heaven (and) underworld who il- 
luminates the interior of the apsu, annihilator of 
the evil, subduer of the insubmlssive, destroyer of 
enemies, the one whose command none of the 
gods in the divine assembly can alter, bestower of 
life, the compassionate god to whom it is good to 
pray, the one who dwells in the city Calah, great 
lord, my lord: 

i 9b-17a) (I), Ashurnasirpal, strong king, king of 
the universe, unrivalled king, king of all the four 
quarters, sun(god) of all people, chosen of the 
gods Enlil and Ninurta, beloved of the gods Anu 
and Dagan, destructive weapon of the great gods, 
the pious, beloved of your (Ninurta's) heart, 
prince, favourite of the god Enlil, whose priest- 
hood is pleasing to your great divinity and whose 
reign you established, valiant man who acts with 
the support of Assur, his lord, and has no rival 
among the princes of the four quarters, marvel- 
lous shepherd, fearless in battle, mighty flood-tide 
which has no opponent, the king who subdues 
those insubordinate to him, who rules all peoples, 
strong male, who treads upon (i 15) the necks of 
his foes, trampler of all enemies, the one who 
breaks up the forces of the rebellious, he who acts 
with the support of the great gods, his lords, and 
has conquered all lands, gained dominion over the 
highlands in their entirety and received their trib- 
ute, capturer of hostages, he who is victorious 
over all lands; 



i 5 d ut-U]9-lu: the w, 9 sign is uru. Also note A. 0.101. 3 line 9; 
A. 0. 101. 101. This is a name for Ninurta. The reading of the 
name is according to a private communication from Lambert- 
See Borger, Zeichenliste p. 162. i 6 i-tdl-lu: as 1 observed in 
ARI 2 p. 119 n. 481 this is a Gt stative of alalu 'to sing, 
shout', i 7-18 ez-zM ... pa-lih 'the angry ... worshipper 1 : var. 
omits, i 7 is-tts-sii: sec von Soden, AHw p. 401b sub istissu. 
I 9 mu-sw = siqirsw. sec Schramm, EAK 2 p. 22. i 9 dingir 
rem-w sd si-pu-su dug.ga: cf . dingiewwi reme-ni-ti Sd qur~bu- 
Sd dug.ga A. 0.1 01. 28 i 7 and (ilu sibitti) re-me-nu-tu Sd su- 



pu-su-nu dug.ga Sumer 26 (1970) p. 135 line 3 (Shalm. in). 
Further note the names reme-ni-DWGm ibid. no. 17:42, 
marduk-reme-ni ibid. no. 19:27, m assur-reme-ni Postgate, 
Governor's Palace no. 9:17, etc. As I pointed out in ARI 2 p. 
119 n. 485 such references prove that in our passage, as in 
A. 0.101.3 line 16, A.0.101.29 line 1, and A.0. 101. 2004 line 6, 
r£m-u = remenit, i 9 man dan-nu 'strong king': A. 0.101. 3, 5, 
and 7 omit, i 16 var. hur-sd-ni- sit- nu or hur-sd-ni ov-su-nu 
(A.0.101.S) for hur-sd-ni pat gim-ri-su-nu. 



Ashurnasirpal n A.0, 101.1 



195 



17) li-i-ti sd-kin li-i-te ugu nv-si-na kur.kur.mes 
e-nu-ma as-sur en na-bu-u Mu-a mu-sar-bu-u 
man -ti-a 

18) gis.tukul-sw la pa-da-a a-na i-da-at EN-ti-a 
lu it-muh m as-sur-PAB-A nun-m na-a-du pa-lih 
dingir.meS gal.mes 

19) u-sum-gal-lu ek-du ka-sid uru.uru hur-sd-ni 
pat gim-ri-Sii-nu lugal en.mes-^ mu-la-it ek- 
su-te a-pir 

20) sa-lum-ma-te la a-di-ru gis.lal ur-sd-nu tiz- 
qa-ru la pa-du-u mu-rib a-nun-te lugal du 
mal-ki.MES 

21) EN EN.MES-e UTUL LUGAL LUGAL.MES-fl/ hSl-pU 

na-a>-du ni-bit d MAS qar-di ka-su-us 

DINGIR.MES GAL.MES YHU-tir gi-mil-U 

22) man sd ina gis, tukul-ti as-sur u d sd-mas 
dingir.mes tik-li-su me-se-ris J>v-ku-ma 
kur.mes-w sap-su-te u mal-ki.MEl kur.mes-M 

23) gim gi a-pi u-ha-si-su kul-lat kur.kur.mes- 
su-nu ana gir.ii.mes-sh u-sek-ni-sd za-nin 
nidba.mes a-na dingir.mes 

24) gal.mes nun-w ke-nu sd a-na su-te-sur 
garza. mes e.kur.mes kxjr-su pit-qu-du ka- 
a-ia-na sd ep-set qa-ti-su u 

25) na-dan zi-bi-su dingir.mes gal.mes sd AN-e u 
Ki-te i-ra-mu sanga-sw ina e.kur.mes a-na 
da-ris u-kUnu 

26) Gis.TUKUL.MES-iri-ww ez-zu-te ana si-rik-te 
EN-te-su is-ru-ku sd-lum-ma-at 
giS.tukul.me§-5« me-lam EN-ti-M ugu 

MAN.MES-W* 

27) Sd kib-rat 4-i u~sar~ri-hu-sii kur.mes-w/ as-sur 
pat gim-ri-Su-nu e-lis u ki.ta is-ta-na-nu-ma 
gun u ma-da-tu 

28) UGXJ-M-nu u-ki-nu ka-sid a-a-bu-ut as-sur 
man dan-nu man kur as-sur a tukul-mas sid 
as-sur sd kul-lat za-i-ri-su 

29) i-ni-ru ina ga-si-si u-re-tu-u pa-gar ge-ri-su 

DUMU.DUMU Sd md ISKUR-ERIN.TAH GIR.NITA 
DINGIR.MES GAL.MES 

30) sd si-kip-ti la ma-gi-ri-sit il-tdk-ka-nu-ma i- 
pe-iu gim-ri lib-lib-bi sd m As-KAL-cw sa ma- 
ha-zi 

31) u-pdt-tu-u u-kin-nu is-re-e-ti ina u^-me-su-ma 
ina pi dingir.mes gal.mes man-?/ en-// kis- 
su-ti t-a 

32) man-/:w be-la-ku na-a-da-ku MAR-ku dugud- 
ku sur-ru-ha-ku sag.kal-£w ur-sd-na-ku qar- 



I 17b- 18a) When Assur, the lord who called my 
name (and) who makes my sovereignty supreme, 
placed his merciless weapon in my lordly arms; 
i 18b-31a) (I) Ashurnasirpal, attentive prince, 
worshipper of the great gods, ferocious dragon, 
conqueror of cities and the entire highlands, king 
of lords, controller of the obstinate, crowned with 
splendour, fearless in battle, lofty (and) merciless 
hero, who stirs up strife, king of all princes, lord 
of lords, chief herdsman, king of kings, attentive 
purification priest, designate of the warrior god 
Ninurta, destructive weapon of the great gods, 
avenger, the king who has always acted justly 
with the support of Assur and the god Samas, the 
gods who help him and cut down like marsh reeds 
fortified mountains and princes hostile to him, 
(and) subdued all their lands, provider of 
offerings for the great gods, legitimate prince, to 
whom is perpetually entrusted the proper adminis- 
tration of the rites of the temples of his land, 
whose deeds and (i 25) offerings the great gods of 
heaven and underworld love and (therefore) estab- 
lished forever his priesthood in the temples, 
granted to his dominion their fierce weapons (and) 
made him more marvellous than (any of) the 
kings of the four quarters with respect to the 
splendour of his weapons (and) the radiance of 
his dominion, (he who) has always contested with 
every last enemy of Assur above and below and 
imposed upon them tribute and tax, conqueror of 
the foes of As§ur, strong king, king of Assyria; 
son of TukultT-Ninurta (n), vice-regent of Assur, 
who defeated all his enemies (and) hung the 
corpses of his enemies on stakes, grandson of 
Adad-narart (n), appointee of the great gods, 
(i 30) who always achieved the defeat of those in- 
submissive to him and (thereby) became lord of 
all, offspring of Assur-dan (n) who opened towns 
(and) founded shrines: 



i 31b-37a) At that time my sovereignty, my do- 
minion, (and) my power came forth at the com- 
mand of the great gods; I am king, I am lord, I 
am praiseworthy, I am exalted, I am important, I 
am magnificent, I am foremost, I am a hero, I am 



i 21 var. adds at end of line: ad.mes-sw '(avenger of) his 
fathers', i 24 var. pis-qu-du for pit-qu-du. \ 24-25 var. omits 
sd ep-set ... u-ki-nu 'whose deeds ... temples', i 26 var. omits 
ez-zu-te 'fierce', i 29 after Adad-naran var. adds sid 'vice- 
regent*. Cf, Seux, ERAS p. 110 n. 21. i 31 var, aS-Sur 



(dingir).mes gal.mes '(at the command of) Assur (and) the 
great gods', i 31 k-a: var. and A. 0.101. 17 u-sa-a. Cf. 
A. 0.101. 30 line 21. See Borger, Asarh. p. 97 (to lines 18-19). 
I 32 A. 0.101, 13 and 17 geS-ra-ku *I am powerful* for MAn-ku 
( = sirfiku) 'I am exalted'. See Schramm, EAK 2 p. 22. 



196 



Ashurnasirpal n A.0.101.1 



ra-da-ku 

33) lab-ba-ku u zi-ka-ra-ku m as-sur-PAB-A man 
dan-nu man kur as-sur ni-bit d 30 mi-gir d a- 
nim na-mad d 10 kas-kas dingir.mes 

34) ana-ku gis. tukul la pa-du-u mu-sam-qit kur 
kur.mes-sw ana-ku man le-e^-u qab-li sd-gis 
uru. uru u hur-sd-ni 

35) sag.kal tuq-ma-te man kib-rat 4-/ mu-ne-er 
a-a-bi-su mus-har-mit kul-lat kur.mes-.sw 
man kis-sat ub.mes si nap-har mal-ki .mes 

36) r>tj-su-nu man mu-sak-mis la kan-su-te-su sd 
nap-har kis-sat un.mes i-pe-lu si-ma-a-te an- 
na-te ina pi dingir.mes gal.mes 



37) u-sa-ni-ma ana sim-ti-ia ki-nis u-ki-nu ina 
bi-ib-lat sk-ia u ti-ri-is sv-ia d iNANNA gasan 

aga 

38) SANGA-ti-ia lu tam-gu-ra-ni-ma e-pes murub 4 
u me sk-sa ub-la-ma ina u 4 -me-su-ma m as- 
swr-PAB-A nun-m na-a-du pa-lfh dingir.mes 

39) gal.mes sd bi-ib-lat lib-bi-su d BAD u-sak-si- 
du-su-ma nap-har mal-ki.MES la ma-gi-ri-su 
ik-su-du GAL-tii sv-su ka-sid 

40) a-a-bi-su sd ina ds-ri nam-ra-si u-pa-ri-ru ki- 
sir mul-tar-hi e-nu-ma as-sur en gal-w na- 
bu-u uv-ia 

41) mu-sar-bu-u MAN-ti-ia ugu man.mes-w/ sd 
kib-rat 4-i mu gal-Is lu-sar-bu-u gis.tukul-5w 
la-a pa-da-a ana i-di EN-ti-a 

42) lu-sat-mi-ih kur.kur.mes hur-sd-ni kal.mes 
a-na pe-li suk-nu-se u sd-pa-ri ag-gis u-ma-H- 
ra-ni ina Gis.tukul-ti as-sur en-/^ 

43) ar-hi pa-ds-qu-te kur.mes mar-su-te ina gi-pis 
^RiN.Hi.A.MES-a lu at-ta-lak-ma sd-nin ul ib-si 
ina sur-rat man-//-# 

44) ina mah-ri-i BALA-ia sd d sd-mas di.kud 

UB.MES AN.DITL-SW DUG.GA UGU-/a i§-ku-nu 

ina gis.as.ti MAN-r/ gal-/^ u-si-bu gis.gidru 

45) mur-te-^a-at un.mes a-na sv-ia u-sat-mi-hu 
gis.gigir.mes ERiN.Hi.A.MES-a ad-ki ger-ri 
pa-ds-qu-te kur.mes-^ mar-su-te sd a-na me- 
teq 

46) gis.gigir.mes u erin.hla.mes la sd-ak-nu e-te- 
tiq a-na kur tum 4 -me a-lik uru li-be-e uru 
dan-nu-ti-su-nu uru su-ur-ra uru a-bu-qu 

41) uru a-ru-ra uru a-ru-be-e sd ina bi-rit kur 



a warrior, I am a lion, and I am virile; 
Ashurnasirpal, strong king, king of Assyria, 
designate of the god Sin, favourite of the god 
Anu, loved one of the god Adad (who is) al- 
mighty among the gods, I, the merciless weapon 
which lays low lands hostile to him, I, the king, 
capable in battle, vanquisher of cities and high- 
lands, (i 35) foremost in battle, king of the four 
quarters, the one who defeats his enemies, the 
king who disintegrates all his enemies, king of the 
totality of the (four) quarters including all their 
princes, the king who forces to bow down those 
insubmissive to him, the one who rules all peo- 
ples; these destinies came forth at the command 
of the great gods and they properly fixed (them) 
as my destinies. 

i 37b-38a) Because of my voluntary offerings and 
my prayers the goddess Istar, the mistress who 
loves my priesthood, approved of me and she 
made up her mind to make war and battle, 
i 38b~40a) At that time, Ashurnasirpal, attentive 
prince, worshipper of the great gods, whose 
desires the god Enlil helped him obtain so that his 
great hand conquered all princes insubmissive to 
him, conqueror of his foes, the one who in 
rugged terrain broke up the forces of the rebel- 
lious; 

i 40b-43a) When Assur, my great lord, who called 
me by name (and) made my sovereignty supreme 
over the kings of the four quarters, had made 
(my) great name supreme he placed his merciless 
weapon in my lordly arms (and) sternly com- 
manded me to rule, subdue, and direct the lands 
(and) mighty highlands. With the support of 
Assur, my lord, I kept marching along difficult 
routes (and) over rugged mountains with the mass 
of my troops and there was no opponent, 
i 43b-54a) In my accession year (and) in my first 
regnal year when the god Samas, judge of the 
(four) quarters, spread his beneficial protection 
over me (and), having nobly ascended the royal 
throne, (i 45) he placed in my hand the sceptre 
for the shepherding of the people — (at that time) 
I mustered my chariotry (and) troops. I passed 
through difficult paths (and) rugged mountains 
which were unsuitable for chariotry and troops 
(and) marched to the land Tummu. 1 conquered 
Libe, their fortified city, the cities Surra, Abuqu, 
Arura, (and) Arube which lie between Mounts 
Urinu, Arunu, (and) Etinu, mighty mountains. I 
massacred many of them (and) carried off 



i 33 A. 0.101. 17 sid as-sur u d MA§ Vice-regent of Assur and the 
god Ninurta' for man kur as-sur 'king of Assyria*, i 34 var. 



mu-u-sam-qit. 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101.1 



197 



u-ri-ni kur a-ru-ni kur e-ti-ni kur.mes-c 

KAL.MES-te GAR-flU KXJR-ud GAZ.MES-SW-WW 

48) hi.a a-duk sal-la-su-nu bu-sd-su-nu gu 4 .mes- 
su-nu ds-lu-la erin.mes ig-du-ru kur-m' mar- 
su is-sab-tu kur gig dan-nis EGiR-su-nu 

49) la a-lik kur-w gim zi-qip gir an. bar se-su 
na-a-di u musen AN-e mut-tap-ri-su qi-reb-su 
la i-H-ru ki-ma qin-ni 

50) u-di-ni. musen ina qe-reb KUR-e dan-na-su-nu 
is-ku-nu sd ina man.mes-/?/ AD.MES-/a ma- 
am-ma ina qe-reb-su-nu la te-w ina 3 ud.me 

51) ur.sag kur-w i-hi-ta gap-M lib-ba-su gis.lal 
ub-la e-li ina gir. ii. mes-sw kvr-u u-sa-hi-ip 
ih-pi qi-na-su-nu ukkin -su-nu 

52) u-pa-ri-ir 2 me erin.mes ti-du-ki-su-nu ina 
gis.tukul.meS u-sam-qit sal-la-su-nu dugud- 
ta gim mar~!§it udu se-ni ds-lu-la 

53) us.mes-5W-«m gim na-pa-si kvr-u lu as-ru-up 
si-ta-te-su-nu hur-ru na~at-ba-ku sd kur-/ e- 
ktil urv. MES-ni-su-nu 

54) ap-pul aq-qur ina izi.mes cAmL-up is-tu kur 
tum 4 -me at-tu-mus ana kur kir-ru-ri at-ta- 
rad ma-da-tu M kur kir-ru-ri 

55) kur si-me-si kur si-me-ra kur ul-ma-ni-a 
kur a-da-us kur har-ga-a-a kur har-ma-sa- 
a-a anse.kur.ra.mes anse.gir.nun.na.mes 

56) GU4.MES UDU.MES GESTIN.MES UTUL.MES ZABAR 

ma-da-ta-su-nu am-hur lv za-bil ku-du-ri 
VGV-M-nu ti-kin ki-i ina kur kir-ru-ri 

57) us-ba-ku-ni kur gil-za-na-a-a kur hub-us- 
ka-a-a me-lam-me sd as-sur EN-ia is-hup-M- 
nu anse.kur.ra.mes ku.babbar.mes 

58) KU.GI.MES AN.NA.MES ZABAR. MES UTUL.MES 

zabar ma-da-ta-su-nu a-na muh-hi-a ub~/u-ni 
ta kur kir-ru-ri at-tu-mus 

59) a-na kur ne-reb sd uru hu-lu-nu a-na kur 
hab-hi sd be-ta-a-ni KUt-ab uru ha-tu uru 
ha-ta-ru uru ni-is-tu-un uru sa-bi-di 

60) uru met-qi-a uru ar-sa-ni-a uru te-e-la uru 
ha-lu-a uru.mes-w 5a kur hab-hi sd ina bi- 
rit kur tf-sw kur a-ru-a 

61) kur a-ra-ar-di kur.mes-^ kal.mes gar-/zw 
kur-wg? GAZ.ME§-iw-nw hi, a. mes a-(iwA: sal-la- 
su-nu nig.su.mes-5w-«w ds-lu~la 

62) erin.mes ig-du-ru su.si a-si-tu sd pu-ut uru 
ni-is-tu-un sd gim dungu ta AN-e su-qa-lu-lat 

DlB-tti 



captives, possessions, (and) oxen from them. The 
troops were frightened (and) took to a rugged 
mountain. Since the mountain was exceptionally 
rugged I did not pursue them. The mountain was 
as jagged as the point of a dagger and therein no 
winged bird of the sky flew, (i 50) They had 
placed their fortress like the nest of the udlnu- 
bird within the mountain which none of the kings 
my fathers had ever approached. For three days 
the hero explored the mountain. His bold heart 
yearned for battle. He ascended on foot (and) 
overwhelmed the mountain. He smashed their 
nest (and) scattered their flock. I felled 200 of 
their fighting-men with the sword (and) carried off 
a multitude of captives like a flock of sheep. With 
their blood I dyed the mountain red like red 
wool, (and) the rest of them the ravines (and) 
torrents of the mountain swallowed. 1 razed, des- 
troyed, (and) burnt their cities. 

i 54b-58a) Moving on from the land Tummu 1 
went down to Mount Kirruru. I received the trib- 
ute of Mounts Kirruru and Simesu, the land 
Simerra, the land Ulmania, the land Adaus, the 
land Hargaia, the land Harmasaia — horses, 
mules, oxen, sheep, wine, (and) bronze casseroles. 
I imposed upon them corvee. While I was in 
Mount Kirruru the radiance of Assur, my lord, 
overwhelmed the Gilzanu and the Hubusku (and) 
they brought to me as their tribute horses, silver, 
gold, tin, bronze, (and) bronze casseroles. 

i 58b-69a) Moving on from Mount Kirruru I en- 
tered the pass which (leads from) the city Hulun 
to the interior of the land Habhu. I conquered the 
cities Hattu, Hataru, Nistun, Sabidi, Metqia, 
Arsania, Tela, Halua, cities of the land Habhu 
which lie between Mounts Usu, Arua, (and) 
Arardi, mighty mountains. I massacred many of 
them (and) carried off prisoners (and) possessions 
from them. The troops were frightened (and) took 
to a lofty peak in front of the city Nistun, which 
hovered like a cloud in the sky. Into the midst of 
those which none of the kings my fathers had 
ever approached my warriors flew like birds. I 
felled 260 of their combat troops with the sword. 
I cut off their heads and formed (therewith) a 



i 49 gim ... Se-su na-a-di: also in A.0.101 .17 i 71-72 and cf. 
von Soden, AHw p. 1210b sub seltu. i 55 A. 0.101.17 has uru 
'city* instead of kur 'land' before every GN except the first, 
Simesi, in this line, i 55 var. and A. 0.1 01. 17 ad-da-us. 
i 57 A. 0.101. 17 has uru 'city' instead of kur 'land* before 
Gilzanaiia and A. 0.101. 9 and 13 transpose Gilzanaiia and 
HubuSkaiia. i 57 A. 0.101. 9 inserts pu-ul-hi before me-lam-me 
'awe of (the radiance)', i 58 var. omits (in error) utul.mes 



'casseroles', i 59 A.0.101. 9 and 17 ha-at-tu. i 59 var. ir-bi-di 
for sa-bi-di is probably copyist's error. See Schramm, EAK 2 
p. 23. i 60 A.0.101.9 and 17 me-et-qi-a. i 60 A.0.101. 9 and 
17 ar-su-a-in. i 60 A.0.101.9 uru 'city' instead of kur 'mount" 
before Usu. i 61 A.0.101.9 a-ar-VRV-di and, as King suggests, 
probably the scribe intended -ra- for uru and mistakenly 
transposed the sign with -ar-. 



198 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101.1 



63) Sa ina man.mes-w ad.mes-*? ma-am-ma ina 
qe-reb-su-nu la te-« qu-ra-di-ia gim 
muSen.mes VGV-su-nu i-se-^u 

64) 2 me 1 Su-Si erin.mes mun-dah-si-su-nu ina 

GIS.TUKUL.MES U-Sam-qit SAG.DU.MES-SU-nu 

KUD-/5 a-na a-si-te ar-sip si-ta-te-Su-nu ki-ma 

MUSEN 

65) qi-ni a-na ka-a-pi sd KUR-e sub.mes-/ii Sal-la- 
su-nu nig.su.mes-5w-«w ta qe-reb KUR-e u- 
se-ri-da URU.MES-m sd ina qe-reb 

66) hur-sd-a-ni kal.mes gar-to a-pul aq-qur ina 
izi.mes dS-ru-up erin.mes am-mar ta igi 
gis.tukul.mes-gf ip-pdr-Si-du-ni ur-du-ni 

GIR.II.MES-/a 

67) dib-M gun ma-da-tu u lu za-M ku-du-ri 
UGV-M-nu aS-kun m bu-u-bu dumu ba-bu-a 
dumu en.uru iirf uru ni-iS-tu-un 

68) /-wa uru.4-dingir a-ku-us kus-s« bad w-fccr/- 
///? iwa u^-me-Sii-ma sa-lam bu-na-ni-ia r>v-uS 
ta-na-ti kiS-Su-ti-a 

69) ina lib-bi al-tur ina KUR-e e-qi ina uru m os- 
w-pab-a ina sag e-w u-se-zi-iz ina li-me an- 
ni-ma ina iti.ne ud 24.kam 

70) ma qf-bit aS-sur d iNANNA dingir.mes gal.mes 
en.mes-10 ta uru ni-nu-a at-tu-muS a-na 
uru.mes-w Sd gir kur ni-pur u kur pa-sa-te 

KUR.MES KAL.MES 

71) GAR-nu lu a-lik uru at-ku-un uru ms-/iw uru 
pi-la-zi 20 uru.mes-w ia li-me-tu-su-nu kur- 
wt/ GAZ*MES-Su~nu hi. a a~tf«& 

72) sal-la-su-nu nig.su.mes-sw-a7« as-lu-la 
uRu.MEs-m" ma izi.mes gibil erin.mes am- 
mar ta igi Gis.TUKUL.MES-a ip-pdr-Si-du-ni 
ur-du-ni 

73) GiR.n.MES-ta DiB-rw ka-dur-ru e-me-su-nu-ti 
ta uru.mes-/*/ sa gir kur ni-pur u kur 7?a- 
sa-re at-ium 4 -muS i'd.idigna e-te-bir 

74) a/ia kur kat-mu-hi aq-ti-rib gun ma-da-tu Sd 
kur kat-mu-hi kur mus-ki utul zabar 
gu 4 .mes udu.mes gestin.mes am-hur ki-i i-na 
kur kat-mu-hi 

75) us-ba-ku-ni te-e-mu ut-te-ru-ni ma-a uru s«- 
rw ia E-ha-lu-pe-e it-ta-bal-kdt m ha-ma-ta-a-ia 
Lu.GAR-su-nu i-du-ku 

76) m a-hi-ia-ba-ba dumu /a ma-man ta kur E-a- 



pile. The rest of them (i 65) built nests like birds 
on mountain precipices. I brought down prisoners 
(and) possessions of theirs from the mountain 
(and) I razed, destroyed, (and) burnt the cities 
which lay within the mighty highlands. The 
troops, as many as had fled from my weapons, 
came down (and) submitted to me. I imposed 
upon them tribute, tax, and corvee. Bubu, son of 
Babua, son of the city ruler of the city Nistun, I 
flayed in the city Arbail (and) draped his skin 
over the wall. At that time I made an image of 
myself (and) wrote thereon the praises of my 
power. I erected (it) on the e^w-mountain in the 
city (called) Ashurnasirpal at the source of the 
spring. 



i 69b-99a) In this same eponymy on the twenty- 
fourth day of the month Ab, by the command of 
Assur (and) the goddess Istar, the great gods, my 
lords, I moved out from the city Nineveh (and) 
marched to the cities which lie at the foot of 
Mounts Nipur and Pasate, mighty mountains. I 
conquered the cities Atkun, Ushu, Pilazi, (and) 20 
cities in their environs. I massacred many of 
them, carried off prisoners (and) possessions from 
them, (and) burnt the cities. The troops, as many 
as had fled from my weapons, came down (and) 
submitted to me. I imposed upon them corvee. 
Moving on from the cities which are at the foot 
of Mounts Nipur and Pasate I crossed the Tigris 
(and) approached the land Katmuhu, I received 
the tax (and) tribute of the land Katmuhu (and) 
the Musku, bronze casseroles, oxen, sheep, (and) 
wine. While (i 75) I was in the land Katmuhu this 
report was brought back to me: The city Sum, 
which belongs to Brt-Halupe, has rebelled. They 
have killed Hamataila, their governor, (and) ap- 
pointed Ahi-iababa, son of a nobody, whom they 
brought from the land Blt-Adini, as their king.' 
With the assistance of Assur (and) the god Adad, 
the great gods who made my sovereignty supreme, 



i 67 var. and A. 0.1 01. 17 m bu-ba-a. i 69 ina KUR-e e-qi: 
similarly, Shalm. in says he erected his statue (in another city) 
ina qaq-qi-ri e-qi 3 R 8 ii 44. It is known that the equ (and bit 
gqi) refers to an extremely holy area, a sanctum sanctorum 
(see the dictionaries). It may specifically refer to a sacred 
object erected there, as Oppenheim, History of Religions 5 
(1965) p. 256, has suggested. In the royal inscriptions of 
Asn. 11 and Shalm. in it seems to be another, foreign, word 



for salmu ( the (royal) statue'. Cf. Schramm, EAK 2 p. 72. 
i 73 According to King and Le Gac A.0.I0I.17 has 
[d.hal. [hal] for id.idigna but the passage is now broken off. 
i 74 var. omits gun 'tax', i 75 A. 0.101. 9 and, according to 
King and Le Gac (passage now broken), 17 su-u-ru. 
i 75 A.0. 101.9 and, according to King and Le Gac (passage 
now broken), 17 ±- m ha-lu-pe-e. i 75 var. kur ha-ma-ta-a-ia or 
omits the name, i 76 var. omits kur 'land' before BTt-Adini. 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101.1 



199 



di-ni ub-lu-ni-M a-na uan-H ana uGu-sii-nu 
is-ku-nu i-na re-su-te sd as-sur d isKUR 

77) dingir.mes gal.mes mu-sar-bu-u MAN-//-fl 
gis.gigir.mes ERiN.m.A.MEs-a ad-ki si-di ID 
ha-bur a-sa-bat i-na me-tdq-ti-ia ma-da-tu 

78) hi.a sd md sd-tna-nu-ha-MAN-DmGiR.MES-ni 
uru sd-di-kan-na-a-a sd m Lu- d isKUR uru qat- 
na-a-a ku.babbar.mes ku.gi.mes 

79) an.na.mes utul.mes zabar tug lu-bul-ti bir- 
me tug lu-biil-ti tug.gada.mes at-ta-har ana 
uru su-ii-ri sd t-ha-lu-pe-e aq-tf-rib 

80) pul-hi me-lam-me sd as-sur EN-/'a is-hup-su- 
nu lu. gal.mes lu.su.gi.mes uru a-na su-zu- 
ub zi.MES-su-nu a-na GABA-ia t-ni 

81) gIr.ii-g is-bu-tii ma-a ha-da-al du-ku ma-a 
ha-da-at bal-lit ma-a ha-da-at sd sk-ka-ni e- 
pu-us m a-hi-ia-ba-ba dumu la ma-ma- na 

82) sd takur E-a-di-ni ub-lu-ni-su-ni ina su dib- 
at ina gi-pis lib-bi-ia u su-us-mur 
Gis.TUKUL.MEs-a uru a-si-bi erin.meS en hi-ti 
gab-bu 

83) u-sa-bi-tu-ni i-ta-nu-ni lu.gai.mes-# a-na 

E.GAl-SU E.KUR.MES-SW U-Se-Hb KU.BABBAR-5W 
KU.GI-5W NIG.GA-SW NIG.SU-SW ZABAR 

84) AN.BAR.MES AN.NA.MES UTUL.MES ZABAR tap- 

ha-a-ni zabar ha-ri-a-te zabar nig.ga zabar 
ma-a^-a-du na 4 .giS.nuu.gal gis.bansur 

85) ih-Zl MUNUS. ERIN.MES E.GAL.MES-5W 

munus.dumu.munus.mes-5w sal-la-at 

ERIN.MES EN hi-tl Q-dl NIG.GA.MES-5U-/IU 
DINGIR.MES-Wl-Sll Q-dl NIG.GA-5W-/7W 

86) na 4 KUR-e su-qu-ru gis.gigir-sw ra-ki-su 

ANSE.KUR.RA.MES GIS.LAL GIS ni-h-SU hal-lu- 
lip-ti ANSE.KUR.RA.MES Hal-lu-Up-ti ERIN.MES 

87) tug lu-bul-ti bir-me tug lu-bul-ti 
gis.gada.mes i.Gis mjG.GA-be Gis e-re-nu 
sim.mes dug.ga.mes ki-si-ti gis e-re-ni 

88) sig.za.gin.mi sig.za.gin.sa 5 gis.mar.gid.da- 
su gu 4 .mes-5w udu se-ni-su sal-la-su dugud- 
ta sd gim mul.mes an-£ sn-ta la-a tuk-w 

89) ds-lu-la ;i Vz/-dingir lu.gar-/?w sd ra-ma-ni- 
ia vGV-sii-nu as-kun a-si-tu ina pu-ut 
KA.GAL-J7i ar-sip lu. gal.mes am-mar 

90) ib-bal-ki-tu-ni a-ku-su kus.mes-^iI~/iw a-si-tu 
u-hal-lip a-nu-te ina lib-bi a-si-te u-ma-gigi 
a-nu-te ina ugu 

91) i-si-te ina zi-qi-be u-za-qip an-nu-te ina bat- 
tu-bat-ti sd a-si-te ina zi-qi-be u-sal-bi ma-a^- 



I mustered my chariotry (and) troops (and) made 
my way to the banks of the River Habur. On my 
march, I received the plenteous tribute of 
Samanuha-sar-ilani, a man of the city Sadikannu, 
(and) of AmTl-Adad, a man of the city Qatnu — 
silver, gold, tin, bronze casseroles, garments with 
multi-coloured trim, (and) linen garments. I ap- 
proached the city Sura, which belongs to BTt- 
Halupe. (i 80) Awe of the radiance of Assur, my 
lord, overwhelmed them. The nobles (and) elders 
of the city came out to me to save their lives. 
They submitted to me and said: 'As it pleases 
you, kill! As it pleases you, spare. As it pleases 
you, do what you will!' I captured Ahi-iababa, 
son of a nobody, whom they brought from the 
land BTt-Adini. With my staunch heart and fierce 
weapons I besieged the city. All the guilty soldiers 
were seized and handed over to me. I sent my no- 
bles into his palace (and) temples. I carried off his 
silver, gold, possessions, property, bronze, iron, 
tin, bronze casseroles, bronze pans, bronze pails, 
much bronze property, gisnugallu-alahaster, (i 85) 
an ornamented dish, his palace women, his 
daughters, captives of the guilty soldiers together 
with their property, his gods together with their 
property, precious stone of the mountain, his har- 
nessed chariot, his teams of horses, the equipment 
of the horses, the equipment of the troops, gar- 
ments with multi-coloured trim, linen garments, 
fine oil, cedar, fine aromatic plants, cedar shav- 
ings, purple wool, red-purple wool, his wagons, 
his oxen, his sheep — his valuable tribute which, 
like the stars of heaven, had no number. 1 ap- 
pointed Azi-ili as my own governor over them. I 
erected a pile in front of his gate; I flayed as 
many nobles as (i 90) had rebelled against me 
(and) draped their skins over the pile; some I 
spread out within the pile, some I erected on 
stakes upon the pile, (and) some I placed on 
stakes around about the pile. 1 flayed many right 
through my land (and) draped their skins over the 
walls. I slashed the flesh of the eunuchs (and) of 
the royal eunuchs who were guilty. I brought 
Ahi-iababa to Nineveh, flayed him, (and) draped 
his skin over the wall of Nineveh. (Thus) have 1 
constantly established my victory and strength 
over the land Laqu. While I was in the city Suru I 
imposed an exceptionally large tribute, tax, and 



i 77 var. omits -a ^y 1 after gis.gigir.mes erin.hi.a.mes 
'chariotry (and) troops 1 . A. 0.101.9 has -ia. i 78 In both 1 R 
and King, AKA the name is copied m DiNGiR- d isKUR 'Il!-Adad\ 
The correct name * AmTl-Adad' is found on one squeeze cited 
by Le Gac as well as in the annals of Adad-naran n (A. 0.99. 2 
line 109). Cf. Schramm, EAK 2 p. 23. i 78 A.0.101.9 qa-at- 



na-a-a. i 79 var. su-ri. i 79 A.0.101.9 t- m ha-lu-pe-e. i 82 var. 
omits kur 'land' before BTt-Adini. i 82 A.0.101.9 and, 
according to King (passage now broken), 17 i- m a-di-ni. 
i 85 var. dingir.mes-£w or DiNom.MES-m, i.e. omits 'his' 
before 'gods', i 88 A.0.101.9 omits sfG.ZA.GiN.Mi 'purple 
wool'. 



200 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101.1 



du-te ina pi-rik kur-/# 

92) a-ku-su Kus.MES-su-nu bab.mes-^/ u-hal-lip 

M LU.Sfl-SAG.MES 5a LU.5A-SAG MAN.MES-w/ EN 

hi-i-ii uzv.MEs-su-nu u-ba-iiq 

93) m a-hi-ia-ba-ba ana uru ni-nu-a ub-la-su a- 
ku-su kus-M bad ,sa uru ni-nu-a u-hal-lip li- 
ta u dan-na-ni 

94) ugu kur la-qe-e al-ta-kan ki-i ina uru sw-r/- 
r/ us-ba-ku-ni ma-da-tu set man.mes-a?/ sa kur 
la-qe-e a-na si-hfr-ti-sii-nu 

95) ku.babbar.mes ku.glmes an.na.mes 
zabar.mes utul.mes zabar gu4.mes udu.mes 
tug lu-buhti bir-me tug lu-bul-ti 

GIS.GADA.MES GUN 

96) u ta-mar-tu u-sd-tir vcu-su-nu ds-kun ina 
UA-me-M-ma ma-da-tu sd m ha-ia-a-ni uru hi- 
in-da-na-a-a ku.babbar.mes 

97) KU.GI.MES AN.NA.MES ZABAR.MES NA 4 Sam-MU 

NA4.Gis.NUu. gal siG.ZA.GiN.Mi ud-ra-a-te 
ma-da-tu-sti am-hur ina u^-me-su-ma sa-lam 

98) UAN-ti-a sur-ba-a vu-us li-i-ta it ta-na-ti ina 
sa al-tiir ina murub 4 e.gal-su u-se-zi-iz 

NA 4 .NA t RU.A.MES-a DU-W5 

99) ta-na-ti ges-ru-ti-a ina sa sar ina ka-su ds- 
ku-un ina li-me mu Mu-a-ma ina qi-bit as-sur 

EN GAL EN-a U d MAS AGA SANGA-//-(I 

100) sa ina tar-si MAN.MES-m ad.mes-*? lu.gar 
kur su-hi a-na kur as-sur la DV-ni m DiNGiR- 
du lu.gar. kur kur su-hi a-na su-zu-ub 

ZLMES-5W a-di SES.MES-5W 



101) DUMU.MES-.Sl/ KU.BABBAR.MES KU.GLMESmflf- 

da-tu-su ana uru ni-nu-a a-na uGu-a lu ub-la 
ina li-me v-ma ina uru.nina us-ba-ku te-e-mu 

102) ut-te-ru-ni ma-a LU.MES-e kur ds-su-ra-a-a 
m hu-la-a-a Lv,EN.VRu-su-nu sd m sitl-ma-nu- 
sag man kur as-sur nun a-lik pa-ni-a 

103) ina uru hat-zi-lu-ha u-sd-as-bi-tu-sti-nu-ni i- 
ta-bal-ku-tu uru da-am-da-mu-sa uru man- 
ti-a a-na as-ba-te il-li-ku 

104) ina qi-bit as-sur d sd-mas it d i§KUR dingir.mes 
tik-li-ia gis.gigir.mes erin.hla.me§-# ad-ki 
ina sag e-ni yd su-ub-na-at a-sar sa-lam 



duty upon all the kings of the land Laqu, (i 95) 
silver, gold, tin, bronze, bronze casseroles, oxen, 
sheep, garments with multi-coloured trim, (and) 
linen garments. At that time I received the tribute 
of Haiianu, a man of the city Hindanu — silver, 
gold, tin, bronze, saramu-stone, gisnugallu- 
alabaster, purple wool, (and) dromedaries. At 
that time I made a colossal royal statue of myself, 
wrote thereon (a description of) my victories and 
praises, (and) erected (it) within his palace. I 
made my monumental inscriptions, wrote thereon 
(an account of) my praises (and) my might, (and) 
deposited (them) at his gate. 



i 99b-101a) In the eponym year of my name, by 
the command of Assur, the great lord, my lord, 
and the god Ninurta who loves my priesthood, 
although at the time of the kings my fathers the 
governor of the land Suhu had not come to 
Assyria, Ill-ibni, governor of the land Suhu, 
brought to Nineveh to my presence his tribute, 
silver (and) gold, to save his life together with 
(that of) his brothers (and) his sons, 
i 101b - ii 2a) In the same eponymy, while I was 
in Nineveh, a report was brought back to me say- 
ing men of Assyria (and) Hulaiia, their city ruler 
— whom Shalmaneser, king of Assyria, a prince 
who preceded me, had settled in the city 
Halziluha — had rebelled; they had come to cap- 
ture the city Damdammusa, my royal city. By the 
command of Assur, the gods Samas and Adad, 
the gods who help me, I mustered my chariotry 
(and) troops. At the source of the River Subnat, 
where (i 105) stand the statues of Tiglath-pileser 
and Tukultl-Ninurta, kings of Assyria, my 



i 93 var. cited by Le Gac pp. 35-36 n. 14 adds (before 
breaking off): [...] gabaw'c t-ni GiR.n.MES-a Dm-tu-ma ha-da-at 
du-ku [...] sd ta e a-di-ni ub-iu-ni-su-ni ina su mB-at ina gi-pis 
[...]. Cf. i 80-82. This is a curious error, i 94 A.0.101.9 su- 
ri-ma for su-u-ri. i 95 A.0.101.9 inserts am-hur before gun, 
changing the translation to: 'While I was in the city Sum I 
received tribute from all the kings ... linen garments (and) 
imposed upon them an exceptionally large tax and duty.' 
i 96-97 A.0.101.9 omits ku.babbar.mes ku.gi.mes an.na.mes 
'silver, gold, tin*, i 98 var. omits ina sa 'thereon'; A.0.101.9 



ina Hb-bi. i 98 A.0.101.9 omits -a 'my* after na 4 .na..ru.a.mes 
'monumental inscriptions*, i 99 var. ina ka. mes-su/Im *at his 
doors' or ina ka.gal-sw'/sw 'at his gate'; A.0.101.9 and 17 have 
instead ina uru qat-ni 'at the city Qatnu'. i 99 var. omits gal 
'great' or en gal 'great lord' (A.0.101.9); var. EN-e. 
i 100 A.0. 101,9 and, according to King and Le Gac (passage 
now broken), 17 "dingir-Z/mu. i 100 A.0.101.9 ses-5u 'his 
brother*, i 102 var. lu.en-s«-/i« 'their ruler' for lu.en.uru~ 
§u-nu 'their city ruler', i 103 A.0.101.9 kur 'land' for uru 
'city' before Halziluha. 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101.1 



201 



105) sd m Gis Jukul-ti-A-e-sdr-ra u m GisJukul-ti- d MA$ 
man kur as-sur AD.MES-a i-za-zu-u-ni sa-lam 
MAN-ti-ia ab-ni it-ti-su-nu u-se-zi-iz 

106) ina UA-me-su-ma ma-da- tu sd kur i-za-la 
gimmes udu. mes gestin.mes at-ta-har a-na 
kur kas-ia-ri at-ta-bal-kdt a-na uru ki-na-bu 

107) uru dan-nu-ti-Su sd m hu-la-a-a aq-ti-rib ina 
gi-piS ERiN.Hi.A.MES-tf ut-a Sit-mu-ri uru a- 
si-bi KVR-ad 8 me erin.mes mu-tah-si-Su-nu 

108) ina gis.tukul u-Sam-qit 3 lim sal-la-su-nu ma 
izi.mes gibil ki-i li-tu-te l-en ina sk-Su-nu 
ti.la ul e-zib m hu-la-a-a 

109) lu.en.uru-su-aw ti.la ina su as-bat 
LJj.ko.MES-su-nu a-na i-si-ta-a-te ar-sip lu 
ba-tu-li-su-nu munus ba-tu-la-te-Su-nu a-na 
GIBIL-te gibil 

110) m hu-la-a-a lu.en.uru-^-ww a-ku-su kus-sw 
bad sd uru da-am-da-mu-sa u-hal-lip uru 
ap-pul aq-qur ina izi.mes gibil-w/7 

111) uru ma-ri-ri sd li-me-tu-Su-nu kur-wc/ 50 
erin,me§ ti-du-ki-Su-nu ina giS.tukul.meS u- 
sam-qit 2 me Sal-la-su-nu ina izi.meS oimh-up 
3 me 32 

1 12) erin.mes sd kur ni-ir-bi ina mit-hu-si ina 
edin a-duk sai-la-su-nu gu 4 . MES-Su-nu udu 
se-ni-Su-nu u-te-ra kur ni-ir-bu sd gir kur 
u-hi-ra 

113) a-ha-iS is-bu-tu a-na uru te-e-/a uru dan- 
nu-ti-Su-nu e-ru-bu ta uru ki-na-bu at-tu- 
muS a-na uru te-e-la aq-ti-rib 

114) uru KAL-aw dan-niS 3 bad.mes-h/ ta-W 
erin.mes a-na bad.mes-sw-ww dan-nu-te it 
ERiN.Hi.A.MES-sw-rtw hi.a.meS it-tdk-lu-ma la 
ur-du-ni 

115) GiR.n.MEs-a /a-a is-bu-tu i-na mit-hu-si u ti- 
du-ki uru a-si-bi KUR-ad 3 lim erin.mes ti- 
du-ki-Su-nu ina gis.tukul. mes u-Sam-qit Sal- 
la-su-nu 

116) nig.su. MES-su-nu gu 4 .mes-5w-/7w udu se-ni- 
Su-nu aS-lu-la Sal-la-su-nu hi. a. mes ina 
izi.mes gibil Erin.mes ti.la. mes hi. a. mes ina 
su-te u-sab-bi-ta 

117) an-nu-te kap-pi-Su-nu rit-ti-su-nu u-bat-tiq 
an-nu-te ap-pi-su-nu GESTu.ii-Su-nu 
Ki&m.ME&-su-nu u-bat-tiq Sd erin.me^ 
hi.a.meS iGiM-M-nu u-ni-pil 

118) l-et i-si-tu Sd ti.la.meS 1 Sd sag.du.meS ar- 
sip ina gis gup-ni ina li-me-et uru -Sii-nu 
sag.du.mes-5w-/iw ina lib-bi u-^i-il lu ba-tu- 
li-su-nu 



forefathers, I built my royal statue (and) erected 
(it) with them. At that time I received tribute 
from the land Izalla, oxen, sheep, (and) wine. I 
crossed over to Mount Kasiiari (and) approached 
the city Kinabu, the fortified city of Hulaiia. With 
the mass of my troops (and) my fierce battle I 
besieged (and) conquered the city. I felled with 
the sword 800 of their combat troops, I burnt 
3,000 captives from them. I did not leave one of 
them alive as a hostage. I captured alive Hulaiia 
their city ruler. I made a pile of their corpses. I 
burnt their adolescent boys (and) girls, (i 110) I 
flayed Hulaiia their city ruler (and) draped his 
skin over the wall of the city Damdammusa. I 
razed, destroyed, (and) burnt the city. I con- 
quered the city Mariru which was in their en- 
virons. I felled 50 of their fighting-men with the 
sword, burnt 200 captives from them, (and) de- 
feated in a battle on the plain 332 troops of the 
land Mirbu. I brought back prisoners, oxen, (and) 
sheep from them. The (inhabitants of) the land 
Nirbu, which is at the foot of Mount Uhira, 
banded together (and) entered the city Tela, their 
fortified city. Moving on from the city Kinabu I 
approached the city Tela. The city was well 
fortified; it was surrounded by three walls. The 
people put their trust in their strong walls and 
their large number of troops and did not come 
down to me. (i 115) They did not submit to me. 
In strife and conflict I besieged (and) conquered 
the city. I felled 3,000 of their fighting men with 
the sword. I carried off prisoners, possessions, 
oxen, (and) cattle from them. I burnt many cap- 
tives from them. I captured many troops alive: 
from some I cut off their arms (and) hands; from 
others I cut off their noses, ears, (and) extremi- 
ties. I gouged out the eyes of many troops. I 
made one pile of the living (and) one of heads. I 
hung their heads on trees around the city, (ii 1) I 
burnt their adolescent boys (and) girls. I razed, 
destroyed, burnt, (and) consumed the city. At 
that time I razed, destroyed, (and) burnt the cities 
of the land Nirbu (and) their strong walls. 



i 106 var. i-zal-la for i-za-la. i 107 var. 6 me '600' for 8 me 
'800'. i 112 var. omits kur 'mount' before Uhira. i 113 var. 



omits uru 'city* before Kinabu. i 117 var. omits kisib.mes-5w- 
nu 'their extremities'. 



202 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101.1 



Col. ii 

1) munus ba-tu-la-te-su-nu ana gibil-// gibil 
uru ap-pul aq-qur ina izi.mes gibil-w/? a- 
kul-su ina u 4 -me-M-ma uru.didli sd kur ni- 
ir-bi 

2) bad. mbs- ni-su-nu dan-nu-te ap-pul aq-qur ina 
izi.mes ds-ru-up is-tu kur ni-ir-bi at-tum^-sd 
a-na uru tu-us-ha 

3) aq-ti-rib uru tu-us-ha ana es-M-te as-bat 
bad-su la-be-ru ti-na-kin a-sar-su u-me-si 
dan-na-su ak-sud bad gibil 

4) ta us-se-su a-di gaba-dib-bi-su ar-sip u-sek-lil 
u-sar-rih E.GAL-Ium a-na su-bat man -ti-a ina 
lib-bi ad-di gis.ig.mes dxj-us ina kA.mm^M 
li-re-te 

5) ^.gal si-i ta us-se-sd a-di gaba-dib-bi-sd ar- 
sip u-sek-lil sa-lam bu-na-ni-a sd na 4 pi-li 
BABBAR-e mj-us ta-na-ti 

6) kis-sii-ti-a su-tu-ur-te ii il-ka-kat qur-di-ia sd 
kur. kur na-i-ri e-tap-pa-su ina sA sar ina 
uru tu-us-ha 

7) u-se-zi-iz na 4 .na.ru.a sar ina bAd-sw gar-w/2 
un.mes kur as-sur an-sa-te sd ta pa-an su- 
un-qi bu-bu-te a-na kur.kur.mes 

8) sd-ni-a-te a-na kur sub-re-e e-li-u-ni u-te-ra- 
su-nu ina uru tu-us-ha u-sd-as-bit-su-nu uru 
su-a-tu a-na ra-me-ni-a 

9) as-bat se.am.mes se.in.nu.mes sd kur ni-ir-bi 
ina iib-bi i>UB-uk si-ta-at kur ni-ir-bi sd ta 
igi Gis.TUKUL.MES-a ip-pdr-si-du-ni 

10) ur-du-ni gir.ilmes-£? is-bu-tu uru. mvu-su-nu 
E.m.A.MES-sii-nu na-tu-te u-sd-as-bi-su-nu 
gun u ma-da- tu anse.kur.ra.mes 

11) ANSE.GIR.NUN.NA.MES GU4.MES UDU.MES 

gestin.mes utul.mes zabar lu za-bi-il ku- 
du-ri ugu sd pa-an u-sd-tir ana uwu-su-nu 
ds-kun DUMu.MEs-5w-ftw ki-i li-tu-te 

12) as-bat ki-i ina uru tu-us-ha us-ba-ku-ni ma- 
da-tu sd ""am-me-ba-a^-li dumu za-ma-ni 
m DiNGiR-/H-/7 kur sub-ri-a-a 

13) sd m la-ab-tu-ri dumu tu-pu-si kur ni-ir-du-un 
u ma-da-tu sd kur u-ru-me sd bi-ta-ni sd 
man.meS-/?/ sd kur. kur na-i-ri 

14) GIS.GIGIR.MES ANSE.KUR.RA.MES 
ANSE.GiR.NUN.NA.MES KU.BABBAR.MES 
KU.GI.MES UTUL ZABAR GU4.MES UDU.MES 



ii 2b- 12a) Moving on from the land Nirbu I ap- 
proached the city Tusha. I took Tusha in hand 
for renovation. I cleared away its old wall, de- 
lineated its area, reached its foundation pit, (and) 
built (and) completed in a splendid fashion a new 
wall from top to bottom. A palace for my royal 
residence I founded inside. I made doors (and) 
hung (them) in its doorways. This palace I built 
(and) completed from top to bottom. I made an 
image of myself in white limestone (and) wrote 
thereon praise of the extraordinary power and 
heroic deeds which I had been accomplishing in 
the lands Nairi. I erected (it) in the city TuSha. I 
inscribed my monumental inscription (and) depos- 
ited (it) in its walL I brought back the enfeebled 
Assyrians who, because of hunger (and) famine, 
had gone up to other lands to the land Subru. I 
settled them in the city Tusha. I took over this 
city for myself (and) stored therein barley and 
straw from the land Nirbu. The rest (of the in- 
habitants) of the land Nirbu which had fled from 
my weapons (ii 10) came down (and) submitted to 
me. I resettled them in their abandoned cities and 
houses. I imposed upon their cities more tribute 
and tax than ever before — horses, mules, oxen, 
sheep, wine, bronze casseroles, (and) corvee. I 
took their sons as hostages. 



ii 12b-15a) While I was in the city Tusha I re- 
ceived tribute from Amme-ba } ll, a man of BTt- 
Zamani, from Ill-hite, the Subru, from Labturu, 
son of Tupusu (of) the land Nirdun, and tribute 
from the interior of the land Urumu, (and) from 
the kings of the lands Nairi — chariots, horses, 
mules, silver, gold, bronze casseroles, oxen, 
sheep, (and) wine. I imposed corvee upon the 
lands Nairi. 



ii 4 A. 0.101.17 adds u-si-im '(and) decorated' after useklil 
'completed*, ii 4 King gives a text which (in error) omits ina 
iib-bi ad-di gis.ig.mes" du-ws 'I founded inside. I made doors', 
ii 7 A. 0.101.17 an-na-te 'these' for an-Sd-te 'enfeebled'. No 
doubt the text of A.0.101.17 is erroneous and should be either 
ansate or anhate. Cf. A.0.98.1 line 60. See Peiser, KB 1 p. 72 
n. 5 and Schramm, EAK 2 p. 1. ii 7 A.0.101.17 after bubute 
has ana kur.me§-#« kur.kur.mes '(had gone up) to (other) 
mountains (and) lands (to the land Subru)'. ii 9 var. uru 'city' 



for kur 'land' before Nirbu. ii 9 A. 0.1 01. 12 kur ir-ni-be (in 
error) (first occurrence), kur ni-ir-be (second occurrence). 
ii 10 na-tu-te: natu = nadu 'to abandon' in texts of TN. n 
and Asn. n. Cf. A. 0.100. 5 line 24, A. 0.101. 19 line 95, and 
A.0. 101. 30 line 78. See CAD 11/1 (N) p. 67. ii 11 A.0.101.17 
omits utul.mes zabar 'bronze casseroles*, ii 11 var. omits lu 
za-bi-il ku-du-ri '(and) corvee", ii 11 var. lu.mes-sw-aw 'their 
men' for dumu.mes-sw-aw 'their sons', ii 12 A.0.101.17 za- 
ma^a^-ni. 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0,101.1 



203 



gestin.me§ ma-da-ia-M-nu am-hur 

15) lu za-bi-il ku-du-ri ugu kur.kur na-i-ri al~ 
ta-kan ina ta-ia-ar-ti-ia sd kur.kur na-i-ri 
kur ni-ir-bu sd sa 

16) kur kas-ia-ri BAL-kdt 9 uru,didu-s«-/?w u- 
ta-se-ru a-na uru is-pi-li-ip-ri-a uru dan-nu- 
ti-su-nu u kur-w mar-su 

17) it-tak-lu-ma u-ba-na-at KUR-e a-si-bi KVR-ad 
ina qe-reb kur dan-ni gaz.mes-sw-ww a-duk 

US.MES-£tt-rt« GIM Hd-pa-Sl KUR-lf 

18) lu as-ru-up si-ta-te-su-nu hur-ru na-at-ba-ku 
sd KUR-e lu e-kul sal-la-su-nu mGAv-su-nu 
ds-lu-la sag.du.mes muq-tab-li-M-nu 

19) u-ne-kis di-im-tu ina sag vKV-su-nu ar-sip lu 
ba-tu-li-su-nu munus ba-tu-la-te-su-nu a-na 
gibiW/' gibil ina ne-re-be sd uru bu-li-ia-ni 

20) e-tar-ba si-di id lu-qi-a as-ba-ta ina me-tdk- 
ti-a uru.mes-/!/ sd kur hab-hi sd ina ne-re-be 

KVK-ad GAZ.MES-Sli-nU HI. A.MES 

21) a-duk sal-la-su-nu as-lul uru.didli.mes ina 
izlmes a-sa-rap a-na uru ar-du-pa at-ti-si-a 
ina UA-me-sii-ma ma-da-tu 

22) sd m a-hi-ra-mu dumu ia-hi-ri sd kur zalAa-a- 

a dumu ba-hi-a-ni kur hat-ta-a-a u 
MAN.MES-/11 sd kur ha-ni-gal-bat 
ku.babbar.mes ku.gi.mes 

23) AN.NA.MES UTUL ZABAR GU4.MES UDU.MES 

anse.kur.ra.mes ma-da-ta-su-nu am-hur ina 
li-me m as-sur-AS te-e-mu ut-te-ru-ni ma-a 

24) m zALAG- d iSKUR lu na-si-ku sd kur da-ga-ra 
BAL-kdt kur za-mu-a ana si-hir-ti-M a-ha-is 
is-bu-tu ne-ru-bu sd uru ba-bi-te 

25) bad ir-si-pu a-na e-pes murub 4 u me a-na 
sk-ia it-bu-ni ina gis. tukul-ti as-sur en GAL-e 

EN-ia U d URI.GAL 

26) du \Gi-ia ina gis.tukul.mes ez-zu-te sd as-sur 
en is-ru-ka a-na a-ia-si gis.tukul.mes 
ERiN.Hi.A.MES-a ad-ki a-na ne-re-be 

27) sd uru ba-bi-te a-lik erin.mes a-na gi-pis 

ERIN.HI.A.MES-5W-«W It-t&k-lu-ma ME 0-pU-SU 

ina a.mes mah.mes sd d URLGAL a-lik 

28) pa-ni-a it-te-su-nu am-da-hi-is bad 5 . bad 5 -M- 
nu ds-kun ukkin-5W-/7W u-pa-ri-ir 1 lim 4 me 1 
su-si erin.mes mun-dah-si-su-nu ina ne-re-bi 

29) a-duk uru li-ze-e uru be-ru-tu uru la-ga-la- 
ga uru dan-nu-ti-su-nu a-di 1 me uru.didli 
&7 li-me-tu-su-nu KUR-ud 



ii 15b- 19a) On my return from the lands Nairi, 
the land Nirbu which is within Mount Kasiiari re- 
belled. They abandoned their nine cities (and) 
trusted in the city Ispilipria, their fortified city, 
and a rugged mountain. But I besieged (and) con- 
quered the mountain peaks. Within the mighty 
mountain I massacred them. With their blood I 
dyed the mountain red like red wool (and) the rest 
of them the ravines (and) torrents of the moun- 
tain swallowed. I carried off captives (and) posses- 
sions from them. I cut off the heads of their 
fighters (and) built (therewith) a tower before 
their city. I burnt their adolescent boys (and) 
girls. 

ii 19b-23a) I entered the pass of the city Buliiana 
(and) made my way to the banks of the River 
Luqia. On my way I conquered the cities of the 
land Habhu which are in the pass. I massacred 
many of them, carried off captives from them, 
(and) burnt the cities. I emerged at the city 
Ardupa. At that time I received tribute from 
Ahi-rarnu, a man of BlMahiri, from the (A)zallu, 
a man of Blt-Bahiani, men of Hatti, and (from) 
the kings of the land Hanigalbat — silver, gold, 
tin, bronze casseroles, oxen, sheep, (and) horses. 
ii23b-31a) In the eponymy of Assur-iddin a re- 
port was brought back to me saying Nur-Adad 
the sheikh of the land Dagara had rebelled; (the 
inhabitants of) the entire land Zamua had banded 
together; they had built a wall in the pass of the 
city Babitu; (and) they had risen against me to 
wage war and battle. With the support of Assur, 
the great lord, my lord, and the divine standard 
which goes before me, (and) with the fierce 
weapons which Assur, (my) lord, gave to me I 
mustered (my) weapons (and) troops (and) 
marched to the pass of the city Babitu. The peo- 
ple, trusting in the massiveness of their troops, 
did battle. With the supreme might of the divine 
standard which goes before me I fought with 
them, brought about their defeat, (and) broke up 
their group. I slew 1,460 of their combatants in 
the pass. I conquered the cities Uze, Berutu, (and) 
Lagalaga, their fortified cities, together with 100 
cities in their environs. I carried off captives, 
property, oxen, (and) sheep from them. Nur- 



ii 21 A. 0.101. 17 ar-^du^-ba. ii 23 var. m as-sur-i-din, 

ii 23 A. 0.101. 12 and possibly 17 (broken) have gis.gigir.mes 

'chariots' instead of anse.kur.ra.mes 'horses'. 

ii 24 A. 0.1 01. 12 has kur 'land' instead of uru *city' before 

Babite. ii 25 d URi.GAL 'divine standard': see the note to 



A. 0.98.1 line 48. ii 26 gis.tukul.mes 'weapons' before 
erin. hi. a.mes 'troops' is probably an error for gis.gigir.mes 
'chariots', ii 27 d fjRi.GAL 'divine standard*: see the note to 
A. 0.98.1 line 48. ii 29 A.0.101.17 [b]e-ru-tu. 



204 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101.1 



30) Sal-la-su-nu mar-Si-su-nu gu 4 .mes-5W-«i/ udu 
se-m-Su-nu dS-lu-la m ZALAG- d iSKUR a-na Su- 
zu-ub zi.mes-Su a-na KUR-e mar-si 

31) e-U 1 LIM 2 ME ERIN.m.A.MES-SW-rtH Ct-SU-ha 

iS-tu kur da-ga-ra at-tu-muS a-na uru ba-a- 
ra aq-ti-rib uru ba-a-ra 

32) KUR-acf 3 me 20 erin.mes ti-du-ki-Su-nu ina 
gis.tukul.mes u-Sam-qit gu 4 .mes-5m-«w udu 
se-ni-Su-nu sal-la-su-nu dugud GUR-ra 

33) 3 me ERiN.Hi.A.MES-sw-nw a-su-ha ina iti.du 6 
ud IS.kam ta uru kal-zi at-tu-muS a-na ne- 
re-be sd uru ba-bi-te KU 4 -ub 

34) ta uru ba-bi-te at-tu-mus a-na kur ni-sir sd 
kur lu-ul-lu kur ki-ni-ba i-qa-bu-Su-ni aq-ti- 
rib uru bu-na-a-si uru dan-nu-ti-Su-nu 

35) sd m mu-sa-si~na 30 uru.didli Sd li-me-tu-Su 
ak-Sud erin.mes ig-du-ru kur-w mar-su is- 
sab-tu m as-sur-PAB-A ur.sag EGiR-Su-nu 

36) ki-ma musen.mes i-Se^u ina KUR-e kur ni-sir 
Lv.kD.MBS-su-nu BVB-uk 3 me 26 muq-tab-li- 
su-nu u-na-pi-is an§e.kur.ra.mes-sw e-kim-Su 

3 7) si-ta-te-Su-nu hur-ru na-at-ba-ku Sd KUR-e e- 
kul 1 uru.didli Sd sa kur ni-sir Sd a-na dan- 
nu-ti-Su-nu iS-ku-nu ak-Sud GAz.MEs-Sii-nu 

38) a-duk Sal-la-su-nu nig.su.mes-sh-/2h gu 4 .mes- 
Su-nu udu se-ni-Su-nu aS-lul uru.didli ina 
izi.mes dS-ru-up a-na uS-ma-ni-ia-ma GVR-ra 
be-ddk 

39) ta uS-ma-ni an-ni-te-ma at-tu-muS a-na 
uru.didli Sd edin kur ni-sir Sd a-Sar-Su-nu 
ma-am-ma la-a e-mu-ru a-lik uru la-ar-bu-sa 

40) uru dan-nu-ti-Su Sd m ki-ir-ti-a-ra 8 uru.didli 
Sd li-me-tu-Su KUR-ud erin.mes ig-du-ru 
kur-m mar-su is-sab-tu kur-w gim zi-qip 
gir.an.bar 

41) se-e-su na-a~di man ta erin.hi.a.mes-.s« 
EGiR-su-nu e-li ina qe-reb KUR-e lu.ad.mes- 
su-nu ad-di 1 me 72 erin.mes ti-du-ki-Su-nu 
a-duk erin, me§ 

42) hi.a.meS ina ka-a-pi Sd KUR-e DUB-uk Sal-la- 
su-nu NlG.SV,UES-Su-nU GV4-ME§-Su-nu udu 
se-ni-Su-nu GUR-ra uru.didli ina izi.mes 

43) GiBiL-up sag.du.mes-sw-aw ina gis gu-up-ni Sd 
KUR-e e-H-il it ba-tul.UES-Sti-nu munus ba- 
tu-la-te-Su-nu a-na GiBiL-fe gIbil ina uS-ma- 
ni-ia GUR-ra be-ddk 



Adad, to save his life, climbed up a rugged moun- 
tain. I uprooted 1,200 of their troops. 

ii 31b-33a) Moving on from the land Dagara I 
approached the city Bara. I conquered Bara. I 
felled with the sword 320 of their fighting- men 
(and) brought back their oxen, sheep, (and) their 
valuable booty. I uprooted 300 of their troops. 

ii 33b-38) On the fifteenth day of the month 
Tishri I moved on from the city Kalzi (and) en- 
tered the pass of the city Babitu. Moving on from 
the city Babitu I approached Mount Nisir which 
the Lullu call Mount Kiniba. (ii 35) I conquered 
the city Bunasi, their fortified city which (was 
ruled by) Musasina, (and) 30 cities in its environs. 
The troops were frightened (and) took to a rugged 
mountain. Ashurnasirpal, the hero, flew after 
them like a bird (and) piled up their corpses in 
Mount Nisir. He slew 326 of their men-at-arms. 
He deprived him (Musasina) of his horses. The 
rest of them the ravines (and) torrents of the 
mountain swallowed. I conquered seven cities 
within Mount Nisir which they had established as 
their strongholds. I massacred them, carried off 
captives, possessions, oxen, (and) sheep from 
them, (and) burnt the cities. I returned to my 
camp (and) spent the night. 

ii 39-43) Moving on from this camp I marched to 
the cities in the plain of Mount Nisir which no 
one had ever seen. I conquered the city Larbusa, 
the fortified city which (was ruled by) Kirteara, 
(and) eight cities in its environs. The troops were 
frightened (and) took to a rugged mountain. The 
mountain was as jagged as the point of a dagger. 
The king with his troops climbed up after them. I 
threw down their corpses in the mountain, massa- 
cred 172 of their fighting men, (and) piled up 
many troops on the precipices of the mountain, I 
brought back captives, possessions, oxen, (and) 
sheep from them (and) burnt their cities. I hung 
their heads on trees of the mountain (and) burnt 
their adolescent boys (and) girls. I returned to my 
camp (and) spent the night. 



ii 31 var. uru 'city* for kur land' before Dagara. ii 34 var. 
omits kur 'mounf before Kiniba. ii 34 var. ki-ni-pa. 
ii 34 ni-sir: Lambert, RA 80 (1986) pp. 185-86 suggests this 
should be read ni-mus. ii 35 30: in most exs. the three 
Winkelhaken are written closely together. But in at least one 
there is a space between the first and the other two: *and 20\ 



A similar problem appears in ii 57 but there vars. have a-di 30 
'together with 30'. It seems, then, that '30' is the correct figure 
in both passages. See Schramm, EAK 2 p. 24 (to ii 57). 
ii 36 'bird': text has 'birds', ii 40 A.0.101.17 m ki-ir-te-a-ra. 
ii 40-41 gim ... na-a-di: see the note to i 49. ii 43 A.0.101.17 
omits munus ba-tu-la-te-su-nu *(and) girls'. 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101.1 



205 



44) ina us-ma-ni an-ni-te-ma ak-tu-ds 1 me 50 
uru.didli sd uru la-ar-bu-sa-a-a uru.bad- 
lu-lu-ma-a-a uru bu-ni-sa-a-a uru ba-ra-a-a 

45) GAZ.MES-sii-nu a-duk sal-la-su-nu as-lul 
uru.didli a-pul a-qur ina izlmes GiBH-up 50 
erin.mes sd uru ba-ra-a-a ina mit-hu-si ina 
edin a-duk 

46) ina UA-me-su-ma man.mes-/u sd kur za-mu-a 
ana si-hir-ti-su-nu piil-hi me-lam-me sd as-sur 
EN-a is-hup-sii-nu GiR.n.MES-a is-bu-tu 

ANSE.KUR.RA.MES KU.BABBAR KU.GI 

47) am-hur kur-/w gab-bi sd pa-a l-en u-sd-ds- 
kin anse.kur.ra.mes kij.babbar ku.gi Se.am 
u se.in.nu ka-du-ru e-me-su-nu-ti 

48) ta URU.Gis.tukul-ti-as-sur-niB-at at-tu-mus 
gir kur ni-is-pi a-sa-bat du mu-si ar-te-di a- 
na uru.mes-/7/ sd Ki-su-nu ru-u-qu sd bi-rit 
kur gam-ru kur e-di-nu 



49) gar-«w &f m zALAG- d i§KUR a-na dan-nu-ti-su 
is-kun a4ik uru be-ru-tu KUR-ud uru ma 
izlmes gibil ina li-me m iDm-a-dur ina 
uru, nina us-ba-ku-ni te-e-mu 

50) ut-te-ru-ni ma-a m a-me-ka m ar-ds-tu-a ma- 
da-tu u ka-du-ru sd as-sur en-# lu ik-lu-u ina 
qi-bit as-sur en gal-? EN-/a u d URi,GAL a-lik 
pa-ni-a 

51) ina iti.sig 4 ud I.kam 3-te-su a-na kur za- 
mu-a ds-ku-na di-ku-tu pa-an gis.gigir.mes u 
ERiN.Hi.A.MES-a la-a ad-gul ta uru kdl-zi at- 
tu-mus id za-ba 

52) ki.ta e-te-bir ina kur ne-re-bi sd kur ba-bi- 
te e-ru-ub yd ra-da-a-nu e-te-bir ina gIr.kur- 
e kur si-ma-ki du UD.MES-a ak-tu-ds gu 4 .mes 

53) udu.mes gestin.mes ma-da-tu sd kur da-ga- 
ra at-ta-har ta gir kur si-ma-ki 

GIS.GIGIR.MES KAL-tU pit-Ml-lu SAG.KAL-5M I- 

si-ia a-se-qe mu-su a-di 

54) na-ma-ri ar-te-di id tur-na-at e-te-bir ina 
mit-har sa-an-te a-na uru am-ma-li uru 
dan-nu-ti-su sd m a-ra-ds-tu-a aq-ti~rib 



II 44-47) I tarried in this camp. 150 cities belong- 
ing to the cities of the Larbusu, Dur-Lullumu, 
Bunisu, (and) Bar a — I massacred them, carried 
off captives from them, (and) razed, destroyed, 
(and) burnt their cities. I defeated 50 troops of 
the Bara in a skirmish in the plain. At that time 
awe of the radiance of Assur, my lord, over- 
whelmed all of the kings of the land Zamua (and) 
they submitted to me. I received horses, silver, 
(and) gold. I put all of the land under one author- 
ity (and) imposed upon them (tribute of) horses, 
silver, gold, barley, straw, (and) corvee. 



ii 48-49a) Moving on from the city TukultT- 
Assur-asbat I made my way to the foot of Mount 
Nispi. Travelling all night I marched to the cilies 
which are remote, which lie between Mounts 
Gamru (and) Edinu, (and) which Nur-Adad had 
made his garrisons. I conquered the city Berutu 
(and) burnt (it). 

ii 49b~60a) In the eponymy of Miqti-adur I was in 
Nineveh (and) a report was brought back to mc 
saying Ameka (and) AraStua had withheld the 
tribute (and) corvee of Assur, my lord. At the 
command of Assur, the great lord, my lord, and 
the divine standard which goes before me, on the 
first day of the month Si van I mustered (my 
army) for a third time against the land Zamua. 
Without waiting for the advance of (my) chariotry 
and troops I moved on from the city Kalzi, 
crossed the Lower Zab, (and) entered the passes 
of Mount Babitu. I crossed the River Radanu 
(and) all day I tarried at the foot of Mount 
Simaki. I received the tribute of the land Dagara, 
oxen, sheep, (and) wine. From the foot of Mount 
Simaki I took with me strong chariots, cavalry, 
(and) crack troops. I continued travelling through 
the night until dawn, crossed the River Turnat, 
and at first light approached the city Ammali, the 
fortified city which (was ruled by) Arastua. (ii 55) 
In a clash of arms I besieged the city (and) con- 
quered (it). I felled with the sword 800 of their 



ii 44 var. bu-ti-sa-a-a or bu-na-i-sa-a-a (A.0. 101.17). 

ii 44 var, inserts at end of line KUR-ud: 'I conquered (150 

cities belonging to ...)'. ii 48 A, 0.1 01. 17 uru Gis.tukul-ti-As- 

as-bat, ii 48 A. 0.101 J 7 ni-is-pi. ii 48 bi-rit kur gam-ru kur 

e-di~nu 'between Mounts Gamru (and) Edinu' appears only in 

A. 0,101. 17 but this seems better than the main text which has, 

instead: bi-rit kur ni-is-pi 'between Mount Nispi', 

ii 49 A.0.101.17 m ZALAG-10 (Le Gac mistakenly has - d 10). 

H49 A.0.101.17 be-ru-tu. ii 49 m imu-a-dur 'Miqti-adur': for 

the reading see Postgate, Fifty Documents no. 26 note to A 17 

and von Soden, AHw p. 658a. Cf. Ungnad, RLA 2 



pp. 418-19 n. 9 and Weidner, AfO 13 (1939-41) p. 310. 

ii 51 A.0.101.17 za-mu-a-a '(the land of) the Zamu\ 

ii 51 A.0.101.17 adds ma-cP-te after giS.gigir.meS: 'numerous 

chariotry*. ii 52 var. aq-ti-rib 'I approached' for ak-tu-ds *I 

tarried at*, ii 53 A.0.101.17 da^a-tu for kal-/«. 

ii 53 sag.kal-sw: sag.(kal) = {a)Sarittu/{a)sarissu 'crack 

troops'. See CAD 1/2 (A) p. 419. It also occurs in ii 103 and 

A.0.101.19 line 70 (sd-ri-su). ii 54 var. kur uru am-ma-li 

'the land of the city Ammali'. A.0.101.17 ma-am-li. 

ii 54 A.0.101.17 "Wf-fw-ff. 



206 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101.1 



55) ina mit-hu-si ti-du-ki uru a-si-bi KVR-ad 8 
me erin.mes mun-dah-si-su-nu ina 
gis.tukul.mes u-sam-qit pag-ri.MEl-sil-nu 
sila vRv-M-nu u-mal-li jJS.MES-su-nu 

56) E.m.A.MES-sii-nu as-ru-up lu. erin.mes 
hi.a.mes tlla.mes ina su-te u-sab-bi-ta sal- 
la-su-nu hi.a.mes ds-lu-la uru a-pul a-qur ina 

IZI.MES GfBIL-W/7 URU Hu-du-UH 

57) a-di 30 uru.didli sd li-me-tu-su KUR-ud 
GAz-su-nu a-duk sal-la-su-nu GU4, MES-su-nu 
udu se-ni-su-nu ds-lu-la xj'RU*i>iDU~M-nu ap- 
pul aq-qur ina izi.mes gibil lu ba-tul.MEl- 
su-nu 

58) munus ba-tu-la-ti-su-nu ana GiBiL-te gibil 
uru ki-sir-tu uru dan-nu-ti-su sd m sa-bi-i-ni 
a-di 10 uru.didli sd li-me-tu-su KUR-ud 
GAZ.MES-su-nu a-duk sal-la-su-nu 

59) ds-lu-la uru.didli sd uru ba-ra-a-a sd m ki- 
ir-ti-a-ra sd uru du-ra-a-a sd uru bu-ni-sa-a- 
a a-di ne-reb sd kur has-mar a-pul a-qur ina 
izi.mes gibil- up 

60) ana du 6 u kar-me GVR-er ta sa uru.didli sd 
m ar-ds-tu-a at-tu-mus ina ne-reb sd bi-rit kur 
la-a-ra kur bi-di-ir-gi kur.mes-6 mar-su-te sd 
ana me-teq 

61) GIS.GIGIR.MES U ERIN.HI.A.MES-/e la GAR-nU e- 

tar-ba ana uru za-am-ri uru UA^-ti-su sd 
m a-me-ka kur za-mu-a-a aq-ti-rib m a-me-ka 

TA IGI GIS.TUKUL.MES-tf KAL.MES ME-/a 



62) sit-mu-ri ip-ldh-ma kur gig is-bat nig.ga 
e.gal-sw gis.gigir-5W ds-sd-a ta uru za-am-ri 
at-tu-mus Id Idl-tu-u e-te-bir a-na KUR-e kur 

e-ti-ni 

63) a.sa nam-ra-si sd ana me-teq gi5.gigir.me§ u 
erin.hi.a.mes la GAR-nu sd ina man.mes-w/ 
AD.MES-a ma-am-ma ina qe-reb-su la te-u a- 
lik man ta erin. hi.a.mes a-na KUR-e kur e- 
ti-ni 

64) En(*) NIG.GA-5W NIG.SU.MES-5W U-nU-Ut ZABAR 
HI. A tap-hi ZABAR UTUL ZABAR. MES Sa-ap-U 

zabar zu-qa-te zabar ni-sir-ti e.gal-su e na- 
kdm-te-M 

65) ta qe-reb KUR-e ds-sd-a a-na us-ma-ni-ia 
GUR-ra be-dak ina re-su-te sd as-sur u d sd- 



combat troops. With their corpses I filled the 
streets of their city (and) with their blood I dyed 
their houses red. Many troops I captured alive 
(and) carried off many captives from them. I 
razed, destroyed, (and) burnt the city. I con- 
quered the city Hudun together with 30 cities in 
its environs. I massacred them (and) carried off 
captives, oxen, (and) sheep from them. 1 razed, 
destroyed, (and) burnt their cities. I burnt their 
adolescent boys (and) girls. I conquered the city 
Kisirtu, the fortified city which (was ruled by) 
Sablni, together with 10 cities in its environs. I 
massacred them (and) carried off captives from 
them. I razed, destroyed, (and) burnt the cities of 
the Bara, of the man Kirteara, a man of the city 
Duru, (and) of the Bunisu, as far as the pass of 
Mount Hasmar. I turned (them) into ruin hills. 



ii 60b-62a) Moving from among the cities which 
(were ruled by) Arastua I entered the pass which 
is between Mount Lara (and) Mount Bidirgi, 
rugged mountains which were unsuitable for 
chariot ry and troops, I approached the city 
Zamru, the royal city of Ameka the Zamu. 
Ameka became frightened in the face of my 
strong weapons (and) my fierce battle and took to 
a rugged mountain. I removed the property of his 
palace (and) his chariot. 

ii 62b-65a) Moving on from the city Zamru I 
crossed the River Lallu. I marched to Mount 
Etinu over rugged terrain which was unsuitable 
for chariotry and troops (and) to which no king 
among my fathers had ever approached. The king 
with (his) troops climbed up to Mount Etinu. I re- 
moved from the mountain his (Ameka's) prop- 
erty, possessions, many bronze utensils, bronze 
tubs, bronze casserole(s), bronze bowls, bronze 
tureens, the treasure of his palace, (and) his store- 
house. Returning to my camp I spent the night. 



ii 65b-72a) Moving on from this camp with the 
help of Assur and Samas, the gods who support 



ii 56 A.0.101.17 lu.erin.mes ti.la.mes hi.a.mes. ii 57 var. u 
for a-dt see the note to ii 35. ii 57 var. li-me-tu-su-nu 'their 
environs*, ii 57 A.0.101.17 inserts hi.a.mes before a-duk '(I 
massacred) many (of them).' ii 58 var. li-me-tu-su-nu 'their 
environs 1 , ii 59 A.0.101.17 m kHr-te-a-ra. ii 59 A.0.101.17 
BAT>-a-a for du-ra-a-a. ii 62 A.0.101.17 Gis.GiGiR.MES-.fr/ 'his 
chariots', ii 64 E n : written du 6 .ud.du rather than du 6 .du. 



Scribal error. See Schramm, EAK 2 p. 24. ii 64 tap-hi (not 
am) 'tub': also in ii 66, 92, and iii 66. See Schott, Vorarbeiten 
p. 145 n. 3; Schramm, EAK 2 p. 24; and Borger, Zeichenliste 
p. 103 no. 170. ii 64 A.0.101.17 omits zabar 'bronze' after 
sa-ap-ii 'bowls' and possibly (broken) after zu-qa-te 'tureens'. 
ii 65 var. omits -ia 'me' after tik-li 'support'. A.0.101.17 t[ik- 
li] (Le Gac says A.0.101.17 has tik-li-a). 



Ashuraasirpal ii A. 0.101.1 



207 



mas dingir.mes tik-li-ia ta us-ma-ni an-ni- 
te-ma at-tu-mus egir-sw 

66) as-bat id e-di-ir lu e-bir ina bir-ti kur su-u 
kur e-la-ni-ti kur.mes kal.mes gaz.mes-sw- 
nu hi.a.mes a-duk nig.ga-sw nig.su-sm tap-hi 

ZABAR 

67) UTUL ZABAR Sa-ap-U ZABAR nam-zi-a-te ZABAR 
U-nU-Ut ZABAR.MES HI.A.MES GIS.BANSUR KU.GI 

ih-zi GU4.MES-5W udu se-ni-su 

68) sal-la-su dugud-/# ta gir KUR-e kur e-la-ni- 
it as-lul anse.kur.ra.mes-5w e-kim-su m a- 
me-ka a-na su-zu-ub zlmes-s« a-na kur sa- 
bu-a e-li 

69) uru za-am-ru uru a-ra-si-id-ku uru am-ma- 
ru uru pdr-sin-du uru i-ri-tu uru su-ri-tu 
uru dan-nu-ti-su a-di 1 me 50 uru.didli 

70) sd li-me-tu-sii ap-pul a-qur ina izi.mes gibil- 
up ana du 6 u kar-me GUR-er ki-i ina pu-ut 
uru pdr-sin-di us-ba-ku-ni pit-hal-lu lu kal- 
la-pu 

71) a-na su-ub-te use-sib 50 mun-dah-si-su sd 
m a-me-ka ina edin a-duk SAG„nu,MEl~M-nu 
KUD-15 ina gis gup-ni Sd tur i.GAL-M e-H-il 

72) 20 erin.mes ti.la.meS ina su Dm-/a ina bad 
e.gal-sW u-ma-gi-gi ta uru za-am-ri pit-hal- 
iu lu kal-la-pu i-si-ia a-se-qe 

73) a-«a uru.didli sa "Vra uru ar-zi-za-a-a sd 
ina man.mes-w ad.mes-g ma-am-ma ina qe- 
reb-su-nu la te-w a-/i& uru dr-zi-zu uru ar- 
si-in-du 

74) uru dan-nu-ti-M a-di 10 uru.mes-w sa //- 
me-tu-su (sd) ina kur ni-is-pi kur gig gar- 
/?« KUR-wd GAz-M-nu a-duk uru.didli a-/?w/ 
#-#t/r ma izi.mes gibil 

75) a-na us-ma-ni-ia-ma a-tu-ra ina u 4 -me-su-ma 
zabar.mes tab-bi-li zabar kdm-ma-te zabar 
sd-a-ri-a-te ma-da-tu sd kur si-pir-me-na sd 
gim munus.mes 

76) sap-ru-ni am-hur ta uru za-am-ri a-tu-mus 
a-na kur la-a-ra kur mar-si sd a-na me-teq 
gis.gigir.mes erin. hi.a.mes la GAK-nu ina 
ka-la-ba-te an. bar a-kis 

77) ina ak-kul urudu.mes a-qur gis.gigir.mes 
erin. hi.a.mes u-se-tiq a-na uru. gis. tukul-ti- 
as-sur-as-bat sd kur lu4u uru a-ra-ak-di i- 
qa-bu-su-ni at-ta-rad man.mes-w 



me, I set out after him (Ameka). Crossing the 
River Edir I massacred many of them between 
Mounts Su (and) Elaniu, mighty mountains. I car- 
ried off from the foot of Mount Elaniu his prop- 
erty, possessions, bronze tubs, bronze casseroles, 
bronze bowls, bronze vats, many bronze utensils, 
a dish decorated with gold, his oxen, sheep — his 
valuable booty. I deprived him of his horses. 
Ameka, to save his life, climbed up Mount 
Sabua. I razed, destroyed, (and) burnt the cities 
Zamru, Arasidku, Ammaru, Parsindu, Iritu, 
Suritu, his fortified cities, together with 150 cities 
in the environs of his (region). I turned (them) 
into ruin hills. While I remained before the city 
Parsindu I set the cavalry (and) light troops in 
ambush (and) killed 50 of the combat troops of 
Ameka in the plain. I cut off their heads (and) 
hung (them) on trees of the courtyard of his 
palace. I captured 20 soldiers alive (and) spread 
(them) out in the wall of his palace. 



ii 72b-76a) From the city Zamru I took with me 
the cavalry (and) light troops. I marched to the 
cities (ruled) by Ata, a man of the city Arzizu, 
amongst which no king among my fathers had 
ever penetrated. I conquered the cities Arzizu 
(and) Arsindu, his fortified cities, together with 10 
cities in the environs of his (region) (which) lay 
in Mount Nispi, a rugged mountain. I massacred 
them. I razed, destroyed, (and) burnt the cities. I 
returned to my camp. At that time I received 
bronze, bronze ..., bronze rivets, (and) beams, the 
tribute of the land Sipirmena whose (inhabitants) 
do their hair like women. 



ii 76b-84a) Moving on from the city Zamru to 
Mount Lara, a rugged mountain which was un- 
suitable for chariotry (and) troops, I cut through 
with iron axes (and) I smashed (a way) with 
copper picks. (Thus) was I able to move forward 
the chariotry (and) troops. I went down to the 
city TukultT-Assur-asbat which the Lullu call 
Arrakdu. All the kings of the land Zamua took 



ii 66 A. 0.1 01. 17 su-u-a for su-u. ii 66 var. omits hi.a.mes 
'many of changing the translation to 'I massacred them'. 
ii 66 tap-hi: see the note to ii 64. ii 67 A. 0.101. 17 omits 
zabar 'bronze 1 (first three occurrences), ii 67-68 var.: 
GVt.MES-su-nu udu se-ni-M-nu sai-ia-su-nu 'their oxen, sheep 
— their (valuable) property*. Var. inserts nig.su.mes-sw-hw 
'their possessions* before sal-ia-su-nu 'their property'. 
ii 68 var. sa-bu for sa-bu-a, ii 69 A. 0.1 01. 17 a-ri-si-id-ku. 
ii 69 A. 0.101. 17 pa-ar-si-in-du. ii 69 A.0.101.17 uru MAN-r/- 



§u 'his royal cities' for uru dan-nu-ti-su 'his fortified cities'. 
ii 70 A.0.101.17 pa-ar-si-in-di. ii 71 A.0.101.17 inserts ina 
uru za-am-ri 'in the city Zamru' after unekkis *I cut off (their 
heads)*, ii 71 See Grayson, Studies Oppenheim pp. 90-91 and 
TSTS 1 pp. 3-5. ii 73 A.0.101.17 dr-si-an-du. 
ii 75 A.0.101.17 omits zabar 'bronze' after tab-bi-li and 
kdm-ma-te. ii 75 var. si-pir-me-na or si-pi-a-me-na 
(A.0.101.17) (Le Gac erroneously says A.0.101.17 has si-pi-ir- 
me-na). ii 77 A.0.101.17 kur lu-ul-lu kur dr-rak-di-a (Le Gac 



208 



Ashurnasirpal n A. 0.101.1 



78) sd kur za-mu-a ana si-hfr-ti~su-nu ta igi na- 
mur-rat Gis.TUKUL.MES-a u sur-bat EN-ti-a e- 
dur-ma GiR.n.MES-a is-bu-tii gun ma-da-tu 

KU.BABBAR.MES KU.GI.MES AN.NA.MES 

79) ZABAR.MES UTUL.MES ZABAR TUG iu-bul-ti bir- 
me ANSE.KUR.RA.MES GU4.MES UDU.MES 

gestin.mes ugu sd pa-an u-sd-tir uGU-su-nu 
GAK-un lu ka-du-ra-su-nu 

80) ina uru kal-hi du-ws ki-i ina kur za-mu-a us- 
ba-ku-ni uru hu-du-na-a-a uru har-ti-is-a-a 
uru hub-us-ka-a-a uru gil-za-na-a-a pui-hi 

81) me- lam -me sd as-sur en- /a is-h up-su-nu gun 
ma-da-tu ku.babbar ku.gi anse.kur.ra.mes 
tug lu-biil-ti bir-me gu 4 .mes udu.mes 
gestin.mes ana uGu-/a ub-lu-ni un.mes 

82) am-mar ta igi gis.tukul.mes-g ip-pdr-si-du 
ana kur.mes-/?/ e-li-u-ni EGiR-su-nu a-lik ina 
bi-rit kur a-zi-ru kur si-ma-ki u-si-bu-ni uru 
me-su a-na dan-nu-ii-su-nu 

83) is-ka-nu-ni kur a-zi-ra a-pul a-qur ta bi-rit 
kur si-ma- ki a-di id tur-na-at pag-ri.MEs-M-nu 
at-bu-uk 5 me muq-tab-li-su-nu u-nap-pi-is 

84) sal-la-su-nu DUGUD-fa as-lul uru.didli ina 
izi.mes GiBiL-w/? ina u 4 -me-su-ma ina kur za- 
mu-a uru at-U-la sd m si-bir man kur kar-du- 
ni-ds um-su-ni i-^a-ab-ta 

85) ana du 6 w kar-me GUR-ra m as-sur-PAB-A man 
kur #5-5w/" a«a es-su-te is-bat bad-su al-mi 
e.gal a/2a su-bat UAN-ti-ia ina lib-bi ad-di u- 
si-im u-sar-rih ugu sd pa-an u-sd-tir 



86) se.am.mes se.in.nu.mes sd kur du.a.bi ina 
sa dub-wA" URU.BAD-ai-swr mu-sm ab-bi ina 
IT1.SIG4 ud I.kam ma li-me m sd-mNGm-ma- 
sigs gis.gigir.mes ERiN.m.A.MES-a ad-ki 

87) id. hai. hal e-te-bir ana kur kat-mu-hi kxu- 
#Z? e.gal ina URU.DUe-w-// u-sar-ri ma-da-tu 
sd kur kat-mu-hi at-ta-har ta kur kat-mu-hi 
at-tu-mus ina ne-reb 

88) sa kur ^nanna.mes KU 4 -a& ina uru ki-ba-ki 
a-sa-kan be-dak gu 4 .mes udu.mes gestin.mes 
utul zabar.mes ma-da-tu sd uru ki-ba-ki 
at-ta-har ta uru ki-ba-ki at-tu-mus 



fright before the brilliance of my weapons and 
awe of my dominion and they submitted to me. I 
imposed upon them more tribute and tax than 
ever before — silver, gold, tin, bronze, bronze 
casseroles, garments with multi-coloured trim, 
horses, oxen, sheep, (and) wine. Their corvee they 
performed in Calah. While I was in the land 
Zamua, awe of the radiance of Assur, my lord, 
overwhelmed the inhabitants of the cities Hudun, 
Hartisu, Hubusku, (and) Gilzanu (and) they 
brought to me tribute (and) tax — silver, gold, 
horses, garments with multi-coloured trim, oxen, 
sheep, (and) wine. I marched after as many peo- 
ple as had fled from my weapons (and) climbed 
up into the mountains. They were ensconced 
between Mounts Aziru (and) Simaki (and) had 
made the city Mesu their garrison. I razed (and) 
destroyed Mount Aziru (and) piled up their bodies 
from Mount Simaki as far as the River Turnat, I 
slew 500 of their men-at-arms (and) carried off 
their valuable booty. I burnt the cities. 

ii 84b~86a) At that time in the land Zamua, the 
city Atlila which Sibir king of Kardunias had cap- 
tured, was dilapidated (and) had turned into ruin 
hills. Ashurnasirpal, king of Assyria, took (this 
city) in hand for renovation. I put a wall around 
it, founded therein a palace for my royal resi- 
dence, (and) decorated it more splendidly than 
ever before. I stored therein barley (and) straw 
from all the (surrounding) land. I named it Dur- 
Assur. 

ii 86b-91a) On the first day of the month Sivan, 
in the eponymy of Sa-ilTma-damqa, I mustered 
(my) chariotry (and) troops. After crossing the 
Tigris I entered the land Katmuhu. I consecrated 
a palace in the city Tll-uli. I received tribute from 
the land Katmuhu. Moving on from the land 
Katmuhu I entered the pass of the land Istarate. I 
pitched camp (and) spent the night in the city 
Kibaku. I received tribute from Kibaku, oxen, 
sheep, wine, (and) bronze casserole(s). Moving on 
from Kibaku I approached the city Matiatu. I 
conquered Matiatu together with its suburbs. I 



mistakenly says it has uru instead of the second kur). 
ii 78 Sur-bat: cf, §u-ri-bat in inscriptions of Shalm. 111 cited in 
von Soden, AHw p. 1284a, where the word is connected to 
suripu *ice\ The derivation and meaning are uncertain. It also 
appears in ii 119, iii 24; A.0.10I.17 iii 105, iv 112; and 
A.0.101,19 line 86. ii 19 A.0.101J7 omits zabar after 
utul.mes 'casseroles', ii 80 A.0.101,17 kur Hand' for uru 
'city' before the last four GNs in this line, ii 82 var. omits -a 
'my' after gis.tukul.me! 'weapons', ii 82 var. uru dan-nu-ti- 
su-nu 'their garrison city* for a-na dan-nu-ti-su-nu 'their 



garrison', ii 84-86 Sibir is perhaps the same as Simbar-Shipak 
(c. 1024-1007 BC). See Brinkman, PKB p. 154. 
ii 87 A. 0.101. 17 has uru ti-lu-ii for uru.du$-m-/i. 
ii 87 A.0.1 01. 10 omits e.gal ... u-sar-ri 'I consecrated a 
palace in the city of Ttl-uhV ii 87 A J). 101. 17 inserts ina uru 
ti-lu-li before at-ta-har, 4 I received in the city Tll-uli (tribute 
...)'. ii 88 A. 0.10 1.10 omits sd kur ^nanna.mes KU 4 -a&; var. 
omits kur 'the land* before ^nanna.mes 'Istarate'. A. 0.101. 17 
uru d iSi-tdr.MES-te 'the city Istarate'. Cf. J. Lewy, Orientalia 
ns 21 (1952) p. 5 n. 3. ii 88 A.0. 101.17 utul.mes and omits 



Ashuraasirpal n A . . 1 1 . 1 



209 



89) a-na uru mat-ia-ti aq-ti-rib uru mat-ia-tu a- 
di uru kap-ra-ni-sd ak-sud 2 lim 8 me 
erin.mes ti-du-ki-su-nu ina gis.tukul.mes u- 
sam-qit sal-la-su-nu hi.a as-lul 

90) erin.mes am-mar ta igi gis.tukul.mes-g ip- 
pdr-si-du-ni GiR.n.MES-/a dib-?w uru.mes-w/- 
su-nu u-sd-as-bi-su-nu gun ma-da-tu u-ra-si 
u-dan-ni-in VGU-su-nu 

91) as-kun sa-lam bu-na-ni-a du-ws li-ta-at kis- 
su-ti-ia ina lib-bi al-tur ina uru mat-ia-ti u- 
se-zi-iz ta uru mat-ia-ti at-tu-mus ina uru 
za-za-bu-ha 

92) GAR-an be-dak ma-da-tii sd kur hab-hi 
gu 4 .mes udu.mes gestin.mes utul zabar.mes 
tap-hi zabar.mes qur-pi-si zabar a-ta-har ta 
uru za-za-bu-ha at-tu-mus 

93) ina uru ir-si-a a-sa-kan be-dak uru ir-si-a 
ina izi.meS gibil ma-da-tu sd uru su-u-ra 
gu 4 ,me§ udu.mes gestin.mes utul zabar ina 
uru ir-si-a at-ta-har 

94) ta uru ir-si-a at-tu-mus ina sa kur kas-ia-ri 
a-sa-kan be-dak uru ma-da-ra-an-zu 2 
uru.didli sd li-me-tu-su KUR-ud gaz.mes-M- 
nu a-duk 

95) sal-la-su-nu as-lul uru.mes-/?/ ina izi.mes 
gibil- up 6 UD.MES-te ina lib-bi kur kas-ia-ri 
kur dan-ni a.sa nam-ra-si sd a-na me-teq 
gis.gigir.mes u erin.hi.a.mes 

96) la GAR-nu kur-w ina ka-la-ba-ti an.bar a-kis 
ina ak-kul urudu.mes aq-qur gis.gigir.mes u 
erin.hi.a.mes dib-/<7 ina uru.didli sd si-di 
hu-li-a gar sa kur kas-ia-ri 

97) GU4.MES udu.mes gestin.mes utul zabar 
qur-pi-si zabar at-ta-har kur kas-ia-ru at- 
ta-bal-kdt 2-te-su a-na kur. kur na-i-ri at-ta- 
rad ina uru si-gi-sd 

98) a-sa-kan be-dak ta uru si-en-gi-sd a-tu-mus 
ana uru ma-da-ra uru dan-nu-ti-M sd m la- 
ab-tu-ri dumu tu-pu-si aq-ti-rib uru kal-gh 
dan-nis 4 bad.mes-^/ 

99) la-a-be uru a-si-bi ta igi gis.tukul.mes-^ 
kal.mes ip-la-hu-ma nig.ga.mes-5w-/7w 6w- 
sd-su-nu i>jJMV,MEs-su-nu ana sap-ru-te am- 
hur-M-nu ana su-zu-ub zi.MEs-su-nu w-sar- 
su-nu 

100) gun ma-da-tu ti-ra-si.MES VGU-su-nu as-kun 



felled with the sword 2,800 of their fighting-men 
(and) carried off many captives from them. The 
troops, as many as had fled from my weapons, 
submitted to me (and) I settled them in their cit- 
ies. I imposed upon them stringent tribute, taxes, 
(and) labourers. I made an image of myself (and) 
wrote thereon (an account of) my powerful vic- 
tories. I erected (it) in Matiatu. 
ii 91b-97a) Moving on from the city Matiatu I 
pitched camp (and) spent the night at the city 
Zazabuha. I received tribute from the land 
Habhu, oxen, sheep, wine, bronze casseroles, 
bronze tubs, (and) bronze armour. Moving on 
from the city Zazabuha I pitched camp (and) 
spent the night in the city Irsia. I burnt lrsia. I re- 
ceived tribute from the city Sum, oxen, sheep, 
wine, (and) bronze casseroles, in the city Irsia. 
Moving on from Irsia I pitched camp (and) spent 
the night within Mount KaSiiari. I conquered the 
city Madaranzu (and) two cities in its environs, I 
massacred them, (ii 95) carried off prisoners from 
them, (and) burnt the cities. For six days within 
Mount Kasiiari, a mighty mountain (and) rugged 
terrain which was unsuitable for chariotry (and) 
troops, I cut through the mountain with iron axes 
(and) smashed (a way) with copper picks. (Thus) 
was I able to move forward the chariotry and 
troops. In the cities which were in the region of 
my road in Mount Kasiiari I received oxen, sheep, 
wine, bronze casserole(s), (and) bronze armour. 



ii 97b- 100a) After crossing Mount Kasiiari I went 
down for a second time to the lands Nairi. I 
pitched camp (and) spent the night in the city 
Sigisu. Moving on from the city Sigisu 1 ap- 
proached the city Madara, the fortified city of 
Labturu, son of Tupusu. The city was well 
fortified; it was surrounded by four walls. I be- 
sieged the city. They took fright in face of my 
mighty weapons and 1 received from them prop- 
erty, possessions, (and) sons as hostages. I spared 
their lives. I imposed upon them tribute, taxes, 
(and) labourers. I razed (and) destroyed the city 
(and) turned (it) into ruin hills, 
ii 100b- 103 a) Moving on from the city Madara I 



zabar.me§ 'bronze (casseroles)', ii 89 A. 0.101.17 mat-te-ia-te 
(first occurrence) and mat-ia-u~te (second occurrence), 
ii 91 A.0.101.17 mat-te-ia-te (first occurrence), ii 91 var. 
omits uru 'city' before mat-ia-ti. ii 91 A.0.10L17 mat-te-ia-te 
(second occurrence), ii 92 A.0.101.17 utul.mes tap-hi.MES sa- 
ap-li qur-pi-si. meI 'casseroles, tubs, bowls, (and) armour'. 
ii 92 tap-hi: see the note to ii 64. ii 93 A. 0.101.19 line 57 su- 
u-ra for su-u-ra. ii 93 A.0.101.17 utul.me§ 'casseroles* and 



omits zabar 'bronze', ii 96 A.0.101.17 omits an.bar 'iron'. 
ii 97 and 101 A.0.101.17 utul.mes qur-pi-slMEi 'casseroles 
(and) armour'. Omits zabar 'bronze' both times, ii 97 var. 
ka§-ie-e-ru. ii 97 A.0.101.17 kur 'land' (not kur. kur lands') 
before Nairi. ii 97 var. $i-ni-gi-sd. ii 98 var. and A.0.101.17 
si-gi-sd. ii 99 u-$XR~su-nu: also in A.0.101.19 line 66; but 
A.0.101.17 iv 48 u-ser-Su-nu and von Soden, AHw p. 1485 sub 
wa$aru D5a emends to u-§er-su-nu. ii 100-103 A. 0.101, 17 and 



210 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101.1 



uru a-pul a-qur ana du 6 u kar-me GVR-er is-tu 
uru ma-da-ra at-tu-mus a-na uru tus-ha-an 

101) Kuweit £.gal ina uru tus-ha-an u-sd-ri ma~ 
da-tu Sd kur ni-ir-du-un anse.kur,ra.me§ 

AN&E.g1r.NUN.NA.ME£ UTUL ZABAR qur-pi-si 

ZABAR GU4.MES UDU.MES 

102) gestin.mes ina uru tu-us-ha-an a-ta-har 1 
su-si uru.mes-h/ bad.mes~w dan-nu-te sd gir 
kur kas-ia-ri sd m lab-tu-ri dumu tu-pu-si ap- 
pul aq-qur ana DUe 

103) u kar-me u-ter ina gis. tukul-ti as-Sur EN-ia ta 
uru tu-us-ha-an a-tu-mus gis.gigir.mes KAL-tu 
pit-hal-lu sag-5W /-$/-«? a-se-qe ina rak-su-te 

104) id.idigna e-te-bir du mu-Si-ti ar-te-di a-na 
uru pi-tu-ra uru dan-nu-ti-su-nu sd kur *//- 
ir-ra-a-ia aq-ti-rib uru gig dan-niS 

105) 2 bad.mes-w la-a-bi kin-hu-su gim su.si 
KUR-e &/-#/ mar a.mes mah.mes Af as-^wr en- 
ia ma g/'-p/f ERiN.Hi.A.MEs-tf ME-/a sit-mu-ri 

106) it-ti-Su-nu am-da-hi-is ina 2 u*-me la-am 
d uTu na-pa-hi gim d iSKUR &? gir.bal vgv-su- 
nu dS-gu-um nab-lu UGU-su-nu u-Sd-za-nin 
ina sip-si 

107) u da-na-ni mun-dah-si-a gim an-ze-e.Mv$EN 
vGv-su-nu i-se-^u uru KUR-ad 8 me erin.mes 
mun-dah-si-su-nu ina gis.tukul.mes u-sam- 

qit SAG.DU.MES-S7/-AZW 

108) KUD-/5 ERIN.MES TI.LA.MES HL A.MES ina SU 

DiB-to si-ta-ti-su-nu ina izlmeS gIbil-m/? Sal- 
la-su-nu DUGUD-ta aS-lul a-si-tu Sd tlla.meS 
sd sag.du.mes 

109) ina pu-ut kA.gal-Su ar-sip 7 me erin.mes ina 
pu-ut KA.GAL-su-nu a-na gis zi-qi-pi u-za-qip 
uru a-pul a-qur ana du 6 u kar-me GUR-er lu 
ba-tu-li-Su-nu 

110) munus ba-tu-la-ti-Sti-nu ana GiBiWe gibil 
uru ku-u-ku-nu sd pi-i ne-reb sd KUR-e kur 
ma-at-ni ak-Sud 7 me Erin.mes ti-du-ki-Su-nu 
ina gis.tukul.mes u-Sam-qit 

1 1 1) sal-la-su-nu hi.a aS-lul 50 uru.mes-w sd kur 
di-ri-a KVR-ud gaz.mes-sw-/z« a-diik sal-la- 
su-nu aS-lul 50 erin.mes ti.la.mes u-sa-bi-ta 

URU.DIDLI ap-piil 

112) a-qur ina izi.mes gibil-w/? me-lam EN-ti-a 
vGV-su-nu at-bu-uk ta uru pi-tu-ra at-tum 4 - 
Sd a-na uru ar-ba-ak-ki kur hab-hi sd be-ta- 
a-ni at-tar-da 



entered the city Tusha. I consecrated a palace in 
Tusha. I received in Tusha tribute from the land 
Nirdun, horses, mules, bronze casserole(s), bronze 
armour, oxen, sheep, (and) wine. I razed, des- 
troyed, (and) turned into ruin hills 60 cities, 
mighty garrisons, at the foot of Mount KaSiiari, 
which (were ruled by) Labturu, son of Tupusu. 



ii 103b- 110a) With the support of Assur, my lord, 
I moved on from the city Tusha. I took with me 
strong chariots, cavalry, (and) crack troops. I 
crossed the Tigris by means of a bridge of rafts. 
Travelling all night I approached the city Pitura, 
the fortified city of the Dirru. The city was excep- 
tionally difficult; it was surrounded by two walls; 
its citadel was lofty like a mountain peak. With 
the exalted strength of Assur, my lord, with my 
massive troops, and with my fierce battle I fought 
with them. On the second day, before sunrise, I 
thundered against them like the god Adad-of-the- 
Devastation (and) rained down flames upon them. 
With might and main my combat troops flew 
against them like the Storm Bird. I conquered the 
city. I felled 800 of their combat troops with the 
sword (and) cut off their heads. I captured many 
soldiers alive. The rest of them I burnt. I carried 
off valuable tribute from them. I built a pile of 
live (men and) of heads before his gate. I impaled 
on stakes 700 soldiers before their gate. I razed, 
destroyed, (and) turned into ruin hills the city. I 
burnt their adolescent boys (and) girls. 



ii 110b-112a) I conquered the city Kukunu which 
is at the entrance to the pass of Mount Matnu. I 
felled with the sword 700 of their fighting-men. I 
carried off many captives from them. I conquered 
50 cities of the Dirru. I massacred them, carried 
off prisoners from them, (and) captured 50 sol- 
diers alive. I razed, destroyed, (and) burnt the cit- 
ies. I unleashed against them my lordly radiance, 
ii 11 2b- 11 8a) Moving on from the city Pitura I 
went down to the city Arbakku in the interior of 
the land Habhu. They took fright in the face of 
my royal radiance and abandoned their cities 



19 tu-u$~ha (omits -an), ii 101 See the note to ii 97. 
ii 103 sao-su: see the note to ii 53. ii 103 raksilte 'a bridge of 
rafts': cf. A.0.101.19 line 70. See von Soden, AHw p. 948 sub 
raksu le. ii 105 kurhuSu ... saqi 'its citadel ... peak': cf. 
A.0.101.17 iv 67 and 19 line 72, While one might read Sd-kin 
'was shaped (like)' (CAD 8 [K] p. 405), I think the present 
interpretation is more probable; cf. von Soden, AHw 



p. 1180b. ii 109 A.0.101.17 5 <me> '500' for 7 me '700'. 
A.0.101.19 line 76 has 7 <me> '700'. ii 110 A.0.101.17 omits 
munus ba-tu-la-ti-Su-nu '(and) girls', ii 111 var. di-ri-a-a or 
di-ra-a. ii 111 A.0.101.19 line 78 '40 cities' and '40 soldiers*, 
ii 112 A.0.101.14/7/-/w-w; A.0.101.19 line 79 pi -da- ra. 
ii 112 A.0.101.14flr-/;ff-A/'. 



Ashurnasirpal n A. 0.101.1 



211 



113) ta igi me-lam-me MAN-ti-a ip-la-hu-ma 

URU.DIDLI-5W-/7W BAD.MES-/2/-5W-/2W U-SB-rU 

ana su-zu-ub zi.mes-sw'-ww ana kur ma-at-ni 
kur dan-ni e-li-u 

114) EGiR.MEs-sw-nw ar-te-di 1 lim erin.meS rawg- 
tab-li-su-nu ina qe-reb KUR-e mar-si u-nap- 
pi-is us.mes-5W-a?« kur-w as-ru-up pag- 
ri.MES-su-nu hur-ru 

115) na-at-ba-ku sd KUR-e u-ma-li 2 me erin.mes 
ti.mes /wa su DiB-ta kap-pi-su-nu u-be-tiq 2 
lim sal-la-su-nu as-lul gu4.mes-sw-/im udu se- 
ni-Su-nu 

1 1 6) a-na la me-ni Gim-ra uru i-ia-ia uru sa-la- 
ni-ba uru, mes kal.mes sd uru ar-ba-ki kur- 
wii gaz.mes-.M~/iw a-duk §al4a~su-nu dS4ul 

1 17) 2 me 50 uRu.ME§-m £a bad.me^-sw-hm 
kal.mes sa kur. kur na-i-ri a-pul a-qur ana 
du 6 w kar-me GUR-er se. kin. tar kvr-su-hu 
e-si-di SE.AM.MES 

118) u se.in.nu.mes ina uru tu-us-ha at-bu-uk 
m am-me-ba-a^-la dumu za-ma-ni lu.gal.mes- 
ti-su BAL.MBS-su-ma gaz-su a-na tu-ri gi-mil4i 

119) sd m am-me-ba-a y 4a a-lik ta igi na-mur-ra-at 
Gis.TUKUL.MES-a u su-ri-bat EN-ti-a 

120) e-dur-ma gis.gigir.mes ra-ki-su hal-lu-up-ti 

ERIN.MES ANSE.KUR.RA.MES 4 ME 1 SU-Sl 

121) ANSE.KUR.RA.MES LAL-at GIS ni-rUM 2 GUN 
KU.BABBAR.MES 2 GUN KU.GI.MES 1 ME GUN 

122) AN.NA.MES 1 ME GUN ZABAR. MES 3 ME GUN 
AN. BAR. MES 1 ME UTUL ZABAR 3 LIM kap-pl 

zabar sa-ap-li zabar a-ga-na-a-te zabar 

123) 1 lim tug lu-bul-ti bir-me gis.gada.mes 
gis.bansur na 5 gis ne-mat-tu zu.mes 
ku.gi.mes uh-hu-zu-te 

124) ni-sir-ti e.gal-su 2 lim gu 4 .mes 5 lim 
udu.mes munus.nin-.sw ta nu-ud-ni-sd hi. a 
dumu.munus.mes 

125) lu.gal.meS-.vw ta nu-ud-ni-si-na ma-a-di am- 
hur m as-Sur-¥AB-A man gal-w man dan-nu 
man §u man kur aS-sur a tukul-ma§ man 
GAL-e man dan-ni 

126) man su man kur as-sur a u-erin.tah man 
GAL-e man dan-ni man su man kur as-sur- ma 
et-lu qar-du sd ina oil.tukul-ti as-sur en-sw 
DU.DU-^-ma ina mal-ki. mes 

127) sd kib-rat A-ta sd-nin-su la-a i-su-u man sd 



(and) walls. To save their lives they climbed up 
Mount Matnu, a mighty mountain. I went after 
them. I slew 1,000 of their men-at-arms within the 
rugged mountain, dyed the mountain red with 
their blood, (and) (ii 115) filled the ravines (and) 
torrents of the mountain with their corpses. I cap- 
tured 200 soldiers alive (and) cut off their arms. I 
carried off 2,000 captives from them. I brought 
back oxen (and) sheep from them without 
number. 1 conquered the cities Iiaia (and) 
Salaniba, fortified cities of the city Arbakku. I 
massacred (and) carried off prisoners from them. 
I razed, destroyed, (and) turned into ruin hills 250 
of their well-fortified cities of the lands Nairi. I 
reaped the harvest of their land (and) stored the 
barky and straw in the city Tusha, 



ii 11 8b- 125a) The nobles of Amme-ba^T, a man 
of BTt-Zamani, rebelled against him and killed 
him. I marched to avenge Amme-ba^lT. They took 
fright before the brilliance of my weapons and 
awe of my dominion (and) I received harnessed 
chariots, equipment for troops (and) horses, 460 
harness-trained horses, two talents of silver, two 
talents of gold, 100 talents of tin, 100 talents of 
bronze, 300 talents of iron, 100 bronze casseroles, 
3,000 bronze receptacles, bronze bowls, bronze 
containers, 1,000 linen garments with multi- 
coloured trim, dishes, chests, couches of ivory 
(and) decorated with gold, the treasure of his 
palace — (also) 2,000 oxen, 5,000 sheep, his sister 
with her rich dowry, (and) the daughters of his 
nobles with their rich dowries. 



ii 125b-131a) Ashurnasirpal, great king, strong 
king, king of the universe, king of Assyria, son of 
TukultT-Ninurta (n), great king, strong king, king 
of the universe, king of Assyria, son of Adad- 
nararl (n) (who was) also great king, strong king, 
king of the universe, king of Assyria; valiant man 
who acts with the support of Assur, his lord, and 
has no rival among the princes of the four quar- 
ters, the king who subdued (the territory 



ii 113 var. inserts dan-nu-te or kal.mes-/^ (A. 0.101. 17) after 
BAD.MEs-(tf/)--w-rtw 'strong walls', ii 115 A. 0.101. 17 dis a-na 
kap-pi-^siD-nu u-ba-tiq '(and) cut off one arm from each of 
them*. See Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 24-25. ii 116 A.0.101.17 dr- 
ba-ak-ki. ii 117 A.0.101.17 omits -su-nu 'their' after bad. mes 
changing the translation to: '250 well-fortified cities'. 
il 118-19 A.0.101.17 r m am-me-ba-tf-tn. ii 119 su-ri-bat; see 
the note to ii 78. ii 120 A.0.101.19 inserts '40' before 



gis.gigir.mes ra-ki-su 'harnessed chariots', ii 122 A.0.101.19 
line 88 *200 talents of bronze ... 1,000 bronze casseroles, 2,000 
bronze receptacles', ii 122 var. omits sa-ap-li zabar a-ga-na- 
a-te zabar *bronze bowls, bronze containers', 
ii 123 A.0.101.19 line 89 bansur.mes gis.na 5 .mes, i.e. plural 
and probably this is the better text, ii 125-35 vars. omit 
everything beginning m as-sur-?AB-A 'Ashurnasirpal' to the end 
of the col. ii 127 A. 0.101. 31 lines 4-5 inserts before man 'the 



212 



Ashur nasir pal n A . . 1 1 . 1 



is-tu e-ber-ta-an id.idigna a-di kur lab-na-na 

u A.AB.BA 

128) gal-// kur la-qe-e ana si-hir-ti-sd kur su-hi 
a-di uru ra-pi-qi ana gir.ii.mes-sw u-sek-ni-sd 
iS-tu sag Id e-ni 

129) fn su-ub-na-at a-di kur ni-rib sd bi-ta-ni su- 
su KVK-ud ta kur ne-re-be sd kur klr-ru-ri 
a-di kur gil-za-ni ta e-ber-ta-an id za-ba 

130) ki.ta a-di VKU.DUs-ba-a-ri sd el-la-an kur 
za-ban ta uru. uus-sd-ab-ta-ni a-di uru.du 6 - 
sd-za-ab-da-ni uru hi-ri-mu uru ha-ru-tu 
kur bi-ra-a-te 



131) sd kur kar-du-ni-ds a-na mi-is-ri KVR-ia u-ter 
u dagal.mes kur. kur na-i-ri a-na pat gim- 
ri-sd a-pel uru kal-hu ina es-M-te as-bat du 6 
la-be-ru 

132) u-na-kiri a-di ugu a.mes lu-u u-M-pil 1 me 
20 //A:-/?/ a-/ia mus-pa-li lu-ta-bi e d MAS EN-/a 
ina qe-reb-su lu-u ad-di e-nu-ma 

133) alam d MAs su-a-tum sd ina pa-an la-a gal-w 
ina hi-sa-at Rb-bi-ia d LAMMA dingir-ZZ-sw 
GAL~te ina du-muq na 4 KUR-e u ku.gi hu-se-e 
lu-u ov-ni 

a-na dingir-//"-/^ GAL-te ina uru kal-hi lu-u 
am-nu-su i-si-na-te-su ina iti.ziz it iti.kin 
lu-u ds~kun e.kur si-i na-la-ba-na lu ak-sur 



134) 

135) bara u mas EN-a ina qe-reb-sa lu u-sar-ri-hi e 

d GA§AN-KUR d 30 U d gU-la NU d e-a-MAN NU 

d iSKUR gu.gal an-£ Ki-/e lu-u ad-di 

Col. iii 

1) ina ITI.SIG4 ud 22.kam //-me md da-ga«-EN-PAB 
ta uru A:a/-§/ at-tu-mus id.idigna e-te-bir 
Ina gir am-ma-te sd id.idigna 

2) ma-da-tu hi.a a-ta-har ina uru ta-bi-te a-sa- 
kan be-dak ina iti.su ud 6.kam ta uru fa- 
^/-/e at-tu-mus si-di id har-mis a-sa-bat 

3) //ftf uru ma-ga-ri-si a-sa-kan be-dak ta uru 
ma-ga-ri-si at-tum 4 -su si-di id ha-bur a-sa-bat 
uru sd-di-kan-ni a-sa-kan 

4) be-dak ma-da-tu sd uru sd-di-kan-ni 

KU.BABBAR KU.GI AN.NA.MES UTUL ZABAR.MES 

GU4.MES udu.mes at-ta-har ta uru &/-£//- 
/ra«-/z/ 

5) at-tu-mus ina uru qa-at-ni GAR-an be-dak 



stretching) from the opposite bank of the Tigris 
to Mount Lebanon and the Great Sea, the entire 
land Laqu, (and) the land Suhu including the city 
Rapiqu, He conquered from the source of the 
River Subnat to the interior of the land Nirbu. I 
brought within the boundaries of my land (the 
territory stretching) from the passes of Mount 
Kirruru to the land Gilzanu, from the opposite 
bank of the Lower Zab to the city Tll-Bari which 
is upstream from the land Zaban, from the city 
TTl-sa-Abtani to the city TtHa-Zabdani, (and) the 
cities Hirimu (and) Harutu (which are) fortresses 
of Kardunias. Finally, I have gained dominion 
over the entire extensive lands Nairi. 
ii 131b— 135) The city Calah I took in hand for 
renovation. I cleared away the old ruin hill (and) 
dug down to water level; I sank (the foundation 
pit) down to a depth of 120 layers of brick. I 
founded therein the temple of the god Ninurta, 
my lord. At that time I created with my skill this 
statue of the god Ninurta which had not existed 
previously as an icon of his great divinity out of 
the best stone of the mountain and red gold. I re- 
garded it as my great divinity in the city Calah. I 
appointed his festivals in the months Shebat and 
EluL I constructed this temple in its entirety. I 
made the dais of the god Ninurta, my lord, 
resplendent therein. I founded the temple(s) of the 
deities Sarrat-niphi, Sin, and Gula, the statue of 
the god Ea-§arru (and) the statue of the god 
Adad, the canal-inspector of heaven (and) un- 
derworld. 

iii l-26a) On the twenty-second day of the month 
Sivan, in the eponymy of Dagan-bela-usur, I 
moved from Calah, After crossing the Tigris, on 
the other side of the Tigris I received much trib- 
ute. I pitched camp (and) spent the night in the 
city Tabitu. On the sixth day of the month 
Tammuz I moved from the city Tabitu (and) 
made my way to the banks of the River Harmis. I 
pitched camp (and) spent the night in the city 
Magarisu. Moving on from the city Magarisu I 
made my way to the banks of the River Habur. I 
pitched camp (and) spent the night in the city 
Sadikannu. I received tribute from the city Sadi- 
kannu, silver, gold, tin, bronze casseroles, oxen, 



king': 'marvellous shepherd, fearless in battle, mighty flood- 
tide which has no opponent'. Cf. A. 0.1 01.1 i 13-14 and 
iii 1 15. ii 128-31 A.0.101.50 lines 10-19 omits sa bi-ta-ni Su- 

su KVR-ud ta kur ne-re-be, changing the translation to: 'I 
brought within the boundaries of my land (the territory 
stretching) from the source of the River Subnat to the passes 
of Mount Kirruru to the land Gilzanu ...* ii 134 I see no 



necessity to emend the text (see Schramm, EAK 2 p. 26). 
ii 134 na-la-ba-na: see Reiner, AfO 23 (1970) pp. 89-91 and 
CAD 11/1 (N) p. 199b. iii 1 Dagan-bela-usur: see Brinkman, 
ZA 59 (1969) pp. 234-38 and cf. JCS 29 (1977) pp. 60-61. 
iii 4 var, omits be-dak ... ku.gi changing the translation to '1 
pitched camp in the city Sadikannu, I received tribute from 
the city Sadikannu, tin, bronze casseroles, oxen, (and) sheep,' 



Ashurnasirpal n A. 0.101.1 



213 



ma-da-tu Sd uru qat-na-a-ia at-ta-har ta uru 
qa-at-ni at-tu-muS 

6) ina uru. BAD-kat-li-me a-sa-ka-an be-ddk ta 
VRU.BAD-kat-li-me at-tu-mus ina uru.e-/2#- 
lu-pe-e a-sa-kan be-dak ma-da-tu 

7) sd KUR.E-ha-lu-pe-e kilbabbar ku.gi 

AN.NA.MES UTUL ZABAR.MES TUG lu-blil-ti bfr- 

me gada.mes gu 4 .mes udu.mes at-ta-har 

8) ta VRV.t-ha-lu-pe-e a-tu-mus ina uru sir-qi 
a-sa-kan be-ddk ma-da-tu sd uru si-ir-qi-a-a 
ku.babbar ku.gi an.na.mes utul.mes 

GU4.MES 

9) udu.mes at-ta-har ta uru sir-qi at-tum 4 -mus 
ina uru su-up-ri a-sa-kan be-ddk ma-da-tu sd 
uru su-up-ra-a-a ku.babbar. mes 

10) KU.GI.MES AN.NA.MES UTUL.MES GU 4 .MES 

udu.mes at-ta-har ta uru su-up-ri-a at- 
tum^-mus ina uru na-qa-ra-ba-ni a-sa-kan 

11) be-ddk ma-da-tu sd uru na-qa-ra-ba-a-ni 

KU.BABBAR.MES KU.GI.MES AN.NA.MES 

utul.mes gu 4 .mes udu.mes at-ta-har TA URU 
na-qa-ra-ba-a-ni 

12) at-tu-mus ina pu-ut uru hi-in-da-a-ni a-sa- 
kan be-ddk uru hi-in-da-a-nu ina gir am- 
ma-te sd fD pu-rat-te sa-li 

13) ma-da-tu sd uru hi-in-da-na-a-a ku.babbar 

KU.GI.MES AN.NA.MES UTUL.MES GU4.MES 

udu.mes at-ta-har ta uru hi-in-da-a-ni 

14) at-tu-mus ina KUR-e ina ugu id pu-rat-te a- 
sa-kan be-ddk ta KUR-e at-ta-mus ina t- m Sd- 
ba-a-ia ina pu-ut uru ha-ri-di 

15) a-sa-kan be-ddk uru ha-ru-du ina gir am- 
ma-te sd *d pu-rat-te sa-li ta £- m sd-ba-a-ia 
at-tum^-mus ina sag uru an-at 

16) a-sa-kan be-ddk uru an-at ina murub 4 id 
pu-rat-te sa-li ta uru an-at at-tum 4 -mus uru 
su-u-ru uru dan-nu-ti-su sd 

17) m NiG.DU lu.gar.kur kur su-hi a-si-bi a-na 
erin.hi.a.mes kur kas-si-i dagal.mes it-ti- 
kil-ma a-na e-pes murub 4 u me a-na lib-bi-a 

18) it-ba-a uru a-si-bi ina 2 u*-me mit-hu-su ina 
lib-be as-kun TApa-an gis.tukul.mes-h dan- 
nu-te m NiG.Du ta 70 erin.mes-5w a-na 

19) su-zu-ub zi.mes-su a-na id pu-rat-te im-qu-ut 
uru KUR-ad 50 pit-hal-lu a-di erin.mes «sd» 
sa md AG-A-suM-^a man kur kar-du-ni-as 

20) m za-ab-da-a-nu ses-sw a-di 3 lim erin.mes ti- 
du-ki-su-nu m EN-A-AS lu.hal a-lik pa-an 
^rin.hi.a.meS-^m-ww it-ti-su-nu ina su u-sab- 
bi-ta 



(and) sheep, (iii 5) Moving on from the city Sadi- 
kannu I pitched camp (and) spent the night in the 
city Qatnu, I received tribute from the people of 
the city Qatnu. Moving on from the city Qatnu I 
pitched camp (and) spent the night in the city 
Dur-katlimmu. Moving on from the city Dur- 
katlimmu I pitched camp (and) spent the night in 
the city of BTt-Halupe. I received tribute from the 
city of BTt-Halupe, silver, gold, tin, bronze 
casseroles, linen garments with multi-coloured 
trim, oxen, (and) sheep. Moving on from the city 
of Blt-Halupe I pitched camp (and) spent the 
night in the city Sirqu. I received tribute from the 
people of the city Sirqu, silver, gold, tin, 
casseroles, oxen, (and) sheep. Moving on from 
the city Sirqu I pitched camp (and) spent the 
night in the city Supru. (iii 10) I received tribute 
from the people of the city Supru, silver, gold, 
tin, casseroles, oxen, (and) sheep. Moving on 
from the city Supru I pitched camp (and) spent 
the night in the city Naqarabanu. I received trib- 
ute from the city Naqarabanu, silver, gold, tin, 
casseroles, oxen, (and) sheep. Moving on from 
the city Naqarabanu I pitched camp (and) spent 
the night before the city Hindanu — Hindanu lies 
on the other bank of the Euphrates. I received 
tribute from the people of the city Hindanu, 
silver, gold, tin, casseroles, oxen, (and) sheep. 
Moving on from the city Hindanu I pitched camp 
(and) spent the night in a mountain by the 
Euphrates. Moving on from the mountain (iii 15) 
I pitched camp (and) spent the night among the 
BTt-Sabi before the city Haridu — Haridu lies on 
the other bank of the Euphrates. Moving on from 
the BTt-Sabi I pitched camp (and) spent the night 
before the city Anat — Anat lies (on an island) in 
the Euphrates. Moving on from the city Anat I 
besieged the city Suru, the fortified city of 
Kudurru, governor of the land Suhu. Trusting in 
extensive Kassite troops he attacked me to wage 
war and battle. I besieged the city (and) on the 
second day fought my way inside. In the face of 
my mighty weapons, Kudurru with 70 of his sol- 
diers fell back to the Euphrates to save his life. I 
conquered the city, (iii 20) I captured 50 cavalry- 
men together with the troops of Nabu-apla- 
iddina, king of Kardunias, Zabdanu his brother 
with 3,000 fightingnnen, (and) Bel-apla-iddina the 
diviner, their commanding officer. I felled with 
the sword many soldiers. I carried off silver, gold, 



iii 7 King mistakenly has udu.mes at-ta-har 'I received sheep* 
twice, iii 8 var. kur land' for uru 'city' before BTt-Halupe, 
iii 8 var. omits utul.mes 'casseroles', iii 10 var. su-up-ri 



(omits -a), iii 15 var. ha-ri-du. iii 17 ""nig.du lu.gar.kur: 
see Brinkman, PKB p. 185 n. 1129. 



214 



Ashurnasirpal n A. 0.101.1 



21) erin.mes ma-a^-du-te ina gis.tukul.meS h- 
sam-qit ku.babbar ku.glmes an.na.mes 

UTUL.MES NA 4 KUR-/ SU-qU-rU NIG.GA E.GAL-5W 

22) GIS.GIGIR.MES-JW ANSE.KUR.RA.ME§ LAL-at GIS 

ni-ri-su hal-lu-up-ti erin.mes hal-lu-up-ti 

ANSE.KUR.RA.MES MUNUS.ERIM.MES 
E.GAL.MES-5W Sal-la-SU 

23) DUGUD-ta as-lul uru ap-pul a-qur li-ti u da- 
na-ni ugu kur su-hi ds-kun pul-ha-at EN-ti-a 
a-di kur kar-du-ni-ds KVR-ud 

24) su-ri-bat Gis.TUKUL.MES-a kur kai-du u-sa- 
hi-ip ugu KUR.MES-m sd a-ha-at id pu-rat-te 
na-mu-ra-ti at-bu-uk sa-lam 

25) bu-na-ni-ia du-ms li-ti u dan-na-ni ina lib-bi 
al-tu-ur ina uru su-u-ri u-se-zi-iz m as-sur- 
pab-a man sd ta-na-ta-M 

26) da-na-a-nu ka-ia-ma-nu-ma a-na hu-ri-ib-te 
ta-ru-su pa-nu-su a-na si-tap-ru-su hu-te-ni-su 
i-sa-ha sk-sii ina uru kal-hi us-ba-ku 

27) te-e-mu ut-te-ru-ni ma-a lu.mes-? kur la-qa- 
a-a uru hi-in-da-a-nu kur su-hi a-na si-hir- 
ti-su-nu it-ta-bal-ku-tu id pu-rat-tu 

28) e-tab-ru ina iti.sig 4 ud 18.kam is-tu uru 
kal-hi at-tum*-mus id.hal.hal e-te-bir hu-ri- 
ib-tu a-sab-ta a-na uru su-u-ri 

29) sd i.vRV-ha-Iu-pe-e aq-tt-rib gis.ma.mes sd 
ra-me-ni-ia ina uru su-u-ri e-tap-ds a-na sag 
id pu-rat-te a-as-bat a-di 

30) hi-in-qi sd id pu-rat-te at-ta-rid uru.didli sd 
m he-en- ti-DiNGm "V^-dingir kur la-qa-a-a 
KUR-wrf GAZ.MES-su-nu a-duk sal-la-su-nu 

31) as-lul uru.didli a-pul a-qur ina izi.mes ds- 
ru-up ina ger-ri-ia-ma a-su-uh-ra ta pi-a-te sd 
id ha -bur a-di 

32) uru si-ba-te sd kur su-hi uru.didli.mes sd 
gir an-na-te sd id pu-rat-te sd kur la-qe-e sd 
kur su-hi ap-pul a-qur ina izi.mes ds-ru-up 
burui4.mes-M~«w e-si-di 4 me 70 Erin.mes 

33) ti-du-ki-su-nu ina gis.tukul.mes u-sam-qit 30 
ti.la.mes u-sab-bi-ta ina gis zi-qi-be u-ze-qi- 
be ina gis.ma.mes sd e-pu-su-ni 

34) gis.ma.mes sd kus.duh.si-^ sd ina hu-li is-tu- 
nis i-du-la-a-ni ina uru ha-ri-di id pu-rat-tu 
lu e-bir kur su-ha-a-ia kur la-qa-a-a 

35) uru hi-in-da-na-a-a a-na gi-pis 

GlS.GlGIK.UES-SU-nU ERlN.HhA.MES-SU-nU 

A.MES-su-nu it-tdk-lu-ma 6 lim 



tin, casseroles, (and) precious stone of the moun- 
tain, the property of his palace, his chariots, 
teams of horses, equipment for troops, equipment 
for horses, his palace women, (and) valuable 
booty from him. I razed (and) destroyed the city. 
(Thus) I established my victory and strength over 
the land Suhu; fear of my dominion reached as 
far as Kardunias; awe of my weapons over- 
whelmed Chaldea; I unleashed my brilliance upon 
the mountains on the banks of the Euphrates, (iii 
25) I made an image of myself (and) wrote 
thereon (an account of) my victory and strength. I 
erected (it) in the city Sura. (The inscription 
reads): 'Ashurnasirpal, the king whose strength is 
constantly praiseworthy, whose face is turned to- 
wards the desert, who delights in loosing his jave- 
lin.' 

iii 26b-31a) While I was in Calah this report was 
brought back to me: 'All of the people of the land 
Laqu, the city Hindanu, (and) the land Suhu have 
rebelled (and) crossed the Euphrates. 5 On the 
eighteenth day of the month Sivan I moved from 
Calah. After crossing the Tigris 1 took to the 
desert (and) approached the city Sum which be- 
longs to Bit-Halupe. I built my own boats in the 
city Sum (and) made my way towards the 
Euphrates. I went down as far as the narrows of 
the Euphrates. 1 conquered the cities of Henti-ili 
(and) Azi-ili, the Laqu. I massacred them, carried 
off captives from them, razed, destroyed, (and) 
burnt (their) cities. 

iii 31b-44a) In (the course of) my campaign I 
turned (aside and) razed, destroyed, (and) burnt 
the cities which are on this bank of the Euphrates 
(and) which (belong to) the land Laqu (and) the 
land Suhu, from the mouth of the River Habur as 
far as the city Sibatu of the land Suhu. I reaped 
their harvests. I felled with the sword 470 of their 
fighting- men. I captured 30 alive (and) erected 
(them) on stakes. I crossed the Euphrates at the 
city Haridu by means of the boats which I had 
made, rafts (made of inflated) goatskins which 
had moved along the road simultaneously (with 
the army). The Suhu, Laqu, (and) (iii 35) 
Hindanu, trusting in the massiveness of their 
chariotry, troops, (and) might, mustered 6,000 of 
their troops (and) attacked me to wage war and 



iii 24-26 Cf. Brinkman, PKB p. 185 and n. 1132. iii 24 Su- 
n-bat: see the note to ii 78. iii 24 var. omits ~a *my' after 
gis.tukul.mes 'weapons', iii 27 var, uru 'city* for kur land' 
before Laqu. iii 29 var. i.TJRU-hu-lu-pe-e. iii 32 var. omits Sd 
kur su-hi ap-pul a-qur ina izi.mes ds-ru-up changing the 
translation to : 'I turned (aside and) reaped the harvest of the 



cities which are on this bank of the Euphrates (and) which 
(belong to) the city Laqii, from the mouth of the River Habur 
as far as the city Sibatu of the land Suhu.' iii 33 var. '20' for 
'30'. iii 33-34 var. omits sd e-pu-su-ni gis.ma.mes sd 
Kus.DUH.si-e 'which I had made, rafts (made of inflated) 
goatskins', iii 34 var, su-ha-a. 



Ashur nasir pal n A . . 1 1 . 1 



215 



ERiN.Hi.A.MES-iw-«w id-ku-ni a-na e-pes 

MURUB 4 U ME 

36) a-na gaba-iq it-bu-ni it-te-su-nu am-da-hi-is 
BADs.BADs-M-nu ds-kun GIS.GIGIR.MES-SU-nU 
a-si-H 6 lim 5 me muq-tab-li-su-nu ina 
Gis.TUKUL.MLS u-sam-qit si-ta-te-su-nu 

37) ina su-me-e ina mu-da-bi-ri id pu-rat-tu e-ktit 
ta uru ha-ri-di sd kur su-hi a~di uru ki-pi- 
na uRu.MEs-m sd uru hi-in-da-na-a-a 

38) sd kur la-qa-a-a sd gir am-ma-te Kim-ud 
GAZMizs-su-m< a-duk sal-la-su-nu as-lul 
uru,didli a-pul a-qur ina izi.mes ds-ru-up 
m ^r-z/-DiNGiR kur la-qa-a-a 

39) a-na a.mes-su it-ti-kil-ma ina uru ki-pi-na 
ne-pi-ri lu is-bat it-ti-su-nu am-da-hi-is is-tu 
uru ki-pi-na a-pi-ik-ta-su ds-kun 1 lim 
erin.mes 

40) ti-du-ki-M a-duk gis.gigir.mes-s« a-si-H sal- 
la-su hi.a.mes as-lul DiNGiR.MES-m'-£w u-te-ra 
a-na su-zu-ub zlmes-sw kur-w mar-su kur 
bi-su-ru sd sag 

41) id pu-rat-te lu is-bat ina 2 u^-me egir-sw ar- 
te-di si-ta-at erin.hi.a.mes-sw ina 
gis.tukul.mes u-sam-qit re-eh-ta-su-nu kur- 
u id pu-rat-tu lu e-kul a-di 

42) uru du-um-me-te uru az-mw uru.didli sd 
dumu a-di-ni ar-di-su si-ta-at erin.hla.mes- 
sti ina gis.tukul.mes u-sam-qit sal-la-su 
DucuD-ta GL4.MES-5W udu se-ni~su 

43) sd ki-ma mul.mes an-£ me-nu-ta la i-su-ii as- 
lul ina Ut-me-su-ma m i-la-a kur la-qa-a-a 
gis.gigir.meS-^w ra-ki-su 5 me erin.hi.a.mes- 
sii lu a-su-ha 

44) a-na KUR-ia as-sur ub-la uru du-um-mu-tii 
uru az-tnu KVR-ud a-pul a-qur ina izi.meS 
GiBiL-up ina hi-in-qi sd id pu-rat-te at-ti-si ina 
ge-ri-ia-ma 

45) a-su-uh-ra "Vzhdingir ta igi 
gis.tukul.mes-gf kal.mes ana su-zu-ub 
ZLMES-5W e-li m i-la-a lu na-si-ku sd kur la- 
qe-e erin.hi.a.mes-sm gis.gigir.mes-sw lal-s« 

46) a-su-ha a-na VRV-ia as-sur ub-la m he-em-ti- 
dingir kur la-qa-a-a ina uru-sw e-sir-su ina 
Gis.tukul-ti as-sur en-ot ta igi gis.tukul.mes- 
a kal.mes ME-ia sit-mu-ri 

47) A.MES-a gft-ma-la-ti ip-ldh-ma nig.ga e.gal- 
su ku.babbar ku.gi an.na.mes zabar.mes 
utul zarar tug lu-bul-ti bir-me sal-la-su 
DUGUD-to am-hur-ma gun 

48) ma-da-tu ugu Sd pa-an u-sd-te-er vGV-su-nu 
as-kun ina m-me-su-ma 40 gu 4 .am.mes-/i/ 



battle. I fought with them (and) inflicted upon 
them a defeat. I destroyed their chariotry, I felled 
6,500 of their men-at-arms with the sword, (and) 
the rest of them the Euphrates consumed because 
of the thirst (they suffered) in the desert. I con- 
quered from the city Haridu of the land Suhu as 
far as the city Kipinu, cities of the Hindanu (and) 
Laqu (and) which were on the other bank, I mas- 
sacred them, carried off captives from them, 
razed, destroyed, (and) burnt (their) cities. Azi-ili, 
the Laqu, trusting in his (own) might, seized the 
crossing at the city Kipinu. I fought with them 
(and) away from Kipinu I brought about his de- 
feat, (hi 40) I massacred 1,000 of his fighting 
men, destroyed his chariotry, carried off many 
captives from him, (and) brought away his gods. 
To save his life he took to a rugged mountain, 
Mount Bisuru, in the direction of the Euphrates. 
On the next day I went after him. I felled with 
the sword the rest of his soldiers (and) their 
remains the mountain (and) the Euphrates con- 
sumed. I went after him as far as the cities 
Dummetu (and) Azmu, cities of Blt-Adini. I felled 
with the sword the rest of his troops (and) carried 
off from him valuable booty, oxen, (and) sheep 
which, like the stars of heaven, had no number. 
At that time I uprooted Ila, the Laqu, his har- 
nessed chariots, (and) 500 of his troops. I brought 
(them) to my land Assur. I conquered, razed, des- 
troyed, (and) burnt the cities Dummetu (and) 
Azmu. I emerged from the narrows of the 
Euphrates. 

iii 44b-48a) In (the course of) my campaign I 
turned (aside). Azi-ili vanished in the face of my 
mighty weapons in order to save his life. I 
uprooted Ila, sheikh of the land Laqu, his troops, 
(and) his chariots with teams. I brought (them) to 
my city Assur. I confined Hemti-ili, the Laqu, in 
his city. With the support of Assur, my lord, he 
took fright in face of my mighty weapons, my 
fierce battle, (and) my perfect power (and) I re- 
ceived the property of his palace, silver, gold, tin, 
bronze, bronze casseroles, garments with multi- 
coloured trim, his valuable booty. In addition, I 
imposed upon them more tribute (and) tax than 
ever before. 



iii 48b-50a) At that time I killed 40 strong wild 
bulls on the other bank of the Euphrates. I 



iii 36 var. im-da-hiis 'he fought', iii 38 var. uru for kur 
before la-qa-a-a (both occurrences), iii 45 var. m a-zi~lu. 



iii 45 var. la-qa-e. iii 46 var. " l hi-am-ti-DWGiR. Note the 
orthography m he-en-ti-i>iHGiR in iii 30. iii 48 var. '50* for '40'. 



216 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101.1 



kal.mes ina gir am-ma-te sd id pu-rat-te a- 

duk 8 GU4.AM.MES 

49) ti.la.mes ina su vm-at 20 ga.num.musen.mes 
a-duk 20 ga.nuu.musen.mes ti.mes ina su 
DiB-/a 2 uru.mes-w/ //i# ugu in pu-rat-te ad- 
di 1 i/ia gir an-na-te 

50) jtf Id pu-rat-ti uru tor- m AS-PAB-A mu-jw a6-W 
1 i/ifl gir am-ma-te sd id pu-rat-te ne-bar-ti- 
as-sur mj-su ab-bi ina iti.sig 4 ud 20.kam ta 
uru kal-hi at-tu-mus 

51) id, hal, hal e-te-bir a-na KVR.£- m a-di-ni a-lik 
a-na uru kap-ra-bi uru dan-nu-ti-su-nu aq- 
ti-rib uru KAi-an dan-nis gim dungu ta AN-e 
su-qa-lu-la 

52) erin.mes a-na erin.hla.mes-5w-«w hi.a.mes 
it-ddk-lu-ma la-a ur-du-ni GiR.n-/a la-a is-bu- 
tii ina qi-bit as-sur en GAL-e en-a u d URi.GAL 
a-lik iGi-ia uru a-si-bi 

53) ina pil-se na-pi-li sa-a-bi-te uru KVR-ad 
GAZ.MES-sii-nu hla.mes a-duk 8 me muq- 
tab-li-su-nu u-ne-pi-is sal-la-su-nu nig.su-5u- 
nu ds-lu-la 2 lim 5 me 

54) ERiN.Hi.A.MES-M-nw a-su-ha ina uru kal-hi 
u-sd-as-bit uru ap-pul aq-qur ina izi.mes 
gibil a-kul-su pul-hi me-lam-me as-sur en-at 
ugu t-a-di-ni al-ta-kan 

55) ina UA-me-sii-ma ma-da-tu sd m a-hu-ni dumu 
a-di-ni sd m ha-bi-ni uRu.DU6-NA 4 -a-tf 
ku.babbar.mes ku.gi.mes an.na.mes 
zabar.mes tug lu-bul-ti bir-me 
tug.gada.mes gis.ur.mes 

56) gis e-re-ni ni-sir-ti e.gal-sm am-hur li-ti-su-nu 
as-bat re-mu-tu ds-ku-na-ds-su-nu ina iti.gu 4 
ud 8.kam ta uru kal-hi at-tu-mus 

ID. HAL. HAL 

57) e-te-bir a-na uru gar-ga-mis sd kur hat-te a- 
sa-bat ar-hu a-na t-ba-hi-a-ni aq-ti-rib ma- 
da-tu sd dumu ba-hi-a-ni gis.gigir.mes ra-ki- 
su anse.kur.ra.mes ku.babbar.mes 

58) ku.gi.mes an.na.mes zabar.mes utul zabar 
am-hur gis.gigir.mes pit-hal-lu lu zu-ku sd 
dumu ba-hi-a-ni i-si-ia a-se-qe ta t-ba-hi-a-ni 
at-tu-mus 

59) a-na kur a-zal-li aq-ti-rib ma-da-tu sd 
md isKUR- :! /-me kur zal-la-a-ia gis.gigir.mes 
ra-ki-su anse.kur.ra.mes ku.babbar.mes 
ku.gi.mes an.na.mes zabar 

60) utul zabar gu4.mes udu.mes gestin.mes at- 
ta-har gis.gigir.mes pit-hal-lu lu zu-ku i-si-ia 



captured eight wild bulls alive. I killed 20 os- 
triches. I captured 20 ostriches alive. I founded 
two cities on the Euphrates, one on this bank of 
the Euphrates (which) I called Kar-Ashurnasirpai 
(and) one on the other bank of the Euphrates 
(which) I called Nebarti-Assur. 
iii 50b-54) On the twentieth day of the month 
Sivan I moved from Calah. After crossing the 
Tigris I marched to the land Blt-Adini (and) ap- 
proached the city Kaprabu, their fortified city. 
The city was well fortified; it hovered like a cloud 
in the sky. The people, trusting in their numerous 
troops, did not come down (and) submit to me. 
By the command of Assur, the great lord, my 
lord, and the divine standard which goes before 
me, I besieged the city (and) conquered it by 
means of tunnels, battering-rams, (and) siege- 
towers. I massacred many of them, I slew 800 of 
their men-at-arms, (and) carried off captives (and) 
property from them. I uprooted 2,500 of their 
troops (and) settled them in Calah. I razed, des- 
troyed, burnt, (and) consumed the city. (Thus) I 
imposed awe of the radiance of Assur, my lord, 
upon Blt-Adini. 



iii 55-56a) At that time I received tribute from 
Ahunu, a man of Blt-Adini, (and) from Habinu, 
a man of the city TTl-abni, silver, gold, tin, 
bronze, linen garments with multi-coloured trim, 
cedar logs, the treasure of his palace. I took hos- 
tages from them (and) showed them mercy, 
iii 56b-77a) On the eighth day of the month lyyar 
I moved from Calah. After crossing the Tigris I 
set out for the city Carchemish of the land Hatti 
(and) approached BTt-Bahiani. I received tribute 
from Blt-Bahiani, harnessed chariots, horses, 
silver, gold, tin, bronze, (and) bronze casseroles. I 
took with me the chariots, cavalry, (and) infantry 
of BTt-Bahiani. Moving on from BTt-Bahiani I ap- 
proached the land Azallu. (iii 60) I received trib- 
ute from Adad- 3 ime, the (A)zailu, harnessed 
chariots, horses, silver, gold, tin, bronze, bronze 
casseroles, oxen, sheep, (and) wine, I took with 
me the chariots, cavalry, (and) infantry. Moving 
on from the land Azallu I approached Blt-Adini. 
I received tribute from Ahunu, a man of BTt- 
Adini, silver, gold, tin, bronze, bronze casseroles, 
ivory dishes, ivory couches, ivory chests, ivory 
thrones decorated with silver (and) gold, gold 



iii 52 d uRLGAL 'divine standard'. See the note to A. 0.98.1 line 
48, iii 53 var. 2 lim 4 me '2,400'. iii 55 var. uru. DU 6 -NA 4 -ff or 
uru ,du s-ab-na-a-a . iii 57 var. kur land* for uru 'city* before 



Carchemish. iii 57 var. inserts kur 'land' before BTt-Bahiani. 
iii 59 var. md isKUR-?m-me. iii 60 var. omits zabar 'bronze' 
after utul 'casseroles'. 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101.1 



217 



a-se-qe ta kur a-zal-li at-tu-mus a-na t-a-di- 
ni aq-ti-hb 

61) ma-da- tu sd m a-hu-ni dumu a-di-ni 

KU.BABBAR.MES KU.GI. MES AN.NA.MES ZABAR 
UTUL.MES ZABAR GIS.BANSUR ZU.MES GIS.NA 
ZU.MES GIS.NA5.MES ZU.MES 

62) GIS.AS.TI.MES ZU.MES KU.BABBAR KU.GI 
GAR.RA.MES HAR.MES KU.GI Stt-^U-ri KU.GI §d 

tam-li-te ga-gi ku.gi gIr ku.gi gu 4 .mes 
udu.mes gestin.mes ma-da-ta-sii am-hur 

63) gis.gigir.mes pit-hal-lu lu zu-ku sd m a-hu-ni 
i-si-ia a-se-qe ina m-me-su-ma ma-da-tu sd 
m ha-bi-ni URU.DU 6 -NA4-a-tf 4 ma.na 

KU.BABBAR.MES 4 ME UDU.MES am-hur-SU 

64) 10 MA.NA KU.BABBAR.MES ina MU 1.KAM-5W 

ma-da- tu ina ugu-sm gar-ma ta KUR.E-a-di-ni 
at-tu-mus id.a.rad ina <a>.kal-s<z ina 

GIS.MA.MES KUS.DUH,SI-e lU-U 

65) e-bir a-na kur gar-ga-mis aq-ti-rib ma-da-tu 
sd m sa-an-ga-ra man kur hat-te 20 gun 
ku.babbar sa-^u-ri ku.gi har ku.gi gir.mes 
ku.gi 1 me gun 

66) ZABAR 2 ME 50 GUN AN. BAR. MES tap-hi. MES 

zabar ha-ri-a-te zabar nar-ma-ka-te zabar 
ki.ne zabar u-nu-ut emal-su hi.a.mes sd 

KI.LA-Sd 

67) la-a sab-ta-at gis.na.mes gis.tug.mes 

GIS.AS.TI.MES GIS.TUG.MES GIS.BANSUR. ME§ 
GIS.TUG.MES ZU.MES GAR.RA.MES 2 ME 

munus.kal.tur.mes tug lu-bul-ti bir-me 

68) TUG.GADA.MES SIK.ZA.GIN.MI SIK.ZA.GIN.SA5 
NA4.GIS.NUu.GAL ZU.MES AM. SI. MES GIS.GIGIR 

eb-bi-tu gis ne-mat-ti ku.gi sd tam-li-te si- 
mat MAN-//-5W am-hur-M gis.gigir.mes 

69) pit-hal-lu lu zu-ku sd uru gar-ga-mis i-si-ia 
a-se-qe man.mes-wi sd kur.kur uif-su-nu a- 
na ugu-/# ur-du-ni GiR.n-a is-sab-tu li-ti-su- 
nu as-bat 

70) pa-na-tu-ia uk-ti-lu a-na kur lab-na-na du- 
ku ta kur gar-ga-mis at-tu-mus ina bi-rit 
kur mun-zi-ga-ni kur ha-mur-ga a-sa-bat 

71) kur a-ha-a-nu a-na GUB-ia u-ta-sir 4 a-na uru 
ha-za-zi sd m lu-bar-na kur pa-ti-na-a-a aq-ti- 
rib ku.gi.mes tug lu-bul-ti tug.gada.mes at- 
ta-har 

72) e-te-tiq id ap-re-e e-te-bxr a-sa-kan be-dak ta 
ugu id ap-re-e at-tu-mus a-na uru ku-nu-lu-a 



bracelets, gold rings with trimming, gold neck- 
laces, a gold dagger, oxen, sheep, (and) wine. I 
took with me the chariots, cavalry, (and) infantry 
of Ahunu. At that time I received tribute from 
Habinu, a man of the city TTl-abni ? four minas of 
silver (and) 400 sheep (and) I imposed upon him 
as annual tribute 10 minas of silver. Moving on 
from the land Blt-Adini (iii 65) I crossed the 
Euphrates, which was in flood, in rafts (made of 
inflated) goatskins (and) approached the land 
Carchemish. I received tribute from Sangara, king 
of the land Hatti, 20 talents of silver, a gold ring, 
a gold bracelet, gold daggers, 100 talents of 
bronze, 250 talents of iron, bronze (tubs), bronze 
pails, bronze bath-tubs, a bronze oven, many or- 
naments from his palace the weight of which 
could not be determined, beds of boxwood, 
thrones of boxwood, dishes of boxwood 
decorated with ivory, 200 adolescent girls, linen 
garments with multi-coloured trim, purple wool, 
red-purple wool, g/5«wga//w-alaba$ter, elephants' 
tusks, a chariot of polished (gold), a gold couch 
with trimming — (objects) befitting his royalty. I 
took with me the chariots, cavalry, (and) infantry 
of the city Carchemish. All the kings of the lands 
came down (and) submitted to mc. 1 took from 
them hostages (and) (iii 70) they were kept in my 
presence on the march to Mount Lebanon (lit, 
'(and) they marched to Mount Lebanon'). Moving 
on from the land Carchemish I took the way 
between Mounts Munziganu (and) Hamurga. 
Leaving Mount Ahanu on my left I approached 
the city Hazazu which (was ruled by) Lubarna, 
the Patinu. I received gold (and) linen garments. 
Passing on I crossed the River Apre, pitched 
camp (and) spent the night. Moving on from the 
River Apre I approached the city Kunulua, the 
royal city of Lubarna, the Patinu. He took fright 
in the face of my raging weapons (and) fierce bat- 
tle and submitted to me to save his life. I received 
as his tribute 20 talents of silver, one talent of 
gold, 100 talents of tin, 100 talents of iron, 1,000 
oxen, 10,000 sheep, 1,000 linen garments with 
multi-coloured trim, (iii 75) decorated couches of 
boxwood with trimming, beds of boxwood, 
decorated beds with trimming, many dishes of 
ivory (and) boxwood, many ornaments from his 



iii 63 var. VRV.DU^-ab-na-a-a. iii 66 For the beginning of the 
line see Schramm, EAK 2 p. 24 (to ii 64). iii 66 var. omits 
tap-hi. mes (in error) 'tubs'. Regarding tap-hi see the note to 
ii 64, iii 66 hariate siparri narmakate siparri "bronze pails, 
bronze bath-tubs': see Oppenheim, ANET 3 p. 275 and n. 2. 
iii 68 var. omits tug.gada.mes linen garments*, iii 69 var. 
omits pit-hal-lu ... a-se-qe *I took with me the chariots, 



cavalry, (and) infantry of the city Carchemish'. iii 69 var. sd 
kur hat-ta~a-a 'of the Hittites' for sd uru gar-ga-mis 'of the 
city Carchemish'. iii 69 ur-du-ni (they) came down to me 1 : so 
Le Gac. King has uv-ku-ni '(they) came to me*, iii 70 w-ku 
= illiku: not aldku as suggested by Aro, StOr 26 p. 212 6.227. 
iii 71 pa-ti-na-a-a 'the Patinu': not hat-ti-na-a-a 'the Hattinu*. 
See Hawkins, Iraq 36 (1974) p. 81. 



218 



Ashurnasirpal ii A.0.10L1 



uru MAN-ti-M sd m lu-bar-na kur pa-ti-na-a-a 

73) aq-tf-rib ta pa-an gis.tukul.mes ez-zu-te 
ME-ia sit-mu-ri ip-ldh-ma a-na su-zu-ub 

Z1.MES-5W GIR.II-tf IS-bat 20 GUN KU.BABBAR 1 
GUN KU.GI 

74) 1 ME GUN AN.NA.MES 1 ME GUN AN.BAR.MES 1 
LIM GU4.MES 10 LIM UDU.MES 1 LIM TUG lu- 

bul-ti bir-me tug.gada.mes gis ne-mat-ti 
gis.tug.mes sa tam-U-te 

75) uh-hu-za-te gis.na.mes gis.tug.mes 
gis.na.mes sa tam-U-te gar.ra.mes 
gis.bansur.mes zu.mes gis.tug.mes hi.a.mes 

U-nU-Ut E.GAL-5W HI.A.MES M KI.LA-&7 

76) la-a sab-ta-at 10 munus.nar.mes 
dumu.munus ses-su ta nu-du-ni-sd [ma]-a^-di 
pa-gu-tu GAL-/w musen.mes gal.mes ma-da- 
tu-su am-hur-su a-na su-a-su re-mu-tu 

77) ds-ku-na-su gis.gigir.mes pit-hal-lu lu zu-ku 
Sd kur pa-ti-na-a-a i-si-ia a-se-qe li-ti-e-Sii 
as-bat ina u 4 -me-su-ma ma-da-tu Sd m gu-u-si 

78) kur ia-ha-na-a-a ku.babbar ku.gi an.na.mes 
[...] gu 4 .mes udu.mes tug lu-bul-ti bir-me 
tug.gada.mes at-ta-har ta uru ku-nu-lu-a 
uru MAN-ti-M sd m lu-bar-na 

79) kur pa-ti-na-a-a at-tu-mus id \a-ra-an\-tu e- 
te-bir ina ugu id a-ra-an-te GAR-an be-dak ta 
ugu id a-ra-an-te at-tu-mus ina bi-rit 

80) kur ia-ra-qi kur ia-ah-tu-ri a-sa-bat kur 
[...]-A:w a-ta-bdl-kdt ina ugu id sa-an-gu-ra 
GAR-an ta ugu id sa-an-gu-ra at-tu-mus ina 
bi-rit 

81) kur sa-ra-ti-ni kur qdl-pa-a-ni a-sa-bat ina 
ugu [„.]-ba-meS GAR-an a-na uru a-ri-bu-a 
uru dan-nu-ti-Su sd m iu-bar-na kur pa-ti-na- 
a-a KV4-ba 

82) uru a-na ra-me-ni-ia as-bat se.am.mes u 
se.in.nu sd kur lu-hu-ti e-si-di ina sa dub-wA: 
ta-si-H-tu ina e.gal-su GAR-un Ltj.MES-e kur 
ds-su-ra-a-a 

83) ina tib-bi u~se-sib ki-i ina uru a-ri-bu-a us- 
ba-ku-ni uru.mes-/?/ sd kur lu-hu-ti KUR-ac/ 
GAz.MES-su-nu HLA.MBS-su-nu a-duk ap-piil 
aq-qur ina izlmes 

84) ds-ru-up erin.mes tlla.mes ina su u-$ab-bi- 
ta ina gis zi-qi-bi ina pu-ui uru.didli-.sw-/iw 
u-za-qib ina u^-me-su-ma si-di kur lab-na-na 
lu as-bat a-na tam-di 

85) GAL-te sd kur a-mur-ri lu-u e-li ina a.ab.ba 

GAL-fe GIS.TUKUL.MES-a lu U-IU 



palace the weight of which could not be deter- 
mined, 10 female singers, his brother's daughter 
with her rich dowry, a large female monkey, 
(and) ducks. As for him, I showed him mercy. I 
took with me the chariots, cavalry, (and) infantry 
of the Patinu (and also) took hostages from him. 



iii 77b-84a) At that time 1 received tribute from 
Gusu, a man of the land Iahanu, silver, gold, tin, 
[iron, bronze], oxen, sheep, (and) linen garments 
with multi-coloured trim. Moving on from the 
city Kunulua, the royal city of Lubarna, the 
Patinu, 1 crossed the River [Oron]tes. I pitched 
camp (and) spent the night by the Orontes. Mov- 
ing on from the Orontes (iii 80) I took the way 
between Mounts laraqu (and) Iahturu. I crossed 
Mount [,..]ku (and) pitched camp by the River 
Sangurru. Moving on from the River Sangurru I 
took the way between Mounts Saratinu (and) 
Qalpanu (and) pitched camp by [the River 
...]bamesh. I entered the city Aribua, the fortified 
city of Lubarna, the Patinu, (and) took the city in 
hand for myself. I reaped the barley and straw of 
the land Luhutu (and) stored (it) inside. I staged a 
banquet in his palace. I settled people of Assyria 
in (the city). While I was in the city Aribua I con- 
quered the cities of the land Luhutu. I massacred 
many of their (inhabitants), I razed, destroyed, 
(and) burnt. I captured soldiers alive (and) im- 
paled (them) on stakes before their cities. 



iii 84b-92a) At that time I made my way to the 
slopes of Mount Lebanon (and) went up to the 
Great Sea of the land Amurru. I cleansed my 
weapons in the Great Sea (and) made sacrifices to 
the gods. I received tribute from the kings of the 
sea coast, from the lands of the people of Tyre, 



Iii 76 10 could instead be read u 4 and\ iii 76 musen.mes 
gal.mes *ducks* (lit. 'great birds*): var. has (in error) en.mes 
gal.mes "great lords', iii 80 var. ia-^a-tu-ri. iii 81 qat-pa-a-ni: 
Le Gac. King has ^dup^-pa-a-ni. Cf. Unger, RLA 2 p. 241a 



and Schramm, EAK pp. 26-27. iii 81 [. . ,)-ba-mes: J. Lewy, 
Orientalia ns 21 (1952) p. 400 (ef. Schramm, EAK 2 p. 27), 
suggests [a.ab].ba.mes *the Lakes'. 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101.1 



219 



UDILSISKUR.MES a-na DINGIR.MES-fl/ iu US-bat 

ma-da-tu sd man.mes-w sd si-di a.ab.ba 

86) sd kur sur-ra-a-a kur si-du-na-a-a kur gu- 
bal-a-a kur ma-hal-ia-ta-a-a kur ma-i-za-a-a 
kur ka-i-za-a-a kur a-mur-ra-a-a it uru #r- 

87) 5a MURUB 4 A.AB.BA KU.BABBAR.MES KU.GI.MES 
AN.NA.MES ZABAR.MES UTUL ZABAR TUG lu- 

bul-ti bir-me tug.gada.mes pa-gu-tu GAL-tu 
pa-gu-tu JVK-tu 

88) GIS.ESI.MES GIS.TUG.MES ZU.MES flQ-hi-ri bi- 

nu-ut tam-di ma-da-ta-M-nu am-hur GiR.iw'a 
is-bu-tu a-na KUR-e ha-ma-ni lu-u e-li 

GIS.UR.MES 

89) gis e-re-ni gis.sur.m1n gis ddp-ra-ni 
gis.llmes iu-ti ak-kis udu.siskur.mes a-na 
DiNGiR.MEs-«/'-/a lu QS-bat a-su-me-tu sd qur- 
di-ia dv-us ina lib-bi ds-qup 

90) gis.ur.mes gis e-re-ni is-tu kur ha-ma-ni na- 
sd-ku Dv-ka a-na e-sdr-ra a-na t-ia-as-ma-ku 
e hi-da-te a-na e d 30 u d uTU dingir.mes 
ku.mes 

91) a-na kur gis me-eh-ri,ME$ a-lik kur gis me- 
eh-ri t ME$ ana si-hir-ti-sd ak-sud gis.ur.mes sd 
gis me-eh-ri.MES a-ki-si a-na uru ni-nu-a 

92) ub-la a-na d iNANNA be-lat uru ni-na-a 
GASAN-/a nig.ba ina li-me md uju-nu-ri ina 
qi-bit as-sur en GAL-e EN-ia ina iti.gu 4 ud 
13.kam is-tu 

93) uru kal-hi at-tu-mus Id.hal.hal e-te-bir a-na 
kur qi-pa-ni at-ta-rad ma-da-tu sd 
LU.EN.URU.MES-te sd kur qi-pa-ni ina uru 
hu-zi-ri-na 

94) am-hur ki-i ina uru hu-zi-ri-na-ma us-ba- 
ku-ni ma-da-tu sd m it-ti-^i kur zal-la-a-ia 
m gi-ri-da-di kur ds-sd-a-ia ku.babbar.mes 

95) ku.gi.mes gu 4 .mes udu.mes am-hur ina w 4 - 
me-su-nu gis.ur.mes gis e-re-ni 
ku.babbar.mes ku.gi.mes ma-da-tu sd m qa- 
ta-zi-li 

96) kur ku-mu-ha-a-ia am-hur is-tu uru hu-zi- 
ri-na at-tu-mus si-di id pu-rat-te a-na e-le-ni 
Din-bat kur ku-ub-bu 

97) at-ta-bal-kdt a-na lib-bi uru.mes-w sd kur 
a-dS-Sd kur hab-hi sd pa-an kur hat-te at- 
ta-ra-da uru u-ma-li-a uru hi-ra-a-nu 

98) URU.MES-m KAL,MEs-te sd ina qe-reb kur a- 
ma-da-ni sd-ak-nu-u-ni KUR-ud gaz.mes-su- 



Sidon, Byblos, Mahallatu, Mafzu, Kaizu, 
Amurru, and the city Arvad which is (on an is- 
land) in the sea — silver, gold, tin, bronze, a 
bronze casserole, linen garments with multi- 
coloured trim, a large female monkey, a small fe- 
male monkey, ebony, boxwood, ivory of nahirus 
(which are) sea creatures. They submitted to me. I 
climbed up to Mount Amanus (and) cut down 
logs of cedar, cypress, dapranu-juniper, (and) 
burasu-iuniper . I made sacrifices to my gods. I 
made a memorial to my valour (and) erected (it) 
therein, (iii 90) I transported cedar logs from 
Mount Amanus and brought (them) to Esarra to 
my temple the shrine, a joyful temple, to the tem- 
ple of the gods Sin and Samas, the holy gods. I 
marched to the land of the me/zrw-trees. I con- 
quered the entire land of the mehru-trees. I cut 
down logs of mehru, brought (them) to Nineveh, 
(and) presented (them) to Istar, mistress of 
Nineveh, my mistress. 



iii 92b- 11 3a) In the eponymy of Samas-nurT, by 
the command of Assur, the great lord, my lord, 
on the thirteenth day of the month lyyar, I 
moved from Calah. After crossing the Tigris I 
went down to the land Qipanu. I received in the 
city Huzirina tribute from the city rulers of the 
land Qipanu. While I was in the city Huzirina 1 
received tribute from Itti, the (A)zallu, (and from) 
Giridadi, the Assu, silver, (iii 95) gold, oxen, 
(and) sheep. At that time I received cedar logs, 
silver, (and) gold, the tribute of Qatazili, the 
Kummuhu. Moving on from the city Huzirina I 
made my way to the banks of the Euphrates — 
upstream. I crossed Mount Kubbu and went down 
amongst the cities of the lands Assa (and) Habhu 
which are before the land Haiti. I conquered the 
cities Umaliu (and) Hiranu, fortified cities which 
lie within Mount Amadanu. I massacred many of 
their (inhabitants and) carried off innumerable 
captives from them. 1 razed (and) destroyed the 
cities. I burnt 150 cities in their environs, (iii 100) 
Moving on from the city Karania I entered the 
pass of Mount Amadanu (and) went down 



iii 89 var. omits -ia 'my' after qur-di 'valour', iii 90 ov-ka: 
read (with Schramm, EAK 2 p. 29) usalika '(1) brought 
(them)'. The remainder of the line is, I believe, a series of 
indirect objects governed by this verb. Probably two shrines 
are involved, Esarra (down to £ hi-da-te 4 a joyful house') and 
the shrine of Sin and Samas. t-ia-as-ma-ku = bitiia simakki. 



This interpretation (prompted by a suggestion of Oppenheim, 
ANET 3 p. 276 n. 20) makes it unnecessary to regard the text 
as corrupt - cf. Grayson, ARI 2 p. 143 n. 624 and CAD 1/2 
(A) p. 328b. iii 92 var. ud 20.kam 'twentieth day*. 
iii 92-97 Cf. E. Gordon, JCS 21 (1967) p. 86; Fales, RSO 45 
(1970) pp. 21-28. iii 98 var. uru a-da-ni 'the city Adanu 5 for 



220 



Ashurnasirpal n A. 0.101.1 



nu ma-^a-tu a-duk sal-la-su-nu a-na la me-ni 

99) ds-lu-ta uru.mes-w ap-pul a-qur 1 me 50 
uru.mes sd li-me-tu-su-nu ina izi.mes ds-ru- 
up is-tu uru ka-ra-ni-a 

100) at-tu-mus ina ne-re-bi sd kur a-ma-da-ni e- 
tar-ba a-na lib-bi uru.mes-w sd kur dir-ri-a 
at- tar-da uru.meS-w sd bir-ti 

101) kur a-ma-da-ni kur ar-qa-ni-a ina izi.mes 
gibil-up kur mai-la-a-nu sd ina qe-reb kur 
ar-qa-ni-a a-na ra-ma-ni-ia as-bat ta kur 
mal-la-a-ni at-tum 4 -sd 

102) a-na uru.meS-/w sd kur za-am-ba sd sid-di 
hu-li-ia ina izi.mes gibil id su-u-a e-te-bir ina 

UGU ID.IDIGNA GAR-GW URU.ME§-W 

103) sd gir an-na-te u gir.ii.mes am-ma-te sd 
Id.idigna sd kur ar-ka-a-na-a ana du € u 
kar-me GUR-er kur hab-hu gab-bu ip-ldh-ma 

GIR.II.MES-tf 

104) is-bat li-ti-M-nu as-bat lu.gar-wm sd ra-ma- 
ni-a a-na muh-hi-su-nu as-kun ina ne-re-bi sd 
kur a-ma-da-ni a-na uru bar-za-ni-is-tu-un 
at-ti-si-a 

105) a-na uru dam-dam-mu-sa uru dan-nu-ti-su sd 
m i-ia-a-niT>vuv za-ma-ni aq-t(-rib uru a-si-bi 
qu-ra-di-ia ki-ma musen vGU-su-nu i-se~ y i 

106) 6 me ^rin.mes mun-dah-si-su-nu ina 
gis.tukul.mes u-sam-qit SAG.ov.MHS-su-nu 
u-na-kis 4 me erin.mes ti.la.meS ina Su.mes 
u-sab-bi-ta 

107) 3 lim sal-la-su-nu u-se-si-a uru su-a-tu a-na 
ra-ma-ni-a as-bat lu.erin.mes ti.la.mes 
sag.du.mes a-na uru a-me-di uru uan-H-su 
lu u-bi-il 

108) a-si-tu sd sag.du.mes ina pu-ut kLgal-su lu 
ar-sip lu.erin.mes ti.la.mes ina ba-at-tu-ba- 
at-te sd uru-sw a-na gis zi-qi-pi lu u-za-qi-pi 

109) me-et-hu-si ina sa ka.gal-5w ds-kun 
gis.kirI6.mes-5w a-kis is-tu uru a-me-di at- 
tum A -sd ina ne-re-be sd kur kas-ia-ri sd uru 
al-la-ab-si-a 

110) sd ina man.mes-/?/ ad.mes-# ma-am-ma kib-su 
u me-tu-qu ina lib-be la-a is-kun-na Kv 4 -ub 
a-na uru u-da uru dan-nu-ti-su sd m lab-tu-ri 
dumu tu-pu-si 

111) aq-ti-rib uru a-si-bi ina pil-si gis sa-pi-te u 
ne-pe-se uru KVR-ud 1 lim 4 me [...] 
erin.mes [.,.]-sii-nu ina gis.tukul.mes u- 
sam-qit 7 me 80 lu.erin.mes ti.mes 

112) ina su u-sa-bi-it 3 lim sal-la-su-nu u-se-si-a 
lu.erin.mes ti.la.mes ina ba-tu-bat-te 
[ur\u-su a-na gis zi-qi-pi u-za-qi-pi an-nu-te 



amongst the cities of the Dirru. I burnt the cities 
which are between Mounts Amadanu (and) 
Arqania. I took in hand for myself the land 
Mallanu which is within Mount Arqania. Moving 
on from the land Mallanu I burnt the cities of the 
land Zamba which were in the region of my path. 
After crossing the River Sua I pitched camp by 
the Tigris. I turned into ruin hills the cities which 
lie on this bank and the other bank of the Tigris 
at Mount Arkania. All of the land Habhu took 
fright and submitted to me. I took hostages from 
them (and) appointed a governor of my own over 
them. I came out of the pass of Mount Amadanu 
to the city Barzanistun. (iii 105) I approached the 
city Damdammusa, the fortified city of Ilanu, a 
man of Blt-Zamani. I besieged the city. My war- 
riors flew like bird(s) against them. I felled 600 of 
their combat troops with the sword (and) cut off 
their heads. I captured 400 of their soldiers alive. 
I brought out 3,000 captives from them. I took 
that city in hand for myself. I took the live sol- 
diers (and) the heads to the city Amedu, his royal 
city, (and) built a pile of heads before his gate, i 
impaled the live soldiers on stakes around about 
his city. I fought my way inside his gate (and) cut 
down his orchards, Moving on from the city 
Amedu (iii 110) I entered the pass of Mount 
Kasiiari at the city Allabsia wherein none of the 
kings my fathers had ever set foot. I approached 
the city Udu, the fortified city of Labturu, son of 
Tupusu. I besieged the city (and) conquered it by 
means of tunnels, siege-towers, (and) battering- 
rams. I felled with the sword 1,400 [.,.] of their 
[fighting] men. I captured 780 soldiers alive. ! 
brought out 3,000 captives from them. I impaled 
the live soldiers on stakes around about his city. 1 
gouged out the eyes of some (and) the remainder 
I uprooted (and) brought to Assyria. I took the 
city in hand [for myself]. 



kur a-ma-da-ni 'Mount Amadanu*. iii 102 See Schramm, 
EAK 2 p. 29. iii 109 al-la-ab-si-a: King has (in error) at-la- 



ab-ra-a. See Schramm, EAK 2 p. 29. iii 111 var. 5 me 80 
*580\ 



Ashurnasirpal n A.0.10L1 



221 



113) lGi.n.MEs-su-nu u-na-pil si-ta-ti-su-nu as-su- 
ha a-na kur as-sur ub-la uru a-na [N]i-ia 
as-bat m as-sur-?AB-A man gxl-u man dan-nu 

MAN KUR aS-SUr A TUKUL-MAS 

114) MAN GAL-e MAN dctn-ni MAN SU MAN KUR as- 
SUr A 10-ERIN.TAH MAN GAL-£ MAN datl-nl 

man su man kur as-sur-ma et-lu qar-du sd 
ina GisJukul-ti as-sur en-su DU.DU-ku-ma ina 
mal-ki.UES sd kib-rat A-ta 

115) sd-nin-su la-a i-su-it lu.sipa tab-ra-te la a-di- 
ru gis.lal e-du-u gap-su sd ma-hi-ra nu 
tuk-w man mu-sd-ak-ni-is la-a kan-su-te-sii 
sd nap-har 

116) kis-sat un.mes i-pe-lu nita dan-nu mu-kab- 
hi-is gu a-a-bi-su da-i-is kur. kur kur.mes 
mu-pa-ri-ru ki-is-ri mul-tar-hi sd ina 

gis Aukul-ti dingir.mes gal.mes 

117) en.mes-siI BV.BU-ku-ma kur.kur.mes nij-si- 
na su-sw KUR-«rf hur-M-ni w-su-nu i-pe-lu- 
ma bi-lat-su-nu im-hu-ru sa-bit li-i-ti sd-kin 
li-i-te 

118) ugu uv-si-na kur.kur.mes e-nu-ma as-sur 
en na-bu-u uu-ia mu-sar-bu-u MAN-ti-a 
gis.tukul-5w la pa-da-a a-na i-da-at EN-ti-a 

119) lu-u it-muh ERiN.Hi.A.MES-ar kur lu-ul-lu- 
me-e dagal.mes ina qe-reb tam-ha-ri ina 
gis.tukul.mes lu u-sam-qit ina re-su-te sd 
d sd-mas 

120) u d isKUR dingir.mes tik-li-a erin.hi.a.mes 
kur.kur na-i-ri kur hab-hi kur su-ba-re-e u 
kur ni-ri-bi gim d iSKUR ra-hi-si vou-su-nu 
ds-gu-um 

121) man sd ta e-ber-ta-an id.idigna a-di kur 
lab-na-na u a.ab.ba GKL-te kur la-qe-e ana 
si-hir-ti-sd kur su-hi a-di uru ra-pi-qi 

122) ana gir.ii.mes-jW u-sek-ni-sd ta sag e-ni id 
su-ub-na-at a-di kur ni-rib sd bi-ta-ni su-sw 
KUR-wrf ta kur ne-re-bi sd kur kir-ru-ri a-di 

123) kur gil-za-ni ta e-ber-ta-an id za-ba ki.ta 
a-di vru. DUe-ba-a-ri sd el-la-an kur za- 
ban(*) a-di jjru. uu^sd-za-ab-da-ni u 

URU.DU 6 - 



iii 11 3b- 11 8a) Ashurnasirpal, great king, strong 
king, king of Assyria, son of Tukultl-Ninurta (n), 
great king, strong king, king of the universe, king 
of Assyria, son of Adad-narart (u) (who was) also 
great king, strong king, king of the universe, king 
of Assyria; valiant man who acts with the support 
of Assur, his lord, and has no rival among the 
princes of the four quarters, marvellous shepherd, 
fearless in battle, mighty flood-tide which has no 
opponent, the king who subdues those insubordi- 
nate to him, who rules all peoples, strong male, 
who treads upon the necks of his foes, trampler 
of the lands of enemies, the one who breaks up 
the forces of the rebellious, he who acts with the 
support of the great gods, his lords, and has con- 
quered all lands, gained dominion over all the 
highlands and received their tribute, capturer of 
hostages, he who is victorious over all lands; 



iii 11 8b- 126a) when Assur, the lord who called 
my name (and) who makes my sovereignty 
supreme, placed his merciless weapon in my 
lordly arms. I felled with the sword the extensive 
troops of the Lullumu in battle. With the help of 
the gods Samas and Adad, the gods my support- 
ers, I thundered like the god Adad, the devasta- 
tor, against the troops of the lands Nairi, Habhu, 
the Subaru, and the land Nirbu. The king who 
subdued (the territory stretching) from the oppo- 
site bank of the Tigris to Mount Lebanon and the 
Great Sea, the entire land Laqu, (and) the land 
Suhu including the city Rapiqu: he conquered 
from the source of the River Subnat to the inte- 
rior of the land Nirbu. I brought within the boun- 
daries of my land (the territory stretching) from 
the passes of Mount Kirruru to the land Gilzanu, 
from the opposite bank of the Lower Zab to the 
city TrLBari which is upstream from the land Za- 
ban, to the cities Ttl-sa-Zabdani and Tll-sa- 
Abtani, the cities Hirimu, Harutu, (which are) 



ii! 116 da-i-is kur.kur kur.mes: a correction to da~i-is kul-iat 
kur.mes might be needed but both epithets are attested. See 
Seux, ERAS p. 71. iii 120 var. ni-ri-be or ni-rib, King has (in 
error?) ni-ir-be. iii 121 'to Mount Lebanon and the Great 
Sea': the same text is found in the parallels A, 0,101. 2-3, 
23-24, 30-32, 34-35, 38, 40, and 50-51. However, A.0.101.26 
has instead ( to the city Carchemish of the land Hatti' and 
A.0. 101. 53 has merely 'to the land Hatti*. Brinkman, PKB 
pp. 393-94 and de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) have cogently 
argued that this proves an earlier date for A.0.101.26. 
iii 121 A. 0.1 01. 3 kur 'land* for uru 'city' before Rapiqu. 
iii 122 'to the interior of the land Nirbu': the same text is 



found in the parallels A.0.101.6, 31-35, 38, and 56 Instead 'to 
the land Urartu' appears in A.0.101.2, 23, and 30. De Filippi, 
Assur 1/7 (1977) has suggested that this Urartian campaign 
was late in the reign and therefore the inscriptions with this 
var. must be late. A further var. is found in A. 0.101. 3 and 28 
which have instead 'to the source of the Tigris'. A. 0.101. 50 has 
'to the passes of Mount Kirruru*. A.0. 101.40 has *to the 
extensive land Urumu'. A.0. 101.52 has 'to [the land Subrju 
(and) the interior of the land Nirbu' while A.0. 101.53 has 
merely 'to the land §ubru\ iii 123-24 'to the cities Tll-sa- 
Zabdani and TIl-sa-Abtani': some parallel texts (A.0. 101. 3 and 
23) have instead 'from the city TTl-sa-Abtani to the city TJl-sa- 



222 



Ashurnasirpal ii A.OJ01J 



124) sd-ab-ta-ni uru hi-ri-mu uru ha-ru-tu kur 
bi-ra-a-te sd kur kar-du-ni-ds ana mi-is-ri 
KVR-ia u-ter ta kur ne-re-bi sd uru ba-bi-te 

125) a-di kur has-mar a-na un.mes kur-/<2 am-nu 
ina kur.kur.mes-^ sd a-pe-lu-si-na-ni 
Lv.GAR.MEs-te-ia al-ta-kan ur-du-ti u-pu-sti 
ku-ditr-ru 

126) e-me-su-nu-ti m as-sur-VAB-A nun na-a-du pa- 
lih dingir.mes gal.mes u-sum-gal-lu ek-du 
ka-sid uru. uru u hur-sd-ni pat gim-ri-su-nu 
man en.mes mu-la-it 

127) ek-su-ti tiz-qa-ru la pa-du-u mu-rib a-nun-te 
man du mal-ki.MEl man man.mes-h/ i-si-pu 
na-a^-du ni-bit d nin~urta qar-di ka-su-us 

128) dingir.mes gal.mes man sd ina gis. tukul-ti 
as-sur u d nin-urta dingir.mes tik-li-su me-sd- 
ris nu.nu-ku-ma kur.mes-^ sap-su-te u mal- 
/t/.mes kur.mes-sh kul-lat 

129) kur.kur.mes-5w-«w ana gir.ii-sw u-Mk-ni-sd 
lu.kur.mes-w/ as-sur an. t a u ki.ta is-ta-na- 
nu-ma gun u ma-da-tu UGU-su-nu u-ki-nu 
m aMur-PAB-A 

130) man dan-nu ni-bit d 30 me-gir d a-nim na-mad 
d KKUR kas~ka$ dingir.mes gis.tukul la pa- 
du-u mu-u-sam-qit kur kur,mes-s« ana-ku 
man le^u-u qab-li 

131) sd-gis uru. uru u hur-sd-ni a-sd-red tuq-ma- 
te man kib-rat A-ta mu-ne-er a-a-bi-su 
kur.kur.mes dan-na-te hur-sd-ni ek~[su]-te 
man.mes-h/ ek-du-te la pa-du~te ta si-it 



132) d sam-si a-di e-reb d sam-si ana GiR.n.MES-a u- 
sek-ni-sd pa-a I -en u-sd-ds-kin uru kal-hu 
mah-ra sd md sul-ma-nu-SAG man kur as-sur 
nun a-lik pa-ni-a du-ws 

133) uru su-u e-na-ah-ma is-lal ana du 6 u kar-me 
gur uru su-u ana es-su-te ab-ni un.mes ki- 
sit-ti $u-ia sd kur.kur.mes sd a-pe-Iu-si-na-ni 
sd kur su-hi kur la-qe-e 

134) ana si-hir-ti-sd uru sir-qu sd ne-ber-ti 

id. a. rad kur za-mu-a ana pat gim-ri-sd sd 
E-a-di-ni u kur hat-te u sd m li-bur-na kur 
pa-ti-na-a-a al-qa-a ina sa u-sd-as-bit 

135) m-tu ta id za-ba an.ta ah-ra-a id pa-ti- 
he.gal uv-sd ab-bi gis.kiri 6 .mes ina li-me- 
tu-Sd az-qup gurun.meS gestin.mes a-na as- 
sur EN-a U E.KUR.MES KUR-Of BAL 



fortresses of Kardunias. I accounted (the people) 
from the pass of the city Babitu to Mount 
Hasmar as people of my land. In the lands over 
which I gained dominion I always appointed my 
governors. They entered (lit. 'performed') servi- 
tude (and) I imposed upon them corvee. 

iii 126b-132a) Ashurnasirpal, attentive prince, 
worshipper of the great gods, ferocious dragon, 
conqueror of cities and the entire highlands, king 
of lords, encircler of the obstinate, lofty (and) 
merciless, he who stirs up strife, king of all 
princes, king of kings, attentive purification 
priest, designate of the warrior god Ninurta, des- 
tructive weapon of the great gods, the king who 
has always acted justly with the support of Assur 
and the god Ninurta, the gods who help him, and 
subdued under him the fortified mountains and 
the kings hostile to him, all their lands, (he who) 
has always contested with the enemies of Assur 
above and below and imposed upon them tribute 
and tax; Ashurnasirpal, (iii 130) strong king, 
designate of the god Sin, favourite of the god 
Anu, loved one of the god Adad (who is) al- 
mighty among the gods, the merciless weapon 
which lays low lands hostile to him, I, the king, 
capable in battle, vanquisher of cities and high- 
lands, foremost in battle, king of the four quar- 
ters, the one who defeats his enemies, I have sub- 
dued (and) brought under one authority fortified 
lands, dangerous highlands, (and) merciless fierce 
kings from east to west. 

iii 132b- 136) The ancient city Calah which 
Shalmaneser, king of Assyria, a prince who pre- 
ceded me, had built — this city had become dilap- 
idated; it lay dormant (and) had turned into ruin 
hills. I rebuilt this city. I took people which I had 
conquered from the lands over which I had 
gained dominion, from the land Suhu, (from) the 
entire land Laqu, (from) the city Sirqu which is at 
the crossing of the Euphrates, (from) the entire 
land of Zamua, from BTt-Adini and the Hatti, 
and from Lubarna (Liburna), the Patinu. I settled 
(them) therein. I dug out a canal from the Upper 
Zab (and) called it Patti-hegalli. I planted or- 
chards in its environs, I offered fruit (and) wine to 
A§§ur, my lord, and the temples of my land, I 
cleared away the old ruin hill (and) dug down to 



Zabdani'. In some exs. of A.0.101.2 the two place-names are 
transposed, iii 124 uru babite 'the city Babitu': three parallel 
texts (A. 0.101.2-3 and 23) have instead kur babite 'Mount 
Babitu'. iii 125-26 urduti uppusu kudurru emessunuii 'They 
entered servitude (and) I imposed upon them corvee*: the same 
text is found in the parallels A. 0.101. 3, 26, and cf, 56 



However, kudurru emessunuti is omitted in the parallels 
A.0.101.2, 23, and 53. uppusu is NA for uppisii. Cf. Grayson, 
ARI 2 p. 146 n. 637. iii 135 pa-ti-HE.GAL 'Canal of 
Abundance*: the same form of the name appears in A.0.101.30 
line 37 and A.O.101.33 line 25'. But on two exs. of A.0.101.26 
line 53 the name is given as pa-ti-H±.NVN, a synonymous 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.1 01.1 



223 



136) du 6 ia-he-ru lu-u u-na-kin a-di ugu a.mes lu 
u-sd-pil 1 me 20 tik-pi a-na mus-pa-li u-ta-bi 
bad-sw ar-sip ta uru 4 -M a-di gaba-dib-bi-su 
ar-sip u-sak-lil 



water level; I sank (the foundation pit) down to a 
depth of 120 layers of brick. I built its wall. I 
built (and) completed it from top to bottom. 



This text is inscribed on a large stone slab and several stone winged 
lion and bull colossi from AshurnasirpaPs North West Palace at 
Calah. The complete text is found on the large slab (exemplar 1) while 
the inscriptions on the other objects stop earlier, presumably being 
continued on adjacent objects (which have not been recovered) as is 
common with the various annals series of Ashurnasirpal (see the intro- 
duction to A.0J01.1). The text itself is a combination of display and 
annalistic material similar to A, 0.101.1. 

In detail, the text begins with a passage (lines 1-2 la) parallel to the 
introduction to the Standard Inscription (A. 0.101. 23 lines l-14a) 
which has epithets of the king and a general geographical description 
of his conquests. There follows a passage (lines 21b-51) with more ep- 
ithets; a narrative of a campaign to the Mediterranean; a description 
of the gathering and hunting of animals; and a succinct narrative of 
the Carchemish campaign (cf. A. 0.101.1 hi 56-76). The text concludes 
(lines 52-62) with a description of the building of Calah and its palace 
which is parallel to the conclusion to the Standard Inscription 
(A. 0. 101.23 lines 14b-22). 



CATALOGUE 







Excavation/ 












Museum 


Registration 


Old BM 




Lines 




Ex. 


number 


number 


number 


Object 


preserved 


cpn 


1 


Mosul no. 1 


ND 1122 


- 


Stone slab 


1-62 


c 


2 


BM 118873 


50-12 28,1 


77 


Winged lion facing righl 


1-41 (ends with putute) 


c 


3 


MMA 32.143.2 


- 


- 


Winged lion facing left 


1-40 (ends with iqbuni) 


P 


4 


MMA 32.143.1 


- 


- 


Winged bull facing right 


1-35 (ends with usaiidi) 


P 


s 


BM 118872 


50-12-28,2 


76 


Winged bull facing left 


1-31 (ends with umhursunu) 


c 


6 


BM 118801 


- 


841 


Winged lion facing right 


1-26 (ends with labnana) 


c 


7 


BM 118802 


- 


809 


Winged lion facing left 


1-26 (ends with sangutTia) 


c 


8 


See commentary 


_ 


_ 


- 


1-62 


n 



COMMENTARY 



As noted in the introduction most exs. end earlier than 
ex. 1 (see the catalogue for details) and since it is as- 
sumed that the text continued on adjacent objects we 
have indicated the missing lines in the scores with ' — \ 



Curiously, ex. 2 omits lines 23-25a (including u-ma-H- 
ru-ni) and this passage might also have been on an ad- 
jacent object (cf. King, AKA p. 197 n. 6). Ex. 8 is 
known only from Le Gac, who based his publication on 



expression, he. gal = hegallu and he. nun = nuhsu (see 
Borger, Zeichenliste no. 143); the logograms are synonymous 
but do not represent the same word (so Parpola, Toponyms 
p. 276 and Postgate, Governor^ Palace p. 239). Yet another 
form appears in A. 0.101, 17 v 6; ba-be-iat-UE.GAL 'Bearer of 



Abundance'. Thus it is clear that the canal had no precise 
name. Cf. Grayson, ARI 2 p. 147 n. 639. iii 135 A.0.101.17 
and 26 add du.a.bi after gurun.mes 'fruit of every kind*. 
iii 136 A.0.101.26 'I built its wall anew'. 



224 



Ashurnasirpal ii A.0.10L2 



several squeezes of various exs. Unfortunately the 
squeezes have since been destroyed (see the introduction 
to A. 0.101.1) and for the passages which Le Gac did 
not copy we can only put '...' in the scores. Besides the 
eight exs. used in our edition there are two exs. in the 
Iraq Museum (IM 26472 and 26473) which we have had 



no opportunity to collate. The partial copy of the text 
published by Layard includes vars., some of which were 
subsequently cited by King. Since the source of these 
vars. is uncertain and they are minor vars., they have 
not been cited in this edition. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1851 Layard, ICC pis. 43-45 (ex. 1 lines 21-55, copy) 

1902 King, AKA pp. 189-205 (exs. 1-2, 5-7, copy, edition) 

1907 Le Gac, Asn. pp. xviii and 172-79 (ex. 8, copy) 

1914 Budge, Sculptures pis. iv-v (exs. 5-6, photo) 

1922 BM Guide p. 42 and pi. vn (exs. 6-7, photo, study) 

1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§514-20 (translation) 

1936 Gadd, Stones pp. 124-27 and 234 (exs. 2-7, study) 

1946 Porada and Hare, Great King p. 8 (ex. 4, partial photo) 

1952 Wiseman, Iraq 14 p. 66 (ex. 1, study) 



1968 Reade, Iraq 30 p. 69 n. 2 and pi. xvmc (cf. Schramm) 

(provenance) 
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 35-36 (study) 
1973 Postgate, Governor's Palace pp. 240-43 (ex. 1, translit- 
eration) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 ci 2 (exs. 1-8, translation) 
1976 Paley, Ashur-nasir-pal p. 72 (ex. 4, provenance) 
1987 Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 49 (exs. 4-5, 
provenance) 



TEXT 



1) e.gal m as-sur-PAB-A siD as-sur ni-sit d BAD u 
d MAS na-ra-am d a-nim u d da-gan ka-su-us 

DINGIR.MES GAL.MES MAN datl-HU MAN SU MAN 

kur as-sur 

2) DUMU GISKIM- d /2/rt-Wrta(*) MAN GAL-e MAN 

dan-ni man su man kur as-sur dumu 10- 
erin.tAh man su man kur as-sur-ma et-lu 
qar-du sd ina gis. tukul-ti as-sur en-su 
r>u.r>v-ku-ma 

3) ina mal-ki.MES sd kib-rat 4-ta sd-nin-su ia-a 
TUK-w lu.sipa tab-ra-te la a-di-ru gis.lal e- 
du-ti gap-su 

4) sd ma-hi-ra ia-a tuk-w man mu-Sak-nis la 
kan-su-te-su sd nap-har ki§-sat un.mes i-pe-lu 
nit a dan-nu mu-kab-bi-is 

5) gu a-a-bi-M da-a-is kul-lat kur.mes mu-pa- 
ri-ru ki-is-ri mul-tar-hi man sd ina gis Jukul-ti 

DINGIR.MES 

6) GAL.MES EN.MES-SW DU.DU-&M-ma 

kur.kur.mes uv-si-na sv-su KVK-ud hur-sd- 
ni vv-su-nu i-pe-lu-ma 

7) bi-lat-su-nu im-hu-ru sa-bit li-i-ti sd-kfn li-i-te 
ugu vv-si-na kur. kur.mes e-nu-ma as-sur 

EN 

8) na-bu-u uv-ia mu-sar-bu-u uxs-ti-ia 
gis.tukul-sw la pa-da-a a-na i-da-at EN-ti-ia 

9) lu-ti it-muh erin.hla.mes kur lu-ul-lu-me-e 
dagal.mes ina qe-reb tam-ha-ri ina 



l-7a) (Property of) the palace of Ashurnasirpal, 
vice-regent of Assur, chosen of the gods Enlil and 
Ninurta, beloved of the gods Anu and Dagan, 
destructive weapon of the great gods, strong king, 
king of the universe, king of Assyria, son of 
TukultT-Ninurta (n), great king, strong king, king 
of the universe, king of Assyria, son of Adad- 
nararT (n) (who was) also king of the universe 
(and) king of Assyria; valiant man who acts with 
the support of Assur, his lord, and has no rival 
among the princes of the four quarters, marvel- 
lous shepherd, fearless in battle, mighty flood-tide 
which has no opponent, the king who subdues 
those insubordinate to him, he who rules all peo- 
ples, strong male who treads upon (5) the necks 
of his foes, trampler of all enemies, he who 
breaks up the forces of the rebellious, the king 
who acts with the support of the great gods, his 
lords, and has conquered all lands, gained domin- 
ion over all the highlands and received their trib- 
ute, capturer of hostages, he who is victorious 
over all countries: 

7b- 17a) When Assur, the lord who called me by 
name (and) made my sovereignty supreme, placed 
his merciless weapon in my lordly arms, I felled 
with the sword the extensive troops of the 
Lullumu in battle. (10) With the help of the gods 
Samas and Adad, the gods my supporters, I thun- 
dered like the god Adad, the devastator, against 



1.5 ni-bit 'designate of for ni-sit 'chosen of. 2.3, 6 tukul- 
mas for GiSKiM- d nin-urta. 2.2, 7 - d MAS for - d nin-urta. 
2.1, 4^5 ~urta: text -ur. 2.2-3 ^skur-erin.tah. 



2.2-3, 7 after Adad-nararT insert man gal-^ man dan-ni 'great 
king, strong king'. 9.2 omits kur land of before lullume. 



Ashurnasirpal ii A.0.10L2 



225 



gis.tukul.mes lu u-sam-qit 

ina re-su-te sd d M-mas u d isKUR dingir.mes 

tik-li-ia erin.hi.a.mes kur.kur na-i-ri kur 

hab-hi kur su-ba-re-e 

u kur ni-rib gim d iSKUR ra-hi-si VGV-su-nu 

ds-gu-um man M ta e-beMan id.idigna a-di 

kur lab-na-na 

u a.ab.ba GAL-te kur la-qe-e ana si-hir-ti-M 

kur su-hi a-di uru ra-pi-qi ana gir.ii-su u- 

sek-ni-m 

ta sag e-ni id su-ub-na-at a-di kur u-ra-ar-ti 

su-sm KUR-ud ta kur ne-reb sd kur kir-ru-ri 

a-di kur gil-za-ni 

ta e-ber-tan h> za-ba klta a-<// URU.DU 6 -£a- 

a-ri sd el-la-an kur za-ban ta uru.du6-s<7- 

za-ab-da-ni 

u uRu.DUs-sd-ab-ta-a-ni uru hi-ri-mu uru 

ha-ru-tu kur bi-ra-a-te M kur kar-du-ni-dS 

ana mi-is-ri kur-w u-te-ri 

ta kur ne-er-bi sd kur ba-bi-te a-di kur 

has-mar a-na un.mes kur-wt am-nu ina 

kur.kur.mes &f a-pe-lu-si-na-ni lu.gar-ww- 

/<?-/# al-ta-kan 

ur-du-ti u-pu-us m as-sur-v ab-a nun-w na-a-du 

pa-lih dingir.mes gal.mes u-sum-gal-lu ek-du 

ka-sid uru. didli w hur-sd-ni 

pat gim-ri-su-nu man en.mes-2 mu-la-it ek- 

su-te a-pi-ir M-lum-ma-te la-di-ru gis.lal wr- 

stf-ww /a pa-du-u 

mu-rib a-nun-te man ta-na-da-a-te lu.sipa 

sa-Iu-ul ub.mes man sd ina qi-bit ka-su us- 

har-ma-tu kur,mes-£ 

u A.AB.BA.MES sd ina qi-it-ru-ub EN-ti-su 

MAN.MES-n/ ek-du-te la pa-du-te ta si-it 

d sam-si a-di 

e-reb d sam-si pa-a I -en u-sd-ds-kin e-ta-tiq 

KUR.ME§-e dan-nu-te a-tam-mar du-rug sap- 

M-qi M J>ij-si~na ub.mes 

u-sd-az-ni-ni nab-li mul-mul-li ugu maU 

ki.UES sd nap-har du uru. didli si-qir KA-ia 

e-ta-nam-da-ru 

M-$a~pu~u en-?/ ana-ku m as-sur-VAB-A er-su 

mu-du-u ha-si-su pe-et uz-ni ne-me-qi d e~a 

man zu.ab is-ma-ni a-na fa-si 

dingir.mes gal.meS sd AN-e u Ki~tim ina ke- 

e-ni sk-su-nu u-du-ni-ma man-?/ en-?/ kis~su- 

ti ina KA-M-nu ku li-sa-a kur.kur.mes 



the troops of the lands Nairi, Habhu, the Subaru, 
and the land Nirbu. The king who subdued (the 
territory stretching) from the opposite bank of the 
Tigris to Mount Lebanon and the Great Sea, the 
entire land Laqu, (and) the land Suhu including 
the city Rapiqu; he conquered from the source of 
the River Subnat to the land Urartu. I brought 
within the boundaries of my land (the territory 
stretching) from the passes of Mount Kirruru to 
the land Gilzanu, from the opposite bank of the 
Lower Zab to the city Tll-Bari which is upstream 
from the land Zaban, from the city TTl-sa- 
Zabdani (15) and the city TTl-sa-Abtani, the cities 
Hirimu, Harutu, (which are) fortresses of Kar- 
dunias. I accounted (the people) from the passes 
of Mount Babitu to Mount Hasmar as people of 
my land. In the lands over which I gained domin- 
ion I always appointed my governors. They en- 
tered (lit. 'performed') servitude. 



17b-21a) Ashurnasirpal, attentive prince, wor- 
shipper of the great gods, ferocious dragon, con- 
queror of cities and the entire highlands, king of 
lords, encircler of the obstinate, crowned with 
splendour, fearless in battle, merciless hero, he 
who stirs up strife, praiseworthy king, shepherd, 
protection of the (four) quarters, the king whose 
command disintegrates mountains and seas, the 
one who by his lordly conflict has brought under 
one authority ferocious (and) merciless kings from 
east to west: 

21b-23a) I have traversed mighty mountains; I 
have seen remote (and) rugged regions throughout 
all the (four) quarters; I have caused flaming ar- 
rows to rain down upon the princes of all cities 
(so that) they ever revere my command (and) pray 
to my lordship; 

23b-25a) I, Ashurnasirpal, sage, expert, intelligent 
one, open to counsel (and) wisdom which the god 
Ea, king of the apsu, destined for me; the great 
gods of heaven and underworld chose me, in their 
steadfast hearts, and my sovereignty, dominion, 
(and) power came forth by their holy command; 
they sternly commanded me to rule, subdue, and 
direct the lands and mighty highlands: 



12.2 kur land* for uru 'city* before rapiqi. 13.2-3 git-za-a- 
ni. 14.2-3, 6-7 -za-ab-da-a-ni. 14-15.2-3, 6-7 transpose the 
first GN in line 15 (Tfl-sa-Abtani) and the last GN in line 14 
(TTI-Sa-Zabdani), 15.6-7 a-di for u. 15.2 kur land* for uru 



'city' before hirimu. 16.6-7 ne-reb . 23- 25a (ending with 
uma^iruni) omitted by ex. 2 and were probably on a 
neighbouring slab. See King, AKA p. 197 n. 6. 



226 



Ashurnasirpal u A. 0.101. 2 



25) u hur-sd-ni dan-nu-te ana pe-e-li suk-nu-se u 
M-pa-ri a-gi-is u-ma-H-ru-ni ina qi-hit as-sur 

EN GAL-e EN-/a 

26) u d nin-urta(*) aga SANGA-ti-ia a-na kur lab- 
na-na lu-ii a-lik ana a.ab.ba GAi-te lu-u e-li 
ina a.ab.ba GAL-te 

27) GIS.TUKUL.MES-/tf lu lil-lU UDU.SISKUR.MES a- 

na DiNGiR.MES-w/-/a lu as-bat ina UA-me-su- 
ma ma-da-tu sd man.mes-h/ Sd si-di tam-di 

28) sd kur sur-ra-a-ia kur si-du-na-a-ia kur a- 
mur-ra-a-a kur gu-bal-a-ia kur ma-hal-la- 
ta^a-Q kur ka-i-za-a-a 

29) kur ma-i-za-a-a u uru ar-ma-da Sd murub 4 
tam-di ku.babbar.meS ku.gi.mes an. n a. mes 

ZABAR.ME& tnUL.MES ZABAR 

30) tug lu-biil-ti bir-me tug.gada.mes zu.mes 
na-hi-ri bi-nu-ut tam-di am-hur ina u 4 -me- 
su-ma pa~ga-a~te gal. mes 

31) pa-ga-a-te. mes tur.mes it-ti ma-da-ti-su-nu 
am-hur-su-nu a-na kur-/# aS-sur lu ub-la-si- 
na i-na uru kal-hi 

32) mar-si-si-na ana ma-a^-dis u-sd-li-di un.mes 
KUR-/a nu-si-na u-sab-ri ina ti-ri-si sv-ia 

33) u su-us-mur sk-ia 15 ur.mah.mes kal.mes ta 
KUR.MES-e u gis.tir.mes ina su-te um-bat 50 
mu-ra-ni 

34) ur.mah.mes lu ds-Sd-a ina uru kal-hi u 

e. gal. mes KUR-/a ina e e-sir lu ad-di-su-nu 
mu-ra-ni-su-nu 

35) a-na ma-a^-dis u-sd-li-di ur mi-in-di-na-ds 
ti.la.mes ina su.mes u-sab-bi-ta su-gul-lat 
gu 4 .am.mes 

36) am.si.mes ur.mah.mes ga.nun.musen.mes 
pa-ge-e pa-ga-a-te anse.edin.na.mes 

MAS, DA. MES DARA.MAS.MES a-Sa-a-te.MF.S 

37) rihim-ri.UES se-en-kur-r Lm.es u-ma-am edin 
KUR-e Du-su-nu ina VRV-ia uru kal-hi lu-u 
ak-sur un.mes 

38) kur-w DtSti-nu u-Sab-ri nun-w egir-w ina 
man.meS-aw dumu.mes-w sa as-sur i-na-bu-su 
lu-u un.mes 

39) egir.mes lu-u lu um-ma-an man lu-u 
lu.gal-w lu-u lu sa'-SAG la ta-ta-pil ina pa-an 
as-sur zi Si-i ti 

40) d nin-urta(*) it d iGi.DU sa sanga~/7 aga-ww 
mas.anse edin u-sat-li-mu-ni e-peS ba-^u-ri 
iq-bu-ni 

41) 30 am.si.mes ina sub-ti a-duk 2 me 57 
gu4.am.mes kal.mes ina gis.gigir.mes-w pa- 
tu-te ina qi-it-ru-ub 



25b-31a) By the command of Assur, the great 
lord, my lord, and the god Ninurta who loves my 
priesthood, I marched to Mount Lebanon. I went 
up to the Great Sea. I cleansed my weapons in the 
Great Sea (and) made sacrifices to my gods. At 
that time I received tribute from the kings of the 
sea-coast, from the lands of the people of Tyre, 
Sidon, Amurru, Byblos, Mahallatu, Kaizu, 
Maizu, and the city Arvad which is (on an island) 
in the sea — silver, gold, tin, bronze, bronze 
casseroles, linen garments with multi-coloured 
trim, ivory of nahirus (which are) sea creatures. 
At that time I received from them with their trib- 
ute, large female monkeys (and) small female 
monkeys. 



31b-38a) I brought them (the monkeys) to my 
land Assur. I bred herds of them in great 
numbers in Calah (and) displayed (them) to all 
the people of my land. With my outstretched 
hand and my fierce heart I captured 15 strong 
lions from the mountains and forests. I took 
away 50 lion cubs. I herded them into Calah and 
the palaces of my land into cages. (35) I bred 
their cubs in great numbers. I captured live tigers 
(mindinas). I formed herds of wild bulls, 
elephants, lions, ostriches, male monkeys, female 
monkeys, wild asses, deer, aialu-deer, female 
bears, panthers, senkurru> beasts of mountain 
(and) plain, all of them in my city Calah, I 
displayed (them) to all the people of my land. 



38b-39) O later prince among the kings my sons 
whom Assur calls, or later people, or vice- 
chancellor, or noble, or eunuch — you must not 
despise (these animals). Before Assur may these 
creature(s) live! 

40-42) The gods Ninurta and Nergal, who love 
my priesthood, gave to me the wild beasts (and) 
commanded me to hunt. I killed 30 elephants 
from an ambush pit. I slew 257 strong wild bulls 
from my ... chariots with my lordly assault with 
swords. I killed 370 strong lions like caged birds 



25 u as a conjunction also appears in line 33. 26.5 d MAS for 
A nin-urta. 26.1-4, 6-7 -urta: text -ur. 37 Layard, and cf. Le 
Gac (ex. 8), give a var. which inserts tu-se-ni. mes after 
senkurrt. 39 za si-i ti = napistu si libluv. see Schramm, EAK 



2 p. 36. 40.1-3, 8 -urta: text -ur. 41a See Grayson, Studies 
Oppenheim p. 93 and TSTS 1 p. 4. 41-42 ina qitrub EN-ti-ia: 
also in A.0.101.30 line 88 and cf. A.0. 101.23 line 14. Parallel 
passages have instead ina qitrub mitiutTia (A. 0.87.1 vi 78) but 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0,101.2 



227 



EN-ti-ia ina gis.tukul.mes u-sam-qit 3 me 70 

UR.MAH.MES KAL.MES GIM MUSEN.MES qU-Up-pl 

ina gis pu-as-hi a-duk 

ina 1T1.GU4 ud 8.kam ta uru kal-hi at-tu-mus 

Id. hal. hal e-te-bir a-na uru gar-ga-miS Sa 

kur hat-te 

aq-ti-rib ntg.ga e.gal-sw hi.a.mes Sa ki.lA-sw 

nu sab-ta-at am-hur-Su man. mes- w sa 

KUR. KUR. MES BV-Su-nU 

ana muh-hi-ia jsv-ku-ni GiR.n-a is-sab-tu li- 

ti-Su-nu as- bat pa-na-tu-ia uk-ti-lu a-na kur 

lab-na-na v>\j-ku 

ta uru gar-ga-mis at-tu-muS ina bi-rit kur 

mun-zi-ga-ni kur ha-mur-ga a-sa-bat kur a- 

ha-nu a-na Gum-ia u-ta-Ser 

a-na uru ha-za-zi sa m lu-bar-na kur pa-ti- 

na-a-a aq-ti-rib ku.babbar ku.gi tijg lu-bul- 

ti tug.gada.mes at-ta-har e-te-tiq id ap-re-e 

e-te-blr a-sa-kan be-dak ta ugu id ap-re-e 

at-tu-mus a-na uru ku-nu-lu-a uru uan-H-Su 

sa m lu-bar-na kur pa-ti-na-a-a aq-ti-rib 

ta igi Gis,TUKUL,MEs-a ez-zu-te ME-ia Sit-mu- 

ri ip-ldh-ma a-na Su-zu-ub zi.mes-sw 

GiR.n.MES-a is-bat 20 gun ku.babbar.mes 1 

gun ku.gi. mes 1 me gun an.na.mes 

1 me gun an. bar. mes 1 lim gu 4 .me$ 10 lim 

udu.mes 1 lim tug lu-bul-ti bir-me 

tug.gada.mes gis. ne-mat-ti gis. tug. mes sa 

tam-li-te uh-hu-za-te 

gis.na.mes gis. tug. mes gis.na.mes zu.me§ Sa 

tam-li-te gar.ra.mes ii-nu-tu e.gal-sw 

hi.a.mes sa Ki.Lk-sd nu sab-ta-at am-hur-su 

uru kal-hu mah-ra-a sd md sui-ma-nu-SAG man 

kur as-sur nun a-lik pa-ni-ia du-ws uru su-u 

e-na-ah-ma is-lal 

uru su-u ana es-sii-te ab-ni un.mes ki-Sit-ti 

Iv-ia sd kur.kur.mes Sd a-pe-lu-Si-na-ni Sd 

kur su-hi 

kur la-qe-e ana si-hir-ti-Sd uru sir-qu Sd ne- 

ber-ti id pu-rat-te kur za-mu-a ana pat gim- 

ri-sd 

kur t-a-di-ni u kur hat-te u Sd m lu-bar-na 

kur pa-ti-na-a-a al-qa-a ina lib-bi u-Sd-as-bit 

du 6 la-be-ru 

u-na-kir~i a-di ugu a. mes lu u-Sd-pil 1 me 20 

tik-pi ina muS-pa-li lu ii-ta-bi e.gal 

gis.eren.na 

e.gal gis.sur.min e.gal gis ddp-ra-ni e.gal 

gis.tug.mes e.gal gis mes-kan-ni e.gal gis 

bu-ut-ni u gis tar-pi-H 

a-na Su-bat MAN-ti-ia ana mul-ta-H-it EN-ti-a 



with the spear. 



43-45) On the eighth day of the month Iyyar I 
moved from Calah. After crossing the Tigris I ap- 
proached the city Carchemish of the land Hatti. I 
received from it much of its palace property, the 
weight of which could not be determined. All the 
kings of the lands came (and) submitted to me. I 
took from them hostages (and) they were kept in 
my presence on the march to Mount Lebanon (lit. 
'(and) they marched to Mount Lebanon'). 
46-51) Moving on from the city Carchemish I 
took the way between Mounts Munziganu (and) 
Hamurga. Leaving Mount Ahanu on my left I ap- 
proached the city Hazazu which (was ruled by) 
Lubarna, the Patinu. I received silver, gold, (and) 
linen garments. Passing on I crossed the River 
Apre, pitched camp, (and) spent the night. Mov- 
ing on from the River Apre I approached the city 
Kunulua, the royal city of Lubarna, the Patinu. 
He took fright in the face of my raging weapons 
(and) fierce battle and submitted to me to save his 
life. I received as his tribute 20 talents of silver, 
one talent of gold, 100 talents of tin, (50) 100 
talents of iron, 1,000 oxen, 10,000 sheep, 1,000 
linen garments with multi-coloured trim, dec- 
orated couches of boxwood with inlay, beds of 
boxwood, decorated ivory beds with inlay, many 
ornaments from his palace the weight of which 
could not be determined. 

52-62) The ancient city Calah which Shalmaneser, 
king of Assyria, a prince who preceded me, had 
built — this city had become dilapidated; it lay 
dormant. I rebuilt this city. I took people which I 
had conquered from the lands over which I had 
gained dominion, from the land Suhu, (from) the 
entire land of Laqu, (from) the city Sirqu which is 
at the crossing of the Euphrates, (from) the entire 
land of Zamua, (55) (from) BTt-Adini and the 
land Hatti, and from Lubarna, the Patinu. I set- 
tled (them) therein. I cleared away the old ruin 
hill (and) dug down to water level. I sank (the 
foundation pit) down to a depth of 120 layers of 
brick. I founded therein a palace of cedar, 
cypress, dapranu-junlper, boxwood, meskannu- 
wood, terebinth, and tamarisk as my royal 
residence (and) for my lordly leisure for eternity. 
I made (replicas of) beasts of mountains and seas 
in white limestone and parwrw-alabaster (and) 



there is no reason to regard either as an error. 



228 



Ashurnasirpal ii A.0.10L2 



sd da-ra~a-te ina ilb-bi ad-di u-ma-am 

KUR.MES-e 

59) U A.AB.BA.MES M NA 4 pe-U BABBAR-e U NA 4 

pa-ru-te bv-us ina ka.mes-sJ u-se-zi-iz u-si- 
im-si u-sar-rih-si 

60) si-kat kar-ri zabar al-me-si gis.ig.mes gis e- 
re-ni gis.sur.min gis ddp-ra-ni gis mes-kan-ni 
ina ka,me$-&7 u-re-ti 

61) ku.babbar.mes ku.gi.mes an.na.me§ 
zabar. me§ ki-sit-ti $u-ia sd kur.kur.mes sd 
a-pe-lu-si-na-ni 

62) a-na ma-a^-di-is al-qa-a ina lib-bi u-kin 



stationed (them) at its doors. I decorated it in a 
splendid fashion; I surrounded it with knobbed 
nails of bronze. I hung doors of cedar, cypress, 
dapranu-')umper, (and) meskannu-wood in its 
doorways. I took in great quantities and put 
therein silver, gold, tin, bronze, booty from the 
lands over which I gained dominion. 



This dedicatory text is inscribed on a huge stone slab (BM 124570 = 
old no. 27), sculptured with the figure of a genius in relief, from one 
of the entrances to the Ninurta temple at Calah. It begins with a dedi- 
cation to Ninurta (lines l-17a) followed by the king's name and titles 
(lines 17b-29a) and concludes with a brief description of his military 
achievements (lines 29b-46). All of the text has duplicates and paral- 
lels in other texts of Ashurnasirpal n (see the commentary to 
A. 0.101.1 for details). This inscription may in fact be the first in an 
annals series, concerning which see the introduction to A. 0.101.1. 



COMMENTARY 



The sculptured slab on which this text is engraved was 
adjacent to other such slabs (see A. 0.101.5-7) adorning 
an entrance to the temple of Ninurta, and all of these 
slabs are now displayed side by side in the British 
Museum. There is an inscription on the rev. of some of 
the slabs (see A. 0.101. 31). At one time the inscription 
on the present slab was believed (see Le Gac, Schramm, 
and Grayson) to be a duplicate of the inscriptions on 
the other slabs but this is not the case. See the editions 
of A. 0.101. 5-7 for details. Le Gac regarded the inscrip- 
tion on this slab as a duplicate of a text on a number 
of squeezes which he published and which he called 
'Annals B\ Le Gac did not provide copies of these 
squeezes but only a chart highlighting what they con- 
tained (Le Gac, Asn. pp. 123-24). Despite the 
difficulties of using this chart (the squeezes have been 



destroyed — see the introduction to A. 0.101.1), on the 
basis of the information there it appears that his An- 
nals B' in fact consist of two distinct texts. The first 
consists of three squeezes (E4, E9, and El 8) which 
indeed seem to be duplicates of A.0. 101.3. All of these 
three squeezes were from broken inscriptions which had 
fragmentary remains parallel to A. 0.101.1 i 1-1 8a and 
in 119fF before breaking off. These are the same paral- 
lels as found in A. 0.101. 3. The remaining squeezes in- 
cluded under *Annals B' by Le Gac represent a second 
text listed in this volume as A. 0.101.4. 

Since it is unknown what each squeeze had in detail, 
it has been impossible to prepare a proper edition and 
the transliteration presented here is from the inscription 
on BM 124570. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1902 King, AKA p. 254 n. 4 ('No. 27', study) 

1907 Le Gac, Asn. pp. i-ii, xiv-xv, and 123-24 (study) 

1914 Budge, Sculptures pi. xxxvi (photo) 



1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 21-22, 25-26, and 32 (study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 ci 3 (study) 



Ashurnasirpal n A. 0.101. 3 



229 



TEXT 



1) 

2) 

3) 

4) 

5) 

6) 

7) 

8) 

9) 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

2o; 

21 

22 
23 
24 
25 



ana d MAS geS-ri dan-dan- ni mah sag.kal 
dingir.mes qar-du 

sar-hu git-ma-lu sd ina me la-a is-sd-na-nu ti- 
hu-su 

ibila res-tu-u ha-mim tuq-ma-te bu-kur nu- 
dim-mud ur.sag 

d i-gi-gt A. gal ma-lik dingir.mes i-lit-ti e-kur 
mu-kil mar-kas 

AN-e Ki-ti pe-tu-u nag-be ka-bi-si KW/m 
dagaW/ 

dingir sd ina ba-lu-Su es.bar AN-e u Ki-tim 
nu kud-sh mu-ndr-bu 
ek-du sd la-a e-nu-u qi-bit ka-su sag.kal 
ub.mes na-din gis.gidru 
u es.bar ana nap-har du uru.uru gu-gal-!u 
Sam-ru sd la-a ut-tak-ka-ru 
si-qir Sap-ti-Su A. gal rap-Su abgal 
dingir.mes mu-tal-lu d ut-ui9-iu 
en en.mes-JYI sd kip-pat AN-e u Ki-tim qa- 
tuS-Su paq-du man tam-ha-ri 
a-li-lu sd tuq-ma-tu i-tdl-lu Su-ul-lu-tu git- 
ma-lu en nag-be 

u a.ab.ba.mes ez-zu la pa-du-u sd ti-bu-Su a- 
bu-bu sa-pin 

kur kur.mes mu-u-Sam-qit iar-gi-gi dingir 
sar-hu sd la-a e-nu-u 

is-tis-su nu-ur AN-e Ki-tim mus-pdr-du qe-reb 
zu.ab mu-ab-bit lem-nu-ti 
mu-sak-nis la ma-gi-ri mu-hal-liq za-ia-a-ri sd 
ina ukkin dingir.mes 

mu-su dingir ma-am-ma la bal-u qa-is ti.la 
dingir rem-w Sd si-pu-Su dug.ga a-sib 
uru kal-hi en GAL-e en -ia m as-sur-PAB-A man 
su man la sd-na~an man kul-lat kib-rat 
4-ta d sam-su kis-sat un.mes ni-sit d BAD u 
d MAS na-ra-am d a-nim 

u d da-gan ka-su-us dingir.mes gal.mes sah- 
tu na-ra-am 

sk-ka nun-w me-gir 4 bad sd sanga-sh ugu 
r>iNGm-ut-ka gal-H 

i-ti-bu-ma tu-Sar-si-du bal-£w et-lu qar-du sd 
ina gis Jukul-ti 

as-sur en-5w r>u-ku-ma ina mal-ki, mes Sd 
kib-rat 4-ta Sd-nin-su la tuk-« 
lu.sipa tab-ra-te la a-di-ru gis.lal e-du-u 
gap-Su Sd ma-hi-ra 

la tuk-w man mu-Sak-niS la-a kan-su-te-Su Sd 
nap-har kiS-Sat un.mes 

i-pe-lu nita dan-nu mu-kab-bi-is gu a-a-M-Su 
da-iS kul-lat kur.mes 



l-17a) To the god Ninurta, the strong, the al- 
mighty, the exalted, foremost among the gods, 
the splendid (and) perfect warrior whose attack in 
battle is unequalled, the eldest son who com- 
mands battle (skills), offspring of the god 
Nudimmud, warrior of the Igigu gods, the capa- 
ble, prince of the gods, offspring of Ekur, the one 
who holds the bond of (5) heaven (and) un- 
derworld, the one who opens springs, the one 
who walks the wide underworld, the god without 
whom no decisions are taken in heaven and un- 
derworld, the swift, the ferocious, the one whose 
command is unalterable, foremost in the (four) 
quarters, the one who gives sceptre and (powers 
of) decision to all cities, the stern canal-inspector 
whose utterance cannot be altered, extensively ca- 
pable, sage of the gods, the noble, the god Utulu, 
(10) lord of lords, into whose hands is entrusted 
the circumference of heaven and underworld, king 
of battle, the hero who rejoices in battles, the tri- 
umphant, the perfect, lord of springs and seas, 
the angry (and) merciless whose attack is a 
deluge, the one who overwhelms enemy lands 
(and) fells the wicked, the splendid god who never 
changes (his mind), light of heaven (and) un- 
derworld who illuminates the interior of the apsu, 
annihilator of the evil, (15) subduer of the ^sub- 
missive, destroyer of enemies, the one whose com- 
mand none of the gods in the divine assembly can 
alter, bestower of life, the compassionate god to 
whom it is good to pray, the one who dwells in 
the city Calah, great lord, my lord: 
17b-29a) Ashurnasirpal, king of the universe, un- 
rivalled king, king of all the four quarters, 
sun(god) of all people, chosen of the gods Enlil 
and Ninurta, beloved of the gods Anu and 
Dagan, destructive weapon of the great gods, the 
pious, beloved of (20) your (Ninurta's) heart, 
prince, favourite of the god Enlil, whose priest- 
hood is pleasing to your great divinity and whose 
reign you established, valiant man who acts with 
the support of Assur, his lord, and has no rival 
among the princes of the four quarters, marvel- 
lous shepherd, fearless in battle, mighty flood-tide 
which has no opponent, the king who subdues 
those insubordinate to him, who rules all peoples, 
(25) strong male, who treads upon the necks of 
his foes, trampler of all enemies, the one who 
breaks up the forces of the rebellious, he who acts 
with the support of the great gods, his lords, and 



9 d ut-u i9 -lu: see the note to A. 0.101.1 i 5. 



230 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101. 3 



26 

21 
28 

29; 

30 
31 

32; 

33 
34 

35; 
36 

37 

38 
39 

40; 

41 

42 

43 

44; 

45 

46 



mu-pa~ri-ru ki-is-ri mul-tar-hi set ina 

GIS. tukul-tl DINGIR.MES GAL.MES 

en-su vv-ku-ma kur.kur.mes Bu-si-na qat- 

su KUR-ud hur-sd-ni Du-su-nu 

i-pe-lu-ma bi-lat-su-nu im-hu-ru sa-bit li-i-ti 

sd-kin 

li-i-te ugu uu-si-na kur.kur.mes e-nu-ma 

as-sur en na-bu-u Mu-a 

mu-sar-bu-u uAN-ti-a gis.tukul-sw la pa-da-a 

a-na i-da-at 

BN-ti-ia lu-u it-muh erin.hla.mes kur lu-ul- 

lu-me-e dagal.mes 

ina qe-reb tam-ha-ri ina gis.tukul.mes lu u- 

sam-qit ina re-su-te sd d sd-mas 

U d ISKUR DINGIR.MES tlk-U-ia ERIN.HLA.MES 

kur. kur na-i-ri kur hab-hi kur $u-ba-re-e 
u kur ni-rib gim d iSKUR ra-hi-si uGU-su-nu 

d§-gu-um MAN Sd TA 

e-ber-ta-an id.hal.hal a-di kur lab-na-na u 

A.AB.BA 

gal-// kur la-qe-e ana si~hir-ti-sd kur su-hi 

a-di 

uru ra-pi-qi ana gir.ii.mes-sw u-sek-ni-sd ta 

sag e-ni 

id su-ub-na~at a-di sag e-ni sd id(*).idigna 

su-sw KUR-ud ta kur ne-re-bi sd kur kir-ru- 

ri a-di kur gil-za-a-ni 

ta e-ber-ta-an id za-ba ki.ta a-di uru.du 6 - 

ba-a-ri 

sd ei-la-an uru za-ban ta uru „BU$-sd-ab-ta- 

ni a-di 

uru. uue-sd-za-ab-da-a-ni uru hi-ri-mu uru 

ha-ru-tu 

kur bi-ra-a-te sd kur kar-du-ni-ds ana mi- 

is-ri KUR-a u-ter 

ta kur ne-re-be sd kur ba-bi-te a-di uru 

has-mar ana un.mes 

KUR-a am-nu ina kur.kur.mes sd a-pe-Iu-si- 

na-ni L^r.GAR.MES-/e-a 

al-tak-ka-an ur-du-ti u-pu-su nig.du e-me- 

su-nu-ti 



has conquered all lands, gained dominion over the 
highlands in their entirety and received their trib- 
ute, capturer of hostages, he who is victorious 
over all lands: 



29b-46) When Assur, the lord who called my 
name (and) who makes my sovereignty supreme, 
placed his merciless weapon in my lordly arms I 
felled with the sword the extensive troops of the 
Lullumu in battle. With the help of the gods 
Samas and Adad, the gods my supporters, I thun- 
dered like the god Adad, the devastator, against 
the troops of the lands Nairi, Habhu, the Subaru, 
and the land Nirbu, The king who subdued (the 
territory stretching) from (35) the opposite bank 
of the Tigris to Mount Lebanon and the Great 
Sea, the entire land Laqu, (and) the land Suhu in- 
cluding the city Rapiqu: he conquered from the 
source of the River Subnat to the source of the 
Tigris. I brought within the boundaries of my 
land (the territory stretching) from the passes of 
Mount Kirruru to the land Gilzanu, (40) from the 
opposite bank of the Lower Zab to the city TTl- 
Bari which is upstream from the city Zaban, from 
the city Tll-sa-Abtani to the city Trl-sa-Zabdani, 
the cities Hirimu, Harutu, (which are) fortresses 
of Kardunias. I accounted (the people) from the 
passes of Mount Babitu to Mount ('the city') 
Hasmar as people of my land. In the lands over 
which I gained dominion I always appointed my 
governors. They entered (lit, 'performed') servi- 
tude (and) I imposed upon them corvee. 



This text was engraved on various stone slabs found at Calah and was 
probably the first in a series of such inscribed slabs with a lengthy 
text. Regarding the annals series see the introduction to A.0. 101,1. It 
begins with a dedication to the god Ninurta followed by the king's 
name and titles and a brief description of his conquests arranged 



44 uru has-mar: otherwise only kur appears before Hasmar 
and it is a well-known mountain range, uru is therefore 



probably a scribal error. 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101. 4 



231 



geographically. Then appears the king's genealogy and a dedicatory 
passage with blessings and curses. This is followed in some exemplars 
by a continuation of the introductory passage and an annalistic narra- 
tive. 



COMMENTARY 



The inscriptions from which this text has been recon- 
structed were on several squeezes (E 10, E 13 a " b , E 68 ac , 
E 88 ab , E 15) which were among those used by Le Gac 
for the text he called 'Annals B*. The squeezes have 
been destroyed (see the introduction to A. 0.101.1) and 
there is now no means of collating the inscriptions. The 
schematic presentation of their contents given by Le 
Gac, Asn. pp. 123-24, indicates that two separate texts 
were represented on these squeezes, as explained in the 
commentary to A. 0.101. 3. 

Since all of the squeezes included here are virtual du- 
plicates of one another and have a passage which is not 
found in any other version of the annals, they have 
been regarded as one text. It should be noted, however, 
that all but one of the inscriptions omit the passage za- 
hri-ia ... [suknuse] '[for the scorching of] my enemies 
... who oppose me'. According to Le Gac the various 
squeezes end at different points but it is not clear if the 
inscriptions really ended there or if they were broken. 
In either case, they would all seem to represent the first 
in a series of slabs bearing an annalistic text. See 
further the introduction to A.0. 101.1. 

Le Gac, Asn. p. 125, published only the portion of 
this text which is unique, and that is the portion edited 
here (with restorations from A. 0.101. 98- 100 and 
Kinnier Wilson, Iraq 24 [1962] p. 94:34-36). For the 



remainder he merely presented a chart (ibid, 
pp. 123-24) summarizing the contents of each squeeze. 
According to this chart the squeezes had the following 
passages in the following order; 

1. Duplicate of A.0. 101.1 i 1-18 (including 'Ashur- 
nasirpal': E 10, E 68 a " c (actually only beginning with 
uv.DU-ku-ma in i 12), E 88 ab (actually only beginning 
with la a-di-ru), and possibly E 13 ab . For this passage, 
as well as passages 2-3, Le Gac puts 'car/ under E 15. 
Thus either this inscription was on the second in a 
series of inscribed slabs or the top was broken. 

2. Duplicate of A. 0.101. 23 beginning with 
erin.hi.a.mes in line 6 and ending with u-sd-ds-kin-su- 
nu in line 14: E 10 and possibly E 13 ab , E 68 ac , and 
E 88 ab . Regarding E 15 see sub 1. 

3. Duplicate of A.0. 101. 2 lines 21-23: E 10 and possi- 
bly E 13 a " b , E 68 a ' c , and E 88 a " b . Regarding E 15 see 
sub 1. 

4. The unique passage edited here: all squeezes but 
note the var. mentioned earlier in this commentary. 

5. Duplicate of A. 0.101.1 i 18 (beginning with Ashur- 
nasirpal) - 47 (ending with a-ru-ni): E 68 a ' c and E 15 
(exact beginning uncertain in each), E 13 ab (actually 
ends with Ashurnasirpal in i 38), E 88 ab (actually ends 
with ti-ri-is in i 37). For this passage Le Gac puts no 
note under E 10. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1907 Le Gac, Asn. pp. i-n, xiv-xv, and 123-25 (copy, study) 
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 21-22, 25-26, and 32 (study) 



1976 Grayson, AR1 2 ci 3 (translation) 



TEXT 



(For the beginning see the commentary) 

1') A TUKUL- d MAS MAN SU MAN KUR dS-SUr 



2') A 10-ERIN.TAH MAN SU MAN KUR CtS-SUr-ma 

ana ti zi.mes-c gid ud.mes-# siim-ud 

MU.MES-a SIL1M NUMUN.MES-a KUR-tf PAB 

[kusse] 

y) SJD-tl-a HE. GAL URU-a DAGAL UN.MES-tf SLSA 

Ltj-a kur as-sur za-i-ri-ia [ana game astute]-a 



(For the beginning see the commentary) 
l'-2'a) son of Tukultl-Ninurta (n), king of the 
universe, king of Assyria, son of Adad-nararl (n) 
(who was) also king of the universe (and) king of 
Assyria: 

2'b-3') For my life, that my days might be long, 
my years many, (for) the well-being of my seed 
(and) my land, (for) the safekeeping of my vice- 
regal [throne], (for) abundance in my city, (for) 
the increase of my people, (for) the thriving of 
my people in Assyria, [for the scorching of] my 



232 Ashurnasirpal ii A.0. 101.4 

a-na zah mal-ki.MES KUR.MES-a a-na enemies, for the destruction of my [dangerous 

g1r.ii.mes-[<7 suknuse] foes], to [subdue] under me princes who oppose 

me; 
(For the remainder see the commentary) (For the remainder see the commentary) 



This text is on a sculptured slab (BM 124571 = old no. 28) from an 
entrance to the Ninurta temple at Calah. The slab is one of four stone 
monuments found adjacent to one another (see A. 0.101. 3 for details). 
A text on the back of some of these slabs has been edited as 
A. 0.1 01.31. The inscription is very badly worn and only small por- 
tions can actually be read. As far as it can be deciphered it appears to 
be a duplicate of A. 0.101. 3 (see the commentary to that text) with 
some additional lines (parallel to A. 0.101.1 hi 119 to beyond line 132) 
and it is probably part of an annals series (see the introduction to 
A, 0.1 01.1). Not enough can be read to warrant an edition (it has been 
collated) but where variants from A. 0.1 01.1 (i 1-1 8a and iii 119-32) 
are clear, they have been noted in the edition of that text. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1902 King, AKA p. 254 n. 4 (study) 1975 Barnett, Assyrian Sculpture pi. i (photo) 

1914 Budge, Sculptures pi. xxxvn (photo) 1976 Grayson, ARI 2 ci 3 (study) 

1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 19 (study) 



This text is on a sculptured slab (BM 124572 = old no. 29) adjacent 
to the slab listed as A. 0.101. 5. The inscription is very badly worn and 
only small portions can actually be read. As far as it can be deci- 
phered it appears to be a duplicate of A. 0.101. 3 (see the commentary 
to that text) and 5, texts which have parallels in A. 0.101.1. It is prob- 
ably part of an annals series (see the introduction to A.0. 101.1). Not 
enough can be read to warrant an edition (the inscription has been 
collated) but where variants from A. 0.101.1 are clear (King said lines 
1-13 of our text were parallel to A. 0.101.1 i 1-12), they have been 
noted in the edition of that text. Note that A.0. 101 .7 may be a dupli- 
cate of A.0. 101.6. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1902 King, AKA p. 254 n. 4 (study) 1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p, 19 (study) 

1914 Budge, Sculptures pi. xxxvn (photo) 1976 Grayson, ARI 2 ci 3 (study) 



Ashurnasirpal n A.0. 101.7 233 



This text is on a sculptured slab (BM 124573 = old no. 30, BM 
124589 is a cast of this slab) adjacent to the slabs listed as 
A. 0.101.5-6. The inscription is very badly worn and only small por- 
tions can actually be read. As far as it can be deciphered it appears to 
be a duplicate of A.0. 101.6 which in turn is a partial duplicate of 
A.0. 101. 3 (see the commentary to that text) and 5; these, in turn, have 
parallels in A.0. 101.1. It is probably part of an annals series (see the 
introduction to A.0. 101. 1). Not enough can be read to warrant an edi- 
tion (the inscription has been collated) but where variants from 
A.0. 101.1 are clear (King said lines 1-37 of our text were parallel to 
A.0. 101.1 i 1-12), they have been noted in the edition of that text. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1902 King, AKA p. 254 n. 4 (study) 1976 Grayson, AR1 2 ci 3 (study) 

1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 19 (study) 



8 



This inscription is the first in a series produced on successive stone 
slabs, which make up one of the annals series from the North West 
Palace at Calah (see the introduction to A.0.10L1). The phrase 'first 
tablet* is actually inscribed on the edge of the stone slab (IM 55744 = 
ND 811). The text has never been published and therefore cannot be 
edited here. According to information given by Wiseman it begins 
with an invocation of the gods (lines 1-10) almost identical with that 
in the Nimrud Monolith (A. 0.101. 17 i 1-11). It continues (lines 10-52) 
with the epithets and genealogy of Ashurnasirpal as in A. 0.101.1 
i 18-43 and then goes on to an annalistic narrative of the first cam- 
paign (lines 52-72) as in A.0. 101,1 i 43-56 (stopping with utul.mes 
zabar 'bronze casseroles'). 

The narrative was continued on successive stone slabs which prob- 
ably included the texts listed here as A.0. 101.9-12. Each of these be- 
gins with a brief introduction with royal epithets and genealogy before 
going on to narrate various later campaigns, the narrative in each case 
ending abruptly since it was continued on yet another successive slab. 
In fact A. 0.1 01. 9 is clearly the continuation of A. 0.1 01. 8 since it be- 
gins precisely where A.0. 101.8 breaks off; and A.0. 101. 12 is probably 
(the inscription is broken) the continuation of A.0, 101. 9 for the same 
reason. 

The final portion of this annals series may be the inscription on 
another stone slab (ND 820) discovered about the same time. This in- 
scription begins with the name and titles of the king and is a duplicate 
of A. 0.101.1 iii 113. It continues with duplication of that text until it 
breaks off (= A. 0.101.1 iii 127), and probably the broken portion du- 
plicated the end of the annals (down to A.0. 101,1 iii 136). The slab 



234 



Ashurnasirpal n A.0.101.8 

belongs to the British School of Archaeology in Iraq and is kept in the 
British Museum where the inscription was collated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1951 Wiseman, Iraq 13 pp, 118-19 and n. 1 (study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 o 4 and 14 (study) 



This inscription, on a stone slab from Calah (BM 90830), is a con- 
tinuation of an annals series (see the introduction to A. 0.1 01.1). It is, 
in fact, the second tablet in the series of which A. 0.101. 8 is the first 
since, after a brief label (lines 1-2), it resumes the narrative of cam- 
paigns where A. 0.101. 8 breaks off. This narrative is a duplicate of 
A.0.101.1 i 57-103 (ending with uru hal-zi-lu-ha). The third tablet in 
this series is probably represented by A. 0.101. 12. Since A. 0.101.9 has 
only minor variants this passage has not been edited here and the vari- 
ants have been included in the edition of A.0.101.1. Thus only the 
introductory two lines, close parallels to A.0.101.10 lines 1-2 
(= A.0.101.106), need be edited here. The inscription has been col- 
lated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1902 King, AKA p. 254 n. 4 (study) 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 ci 6 (translation) 



TEXT 



1) ^ m ^aS-SUr-PAB-A MAN GAL-W MAN datl-nu MAN 
KlS MAN KUR aS-SUr DUMU TUKUL-MAS MAN 
GA[L-e] 

2) [ma]n dan-nu man kis man kur as-sur dumu 

10-ERIN.TAH MAN GAL-2 MAN datl-HU MAN KIS 

man kur [assurmg] 

(For the remainder see the edition of A.0.101.1 

i 57-103) 



1-2) Ashurnasirpal, great king, strong king, king 
of the universe, king of Assyria, son of Tukultl- 
Ninurta (n), great king, strong king, king of the 
universe, king of Assyria, son of Adad-naran (n) 
[(who was) also] great king, strong king, king of 
the universe (and) king of [Assyria]. 

(For the remainder see the translation of 
A.0.101.1 i 57-103) 



10 



This inscription was engraved upon a stone slab discovered by Layard 
between two monumental lions at Calah. At present the text is known 
only from the publications of Layard and Le Gac. The inscription is a 
continuation of an annals series (see the introduction to A.0.101.1) 



Ashurnasirpal ii A.0.101.10 235 

and may, in fact, be part of the series introduced by A.0.101.8. It be- 
gins with a label (lines 1-2 = A. 0.101. 106). After that it has a narra- 
tive of the campaigns which is a duplicate of A. 0.1 01.1 ii 86 (begin- 
ning with ina iti.sig 4 ) to ii 101 (ending with [anse.kur.ra].mes). Since 
it has only minor variants from the passage in A. 0.101.1, the variants 
have been included in the edition of that text and no separate edition 
is given here. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1851 Layard, ICC pis. 48-49 (copy) 1907 Le Gac, Asn. pp. ii-m ('Annals C) and 126 ('C.l', copy) 

1902 King, AKA p. 254 n. 4 (<L\ study) 1976 Grayson, ARI 2 ci 7 (study) 



11 



This inscription was engraved upon a stone slab discovered by Layard 
at Calah. At present the text is known only from the publication of 
Le Gac which was based on a squeeze which is now lost (see the intro- 
duction to A. 0.101.1). The inscription is a continuation of an annals 
series (see the introduction to A. 0.101.1) and may in fact be part of 
the series introduced by A.0.101.8. It begins with a label (lines 1-3 = 
A. 0.101.104). After that it has a campaign narrative which is a dupli- 
cate of A.0. 101.1 iii 63 (beginning with ina u*-me-su-ma) to iii 67 
(ending with gi[s.bansur.mes]). Since it has only minor variants from 
the passage in A. 0.101.1, the variants have been included in the edi- 
tion of that text and no separate edition is given here. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1907 Le Gac, Asn. pp. ii-iii ('Annals C) and 126-27 CC.2, fc.83') (copy) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 ci 8 (study) 



12 



This inscription, on stone slab fragments from Calah (Rm 2,609-613), 
is a continuation of an annals series (see the introduction to 
A. 0.101.1). It may in fact be the third tablet in the series of which 
A.0.101.8 and 9 are the first and second respectively. The beginning of 
the inscription is missing but it could have had a brief introduction 
similar to A.0.101.9 lines 1-2 followed by the narrative picking up 
where A.0.101.9 ended (duplicate of A.0. 101.1 i 103). The actual por- 
tion of preserved text is a duplicate of A. 0.101.1 ii 1-29 (ending with 
u[ru u-ze-e on the left edge). Since A. 0.101. 12 has only minor vari- 
ants it has not been edited here and the variants have been included in 
the edition of A. 0.101.1. The inscription has been collated. 



236 Ashurnasirpal ii A.0.101.12 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 152 n. 658 (study) 



13 



This inscription, on a broken stone block (YBC 2313), is the Irst in 
another series of inscriptions engraved on successive stone slabs which 
make up one of the annals series from Caiah (see the introduction to 
A.0.101.1). It is parallel to A.0.101.8, also the first tablet in an annals 
series, but A. 0.101.13 continues the narration of campaigns farther 
than A.0.101.8. The stone slab upon which A.0.101.13 is engraved is 
broken but the preserved portion of the obverse is a duplicate of 
A.0.101.1 i 26-33 and the reverse is a duplicate of A.0. 101.1 i 52-59. 
Since A.0.101.13 has only minor variants for the duplicate passages an 
edition of the text is not given here and the variants are cited in the 
edition of A.0.101.1. The inscription has been collated from photos. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1937 Stephens, YOS 9 no, 129 (study) 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 ci 5 (study) 



14 



This inscription is engraved on a stone slab fragment (BM 118924 = 
51-9-2,37) found at Calah, in 'Entrance c, Chamber B, Plan 3', ac- 
cording to Layard who published a copy of it. Le Gac in his edition 
of the 'annals* gave only variants from it based on a paper squeeze, 
now destroyed (see the introduction to A.0.101.1). The inscription is a 
continuation of an annals series (see the introduction to A.0.101.1) 
and Le Gac regarded it as part of the annals series edited in this 
volume as A.0. 101.1. The preserved portion has a campaign narrative 
which is a duplicate of A.0.101.1 ii 110 (beginning with uru ku-ii-ku- 
nu) to ii 117 (ending with se.am.mes). Since it has only minor variants 
from the passage in A.0.101.1, the variants have been included in the 
edition of that text and no separate edition is given here. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1851 Layard, ICC pi. 84 bottom (copy) 1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p, 20 (study) 

1907 Le Gac, Asn. p. xm ('E.72a-b\ study) 



Ashurnasirpal II A. 0.101. 15 



237 



15 



This fragmentary text is found on a number of stone slab fragments 
from Nineveh and represents an annals series from that city (cf. the 
introduction to A, 0.101,1). Unfortunately very little of the text is 
preserved but what is extant duplicates parts of the following passages 
in A.O. 101.1: i 59-60, ii 90-91, ii 126-32, and iii 123-28. The few vari- 
ants from the relevant passages in A. 0.101.1 have been included in the 
edition of that text and there is no need to give a separate edition 
here. The four fragments do not join but they could come from adja- 
cent slabs with a continuous text like A. 0.101.1. 



CATALOGUE 



Ex. 



Museum 


Publication 


number 


reference 


Unlocated 


AAA 19 no. 171 


BCM 219 78 


AAA 19 no. 303 


K 8545 + 8547 


Cat. 3 p. 938 


K8548 


Cat. 3 p. 938 



Dimensions 
(cm) 



Lines 
preserved 



cpn 



36x16 + 
5x10 + 
20x15 + 
24x15 + 



i 59-60 
ii 90-91 
ii 126-32 
iii 123-28 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1893 Bezold, Cat. 3 p. 938 (exs. 3-4, study) 
1932 Thompson, AAA 19 pp. 113-14 pis. lxxvii and lxxxix 
nos. 171 and 303 (exs. 1-2, copy) 



1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 20 (exs. 1-2, study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 152 n. 660 (exs. 1-4, study) 
1979 George, Iraq 41 p. 123 (ex. 2, study) 



16 



A fragmentary text with remains of an annals series (see the introduc- 
tion to A. 0.101.1), possibly from Assur, is in Berlin (VAT 9638). It 
was mentioned by Borger, EAK 1 p. 73 (cf. Grayson, ARI 2 p. 115 n. 
468 c i). 



17 



This text is engraved on a huge stone stele about three metres high, 
sometimes called the 'Nimrud Monolith 5 or 'Great Monolith'. Layard 
discovered it at the entrance to the Ninurta temple at Calah. The 
cuneiform text is engraved on all sides of the monument and on the 
obverse the king's figure and divine symbols are also carved in relief. 
The text begins (i 1-11) with an invocation of various deities and this 
passage is a duplicate of the introduction to A. 0.101. 8 (q.v.). Then 
comes a lengthy passage (i 12 - iv end), a duplicate of A. 0.101.1 i 18b 
- ii 125a, which consists of the royal name and epithets and a descrip- 
tion of the first five campaigns. This is followed (v 1-24) by a 



238 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101. 17 



narrative regarding construction at Calah. The text ends with an 
unusually long and interesting list of curses (v 24-103). The engraver 
made a surprising number of errors, especially in the last column 
(col. v), which suggests he was working hastily to meet a deadline. 



COMMENTARY 



The monolith is now in the British Museum (BM 
118805, 51-9-2,32 - old no. 847) and the inscription 

has been collated. For comments on the long passage 
(i 12 - iv end) which is a duplicate of A. 0.101.1 i 18b - 
ii 125a, see the notes to the latter passage. The stone 
has deteriorated since King and Le Gac published the 



text and many readings which they give are no longer 
preserved. These instances are remarked upon in the 
notes to the individual passages. There are a number of 
errors in the vars. given by Le Gac for this text in his 
critical apparatus to A. 0,10 1.1. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1853 Layard, Discoveries pp. 351-52 (provenance) and the 

plate before p. 351 (photo) 
1861 1 R pi. 27 (copy) 
1889 Peiser, KB 1 pp. 118-23 (edition) 
1902 King, AKA pp. Ixix and 242-53 (photo, copy, edition) 
1907 Le Gac, Asn. pp. 129-36 (copy) 
1914 Budge, Sculptures pis. ii-m (photo) 



1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§490-95 (translation) 

1936 Gadd, Stones p. 129 (study) 

1958 CAD 4 (E) p. 53a (v 26-41, edition) 

1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 19-20 and 32-33 (study) 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 ci 9 (translation) 

1982 Borker-Klahn, Bildstelen no. 136 (photo, study) 



TEXT 



Col. i 

1) QS-SUr EN GAL-W MAN gim-Wt DINGIR.MES 
GAL.MES 

2) d a-nu ges-ru res-tu-u mu-sim 

3) d NAM,MES d e-a man ap-si-i 

4) en ne-me-qi ha-si-su d 30 er-su en a-ge-e 
TlalI-w 

5) nam-ri-ri d AMAR.UTu(*) ap-ak-lu dingir en 
ti-ri-te 

6) d iSKUR ges-ru kas-kas-si dingir. dingir si-ru 
d MAS qar-du qar-ra-di dingir. mes mu-sam-qit 
lem-nu~te 

7) d nusku na-si gis.gidru Kv-te dingir mu- 
(ul)-tal-Iu d NiN.LiL hi-ir-ti d BAD 

8) TamA^ DINGIR.MES GAL.MES d U.GUR glt-ma-lu 

man tam-ha-ri d BAD si-ru ad dingir. mes 

9) ba-nu-u vt-ma d sd-masm.KV$ AN-e ki-// 
mu-ma-H-ri gi-im-ri 

10) d is$-tdr SAG-ti AN-e ki-// sd garza qar-du-ti 
suk-lu-Ia-at 

1 1) dingir.mes gal.mes mu-sim-mu si-ma-at KUR 
mu-sar-bu-u man-// 



i 1-10) Assur, the great lord, king of all the great 
gods; god Anu, foremost in strength, the one who 
decrees destinies; god Ea, king of the apsu, lord 
of wisdom (and) understanding; god Sin, wise 
one, lord of the lunar disk, (i 5) lofty luminary; 
god Marduk, sage, lord god of oracles; god 
Adad, strong, almighty among the gods, exalted; 
god Ninurta, hero, warrior of the gods, the one 
who lays low the wicked; god Nusku, bearer of 
the holy sceptre, circumspect god; goddess Ninlil, 
spouse of the god Enlil, mother of the great gods; 
god Nergal, perfect one, king of battle; god Enlil, 
exalted one, father of the gods, creator of all; god 
Samas, judge of heaven (and) underworld, com- 
mander of all; (i 10) goddess Istar, foremost in 
heaven (and) underworld, who Is consummate in 
the canons of combat; 



i 11-1 2a) great gods, who decree the destinies of 
the land (and) make great the sovereignty of 
Ashurnasirpal: 



i 4-5 r L AL"i-w = sagu {nam-ri-ri): cf . sa/sd-qu-ii nam-ri-ri 
Layard, ICC pi. 87 line 6 and Michel, WO 1 (1947-52) p. 456 
i 4. See Borger, EAK 1 p. 121 and von Soden, AHw p. 728b. 



i 7 mu-(ul)-tal-lu: so all the parallels, for which see the note 
to A.0.100.1 line 11. i 10 sag-//: see note to A.0.100.1 line 13. 



Ashurnaslrpal ii A. 0.101.17 



239 



m as-sur-PAP-A Tnun"! na-a-du pa-lxh 

dingir.mes GAUMES-te u-sum-gal-lu ek-du 

ka-sid 

uru.uru hur-sd-ni pat gim-ri-su-nu lugal 

en.mes-^ mu-la-it ek-su-te 

a-pi-ir sa-lum-ma-^te 1 la a-di-ru gis.lal ur- 

Sa-nu tiz-qa-ru la pa-du-u mu-rib a-nun-te 

MAN DU mal-ki.MES EN EN.MES-e UTUL MAN 

man.mes-w i-si-pu na-a^du ni-bit d MAS qar-di 

ka-su-us dingir.mes gal.mes mu-tir gi-mil-li 

man sd ina gis Aukul-ti as-sur u d sd-mas 

dingir.mes 

tik-li-su me-se-ris it-ta-la-ku-ma kur.mes-/i/ 

sap-su-te 

u mal-ki kur.mes-sw gim gi a-pi li-ha-si-su 

kul-lat KUR.KUR.MES-SH-/2W 

a-na gir.ii.mes-.sw u-sek-ni-sa za-nin 
nidba.mes a-na dingir.mes gal.mes 
ru-bu-u ke-e-nu sa a-na su-te-sur pdr-si 

E.KUR.MES KUR-SW 

pit-qu-du ka-ia-na sa ep-set ^qa^-ti-su u ma- 
dan zi-bi-su 

dingir.mes gal.mes sa AN-e u Ki-te i-ra-mu- 
ma sanga-5w ina e.kur.mes 
a-na dd-ri-is u-kin-nu gis.tukul.mes-5w-«w 
ez-zu-te ana si-rik-te 
EN-ti-su is-ru-ku sd-lum-ma-at 
gis.tukul.mes-sw me-lam EN-ti-su 
ugu man.mes-h/ sd kib-rat 4-i u-sar-ri-hu-su 
kur.mes-w/ as-Sur 

pat gim-ri-sti-nu e-lis u sap-lis is-la-nu-nu-ma 
gun u ma-da-ta 

uGu-M-nu li-kin-nu ka-sid a-ia-hu-ut as-sur 
man dan-nu man kur as-sur 
dumu giskim^mas siD as-sur sd kul-lat za-i- 
ri-su i-ni-ru 
ina ga-si-si u-re-tu-u pag-ri ge-ri-su 

DUMU. DUMU Sd md 10-ERIN.TAH 

GIR.NITA DINGIR.MES GAL.MES M si-kip-te Iff 

ma-gi-ri-su 

il-ta-ka-nu-ma i-pe-lu gim-ri lib-lib-bi sd 



i 12b-32) (I, Ashurnasirpal), attentive prince, 
worshipper of the great gods, ferocious dragon, 
conqueror of cities and the entire highlands, king 
of lords, controller of the obstinate, crowned with 
splendour, fearless in battle, lofty (and) merciless 
hero, he who stirs up strife, (i 15) king of all 
princes, lord of lords, chief herdsman, king of 
kings, attentive purification priest, designate of 
the warrior god Ninurta, destructive weapon of 
the great gods, avenger, the king who has always 
acted justly with the support of Assur and the 
god Samas, the gods who help him, and cut down 
like marsh reeds fortified mountains and princes 
hostile to him (and) subdued all their lands, pro- 
vider of offerings for the great gods, (i 20) legiti- 
mate prince, to whom is perpetually entrusted the 
proper administration of the rites of the temples 
of his land, whose deeds and offerings the great 
gods of heaven and underworld love so that they 
(therefore) established forever his priesthood in 
the temples, granted to his dominion their fierce 
weapons, (and) made him more marvellous (i 25) 
than (any of) the kings of the four quarters with 
respect to the splendour of his weapons (and) the 
radiance of his dominion, (he who) has always 
contested with all enemies of Assur above and 
below and imposed upon them tribute and tax, 
conqueror of the foes of Assur, strong king, king 
of Assyria; son of Tukultl-Ninurta (h), vice-regent 
of Assur, who defeated all his enemies (and) hung 
the corpses of his enemies on posts, grandson of 
Adad-narSrT (n), (i 30) appointee of the great 
gods, who always achieved the defeat of those in- 
submissive to him and (thereby) became lord of 
all, offspring of Assur-dan (n) who opened towns 
(and) founded shrines: 



sa ma-ha-zi u-pdt-tu-u u-kin-nu is-re-e-ti 

ina ut-me-su-ma ina pi-i dingir.mes gal.mes 

man-*7 EN-ti kis-su-ti 

li-sa-a sar-ra-ku be-la-ku na-a^-da-ku ges-ra-ku 

kab-ta-ku sur-ru-ha-ku sag.kal-£w ur-sa-na- 

ku 

qar-ra-da-ku lab-ba-ku u zi-ka-ra-ku m as- 

SUr-PAB-A 

man dan-nu sid as-sur u d MAS ni-bit d 30 me- 
gir d a-nim na-mad 

d iSKUR kas-kas dingir.mes ana-ku gis.tukul 
la pa-du-u 



i 33-46a) At that time my sovereignty, my domin- 
ion, (and) my power came forth at the command 
of the great gods; I am king, I am lord, I am 
praiseworthy, I am exalted, (i 35) I am important, 
I am magnificent, I am foremost, I am a hero, I 
am a warrior, I am a lion, and I am virile; 
Ashurnasirpal, strong king, vice-regent of Assur 
and the god Ninurta, designate of the god Sin, 
favourite of the god Anu, loved one of the god 
Adad (who is) almighty among the gods, I, the 
merciless weapon which lays low lands hostile to 



240 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101. 17 



mu-sam-qit kur «w-kur.mes-5w a-na-ku man 
le-e^-u murub 4 sd-gisvRU.URU 
hur-M-ni sag.kal gis.lal man kib-rat 4-/ 
mu-ne-er 

a-a-bi-su mus-har-me-tf kul-lat kur.mes-s« 
man kis-sat kib-ra-a-te sd nap-har mal-ki 
Di)-su-nu 

man mu-sd-ak-mhsi la ka-an-su-te-su sd nap- 
har kis-sat 

un.mes i-pe-lu si-ma-a-te an-na-a-te 
ina pi-i dingir.mes gal.mes u-sa-ni-ma ana 
si-im-ti-a 

ki-ni-is u-kin-nu ina bi-ib-lat lib-bi-ia 
u tir-si su-a d iNANNA nin aga SANGA-ti-ia 
lu-u tam-gu-ra-ni-ma e-pes murub 4 u me 

lib-ba-sa ub-la-ma ina u 4 -me-su-ma m as-sur- 

PAB-A 

nun na-a-du pa-lih dingir.mes gal.mes sd 

bi-ib-U 

Pib-bi-M d BAD u-se-ek-si-du-su-ma nap-har 

mal-ki 

ia ma-gi-ri-su ik-su-du GAL-tu qa-a-su ka-sid 

a-a-bi-su sd ina ds-ri nam-ra-si u-pa-ri-ru 

ki-sir mul-tar-hi e-nu-ma as-sur en gal-w na- 

bu-u 

mu -ia mu-sar-bu-u MAN-ti-ia ugu man.mes-w 

sd kib-rat 4-/ mu gal-/s lu-sar-bu-u 

GIS.TUKUL-5W 

la pa-da-a a-na i-di EN-ti-ia lu-sat-mi-hi 

kur.kur.mes hur-sd-ni dan-nu-te ana pe-li 

suk-nu-se u sd-pa-ri 

ag-gi-is u-ma- r i-ra-ni ina gis Aukul-ti as-sur 

BN-ia 

ar-hi pa-dS-qu-te KUR.ME^-e mar-su-te ina gi- 

pis 

erin.hla.mes-0 lu at-ta-lak-ma sd-ni-ni ul 

ib-si ina sur-rat MAN-ti^ia^ 

ina mah-re-e BALA.MEs-a sd d M-mas di.kud 

UB.MES AN.DUL-SW 

dug.ga ugu-/# is-ku-nu ina gis.gu.za man-*/ 

GAL-/5 U-sl-bu 

gis.gidru mur-te^a-at un.mes a-na su-ia u- 

sat-mi-hu gis.gigir.[m]es 

ERiN.Hi.A.MEs-a ad-ki ger-ri pa-ds-qu-te 

kur.mes-€ mar-^siH-te 

sd a-na me-teq gis.gigir.mes u erin.hi.a.mes 

la sd-ak-nu e-^te^-tiq 

a-na kur tum A -me a-lik uru li-be-e uru 

dan-nu-U-su-nu uru f~su~i-ur-ra 

uru a-bu-qu uru a-ru-ra uru a-ru-be-e sd 

ina bi-rit kur ^iP-ri-ni 

kur a-ru-ni kur e-ti-ni kur.mes-^ kal.mes-^ 

GAR-FW KUR-Wd GAZ,UES-^SU-nU^ HI.A.MES 

^a-duk^ sal-la-su-nu bu-sd-su-nu gu 4 .mes-sw- 



him, I, the king, capable in battle, vanquisher of 
cities (and) (i 40) highlands, foremost in battle, 
king of the four quarters, the one who defeats his 
enemies, the one who disintegrates all his enemies, 
king of the totality of the (four) quarters includ- 
ing all their princes, the king who forces to bow 
down those insubmissive to him, the one who 
rules all peoples; these destinies came forth (i 45) 
at the command of the great gods and they prop- 
erly fixed (them) as my destinies. 



i 46b-49a) Because of my voluntary offerings and 
my prayers the goddess Istar, the mistress who 
loves my priesthood, approved of me and she 
made up her mind to make war and battle, 
i 49b-54a) At that time, Ashurnasirpal, (i 50) at- 
tentive prince, worshipper of the great gods, 
whose desires the god Enlil helped him obtain so 
that his great hand conquered all princes insub- 
missive to him, conqueror of his foes, the one 
who in rugged terrain broke up the forces of the 
rebellious; 

i 54b-61a) when Assur, my great lord, who called 
me by name (and) made my sovereignty supreme 
over the kings of the four quarters, had made 
(my) great name supreme he placed his merciless 
weapon in my lordly arms (and) sternly com- 
manded me to rule, subdue, and direct the lands 
(and) mighty highlands. With the support of 
Assur, my lord, (i 60) I kept marching along 
difficult routes (and) over rugged mountains with 
the mass of my troops and there was no op- 
ponent. 

i 61b-77a) In my accession year (and) in my first 
regnal year when the god Samas, judge of the 
(four) quarters, spread his beneficial protection 
over me, (and) when 1 nobly ascended the royal 
throne, he placed in my hand the sceptre for the 
shepherding of the people — (at that time) (i 65) I 
mustered my chariotry (and) troops. I passed 
through difficult paths (and) rugged mountains 
which were unsuitable for chariotry and troops 
(and) marched to the land Tummu. I conquered 
Libe, their fortified city, the cities Surra, Abuqu, 
Arura, (and) Arube which lie between Mounts 
Urinu, Arunu, (and) Etinu, mighty mountains, 
(i 70) I massacred many of them (and) carried off 
captives, possessions, (and) oxen from them. The 
troops were frightened (and) took to a rugged 
mountain. Since the mountain was exceptionally 
rugged I did not pursue them. The mountain was 
as jagged as the point of a dagger and therein no 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101.17 



241 



nu asAu-la erin.mes ig-du-ru K[uR]-r«n mar-su 

71) is-sa-^ab-tu^ kur-« mar-si dan-ni-is 
EGiR.MES- r 5ifi-«w la a-lik [ku]r-w gim zi-\qi\p 

GIR AN. BAR 

72) se-e-su ^na-d^-[d\i ii musen an-£ mus-tap- 
*~rP-\su q]e-reb-su ^la P-H-ru [g]im qi-in-ni 

73) u-di-ni.uusBN ina fqe-reh~i KUR-e dan-na- 
t~su^-nu [is-k]u-nu sd ina man.Tmes-^H 

[A]D.MES-a 

74) ma-am-ma ina qe-reb-su-nu *la te-u ma(?)~i 
[3 ud.me.k]am u[r.s]ag KUR-rw i-hi-ta^ gap- 
s[u li]b-ba-sii 

75) gis.lal ub-la e-li ina gir.ii.mes-sw kur-w ^u- 
sa-hi-pa ih-pi qP-in-na-su-nu ukkin-sw-/zw u- 
fpa^-ri-ir 2 me erin.mes t[i\-^du-ki-siP-nu 
ina Gi[s].rTUKUL"i.[M]Es 

76) u-sam-qit saNa-su-nu DVGVD-ta gim mar-si-it 
udu se-ni ds-^lu^-[l\a [u]s.mes-sw-to gi[m] 
na-pa-si kur-w r/ w n as-ru-up si^ta^-[te\- 

i su^-nu h[ur]-ru \~na-at i-ba-i ku^ 
11) sd KUR-e fei-kul vRv.MEs-ni-su-nu ap-ptil 
aq-qur ina izi.meS dS-[ru-up] ta kur ^tum^- 
me at-tu-muS a-na kur klr-ru-ri a\t-ta~rad\ 
ma-[da-t]u 

78) sd kur kir-ru-ri kur si-me-si uru si-me-ra 
uru ul-ma-ni-a uru ad-da-u[s ur]u \h]ar-ga- 
a-r/ai uru [har]^ma^~sa-a-ia 

anse. [kur.r]a. TmesT 
[anse.gi]r.n[un.n]a.mes 

79) gu4.mes udu.mes gestin.mes utul.mes zabar 
ma-da-ta-su-nu am-hur lu za-bi-il ^ku-dtO- 
[ri] VGU-su-[nu u-k\in ^ki-P ina kur ki[r- 
r]u-^rP u[s-ba-ku]-*~nP 

80) kur hub-us-ki-a-ia uru gil-za-na-a-ia me- 
iam-me ^sd as-sur^ en-gt ^is^-hup-sii-nu 

ANSE.KUR.TRA~f.MES KU.B[ABBAR.M]e[S 
K]U.GI.f"MEST AN.N[A.M]ES TzABARl.MES 
rUTUL^I.[MES ZA]B[AR] 

81) ma-da-ta-su-nu a-na VGV-ia ub-lu-ni i~ta1 
kur kir-ru-r[i] at-t[u\-mu$ ina kur ne-re-be 
sd i~uru hu-lu^-[nu] ^ana kur hab-hi scP 
b[e-ta]-*~a-ni e-tar-ba uru ha^-[a]t-^tu^ 

82) uru ^hd^-ta-ru uru ni-is-tu~un uru sa-^bP- 
di Turu me^-et-qi-a u[ru a]r-su-a~in uru 
£[e]- r £~W[fl ur]u ^hd^-[lu-a uru.meJs- 1 "^/ stf 
kurT [/*aZ?]- r W 5a //2tf~J W-nY 

83) kur u-su kur a-ru~a kur a-m-ar-di 

[KUR].TMES-e KAlAMES-te G[AR-^W KUR-w]^ 

GAZ.MEl-M-nu [hi. a], Tmes a^w/: i s\al-la-s\u~ 
nu bu-sd-sii-nu [ds-lu-!\a [eriInJmes ig-du^- 
r[u] 

84) u-ba-nu a-si-tu sd pu-ut uru uru n[i-is\- 



winged bird of the sky flew. Like the nest of the 
udTnu-bird their fortress was situated within the 
mountain which none of the kings my fathers had 
penetrated. [For three days] the hero explored the 
mountain. His bold heart (i 75) yearned for bat- 
tle. He ascended on foot (and) overwhelmed the 
mountain. He smashed their nest (and) scattered 
their flock. I felled 200 of their fighting men with 
the sword (and) carried off a multitude of captives 
like a flock of sheep. With their blood I dyed the 
mountain red like red wool, (and) the rest of 
them the ravines (and) torrents of the mountain 
swallowed. I razed, destroyed, (and) burnt their 
cities. 



i 77b-81a) Moving on from the land Tummu I 
went down to Mount Kirruru. I received the tri- 
bute of Mounts Kirruru and Simesu, the city 
Simerra, the city Ulmania, the city Adaus (Ad- 
daus), the city Hargaia, the city Harmasaia — 
horses, mules, oxen, sheep, wine, (and) bronze 
casseroles. I imposed upon them corvee. While I 
was in Mount Kirruru the radiance of Assur, my 
lord, overwhelmed the Hubusku and the Gilzanu 
(and) they brought to me as their tribute horses, 
silver, gold, tin, bronze, (and) bronze casseroles. 



i 81b-90) Moving on from Mount Kirruru I en- 
tered the pass which (leads from) the city Hulun 
to the interior of the land Habhu. I conquered the 
cities Hattu, Hataru, Nistun, Sabidi, Metqia, 
Arsuain, Tela, Halua, cities of the land Habhu, 
which lie between Mounts Usu, Arua, (and) 
Arardi, mighty mountains. I massacred many of 
them (and) carried off prisoners (and) possessions 
from them. The troops were frightened (and) took 
to a lofty peak in front of the city NiStun, [which] 
hovered [like a cloud in the] sky, Into the midst 
of those (mountains) which none of the kings my 
fathers had ever approached (i 85) my warriors 
[flew] like birds. I felled [260] of their combat 



i 71-72 gim ... *~na-cn-[d\i: see the note to A. 0,1 01.1 i 49. 



242 



Ashurnasirpal n A.0.101.17 



r?«"i-[w/2 sa kima erpeti istu a]n-£ su-qa-lu-lat 
[isbutu sa ina MA]N.rMES~i-/i[i adJ^mes-at"! 
ma-am-ma [ina qereh\- v su-nu la te-iD 

85) lu qu-ra-di-ia gim musen.[mes ellsunu ise y u 2 
me 1 siisi eri]n.mes mu-dah-s[i-su-nu ina 
Gis].rTUKUL.MES~i [u-sam]-^ qit sag^.Idu.meS- 
su-nu u-ne-k(]s ^a-na^ 

86) a-si-te ar-sip si-ta-te-[M-nu kima issurf] fqi- 
in-nP [ana kapi sa ku]r->"^ sub.sub.mes-/?[i 
sallassunu busdsunu] Tta"I [qereb sade u-se]- 
fri-da^ 

87) URU.MES-m sd ina qe-reb hu[r-M-ni 
kal.m]es-I te GAR-nu ap*-[pul aqqur ina] 
izi.mes ^ds^-ru-u\p ummanaii ammar istu 
pUn kakkt\- r ia^ 

88) ip-pdr-Si-du-ni ur-d[u~ni sepeia is]-i~bu-tiP 
g[un madatu u l]u za-bi-il k[u-du(l)-ri(l) 
ellsunu askun m bu-u]-^bu^ 

89) dumu bu-ba-a dumu l[u.en.uru sa al nistun 
ina al arbaHl akus ku]s-s« bad [uhallip ina 
umesuma salam bunaniia] 

90) DU-W5 ta-na-ti [. . . ] 

91) ina iti.ne u[d ...] 

92) sa gir kur ni-^puf^ [...] 

93) sa li-me-t[u-su-nu ...] 

94) '"lu.erin.mes"' [...] 

95) r T A uru.mes-w sa gir~i [,..] 
Lacuna 



Col. ii 

1) lu ba-tu-li-M-nu munus ba-tu-la-te-su-nu 

2) ana GfBiL-f/ gibil uru ap-pul aq-qur ina 
izi.mes GIBIL-rw/?l 

3) a-kul-su [in]a u^-me-su-ma uru.mes-«/ sd 
kur ni-ir-bi 

4) BAD.MES-ni-su-nu dan-nu-te ap-pul aq-qur 

5) ina izi.mes gibil ta kur ni-ir-bi at-tum 4 -sd 

6) ana uru tu-us-ha aq-ti-rib uru tu-us-ha 

7) ana es-su-te as-bat bad-M la-be-ru 

8) u-na-kin a-sar-su u-me-si dan-na-su 

9) ak-sud bAd gibil ta us-se-su a-di gaba-dib- 
bi-su 

10) ar-sip u-sek-lil u-si-im u-sar-nh 

1 1) e.gal ana su-bat UAN-ti-ia ina sA ad-di 

12) gis.ig.mes Du-wi ina KA.MES-5a u-re-te 



troops with the sword. I cut off their heads and 
formed (therewith) a pile. The rest of them built 
nests [like birds on] mountain [precipices]. I 
brought down [prisoners (and) possessions of 
theirs] from [the mountain] (and) I razed, [des- 
troyed], (and) burnt the cities which lay within the 
mighty highlands. [The troops, as many as] had 
fled [from my weapons], came down (and) sub- 
mitted to me. I imposed upon them tribute, [tax, 
and] corvee. Bubu, son of Buba, son of the city 
ruler [of the city Nistun I flayed in the city Arbaii 
(and) draped his skin over] the wall. [At that 
time] (i 90) I made [an image of myself (and) 
wrote thereon] the praises of [my power. I erected 
(it) on the e^w-mountain in the city (called) 
Ashurnasirpal at the source of the spring]. 



i 91-95) [In this same eponymy on the twenty- 
fourth day] of the month Ab, [by the command 
of Assur (and) the goddess IStar, the great gods, 
my lords, I moved out from the city Nineveh 
(and) marched to the cities] which [lie] at the foot 
of Mounts Nipur [and Pasate, mighty mountains. 
I conquered the cities Atkun, Ushu, Pilazi, (and) 
20 cities] in their environs. [I massacred many of 
them, carried off prisoners (and) possessions from 
them, (and) burnt the cities]. The troops, [as 
many as had fled from my weapons, came down 
(and) submitted to me. I imposed upon them 
corvee. Moving on] (i 95) from the cities which 
are at the foot [of Mounts Nipur and Pasate I 
crossed the Tigris (and) approached the land 
Katmuhu], 
Lacuna 

ii l-5a) I burnt their adolescent boys (and) girls. I 
razed, destroyed, burnt, (and) consumed the city. 
At that time I razed, destroyed, (and) burnt the 
cities of the land Nirbu (and) their strong walls. 



ii 5b-36) Moving on from the land Nirbu I ap- 
proached the city Tusha. I took Tusha in hand 
for renovation. I cleared away its old wall, delin- 
eated its area, reached its foundation pit, (and) 
(ii 10) built (and) completed (and) decorated in a 
splendid fashion a new wall from top to bottom, 
A palace for my royal residence I founded inside. 
I made doors (and) hung (them) in its doorways. 
That palace I built (and) completed from top to 



Ashurnasirpal ii A.0.101.17 



243 



13) E.GAL-ium si-i ta us-se-sd 

14) a-di gaba-dib-bi-sd ar-sip u-sek-lil 

15) sa-lam bu-na-ni-a sd NA4 pi-li BABBAR-e 

16) du-ws ta-na-ti kis-su-ti-a su-tu-ur-te 

17) u U-ka-ka-at qur-di-a 

18) sd kur.kur na-i-ri e-tap-pa-su ina sa sar 

19) ina uru tu-us-ha u-sd-zi-iz 

20) NA 4 .NA.RU.A.MES-tf sar ina bad-su ds-kun 

21) un.mes kur as-sur an-na-te sd ta igi 

22) su-un-qi bu-bu-te ana kur.mes-/?/ 

23) kur.kur. mes sd-ni-a-te ana kur sub-re-e 

24) e-ii-ti-ni u-te-ra-su-nu 

25) ina uru tu-us-ha u-(sd)~as-bi-su-nu 

26) uru su-a-tu ana ra-me-ni-a as-bat se.um.mes 

27) u se.in.nu.mes sd kur ni-ir-bi 

28) ina sa at-bu-uk si-ta-at kur ni-ir-bi 

29) stf ta igi gis.tukul.mes-a ip-pdr-si-du-ni 

30) ur-du-ni gir.ii.mes-w is-bu-tu uru.mes-w-sw- 

31) e.hi.a.mes-.s«-/?w na-tu-te u-sd-as-bi-su-nu 

32) gun ma-da-tu anse.kur.ra.mes 

33) anse.gir.nun.na.mes gu 4 .mes udu.mf.s 
gestin.mes 

34) lu za-bi-il ku-du-ri ugu sd pa-an 

35) li-sd-tir ana uov-sii-nu ds-kun 

36) x>UMXJ.ME*$-su-nu ki-i li-tu-te as-bat 

37) ki-i ina uru tu-us-ha us-ba-ku-ni 

38) ma-da-tu sd m am-me-ba-a"-li 

39) dumu za-ma-^a^-ni m DisGiR-hi-te kur sw/>- 
r/-a-a 

40) m la-ab-tu-ru dumu tu-pu-si 

41) kur ni-ir-du-un u ma-da-tu 

42) stf kur u-ru-me sd be-ta-a-ni sd man.mes-az/ 

43) r&fi kur.kur na-i-ri gis.gigir.mes 

44) [a]nse.kur.ra.mes anse.gir.nun.na.mes 
ku.babbar.mes 

45) KU.GI.MES utul.mes zabar gu 4 .mes 

46) t UD u"i.m[e]s gestin.mes ma-da-ta-su-nu am- 
hur 

47) lu za-i~bP-il ku-du-ri ugu kur.kur na-i-ri 

48) al-^ta^-kan ina ta-a-ar-ti-a 

49) sd kur.ku[r] na-i-ri kur ni-ir-bu 

50) sd sa kur kas-ia-ri i-ta-bal-kdt 

51) 9 URu.[M]ES-m-sw-«w u-ta-se-ru 

52) uru is-p\i]- v li^-ip-ri-a uru dan-nu-ti-su-nu 

53) w kur-w m[a]r-5^ i-tdk-lu-ma 

54) u-ba-na-^ aP KUR-e a-si-bi KVR-ad 

55) ma qe-reb f KUR^-e dan-ni GAZ,MES-su-nu 

56) a-^/wAr 6s.[m]es-5w-«w gim na-pa-si 
51) kvk-u ^as^-\r]u-up si-ta-te-M-nu 

58) fcwr-rw na-^aO-ba-ku Sd KUR~e /w e-/rw7 



bottom, (ii 15) I made an image of myself in 
white limestone (and) wrote thereon praise of the 
extraordinary power and heroic deeds which I had 
been accomplishing in the lands Nairi. I erected 
(it) in the city Tusha. (ii 20) I inscribed my monu- 
mental inscription (and) deposited (it) in its wall. 
I brought back the enfeebled Assyrians who, be- 
cause of hunger (and) famine, had gone up to 
other lands to the land Subru. (ii 25) I settled 
them in the city Tusha. I took over this city for 
myself (and) stored therein barley and straw from 
the land Nirbu. The rest (of the inhabitants) of 
the land Nirbu which had fled from my weapons 
(ii 30) came down (and) submitted to me. I reset- 
tled them in their abandoned cities and houses, 
(ii 35) I imposed upon them more tribute and tax 
than ever before — horses, mules, oxen, sheep, 
wine, (and) corvee. 1 took their sons as hostages. 



ii 37-48a) While I was in the city Tusha I received 
tribute from Amme-ba^lT, a man of BTt-Zamani, 
from IlT-hite, the Subru, from (ii 40) Labturu, son 
of Tupusu (of) the land Nirdun, and tribute from 
the interior of the land Urumu, (and) from the 
kings of the lands Nain — chariots, horses, 
mules, silver, (ii 45) gold, bronze casseroles, oxen, 
sheep, (and) wine. I imposed corvee upon the 
lands Nairi. 



ii 48b-63a) On my return from the lands Nairi, 
the land Nirbu, which is within Mount Kasiiari, 
rebelled. They abandoned their (ii 50) nine cities 
(and) trusted in the city Ispilipria, their fortified 
city, and a rugged mountain. But 1 besieged (and) 
conquered the mountain peaks, (ii 55) Within the 
mighty mountain 1 massacred them. With their 
blood I dyed the mountain red like red wool (and) 
the rest of them the ravines (and) torrents of the 
mountain swallowed. I carried off captives (and) 
possessions from them, (ii 60) I cut off the heads 



ii 21 an-na-te: error for ansate or anhate. See the note to 
A.0.101.1 ii 7. 



244 



Ashurnasirpal 11 A . . 1 1 . 1 7 



sal-la-su-nu [b]u-sd-su-nu m-lu-t~lcP 

sag.du.me[s] muq-tab-f U-stD-nit fii-ne*-k[is] 

di-im-tu ina [sa]g(?) [uR]u-r&P-[/iw] a[r-sip] 

lu ba~tu-l[i-su-nu mun]us ba-tu-la-te-[su]- r nu~i 

a-na gibil-* ti gibil J ina ne-reb 

[s\d uru bu-i IP-ia-na e-tar-ba 

[s\i-di i[d] ^luP-qi-a as-ba-ta 

[i\na i mP-tak-t[i\-a uru.mes-k/ sd kur hab-hi 

[set] ina ne-re-[be a]k-ta-sad GAZ.MBS-su-nu 

hi.a.[mhs a-d\u\k s\al-la-su-nu ds-lu-la 

URU.[MEs]- r «f ina izi.mes a-sa-rap 

ana Turu^ ar-^diP-ba at-ti-si-a 

[in]a ^UA-me^su-ma * ma^-da-tu M m a~hi~ra- 

mu 

[dum]u ia-hi-^rP sd kur zal-la-a-ia 

[du]mu ba-hi-^a-nP kur ha-ta-a-a u 

MAN.MES-W/ 

r&fi kur ha-ni-r gaP-bat ku.babbar.mes 

KU.GI.MES 

[a]N.Tna1.M[ES] UTUL.MES ZABAR GU4.MES 

Tudu.mes gis~i.[gigi]r(?).mes ma-da-ta-sii- 

^niP am-hur 

[i]na li-me r m ~^as-sur-AS te-e-mu ^uP-te-ru-ni 

*~ma~}-a m zALAG-r d ~iisKUR lu na-si-ku 

sd kur ^da^-g[a\-ra i-ta-bat-kdt 

kur za-mu-a [ana s]i-hir-ti-su a-{h]a-is(*) 

is-t~bu~i-tu ^ne^-[r]u-bu sd uru ba-[bi]-te 

Tbad ir^-s[i-p]u ana e-pes murub 4 u Tme"! 

ana ^sk-ia* i[t]-* htP-it-ni ina GiLtukul^ tP 

a[s-s\ur 

EN fGAL-e^ 1 E[N-/]a U d UR[l.GAjJ DU IGI~[/]tf 

ina rois.TUKUL.MEs^ [ez]-zu-i te^ sd ^ as-sur^ 

en is-ruk 

ia~ r a~i-si gis. [tuku]l.m[es ER]iN.Hi.A. f MEsi-a 

ad-ki 

ana fne-re-be^ uru ba-bi-te ^a^-lik erin.mes 

^ana gi-pis^ [erin.hi].a.mes-sw-«w ^it-tak^- 

lu-ma 

Tme e-piP-[u]s ina a.mes mah.mes 

sd r d nu[Ri.GAL] du ^iGP-ia it-te-su-nu 

ram-da 1 -h[i-is BAD 5 ]. r BAD 5 -sil-«w ds-kuri^ 

UKKIN-SM-H^] 

f"u-pa-rP-i[r] 1 Tlim"! 4 TmeI 1 su-si 

LU.ERIN.MEfs] 

^mu-un-dah-sP-su-i~mP ina ne-reb a-duk 

uru r2i(?)~i-£[e].re~i uru \b}e-ru-tu uru la- 

ga-la-fga~i 

i~uru~i d[an]^nu^-t[i-s]u ^a-dP 1 me 

uru.mes-w/ 

fscP l[i-me-t]u^siP-nu KVR-ud sal-^la^-su-nu 

[marsTssunu GV^.MES-fsu-nu udu se-ni-su-niP 

[aslula] r m izA[LAG- d is]KUR r ana su-zu-ub^ 

[napsatTsu ana KjuR-^e" 1 mar-si e-li 

100) [1 lim 2 me ummanati}-* $iP-nu a-su-ha 

101) t[a ma/ ofa]-' g#-ra i at-tu-mus 



of their fighters (and) built (therewith) a tower be- 
fore their city. I burnt their adolescent boys (and) 
girls. 

ii 63b-76) I entered the pass of the city Buliiana 
(and) made my way to the (ii 65) banks of the 
River Luqia. On my way I conquered the cities of 
the land Habhu which are in the pass. I massa- 
cred many of them, carried off captives from 
them, (and) burnt the cities, (ii 70) I emerged at 
the city Arduba. At that time I received tribute 
from Ahi-ramu, a man of Blt-Iahiri, from the 
(A)zallu, a man of BTt-Bahiani, men of Hatti, and 
(from) the kings of the land Hanigalbat — silver, 
gold, tin, bronze casseroles, oxen, sheep, (and) 
chariots. 



ii 77-100) In the eponymy of Assur-iddin a report 
was brought back to me saying Nur-Adad, the 
sheikh of the land Dagara, had rebelled; (ii 80) 
(the inhabitants of) the entire land Zamua had 
banded together; they had built a wall in the pass 
of the city Babitu; (and) they had risen against me 
to wage war and battle. With the support of 
Assur, the great lord, my lord, and the divine 
standard which goes before me, (ii 85) (and) with 
the fierce weapons which Assur, (my) lord, gave 
to me I mustered (my) weapons (and) troops 
(and) marched to the pass of the city Babitu. The 
people, trusting in the massiveness of their troops, 
did battle. With the supreme might (ii 90) of the 
divine standard which goes before me I fought 
with them, brought about their defeat, (and) 
broke up their band. I slew 1,460 of their combat- 
ants in the pass. I conquered the cities Uze, 
Berutu, (and) Lagalaga, (ii 95) their fortified cit- 
ies, together with 100 cities in their environs. [I 
carried off] captives, [property], oxen, (and) sheep 
from them. Nur-Adad, to save [his life], climbed 
up a rugged mountain. I uprooted [1,200 of] their 
[troops] . 



ii 101 -107a) Moving on from the land Dagara I 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101. 17 



245 



102) i~a"i-n[a al ba]-* a-ra aq^-ti-hb 

103) [al bam] ^ak^-ta-sad 3 me 20 erin.mes 

104) ([i-du-ki-M-nu] ^ina gis.tukul.mes u-sam \-qit 

105) [alplsunu senlsunu] ^sal~la^-s[u-nu] 

106) [kabitta utera 3 me] e[rin].i m.A^.UBS-M-nu 

107) ra^~[su~ha ina tasriti ud 15.kam i]s(l)-t[u] 

108) [al kalzi at-t]u-mus 

109) [ana nerebe sa ur]u(?) rba(7)-bi(!V-t[e(l)] 
Lacuna 

Col. iii 

1) uru.didli ina izi.mes gibil ina us-ma-ni-a-ma 
GUR-ra be-dak 

2) ta us-ma-ni an-ni-te-ma at-tu-mus ana 

URU.DIDLI 

3) sd edin kur ni-sir sd a-sar-su-nu ma-am-ma 
la-a 

4) e-mu-ru a-lik uru la-ar-bu-sa uru dan-nu-ti-su 

5) sd m ki-ir-te-a-ra 8 uru.didli sd U-me-tu-su 

6) KUR-tttf ERIN.MES ig-du-TU KUR-il mar-SU is- 

sab-tu 

7) kur-w gim z/-<?*p gir.an.bar se-e-su na-di 

MAN 

8) TA ERIN.HI.A.MES-SW EGIR.MES-SW-rtW £-// /Wfl 

qe-reb KUR-e 

9) ADDA.MES-5W-WW at/-<# 1 ME 72 ERIN.MES U- 

du-ki-Su-nu 

10) a-duk Li). ERIN.MES hi.a,mes ina ka-a-pi sd 
KUR-e at-bu-uk 

11) sal-la-su-nu bu-sd-su-nu GU 4 .MES-5«-nw udu 
se-ni-su-nu 

12) u-te-ra uru.didli-s«-/2& ma izi.mes gibil 

SAG.DU.MES-SW-HM 

13) ma gis gu-up-ni sd KUR-e e- 5 /-// lu ba-tul-su- 
nu a-na 

14) GiBiL-te gibil ina us-ma-ni-ia-ma GUR-ra be- 
dak 

15) ma us-ma-ni an-ni-te-ma ak-tu-ds 1 me 50 

URU.DIDLI 

16) sd uru la-ar-bu-sa-a-a URU.BAD-/w-l«-ma-a-a 
uru bu-na-i-sa-a-a 

17) uru ba-ra-a-a GAz.MES-sii-nu a-duk sal-la-su- 

nU aS-M URU.DIDLI-5W-TO 

18) a-/?w/ a-<7wr ina izi.mes gibil 50 erin.mes sd 
uru ba-ra-a-a 

19) /«tf mit-hu-si ina edin a-cfaA: ma U4-me-su-ma 
man.mes-w sa kur za-mu-a 

20) a/za si-hir-ti-su-nu pul-hi me-lam-me sd as-sur 
EN-a is-hup-su-nu 

21) GiR.n.MEs-a is-bu-tu anse.kur.ra.mes 
ku.babbar ku.gi am-hur KUR-rw 

22) gab- be Hftf 1 pa-a 1 -en li-sd-ds-kin 

ANSE.KUR.RA.MES KU.BABBAR KU.GI SE.AM.MES 

23) Se.in.nu ka-du-ru e-me-su-nu ta 
uru.gi§. tukul-ti-AS-as-bat 

24) at-tu-mus gir kur ni-is-pi as-bat du mu-(si) 



approached the city Bara. I conquered [Bar a]. I 
felled with the sword 320 of their righting men 
(and) (ii 105) brought back [their oxen, sheep], 
(and) [their valuable] booty. I [uprooted 300 of] 
their troops. 

ii 107b- 109) [On the fifteenth day of the month 
Tishri I] moved on from [the city Kalizi (and) en- 
tered the pass of the city] Babitu. 
Lacuna 

iii 1) (and) burnt the cities. I returned to my camp 
(and) spent the night. 

iii 2-14) Moving on from this camp I marched to 
the cities in the plain of Mount Nisir which no 
one had ever seen. I conquered the city Larbusa, 
the fortified city (iii 5) which (was ruled by) 
Kirteara, (and) eight cities in its environs. The 
troops were frightened (and) took to a rugged 
mountain. The mountain was as jagged as the 
point of a dagger. The king with his troops 
climbed up after them. I threw down their corpses 
within the mountain, massacred 172 of their 
fighting men, (iii 10) (and) piled up many troops 
on the precipices of the mountain. I brought back 
captives, possessions, oxen, (and) sheep from 
them (and) burnt their cities. I hung their heads 
on trees of the mountain (and) burnt their adoles- 
cent boys. I returned to my camp (and) spent the 
night. 



iii 15-23a) I tarried in this camp. 150 cities be- 
longing to the cities of the Larbusu, Dur- 
Lullumu, Bunisu, (and) Bara — I massacred 
them, carried off captives from them, (and) razed, 
destroyed, (and) burnt their cities. I defeated 50 
troops of the Bara in a skirmish in the plain. At 
that time (iii 20) awe of the radiance of Assur, my 
lord, overwhelmed all of the kings of the land 
Zamua (and) they submitted to me. I received 
horses, silver, (and) gold. I put all of the land 
under one authority (and) imposed upon them 
(tribute of) horses, silver, gold, barley, straw, 
(and) corvee. 



iii 23b~26) Moving on from the city Tukultl- 
Assur-asbat I made my way to the foot of Mount 
Nispi. Travelling all night I marched to the cities 



246 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101. 17 



ar-di ana uru.didli 

sd a-sar-su-nu ru-qu sd bi-rit kur gam-ru 
kur e-di-nu gar-hu sd m zALAG-10 
ana dan-nu-ti-M is-kun a-lik uru be-ru-tu 
KVR-ud uru ina izi.mes gibil 
ina li-me m iDm-a-dur ina uru.nina us-ba-ku 
fe-e-mu u-te-ru-u-ni 

ma-a m a-me-ka m ar-ds-tu-a ma-da-tu u ka- 
du-ru sd as-sur 

EN-a lu ik-lu-u ina qi-bit as-sur en gal en~# u 
d uRi.GAL du iGi-a ina iti.skm ud Lkam 3-te- 
su a-na 

kur za-mu-a-a ds-ku-na di-ku-tu pa-an 
gis.gigir.mes ma-a^-te 
u ERiN.Hi.A.MES-^ la~a ad-gul ta uru kdl-zi 
at-tu-mus 

id za-ba ki.ta e-te-bir ina ne-reb sd kur ba- 
bi-te 

e-tar-ba id ra-da-a-nu e-te-bir ina gir KUR-e 
kur si-ma-ki 

du uD.MES-a ak-tu-ds gu 4 .mes udu.mes 
gestin.mes ma-da-tu 

sd kur da-ga-ra at-ta-har ta gir kur si-ma- 
ki gis.gigir.mes 

da-^a-tu pit-hal-lu sag-su i-si-a a-se-qe 
mu-su ad-di na-ma-ri ar-te-di id ttir-na-at 
e-te-bir ina mit-har sa-a^-te ana uru ma-am-li 
uru dan-nu-te-su 

sd m ar-ds-tu-a aq-ti-rib ina mit-hu-si ti-du-ki 
uru a-si-bi KUR-ud 8 me erin.mes mu-un- 
dah-si-su-nu 

ina gis.tukul u-sam-qit w.AD.MES-su-nu su- 
u-qi VR\j-su-nu 

u-mal-ii vs.MES-sii-nu E.m. a.mes-M- nu as- 
ru-up 

LU. ERIN.MES TI.LA.MES HI.A.MES ina SU-f£ U- 

sab-bi-ta 

sal-la-su-nu hi.a.mes ds-lu-la uru ap-pul aq- 

qur 

ina izi.mes ds-ru-up uru hu-du-un a-di 30 

uru.didli 

sd li-me-tu-su KVR-ud GAz.MEs-su-nu hi.a.mes 

a-duk 

sal-la-su-nu gu4.mes-5m-aw udu se-ni-su-nu 

ds-lu-la uru.didli ap-pul aq-qur ina izi.mes 

gibil 

lu ba-tul-su-nu munus ba-tu-la-te-su-nu ana 

GIBIL-te gibil 

uru ki-sir-tu uru dan-nu-ti-su sd m sa-bi-i-ni 

a-di 10 uru.didli sd li-me-tu-su KVR-ud 

GAZ.MES-sti-nu a-duk 

sal-la-su-nu ds-lu-la uru.didli sd uru ba-ra- 

a-a sd m ki-ir-te-a-ra 

sd URU,BAD-a-a uru bu-ni-sa-a-a a-di ne-reb 

sd kur has-mar 



(iii 25) which are remote, which lie between 
Mounts Gamru (and) Edinu, (and) which Nur- 
Adad had made his garrisons. I conquered the 
city Berutu (and) burnt (it). 

iii 27-55) In the cponymy of Miqti-adur I was in 
Nineveh (and) a report was brought back to me 
saying Ameka (and) Arastua had withheld the 
tribute (and) corvee of Assur, my lord. At the 
command of Assur, the great lord, my lord, 
(iii 30) (and) the divine standard which goes be- 
fore me, on the first day of the month Sivan I 
mustered (my army) for a third time against the 
land Zamua. Without waiting for the advance of 
(my) numerous chariotry and troops I moved on 
from the city Kalzi, crossed the Lower Zab, (and) 
entered the passes of Mount Babitu. I crossed the 
River Radanu (and) (iii 35) all day I tarried at the 
foot of Mount Simaki. I received the tribute of 
the land Dagara, oxen, sheep, (and) wine. From 
the foot of Mount Simaki I took with me strong 
chariots, cavalry, (and) crack troops. I continued 
travelling through the night until dawn, crossed 
the River Turnat, and at first light approached the 
city Mamli 5 the fortified city (iii 40) which (was 
ruled by) Arastua, In a clash of arms I besieged 
the city (and) conquered (it). I felled with the 
sword 800 of their combat troops. With their 
corpses I filled the streets of their city (and) with 
their blood I dyed their houses red. Many troops 
I captured alive (and) (iii 45) carried off many 
captives from them. I razed, destroyed, (and) 
burnt the city. I conquered the city Hudun (and) 
30 cities in its environs. I massacred many of 
them (and) carried off captives, oxen, (and) sheep 
from them. I razed, destroyed, (and) burnt their 
cities, (iii 50) I burnt their adolescent boys (and) 
girls. I conquered the city Kisirtu, the fortified 
city which (was ruled by) Sablni, together with 10 
cities in its environs. I massacred them (and) car- 
ried off captives from them. I razed, destroyed, 
(and) burnt the cities of the Bara, of the man 
Kirteara, a man of the city Duru, (and) of the 
Bunisu, as far as the pass of Mount Hasmar. I 
turned (them) into ruin hills. 



Ashurnasirpal n A. 0.101. 17 



247 



ap-pul aq-qur ina izi.mes ds-ru-up ana du 6 u 

kar-me u-te-er 

ta sa uru.didli sd m ar-ds-tu-a at-tu-muS ina 

ne-reb sd hi-rit 

kur la-a-ra kur bi-di-ir-gi KUR-e mar-su-te 

sd ana me-teq 

GIS.GIGIR.MES U ERIN.HI. A.MES la GAR-HW e~ 

tar-ba ana uru za-am-ri 

uru MAN-ti-M sd m a-me-ka kur za-mu-a-a 

aq-ti-rib m a-me-ka 

ta igi Gis.TUKUL.MES-a dan-nu-ti ME-a sit- 

mu-ri ip-ldh-ma 

kur-w mar-su is-bat nig.ga e.gal-//-5W 

GIS.GIGIR.MES-Sii 

ds-sd-a ta uru za-am-ri at-tu-mus m Idl-lu-u 

e-te-bir ana KUR-e kur e-ti-ni a.sa nam-ra-si 

Sd ana me-teq gis.gigir.mes u erin.hi.a.mes 

la GAR-nu sd ina man.mes-w 

AD.MES-a ma-am-ma ina qe-reb-su-nu la te-w 

a-lik man ta 

Terin.hi.a.mes ana KURi-e kur ^e-tP-ni e- 

r/f NIG.GA.MES-5W bu-sd-^SU^ 

[unut siparri ma^atta taphi] zaba[r u]tu[l 

zab]a[r] 

sa-ap-li ^zu-qa^-t[e (...) ri\i-s\ir-x] i"e^.ga[l]- 

na-kdm-ma-te-su ta qe-reb kur-T^ ds^-[sd]-a 

ana uS-^ma-ni-a-ma^ 

GUR-ra he-dak ina re-su-te sd aS-sur u d Sd- 

mas dingir.mes t[ik-li] 

ta uS-ma-ni an-ni-te-ma at-tu-mus egir-su 

as-^baO 

id e-di-^ru^ lu e-bir ina bir-ti kur su-ti-a 

kur e-la-ni-u KUR-e KAL.MES-le gaz.mes-sw- 

nU HI. A. MES 

a-duk nig.ga-sw bu-sd-su tap-hi zabar 
utul.mes sa-ap-li 

na-zi- v a^-te. mes u-nu-ut zabar. mes hi. a. mes 
gis pa-sur ku.gi ih-zi 

GU 4 - r MES"l-5 r W UDU Se-ni-SU Sal-la-SU DUGUD-to 

TA gIr KUR-e 

kur e-la-ni-u as-lul anse.kur.ra.mes-sm e- 

kim-su 

m a-me-ka a-na su-zu-ub zi.mes-sw ana kur 

sa-bu-a 

e-li uru za-am-ru uru a-ri-si-id-ku uru am- 

ma-ru 

uru pa-ar-si-in-du uru i-ri-tu uru su-ri-tu 

uru UAN-ti-su a-di 1 me 50 uru.didli sd li- 

me-tu-su ap-pul 

^aq^-qur ina izi.mes gibil ana du 6 u kar-me 

u-ter ki-i ina pu-ut 

f"uRU~i pa-ar-si-in-di us-ba-ku-ni pit-hal-lu lu 

kal-la-pu 

ana Sub-te u-s[e]-si-ib 50 erin.mes mu-un- 

dah-si-Su sd m a-me-ka 



iii 56-62a) Moving from among the cities which 
(were ruled by) Arastua I entered the pass which 
is between Mount Lara (and) Mount Bidirgi, 
rugged mountains which were unsuitable for 
chariotry and troops. I approached the city 
Zamru, the royal city of Ameka the Zamu. 
Ameka became frightened (iii 60) in the face of 
my strong weapons (and) my fierce battle and 
took to a rugged mountain, I removed the prop- 
erty of his palace (and) his chariot. 



iii 62b-70a) Moving on from the city Zamru I 
crossed the River Lallu. I marched to Mount 
Etinu over rugged terrain which was unsuitable 
for chariotry and troops (and) which no king 
(iii 65) among my fathers had ever approached. 
The king with (his) troops climbed up to Mount 
Etinu. I removed from the mountain his 
(Ameka's) property, possessions, [many bronze 
utensils], bronze [tubs], bronze casserole(s), 
bowls, tureens, the treasure of his palace (and) his 
storehouse. Returning to my camp I spent the 
night. 



iii 70b-87) Moving on from this camp with the 
help of Assur and Samas, the gods who support 
me, I took after him (Ameka). Crossing the River 
Edir I massacred many of them between Mounts 
Sua (and) Elaniu, mighty mountains. I carried off 
from the foot of Mount Elaniu his property, pos- 
sessions, bronze tubs, casseroles, bowls, (iii 75) 
vats, many bronze utensils, a dish decorated with 
gold, his oxen, sheep, his valuable booty. I 
deprived him of his horses. Ameka, to save his 
life, climbed up Mount Sabua. (iii 80) I razed, 
destroyed, (and) burnt the cities Zamru, 
Arasidku, Ammaru, Parsindu, Iritu, Suritu, his 
royal cities, together with 150 cities in the en- 
virons of his (region). 1 turned (them) into ruin 
hills. While I remained before the city Parsindu I 
set the cavalry (and) light troops in ambush (and) 
(iii 85) killed 50 of the combat troops of Ameka 
in the plain. I cut off their heads (and) hung 
(them) on trees of the courtyard of his palace in 
the city Zamru. I captured 20 soldiers alive (and) 
spread (them) out in the wall of his palace. 



248 



Ashurnaslrpal ii A.0.101.17 



86 



87 



89; 

90 

91 
92 

93 

94; 

95 

96; 

97; 

98 
99 



85) ina edin a-duk sag.du.mes-.sw-/7w u-ne-kis ina 
uru za-am-ri 
ina gis gu-up-ni sd tur e.gal-su u-e^-il 20 

ERIN.MES 

ti.la ina su-r^e" 1 u-sab-bi-ta ina bad e.gal 

w-ma-g/-/[g] 

ta uru za-am-r[i\ pit-hal-lu lu kal-la-pu i-si-a 

ra^-se-fqe^ ana uru.didli sd m a-ta njRU~J 

dr-zi-za-a-a 

^S(P ina man.mes-«/ ad.mes-# m[a-a\m-ma 

ina qe-reb-su-nu 

la te-w ^a^-//7c uru dr-zi-zu i~uru~i dr-si-an-du 

uru dan- v niP-te-su a-di 10 1 uru J.didli Sd 

li-me-tu-£ti 

sd ina qe-^reb^ kur ni-is-pi ncuR-ei mar-si 

GAR-/IW KUR-Wfif 

gaz.mes-5W-«w a-<iw& uru.didli a-pul a-qur 

ina izlmes 

gibil ana ^us-ma^-ni-a-ma GUR-ra rinai u 4 ~ 

me-su-ma zabar.mes 

^tab-bi-li kdm-mcP-te sd-a-ri-a~te ma-da-tu 

sd kur ^sP-pi-a-me-na sd gim munus.mes-/? 

sap-ru-ni 

am-h[ur iStu] uru za-am-ri at-tum 4 -sd kur 

la-a-ra kur-w' 

[marsw] 5a cwcr me-teq gis.gigir.mes 

rERIN~l.HLA.MES la GAR-rtW 

100) [ina] ^ ka-la^-[ba]-te an.Tbar"! a-ki-^si ina 
ak^-kul^lP urudu 

101) a[q]-t~qur gis.gigir(?).mes erinI.hi.a.mes u- 
se-ti-qi a-na 

102) ur[u Gi]Utukul-ti-as-sur-af\-bat sd kur iu- 
ul-lu kur dr-rak-di-a 

103) /-[<7]fl-r£ w -5w~i-/?/ at-tar-da man.mes-w sa kur 
za-ww-a 

104) ana s[i]-^hir-tP-su-nu ta igi na-mu-* ra^-at 

GIS.TUKUL.MES-tf 

105) u Su[r-b]a^aP be-lu-ti-a e-dur-ma 

GlR.ILME§-flf 

106) fis^-b[u]-^tiP [biltu] u ma-da-tu ku.babbar 
ku.gi.me§ 

107) Tan.naT.mIes] z[ab]ar.m[e]s utul.mes r-TUG"! 
lu-biil-ti ^bir^-me 

108) an[$e.kur.ra.mes] TguAmes udu.mes 
rGESTiNi.MEs ^muh-hP [s]d 

109) p[a~an usatir] ruGU~i-sw-r«w ds-kun lu ka- 
diP-ru-su-nu 

110) ina ur[u kalhi e-p]u-i~su kP-i ina Tkur za- 
mu-a us-ba-kiP-ni 

111) kur rhu\-d[u-na-a-a\ Tkur /iari-fi-/[s]-a-a 
kur hu[b-u]S-ki-a-a 

112) i~kur"i g[il-za-na-a-a pulhT] ^me-lam-me^ [sd 
assur] Ten-aTI [is-hu]p-*~su-mP 

113) g[u]n rma~i-d[a-tu kaspi] fKU.Gfi 
[anse.kur]. Tra.mes"! 



iii 88-98a) From the city Zamru I took with me 
the cavalry (and) light troops. I marched to the 
cities (ruled) by Ata, a man of the city Arzizu 
(iii 90) amongst which no king among my fathers 
had ever penetrated- I conquered the cities Arzizu 
(and) Arsiandu, his fortified cities, together with 
10 cities in the environs of his (region) which lay 
in Mount Nispi, a rugged mountain. I massacred 
them. I razed, destroyed, (and) burnt the cities, 
(iii 95) I returned to my camp. At that time I re- 
ceived bronze, ..., rivets, (and) beams, the tribute 
of the land Sipiamena whose (inhabitants) do 
their hair like women, 



iii 98b- 11 6) Moving on from the city Zamru to 
Mount Lara, a [rugged] mountain which was un- 
suitable for chariotry (and) troops, I cut through 
(iii 100) with iron axes (and) I smashed (a way) 
with copper picks. (Thus) was I able to move 
along the chariotry (and) troops. I went down to 
the city Tukultl-Assur-asbat which the Lullu call 
Arrakdia. All the kings of the land Zamua took 
fright before the brilliance of my weapons 
(iii 105) and awe of my dominion and they sub- 
mitted to me. I imposed upon them more [tribute] 
and tax than ever before — silver, gold, tin, 
bronze, casseroles, garments with multi-coloured 
trim, horses, oxen, sheep, (and) wine. Their 
corvte (iii 110) they performed in Calah. While I 
was in the land Zamua, awe of the radiance of 
A§§ur, my lord, overwhelmed the people of the 
cities Hudun, Hartisu, HubuSku, (and) Gilzanu 
(and) they brought to me tribute (and) tax — 
[silver], gold, horses, garments [with multi- 
coloured trim], oxen, [sheep, (and) wine. I 
marched after as many people as] had fled [from 
my weapons (and) climbed up into the moun- 
tains]. 
Lacuna 



Ashurnasirpal ii A.0.101.17 



249 



114) Ttug lu^-b[ul-ti birme] gu 4 .[mes sen! karani] 

115) [ana] ruGu~W[a ubluni nise ammar istu pan 
kakklia] 

116) li\p~{pdr>-i $i-duMni ...] 
Lacuna 

136') I... ti-$d\-rtir* se,[am.mes ...] 
137 r )[...] s[a] du[b ...] 



138')[... iti].sig 4 [...] 

139')[... GIGl]R.MES ERIN.rHI.Al.[MES ...] 

140')[...] ^e-te-bin ana i~kur1 [...] 

i4n[...]«fl[,.i 

Col. iv 



io: 

11 

12 
13 
14 
15 

16; 

17 

1 
19; 

20 
21 

22 

23; 

24 

25; 
26; 

27 
28 

29; 
3o; 

31 

32" 

33 
34 



ma-da-tu sd kur kat-mu-hi ina uru ti-lu-li 
at-ta-har ta kur kat-mu-hi at-tu-mus 
ina ne-reb sd uru d is$-tdr«mm-te e-tar-ba 
ina uru ki-ba-ki a-sa-kan be-dak 

GU 4 .MES UDU.MES GESTIN.MES UTUL.MES 

ma-da-tu sd uru ki-ba-ki at-tah-ra 

ta uru ki-ba-ki at-tu-mus a-na 

uru mat-ie-ia-te aq-ti-rib uru mat-ia-u-te 

a~di uru kap-ra-ni-su ak-ta-sad 2 lim 8 me 

IiRIN.mes ti-du-ki-su-nu ina gis.tukul.mes 

u-sam-qit sal-la-su-nu hi. a. me s as-lul 

erin.mes am-mar ta igi gis.tukul.mes-^ 

ip-pdr-si-du-ni gir.ii.mes-<7 is-bu-tu 

uru.didli-5w-z?w u-sd-as-bi-su-nu gun 

ma-da-tu lu u-ra-si u-dan-ni-ni 

vau-su-nu ds-kun sa-lam bu-na-ni-a 

du-w5 li-te kis-su-ti-a ina sA sar 

ina uru mat-te-ia-te u-sd-zi-iz ta 

uru mat-te-ia-te at-tumi-mus ina uru za-za- 

bu-ha 

a-sa-kan be-dak ma-da-tu M kur hab-hi 

GU 4 .MES UDU.MES GESTIN.MES UTUL.MES tap- 
hi.MES 

sa-ap-U gur-pi-si.Mhs at-ta-har 
ta uru za-za-bu-ha at-tu-mus ina uru ir-si-a 
a-sa-kan be-dak uru ir-si-a ina izi.mes 
gibil ma-da-tu sd uru su-u-ra gu 4 .mes 

UDU.MES 

gestin.mes utul.mes ina uru ir-si-a at-ta-har 

ta uru ir-si-a at-tu-mus ina sa kur kas-ia-ri 

a-sa-kan be-dak uru ma-da-ra-an-zu 2 

uru.didli 

sd li-me-tu-su KVR-ud GAz.MES-su-nu a-duk 

sal-la-su-nu as-lul uru.didli ina izi.mes gibil 

6 ud.mes-/£ ina sa kur kas-ia-ri kur-? 

dan-ni a.sA nam-ra-si sd ana me-teq 

gis.gigir.mes 

u erin.hi.a.mes la GhK-nu kur-w ina ka-la- 

pa-te 

ak-kis ina ak-kul-li urudu aq-qur 



iii 136-137') [I put a wall around it, founded 
therein a palace for my royal residence, (and) 
decorated it] more [splendidly than ever before]. I 
stored therein barley [(and) straw from all the 
(surrounding) land. I named it Dur-Assur], 
iii 138' - iv 18a) [On the first day of the month] 
Sivan, [in the eponymy of Sa-ilTma-damqa, I 
mustered] (my) chariotry (and) troops. [After] 
crossing [the Tigris I entered] the land [Katmuhu. 
I consecrated a palace] in [the city TTl-uli]. I re- 
ceived (iv 1) tribute from the land Katmuhu in the 
city Trl-uli. Moving on from the land Katmuhu I 
entered the pass of the land Istarate. I pitched 
camp (and) spent the night in the city Kibaku. 
(iv 5) I received tribute from Kibaku, oxen, sheep, 
wine, (and) casseroles. Moving on from Kibaku 
I approached the city Mateiatu. 1 conquered 
Mateiatu together with its suburbs, (iv 10) I felled 
with the sword 2,800 of their fighting men (and) 
carried off many captives from them. The troops, 
as many as had fled from my weapons, submitted 
to me (and) I settled them in their cities, (iv 15) I 
imposed upon them stringent tribute, taxes, (and) 
tax-collectors. I made an image of myself (and) 
wrote thereon (an account of) my powerful vic- 
tories. I erected (it) in Mateiatu. 



iv 18b-38a) Moving on from the city Mateiatu I 
pitched camp (and) spent the night at the city 
Zazabuha. I received tribute from the land 
Habhu, oxen, sheep, wine, casseroles, tubs, 
bowls, (and) armour. Moving on from the city 
Zazabuha I pitched camp (and) spent the night in 
the city Irsia. I burnt Irsia. (iv 25) I received trib- 
ute from the city Suru, oxen, sheep, wine, (and) 
casseroles, in the city Irsia. Moving on from Irsia 
I pitched camp (and) spent the night within 
Mount KaSiiari. I conquered the city Madaranzu 
(and) two cities in its environs. I massacred them, 
(iv 30) carried off prisoners from them, (and) 
burnt the cities. For six days within Mount 
Kasiiari, a mighty mountain (and) rugged terrain 
which was unsuitable for chariotry (and) troops, 1 
cut through the mountain with axes (and) 
smashed (a way) with copper picks, (iv 35) (Thus) 
was I able to move along the chariotry and 
troops. In the cities which were in the region of 
my road within Mount Kasiiari I received oxen, 
sheep, wine, casserole(s), (and) armour. 



250 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101. 17 



35) GIS.GIGIR.MES ERIN.HI.A.MES U-Se-ti-qi 
URU.DIDLI 

sd si-di hu-li-ia gar sa kur kas-ia-ri 

GU4.MES UDU.MES GESTIN.MES UTUL.MES gur- 

pi-si. MES 

at-ta-har kur kas-ia-ru at-ta-bal-kdt 

2-te-su ana kur na-i-ri at- tar-da 

ina uru si-gi-sd a-sa-kan be-dak ta 

uru si-gi-sd at-tu-mus a-na 

uru ma-da-ra uru dan-nu-ti-su sd m lab-tu-ri 

dumu tu-pu-si aq-ti-rib uru KAL-an dan-nis 

4 bad.mes-a*/ la-a-bi uru a-si-bi 

ta igi Gis.TUKUL.MES-a dan-nu-te ip-la-hu-ma 

NIG.GA.MES-Stt-rtM bU-M-SU-nU DUMU.MES-SW- 

nu 

ana lu sap-ra-te am-hur-su-nu ana su-zu-ub 

zi,MEs-su-nu u-ser-su-nu gun ma-da-tu 

lu ti-ra-si vgv-su-hu ds-kun uru 

a~/?«7 aq-qur ana du 6 w «e» kar-me u-ter 

ta uru ma-da-ra at-tu-mus 

ana uru tu-us-ha e-tar-ba e.gal 

wg uru tu-us-ha u-sa-ri ma-da-tu 

sa kur ni-ir-du-un anse.kur.ra.mes 

anse.gir.nun.na.mes utul.meS gur-pi-si.MES 

gu 4 .mes udu.mes gestin.mes ina uru tu-us-ha 

at-ta-har 1 iw-s/ uru.mes-w bAd.mes-w 

dan-nu-te sd gir kur kas-^ia^-ri sd m lab-tu-ri 

dumu tu-pu-si ap-pul aq-qur ana du 6 w kar-me 

u-ter ina gis Jukui-ti as-sur EN-a ta 

uru tu-us-ha at-tu-mus gis.gigir.Tmes - ! 

pit-hal-lu sag-su t~P-si-i[a asseqe] 

[ina] *~ra-ka^-[s]u-[t]e i[d idigna e-te-6/]r 

d[u musTte dr]-^te-di ana^ [uru] pi-^tu^-ra 

HjruT d[an-n]u-ti-su-nu sd kur di-[i]r-[r]a-a-ia 

aq-ti-rib uru mar-si dan-nis 2 r BAD"i.MES /a- 

a-5/ 

ki-ir-hu-su gim u-ba-an KUR-e sa-*?/ 

I>ia A. MES MAH.MES 5a aS-SUr EN-tf 

//ia gi-pis ERiN.HLA.MES-a w ME-a sit-mu-ri 
it-ti-sii-nu am-dah-hi-si ina 2 u 4 -me 
la-a-am d sd-mas na-pa-hi gim d iSKUR fa' 

GIR.BAL 

VGV-su-nu ds-gu-um nab-lu vgjj -su-nu u-sd- 

az-ni-(in) 

ina sip-si u dan-na-ni mu-dah-si-a 

gim an-ze-e VGV-su-nu i-se-H uru KUR-wrf 

8 me ^rin.mes mu-dah-si-su-nu ina 
gis.tukul.mes u-sam-qit 

SAG.DU.MES-5W-/TW U-ne-kis ERIN.MES TI.LA.MES 

hi.a.mes ina su u-sa-bi-ta si-ta-te-su-nu 

ina izlmes gibil sal-la-su-nu DUGUD-/a as-lul 



iv 38b-50) After crossing Mount Kasiiari I went 
down for a second time to the land(s) Nairi. I 
pitched camp (and) spent the night (iv 40) in the 
city Sigisu. Moving on from the city Sigisu I ap- 
proached the city Madara, the fortified city of 
Labturu, son of Tupusu. The city was well 
fortified; it was surrounded by four walls. I 
besieged the city, (iv 45) They took fright in face 
of my mighty weapons and I received from them 
property, possessions, (and) sons as hostages. I 
spared their lives. I imposed upon them tribute, 
taxes, (and) tax-collectors, (iv 50) I razed (and) 
destroyed the city (and) turned (it) into ruin hills. 

iv 51 -60a) Moving on from the city Madara I en- 
tered the city Tusha. I consecrated a palace in 
Tusha. I received in Tusha tribute from the land 
Nirdun, horses, (iv 55) mules, casserole(s), ar- 
mour, oxen, sheep, (and) wine. I razed, des- 
troyed, (and) turned into ruin hills 60 cities, 
mighty garrisons, at the foot of Mount Kasiiari, 
which (were ruled by) Labturu, son of Tupusu. 

iv 60b-83a) With the support of Assur, my lord, I 
moved on from the city Tusha. [I took] with me 
[strong] chariots, cavalry, (and) crack troops. I 
crossed the [Tigris] by means of a bridge of rafts. 
Travelling all night I approached the city Pitura, 
(iv 65) the fortified city of the Dirru. The city was 
exceptionally difficult; it was surrounded by two 
walls; its citadel was lofty like a mountain peak. 
With the exalted strength of Assur, my lord, with 
my massive troops, and with my fierce battle 
(iv 70) I fought with them. On the second day, 
before sunrise, I thundered against them like the 
god Adad-of-the-Devastation (and) rained down 
flames upon them. With might and main my com- 
bat troops flew against them like the Storm Bird. 
I conquered the city, (iv 75) I felled 800 of their 
combat troops with the sword (and) cut off their 
heads. I captured many soldiers alive. The rest of 
them I burnt, I carried off valuable tribute from 
them. 1 built a pile of live (men and) of heads be- 
fore (iv 80) his gate. I impaled on stakes 500 sol- 
diers before their gate. I razed, destroyed, (and) 
turned into ruin hills the city. I burnt their adoles- 
cent boys. 



iv 63 Cf. A.0. 101.1 ii 105 and the note. 



Ashurnasirpal n A. 0.101. 17 



251 



79) a-si-tu sd ti.la.mes sd sag.du.mes ina pu-ut 

80) ka.gal-5w ar-sip 5 <me> erin.mes ina pu-ut 

KA.GAL-SU-nU 

81) a-na gis zi-qi-pi u-za-qi-pi uru ap-pul 

82) ^aq~^-qur ana du 6 u kar-me u-ter lu ba-tu-li- 
su-nu 

83) v ana^ [G]iBiL-te gibil uru ku-u-ku-nu sd pi-i 
ne-reb 

84) sd [Ku]R-e kur ma-at-nl GAR-nu kxjr-ucI 

85) 7 Tme"! erin.mes ti-du-ki-su-nu ina 
gis.tukul.mes u-sam-qit 

86) salAa-su-nu hi.a.mes as-lul 50 uru.didli sd 
kur di-ri-a 

87) KUR-i/d gaz.mes-sm'-hw «-flfw/r M-la-su-nu as- 
lul 

88) 50 erin.mes ti.la.mes //w su u-sa-bi-ta 

89) uru.didli ap-pul aq-qur ina izi.mes gibil 
me-lam-me 

90) EN-ti-a UGU-su-nu at-bu-ku ta uru pi-tu-ra 

91) at-tum A -sd a-na uru ar-ba-ak-ki kur hab-hi 

92) sfa] be-ta-ni at-tar-da ta igi me-lam-me 
MAN-ti-a 

93) ip-la-hu-ma uru.didli-sw-«w 5a bad.mes 

KAL.MES-te 

94) us-se-ru ana su-zu-ub zi.MES-su-nu ana kur 
ma-at-na 

95) KUR-e dan-ni e-li-u EGiR.MES-su-nu ar-te-di 

96) 1 lim erin.mes ^muq^-tab-li-su-nu ina r^rei- 
reZ? KUR-e mar-si 

97) ii-^nap^-pi-i[s v]s.MES-fstP-nu kur-u as-rw- 

«/? LU.AD.MES-SW-rtW 

98) hur-ru na-da-ba^ku^ sd kur-6 ii-maNi 

99) 2 me erin.mes ti.TlaI.mes mo su u-sa-be-ta 

DIS £/-/?£/ 

100) kap-pi-i su^-nu u-ba~tiq 2 lim sal-la-su-nu 

101) tfs-/w/ gu 4 .meS-5i/-hw udu se-m-^su-nu ■ ana la 
me-ni 

102) w-te-f nafi uru /-/a-i w uru! sa-la-ni-ba 

103) uru.didli dan-nu-te sd uru dr-ba-ak-ki 

KUR-ud 

104) rGAzT.MEs-rijTi-nw a~dw& sal-la-su-nu as-lul 

105) 2 me 50 uru.didli sa bad.mes dan-^nu^-te sd 
Tkur^.kur ^na^-i-ri 

106) ap-pul aq-qur ana du 6 w ^kar^-me u-[t]er 

107) gis e-sa-di KUR-ti-su-nu e-si-di se.um.mes 

108) Tgis.in.nu.mes^ ina uru ^tu-us^-ha ^aO-bu- 
uk 

109) *~ m am-me-ba-a?-lD dumu za-ma-^nP 

LU.GAL.MES-te-SU 

110) [i6]-r&a/-fa-fK-5ifi-ma rGAzfi.ME§-su a-i"na"i 
ta-r« gi-me-l[im] 

111) [sa m a]m-m[e]-^ba^-a^-li a-lik t[a] igi na-mu- 
ra-at 

112) [&a/r£f/a] r^n sur-ba-at EN-r//-ai e-du-ru-ma 



iv 83b-90a) I conquered the city Kukunu which is 
at the entrance to the pass of Mount Matnu. 
(iv 85) I felled with the sword 700 of their fighting 
men. I carried off many captives from them. I 
conquered 50 cities of the Dirru. I massacred 
them, carried off prisoners from them, (and) cap- 
tured 50 soldiers alive. I razed, destroyed, (and) 
burnt the cities. I unleashed against them my 
lordly radiance. 



iv 90b- 108) Moving on from the city Pitura I 
went down to the city Arbakku in the interior of 
the land Habhu. They took fright in the face of 
my royal radiance and abandoned their cities 
(and) walls. To save their lives they climbed up 
Mount Matnu, (iv 95) a mighty mountain. I went 
after them. I slew 1,000 of their men-at-arms 
within the rugged mountain, dyed the mountain 
red with their blood, (and) filled the ravines (and) 
torrents of the mountain with their corpses. I cap- 
tured 200 soldiers alive (and) (iv 100) cut of! one 
arm from each of them. I carried off 2,000 cap- 
tives from them. I brought back oxen (and) sheep 
from them without number. I conquered the cities 
liaia (and) Salaniba, fortified cities of the city Ar- 
bakku. I massacred (and) carried off prisoners 
from them. I razed, destroyed, (and) turned into 
ruin hills (iv 105) 250 of the well-fortified cities of 
the lands Nairi. I reaped the harvest of their land 
(and) stored the barley and straw in the city 
Tusha. 



iv 109-120) The nobles of Amme-ba^i, a man of 
Blt-Zamani, (iv 110) rebelled against him and 
killed him. I marched to avenge Amme-ba^lT. 
They took fright before the brilliance of [my 
weapons] and awe of my dominion (and) [I re- 
ceived harnessed chariots], equipment for troops 
(and) horses, [460] harness-trained horses, [two 



252 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101. 17 



113) [narkabati rakisu] ^hal-lu-up-te erinlmes 
ansiAkur.ra.mes 

114) [4 ME 1 SUSl] rANSE"I.KUR.rRA.MES LAL-at GIS "1 

ni-ri-su 

115) [2 GUN KU>BABBAR*m]eS [2] TquN Klfl.GI.TMES 

1 me(?) gun~i 

116) [AN.NA.MES 1 ME GUN ZABAR].TmES 3 ME GUN 
AN. BAR. ME !P 

117) [1 me utul zabar 3 lim kappT zaba]r.tmes 
sa-ap-li.UES^ 

118) [zabar agannate zabar 1 lim tug lu]-f~buP- 
t[i] 

119)[...] 

120) [...] ruh-hui-[zu-te] 

Lacuna 

Col. v 

1) uru kal-hu mah-ra-a sd md sul-ma-nu-SAG 

2) man kur as-sur nun-w du iGi-ia e-pu-su uru 
su-u 

3) e-na-ah-ma is-lal a-na DUe u kar-me 

4) i-tur uru su-u a-na es-su-te 

5) ab-ni m-tu is-tu id za-ba 

6) an.ta ah-ri to ba-be-lat-jiE.GAL 

7) Mv-sd ab-bi gis.kiri 6 .mes ana li-me-tu-su 

8) gis.gub.mes gis.gurun.mes du.a.bi 
gestin.mes 

9) as-hu-ut SAG.MES-te ana as-sur en-# 

10) u e.kur.mes KUR-/flr a-qi bAd ana eS-Sti-te 

1 1 ) ar-sip ta us-se-sd a-di gaba-dib-bi-sd 

12) ar-s/p u-sek-lil e.gai 

13) a^ia su-bat uAN-ti-a ana mul-ta-a^-it 

14) EN~ti~a sd da-ra-a-te ina sa atf-e// 

15) u-si-im u-sar-hh si-kat kar-ri zabar 

16) al-me-si gis.ig.mes gis.u.suh 5 .mes 

17) mah.mes du-ws ina me(*)-sir zabar.mes 

18) u-ra-ki-si ina KA-sd u-ra-ti 

19) gis.gu.za.mes gis.esi.mes gis.tug.mes 

20) gis.bansur.mes zu.mes uh-hu-za-te 

21) KU.BABBAR.MES KU.GI.MES AN.NA.MES 
ZABAR.MES 

22) an.bar.mes ki-sit-ti su-ia sd kur.kur.mes 

23) sd a-pe-lu-si-na-ni al-qa-a ina llb-bi 

24) ds-kun nun-w egir-w an-hu-sa lu-ud-dis 

25) mu sat-ra ana ds-ri-sd lu-ter as-sur 

26) ik-ri-be-su i-sem-me e.gal 

27) kis-su-te-ia su-bat UAN-ti-ia sd uru kal-hi 

28) la i-na-di-i~ma~i pa-an kur.mes la u-ma-sar 

29) gis.ig.mes gis. TurI.mes si-kat kar-ri sd 

30) su.ka.an qe-reb-sd la i-na-si 



talents of silver, two] talents of gold, 100 talents 
of [tin, 100 talents of bronze], 300 talents of iron, 
[100 bronze casseroles, 3,000 bronze receptacles, 
bronze] bowls, [bronze containers, 1,000] linen 
garments [with multi-coloured trim, dishes, 
chests, couches of ivory (and) decorated with 
gold, the treasure of his palace — (also) 2,000 
oxen, 5,000 sheep, his sister with her rich dowry, 
(and) the daughters of his nobles with their rich 
dowries]. 
Lacuna 



v l-24a) The ancient city Calah which 
Shaimaneser, king of Assyria, a prince who pre- 
ceded me, had built — this city had become dilap- 
idated; it lay dormant (and) had turned into ruin 
hills. I rebuilt this city, (v 5) I dug out a canal 
from the Upper Zab (and) called it Babelat-hegalli 
('Bearer of Abundance'). / planted orchards with 
all kinds of fruit trees in its environs. I pressed 
wine (and) gave the best to Assur, my lord, (v 10) 
and the temples of my land. I rebuilt the wall. I 
built (and) completed it from top to bottom. I 
founded therein a palace as my royal residence 
(and) for my lordly leisure for eternity, (v 15) I 
decorated (it) in a splendid fashion. I surrounded 
it with knobbed nails of bronze. I made high 
doors of fir, fastened (them) with bronze bands, 
(and) hung (them) in its doorway. I took and put 
therein thrones of ebony (and) boxwood, (v 20) 
dishes decorated with ivory, silver, gold, tin, 
bronze, iron, booty from the lands over which I 
gained dominion. 



v 24b-45a) May a later prince restore its weak- 
ened (portions and) restore my inscribed name to 
its place. (Then) Assur will listen to his prayers. 
He must not forsake my mighty palace, my royal 
residence, of Calah, nor abandon (it) in the face 
of enemies. He must not remove the doors, 
beams, (or) knobbed nails (v 30) of bronze from 



v 6 Id ba-be-lat-mt.cku see the note to A.0.1 01.1 iii 135. 
¥ 8 gis.gub.meS; error for az/dS-qup, See A. 0.101.1 iii 135 
and A.0. 101.30 line 39. v 9 as-hu-ut: see the note to 
A.0. 101.30 line 39. v 9 SAO.MES-te: see the note to A.0.101.30 



line 39. v 17-18 Regarding bronze gates and doors see 
A.0.1 01.51 . v 30 su.ka.an: error for ud.ka.bar = zabar = 
'bronze', sikkat karri (set) siparri is the expected expression. If 
the word sukanu (see von Soden, AHw p. 1262b) were to be 



Ashurnasirpal n A.0.101.17 



253 



ina uru sd-ne-e e.gal sd-ni-te la i-M-kan 

gis.ur.mes-5# la u-sd-bar na-sa-ba-te-sd 

la u-na-sa-ah mu-si ka zi-ni-M 

la i-ka-si-ir KA-sd la i-pa-hi 

ana e na-kdm-te «sd» la e-ki-im-si 

ana e ki-li la i-sar-ra-ak-si 

lu.mes MUNus.MES-fa sd e si-be-te ina SA 

la e-sir ina la-ma-a-ri u mu-su-ri 

u la ke-si-(ri) la us-har-ma-si E.GAL-lum 

sd-ni-tu ina murub 4 -// uru ina ki-i(*)~di uru 

sd ki-i E.GAL-ia la e-re-bi nap-tar-tu 

la i-ra-si-pi ina sa la e-ra-ba mim-ma 

a-mat HUL-/e la i-ha-sa-sa-ma 

pa-an (ekal) kis-su-ti-ia su-bat man- ti-a 



la u-sd-pa-ra-ak sd (kT) pi \iu.sAR-e-ia 

an-ne-e e-pa-su ta-me-tu sit-ri-a 

la us-te-nu-ii as-^sur^ d BAD dingir.mes 

GAL.MES-te mu-sar-bu-u MAN-ti-a en-sw 

ina nap-har kur.kur.mes-^ lu-sar-bu-u 

ina li-te kis-su~ti(*) u me-tel-lu-ti 

li-ir-ta-du-su (bi)-lat kib-rat(*) 4-i 

ina is-qi-su lu-sat-li-mu nu-uh-su 

tu-uh-du w(*) he-gal-lu ina kur-sm 

lu-kin-nu sa ki-i pi-i mu.sar-mj 

an-ne-e la e-pa-su ta-me-et 

sit-ri-ia us-te-nu-u alam 

su-a-tu i-^a-ab-ba-tu-ma 

u-sam-sa-ku ina pis-sd-te i-ka-ta-mu-su 

ina e-pe-ri i-qa-bi-ru-su ina izi.mes 

gibil-51/ ina a.mes i-na-du-su a-na 

ki-bi-is u-ma-mi ii me-te-eq 

bu-u-li i-sd-ak-ka-nu-su ta-me-et 

sit-ri-ia um-ma-na-te a-na a-ma-ri 

u sd-se-e i-kal-lu-u u ina pa-an 

MU.SAR.MES-/a man-ma ki-i la-ma-a-ri 

rfifi la sd-se-e i-pa-ar-ri-ku 

ds-^Mm iz^-zi-ir-ti si-na-ti-na 

na-^ak^-ra *~a-hai-[a (x) a-i]a-a-ba lem-na 

lu e ki- r li liO a-i~me-lu-ta"i 

si-kin zi-ti u-ma-^a-ru-ma 

u-sd-ha-zu i-pa-pi-tu i-sa-ap-pi-^rifi 

EUB-sti a-na bar-ti us-te-en-nu-u 

a-na hul-lu-uq AiAM-ia 

an-ne-e it ta-me-ti ana su-un-ne-^e 1 

u-zu-un-M i-sd-ka-nu-ma lib-ba-su 



it (and) put them in another city (in) another 
palace. He must not smash its beams. He must 
not tear out its drain pipes. He must not clog the 
outlets of its rain spouts. He must not block up 
its door, (v 35) He must neither appropriate it for 
a warehouse (nor) turn it into a prison. He must 
not incarcerate its (the palace's) men or women as 
prisoners therein. He must not allow it to disin- 
tegrate through neglect, desertion, or lack of ren- 
ovation, (v 40) He must not move into another 
palace, either within or without the city, instead 
of my palace. He must not rend the lock, (for) 
there must not be open access. He must neither 
conceive an injurious plan nor put it into effect to 
the disadvantage of my mighty < palace), my 
royal residence. 

v 45b-54a) As for the one who acts according to 
this inscription of mine (and) does not alter the 
ordinances of my text: may Assur, the god Eniil, 
(and) the great gods who make my sovereignty 
supreme, make his dominion supreme in all lands, 
(v 50) May they constantly lead him in victory, 
might, and heroism. May they grant the tribute of 
the four quarters as his portion. May they estab- 
lish in his land plenty, affluence, and abundance, 
v 54b-96a) As for the one who does not act ac- 
cording to (v 55) this inscription of mine (but) 
alters the ordinances of my text; (who) destroys 
this monument, discards (it), covers it with oil, 
buries it in dust, (v 60) burns it with fire, throws 
it in water, puts it in the path of beasts or the 
track of animals; (who) prevents scholars from 
seeing and reading the ordinances of my inscrip- 
tion, bars anyone access (v 65) to my inscription 
in order that it might not be seen and read; 
(who), because of these curses, instructs and in- 
cites a stranger, a foreigner, a malignant enemy, a 
prisoner, or any living (v 70) being so that he des- 
troys, chisels away, changes its wording to some- 
thing else; (v 75) (who) makes up his mind and 
decides to destroy this monument of mine and to 
alter my ordinances and (therefore) commands a 
scribe or diviner or anyone else, 'Destroy this 
monument! Its dictates are not to be observed!' 
(v 80) and whoever heeds his statements; (who) 
conceives anything injurious and orders (it to be 
done) to my works and my monument; (who) 



read one would expect -sd as a suffix to all four items listed. 
v 37 See Schramm, EAK 2 p. 33. v 39 la ke-si-(ri): cf. 
RIMA 1 p. 274 line 131. See Grayson, ARI 2 p. 155 n. 670. 
v 40 i: text has ta. See J. Lewy, ZA 36 (1925) pp. 148-49 n. 
3 and cf. CAD 8 (K) p. 347a and Schramm, EAK 2 p. 33. 
v 41 la e-re-bi: one expects la errab although the grammatical 
form could be explained as the use of the infinitive for a finite 



form (see the introduction to A. 0.99. 2), but this is very rare 
(although possibly occurring with la e-pa-se in v 79). 
v 44 (ekal): see Schramm, EAK 2 p. 33. v 45 {kt>\ cf. ¥ 54 
and see Schramm, EAK 2 p. 33. v 51 (bi)-lat. cf. A. 0,101.40 
line 40. v 71 i-pa-pi-tu: cf. RIMA 1 p. 238 v 24 and ¥on 
Soden, AHw p. 824a. 



254 



Ashurnasirpal n A. 0.101. 17 



76; 

77 
7R 

79; 
8o; 

81 

82' 

83 

84 

85 

86 

87 

88; 

89; 

90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

95 

96; 

97 

98 

99 

100) 

101) 

102) 



10; 



i-ma-al-li-ku-su u lu-u lu.a.ba 

lu lu.hal lu-u ma-^anP-ma sd-nu-u 

nu su-a-tu hul-li-iq Sd pi-i-sii 

la e-pa-Se i-qa-ab-ba-dS-M 

u sd pi-i-su i-se-em-mu-u sd mim-ma 

a-mat hul-?/ i-ha-sa-sa-ma a-na ep-se-ti-a 

u ALAM-ia u-ma^a-ru a-na-ku 

la i-di i-qa-ab-bu-u «(*) ina man-//-<sw> 

pa-^nP-su a-na bat-te i-sd-ka-nu-ma 

alam su-u P-^a~^-ab-ba~tu-ma 

ih-ha-ra- v am-ma~^-tu a-mat-tu sd pi-i-M 

us-te-en-* na^-a *~iP ana ALAM-ia 

su-a-tu li-im-^nP-ti il-te^u-u 

as-sur en gal-w tdingirT ds-su-ru-u 

en si-ma-a-ti i~sP-[m]a-ti-su li-ru-ur 

ep-se-ti-su lu-*~na-kP-ir er-re-ta 

ma-ru-^uP-ta sd ^na-sah is^-di man-H-su 

u zAh tjn.mes-sh li-it-ta-ds-qar 

su-um-qa bu-bu-ta ^u ni-ib^-\r\i-^ tip 

it hu-sd-ah-ha a-na kvr-H-su 

li-du-u sd a-na ALA[M-/]Gr 

su-a-tu e-^zP-zu-ma an-na-^a mP-na 

i-qa-bu-u d a-nu d BAD r£T [ d ]r£-#i 

dingir.mes mi-ig-ri-ia si-[i]-i ru l 

la-a ^ na^-ma-ri-^su^ ina ipi-P-sii-nu 

kab^ti IP-iq-bu TgiS.tukulI \l]a~^a^ 

sa-riP-ma f M i la ma-ga-ri [se]-^eP-ta 

ip-pi-ra \puK\-pu-ha ina KUR-rfw lu-ki-mP 



says, 'I know nothing (of this)' and during his 
sovereignty diverts his attention elsewhere (v 85) 
with the result that this monument is destroyed 
and smashed (or) the wording of its text altered; 
or (who) seeks (to do) evil against this monument 
of mine: may Assur, the great lord, the Assyrian 
god, (v 90) lord of destinies, curse his destiny; 
may he remove his works; may he pronounce an 
evil curse for the uprooting of the foundations of 
his sovereignty and the destruction of his people; 
may he inflict his land with distress, famine, 
hunger, (v 95) and want. 



v 96b- 103) As for the one who becomes angry 
with this monument of mine and says, 'What is 
this 7 ': may the gods Anu, Enlil, and Ea, the gods 
who approve of me, (v 100) decree by their 
weighty edict his unhappiness; may they establish 
a truceless war without terms, strife, conflict, 
(and) battle in his land. 



18 



This fragmentary and enigmatic text is found on a stone stele, com- 
monly called the 'White Obelisk', discovered at Nineveh by Rassam. A 
number of panelled reliefs are also engraved upon the stele. The attri- 
bution of this text to Ashurnasirpal n is still much debated but I con- 
tinue to believe Sollberger, who published the most recent edition, is 
probably right in ascribing it to this king. Since Sollberger's publica- 
tion Reade has argued for an attribution to Ashurnasirpal i, a king 
who is otherwise very obscure (see A. 0.92), while von Soden has pro- 
posed the more general time period between Assur-bel-kala and 
Ashurnasirpal n. 

The beginning of the text is missing but it probably started with an 
invocation of various deities and the royal names and titles, similar to 
introductory passages found on other such steles (e.g. A.0.101.17 and 
19-20). The preserved portion of the text describes campaigns, which 
took place early in the reign, in the area of Mount Kasiiari (cf. 



v 79 la e-pa-Se: use of the infinitive as a finite form. See the 
commentary to A.0.99.2 and cf. the note to v 41. v 85-86 See 
Meier (Weidner), AfO 21 (1966) p. 71. v 96 li-du-u: lit. 'may 
they (not he) inflict', v 97 an-na-^a mP-na: cf. A. 0.101.50 line 



41 and see CAD 4 (E) p, 428b. v 99 Si-[i\-rru~i: see Schramm, 
EAK 2 p. 33. v 102 lse}~i~en-ta: see CAD 7 (1/J) p. 165a and 
16 (S) p. 87b. v 103 \puh}-pu-ha: see CAD 7 (I/J) p. 165a, 16 
(S) p. 87b, and von Soden, AHw p. 876b. 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101. 18 



255 



A.0.10L1 i 101 - ii 1 and parallels). The inscription, which is en- 
graved on various parts and sides of the stele, abruptly ends and, since 
there is much blank space left on the stone, it is clearly unfinished. 

On one panel there is an engraved scene (see Sollberger p. 238 for a 
drawing by Searight) with an epigraph which refers to the Blt-nathi of 
Nineveh. This shrine, which was part of the Istar temple complex at 
Nineveh, is mentioned only in texts of Ashurnasirpal n: A.0.10L56 
lines 14-15 and A.0.101.137. Various etymologies have been offered 
for the word nathi, the most recent being that by Vieyra, RA 69 
(1975) pp. 55-58. ~ 



COMMENTARY 



The stele (BM 118807, 56-9-9,58) is about 3 metres in 
height and was discovered by Rassam in July of 1853 
'about two hundred feet to the northeast of 
Sennacherib's palace' at Kuyunjik. The inscription has 
been collated. 

This edition very closely follows the authoritative 



edition published by Sollberger. A detailed discussion 
of the text and individual problems, which I was for- 
tunately able to discuss with Sollberger before his publi- 
cation, will be found in his edition and there is no need 
to repeat the complex commentary here. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1897 Rassam, Asshur p. 8 (provenance) 

1932 Unger, MAOG 6/1-2 (photo, copy, edition) 

1936 Gadd, Stones p. 124 (study) 

1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 48-49 (study) 

1974 Sollberger, Iraq 36 pp. 231-38 and pis. xli-xlviii (photo, 
copy, edition) 



1975 Reade, Iraq 37 pp. 129-50 (study) 

1975 von Soden, ZA 64 pp. 180-91 (study) 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 ci 10 (translation) 

1981 Reade in Fales, ARIN pp. 147-48 (study) 

1982 Borker-Klahn, Bildstelen no. 132 (photo, study) 



TEXT 



Lacuna 



9' 



gal-/.? u-si-bu [gi]s.[gigi]r.mes 

£RIN.HI.A.MES-te [DAGAL.MES]-te \ ad*-\ki\ 

[h]a-al-su-te la-ma-ri pat-te-pat-[te] a[k\- 

^SUCP MAS. ME S ^M ANSE.KUR.RA.ME^ 

is-tu kur gil-za-ni ' am ] -[hur] ni x [x (x) ha]r 

ina gi-ne^e u~i-[kin(l) assu(l)] 

anse.kur.ra.mes a-na bit-te la u-[se-ri-b]u-ni 

al-[la-bi-ib-ma(l)] a-na 

uru ha-ri-ra uru hal-ha-la-us i~scD [e]n.mes- 

ni [bete] hi-i-ti a[/F lih 

su-a-tu ina li-me m as-sur-PAB-A ^ak~^-[s]ud 

mG-su-t~nu sal-la-su-nu~i 

bu-sd-su-nu mar-si-su-nu u-se-sa-a a-na uru- 

ia as-sur ub-la 

uru sa-x-[t\i-su-nu gal-a a-di un.mes-s[w] 



Lacuna 

l'-18'a) [In my accession year (and) in my first 
regnal year, after] I nobly ascended [the royal 
throne], I mustered my chariotry (and) extensive 
troops. I conquered inaccessible fortresses round 
about, I received a tribute of horses from the land 
Gilzanu. ... [Because] (5') horses were not {con- 
tinual iy) brought in hither to me I [became angry 
and] marched to the cities Harira (and) Halhalaus 
which (were under the authority) of the guilty 
rulers. Those I conquered in the eponymy of 
Ashurnasirpal. I took out their property, booty, 
possessions, (and) herds (and) brought (them) to 
my city Assur. The great ... city together with its 
people I dedicated (10') to Assur, my god (and) 
my lord, ... I conquered. Lords [...] who [had 
fled] to the land Subru which [...]. They put their 



1-2' For a plausible restoration see the note to A. 0.87.1 i 
3' Von Soden, ZA 64 (1975) p. 181 has objected to 
Sollberger's reading at the line's beginning. 5' bit-te: von 



62. Soden, Z A 64 (1975) p. 183 still maintains his reading pit-te. 

7 su-a-tu 'that*: one expects satunu 'those' (cf. line 25'). 



256 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101.18 



100 a-na as-sur DiNGiR-/a 
11') EN-ia r a~i-qis 

12') [...] M X [x] X KUR-U^EN.MES [...] 

13') [...] sd ^a^-na kur sub-re-e r&fi [...] 

14') [...] a-na gi-pis &Rm.m«A.,ym$-te-{sunu] 

1 5') [dannis dan]-nis it-tak-lu-u-ma [. . . ] 

16') [...] ... [...] 

17') [...]... an... [...] 

18') [...] is-bu-tu ina qi-bit as-sur [...] 

19') [...] EN GAL-e EN-/a rGIS.GIGIR.MES~i-[te ...] 

20') [...] ERiN.Hi.A.MES-/e-/tf ad-ki i~uru ak-sucD 

[...] 
21') [...] uru u-si-ra anse.kur.ra.mes i~gu4.mes~i 

22') [...] GIS(?) GAB(?) SW(?) [...] RA [...] 

23') [...] gis.gigir.mes ina gub.ba id-ki si-it-mu- 

ri-is 
24 ; ) [atbima(l)] as-si zi-iq-te ina gir.il mes-/# lib- 

bi kur kas-ia-ri 
25') [hantis(l)] lu ab-bal-kit a-na uru.mes sd-tu- 

nu lu al-lik 
26') [...] mu-si-ta uRVME^-M-nu al-mi 
27) [...] ina d M~ma$ [n]a-pa-hi it-ti gi-piS 
28') [narkabate] erin.hla.mes-^ dagal.mes-^ 
29') am~da-h[i~i]s [d]i-ik-ta-^M^-nu ma-^a~ta a- 

duk 
W) uru ^am^-lat-ti uru sd-bu[r]-^anO uru ru- 

zi-da-ak 
31') uru bu-gu uru us-tu URU.MES-m bal.mes 
32') [k]ur dan-nu-na ak-sud ina izi.mes ds-ru-up 
33') sal-la-su-nu bu-sd-su-nu nam-kur-su-nu 

(usesa{l)) 
Epigraph 

1) t-na-at-hi sd uru ni-nu-a gestin 

UDU. SISKUR. MES-te 

2) sd e.kur dingir sir-te DV-ds 



[full] trust in the might of [their] troops and 
they seized. 



18'b-33') By the command of Assur, [...] the great 
lord, my lord, I mustered my chariot ry [...] (and) 
troops. I reached the city. [...] abandoned the 
city. Horses, oxen, [...] chariotry with ... he 
mustered. [/ attacked] fiercely. I raised the torch 
(and) [quickly] crossed through the heart of 
Mount Kasiiari on foot. I marched to those cities. 
[...] at night I surrounded their cities. [...] At sun- 
rise I fought with the might of [chariotry] (and) 
extensive troops. I massacred many. I conquered 
the cities Amlattu, Saburam, Ruzidak, Bugu, 
(and) Ustu, rebel cities of the land Dannuna. 1 
burnt (them and) their booty, possessions, prop- 
erty </ brought out). 



Epigraph 

1-2) BTt-nathi of the city Nineveh: I perform the 
wine libations (and) sacrifices of the temple of the 
exalted goddess. 



19 



This text is engraved on a stone stele, commonly called the *Kurkh 
Monolith', discovered at Kurkh (near Diyabakir) by Taylor in October 
1861. Besides the text, which is inscribed on both sides of the monu- 
ment, a figure of the king is carved in relief on the obverse. The stone, 
now in the British Museum, is badly worn. 

The text begins (lines 1-25) with an invocation of various deities 
and the royal name with epithets. It then continues, and concludes, 
with a description of the fifth campaign. The same campaign is also 
described in A. 0.101.1 (ii 86-125) but in much less detail and with 
significant variants which have been noted in the edition of A. 0.1 01.1. 



13' Cf. A.0.101.1 ii 8 and parallels. 29' [d\i-ik-ta-r stn~nw. cf. 
von Soden, ZA 64 (1975) p. 181. 



Ashurnasirpal ii A.0.101.19 



257 



It is clear that this text does not conclude with a building section 
and blessings and curses. This also seems to be the case with various 
compilations of campaign accounts, viz. A.O. 101. 3-15. On the other 
hand, A.0.101.1, 2, 23 (and exs. 2-5 of A.0.101.26), 30, 51, and 67 
each have a building section but no blessings or curses. This is in con- 
trast to the usual form of Assyrian royal inscriptions and to other 
texts of Ashurnasirpal, such as the Nimrud Monolith (A. 0.101. 17). I 
know of no reason for this departure from the norm. 



COMMENTARY 



The stone stele (BM 118883 = old no. 125) stands c. 
112 cm high and the inscription has been collated. Col- 
lation has shown that King's publication is more accu- 
rate than that of Le Gac, and the numerous errors in 
the latter publication have not been itemized since this 
would clutter up the notes unnecessarily. Lines 1-49 are 
on the obv. and lines 50-103 on the rev. The scribe 
who engraved the text on the stele made several errors, 
some of which he attempted to correct. This suggests, 



as with the Nimrud Monolith (A. 0.101. 17), that he was 
working hastily under a deadline. No doubt the army 
was anxious to push on. 

As remarked in the introduction, the fifth campaign 
is also described but more briefly in A. 0.101,1. The 
parallel passages are: A.0.101.19 lines 28-29 // 
A.0.10L1 ii 86-87; A.0.101.19 lines 35-52 // A.0.101.1 
ii 87-91; A.0.101.19 lines 54-90 // A.0.101.1 ii 91-125. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1870 3 R pi. 6 (copy) 

1902 King, AKA pp. 222-42 (copy, edition) 

1907 Le Gac, Asn. pp. 137-51 (copy) 

1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§496-502 (translation) 



1936 Gadd, Stones p. 129 (study) 

1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 34-35 (study) 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 ci 11 (translation) 

1982 Borker-Klahn, Bildstelen no. 135 (photo, study) 



TEXT 



1) 

2) 

3) 

4) 

5) 

6) 

7) 

8) 

9) 

10) 

11) 



as-sur d iSKUR d 30 

U d M-maS d INANNA 



DINGIR.MES GAL. ME S 
Ct-li-ku-Ut IGI ERIN.HI.A.MES-H 
m aS-SUr-PAB-A MAN GAL.«MES» 

man dan-nu man su man kur as-sur 
(say ina gis Jukul-ti as-sur d sd-maS 

DINGIR.MES GAL.MES EN.MES-fl 

mj.uv-ku-ma ina mal-ki set kib-rat 
A-ta sd-nin-su la i-su-u nun-z! 
na-^a-du qa-di-id du mal-ki la a-di-ru 

12) gis.lal u-siim-gal-lu ek-du i \~mu*-pdr-ri(*)-rir 
kP- 

13) sir mul-tar-hi gis-gi-nu-u dan-nu 

14) mu-kab-bi-si gu mal-ki la (ma)-gi-ru-te-su 

15) e-[du\-u gap-su sd la i-sd-na-nu r MURUB 4 ] -su 

16) [x x] x sar-hu x x la [x x x (x)] man 
tmanImes [be!] EN-e x [x x] ^ mu^[ri4b(l)] 
Tgis^.lal 



l-4)Assur, god Adad, god Sin and god Samas, 
goddess Istar, great gods who go at the head of 
my troops; 

5-22) Ashurnasirpal, great king, strong king, king 
of the universe, king of Assyria, (who) acts with 
the support of Assur (and) the god Samas, the 
great gods, my lords, and has no rival among the 
princes of the (10) four quarters, attentive prince, 
subduer of all princes, fearless in battle, ferocious 
dragon, the one who breaks up the forces of the 
rebellious, strong gisginu, who treads upon the 
necks of the princes insubmissive to him, (15) 
mighty flood-tide whose conflict cannot be 
rivalled, magnificent ..., who ... [...], king of 
kings, [lord] of lords, he who [stirs up] battle 
[and] conflict, who forces to bow down princes 
insubmissive to him, who rules all peoples, strong 
king, who destroys the fortifications of his ene- 



11 qa-di-id: the G of qadadu can be used transitively and 
there is no need to amend to (mu) -qa-di-id. See CAD 13 (Q) 



p. 45a sub 2a. 16 [be!] EN-e: see Seux, ERAS p. 55 n. 60 and 
p. 318 n. 277. 16-17 r mu i.[ri-ib{l)] r G is"UAL [u] tam-ha-rh 



258 



Ashumasirpal ii A. 0.101. 19 



[it] tam-ha-ri mu-sd-ak-me-si mal-ki la 
kan-su-ie-M sd nap-har kis-sat un.mes i-pe-lu 
man dan-nu mu-^a-bit TbadT kur.mes-sw 
mu-sd-bi-ir 

gis.tukul.mes mal-ki sd Dv-si-na ub.mes 
lu.sipa-w tab-ra-a-te M-pi-ir du un.mes 
man kul-lat kib-rat A-ta d sam-su «man» kis- 
sat un. Tmes^ 

dumu Ttukul 1-mas sd la ma-gi-^ru^-te-su u- 
i na~\-pi-su-\ md^ 
u-^na^-ki-su gu muq-tab-li dumu. dumu sd 

m 10-'ERIN.TAH~l 

u-ki-nu uru.mes e-nu-ma as-sur en na-bu-u 

MV-ia mu-sar-bu-u MAN-ti-a u-kal^lim-arO- 

ni-ma 

2-te-su ana kur na-i-ri a-la-ku iq-ba-a 

ina IT1.SIG4 ud Lkam li-me m sd-viNGiR-ma- 

SIG5 

GIS.GIGIR.MES ERIN.HI.A.MES-tf ad-ki 
ID. HAL. HAL e-te-bir 

ina sid-di hu-li-a ana [uru(?)] riP-ma-i~le-e 

uru kal-seX-)l(sa)] 

ina kur ka-di-^is-ha-ru^ x [x] gis us la a [x 

(x)] x [x x x x (x)] 

ana uru ^ap^-qi e-tar-ba ta uru ^ap^-qi at- 

tumi-mus 

5 ur.mah.mes ina sag uru i~mal(l)i-hi-na ina 

kur hat-te 

ina Gis.BAN-flf ez-ze-te u-sam-qit 

ana kur kat-mu-hi e-tar-ba E.GAL-lum ina 

uru ti-lu-li 

u-sa-ri ma-da-tu sd kur kat-mu-hi 

ina uru ti-lu-li a-ta-har 

ta kur kat-mu-hi at-tum^-mus ina ne-re-be 

M d isz-tdr. mes e-tar-^ba^ ina uru ki-ba-ki 

a-sa-kan be-dak gu 4 .mes udu.mes gestin.mes 

UTUL.MES [(ZABAR)] 

ma-da-tu sd uru ki-ba-ki at-ta-har 

ta uru ki-ba-ki at-tum 4 -mus 

^ana 1 uru mat-i-ia-te aq-ti-rib uru mat-i-ia- 

te 

a-di kap-ra-ni-M ak-(ta)-sad 

2 lim 8 me erin. mes ti-du-ki-su-nu ina 

gis.tukul u-sam-qit 

sal-la-su-nu ma-^a-tu ds-lu-la 

erin. mes am-mar ta igi Gis.TUKUL.MES-a ip- 

i" pdr^-si-du-ni 

gir. 11-/0 is-bu-tti URU.MES-ni-su-nu 

u-sd-as-bi-su-nu 

gun ma-da-tu lu u-ra-si u-dan-ni-ni 

jjGU-M-nu as-kun sa-lam r bu-na^-ni-a du-ws 



mies, who smashes (20) the weapons of the 
princes of all the (four) quarters, marvellous 
shepherd, commander of all people, king of all 
the four quarters, sun(god) of all people; 



23-25a) son of Tukukl-Ninurta (n), who slew 
those insubordinate to him (and) slashed the 
necks of warriors; grandson of Adad-narari (11), 
(who) founded cities: 

25b~52a) When Assur, the lord who called my 
name (and) who makes my sovereignty supreme, 
instructed me and commanded me for a second 
time to march to the land(s) Nairi; on the first 
day of the month Sivan, in the eponymy of Sa- 
illma-damqa, I mustered my chariotry (and) 
troops. I crossed the Tigris, (30) In the region of 
my road to [the city] Limale (and) the city Kalse 
[(which is)] in the land Kadisharu / marched ... I 
entered the city Apqu. I moved on from Apqu. I 
killed with my fierce bow five lions before the city 
Malhina in the land Hatti. (35) I entered the land 
Katmuhu. I consecrated a palace in the city TTl- 
uli. I received tribute from the land Katmuhu in 
Tfl-uli. Moving on from the land Katmuhu I en- 
tered the pass of the land Istarate. (40) I pitched 
camp (and) spent the night in the city Kibaku. I 
received tribute from Kibaku, oxen, sheep, wine, 
(and) casseroles. Moving on from Kibaku, I ap- 
proached the city Matiatu. I conquered Matiatu 
together with its suburbs. (45) 1 felled with the 
sword 2,800 of their fighting men (and) carried off 
many captives from them. The troops, as many as 
had fled from my weapons, submitted to me (and) 
I settled them in their cities. (50) I imposed upon 
them stringent tribute, taxes, (and) labourers. I 
made an image of myself (and) wrote thereon (an 
account of) my powerful victories. I erected (it) in 
Matiatu. 



cf. munb anunte A.0.101.1 i 20, iii 127, etc. See Seux, ERAS 
pp. 235-36. 23 w-r na^-phsu-^ma^: see Schramm, EAK 2 p. 34 



and cf. Seux, ERAS p. 187. 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101.19 



259 



52) li-ti kis-M-ti-ia ina sa al-tur-ru ina uru mat- 
ia-te u-se-zi-iz uru bu-un-^nu\-)[(...)\ 

53) ldurani(l)\ dan-nu-^tiD sd uru ma-^sifi-la 
i~2~i uru.mes-w sd li-me-tu-su ak-{ta)-sad 3 
me erin.mes ti-du-ki-su-nu ina gis.tukul 

54) u-sam-qit sal-la-su-nu as-lu-la uru.mes-w ina 
izi a-sa-rap ta uru mat- ia-te at-Ftunu-mus 1 

55) ^ana^ uru za-za-bu-ha a-sa-kan be-dak ma- 
da-iu set kur hab-hi gu 4 .mes udu.mes 

GESTIN.MES I UTUL 1.MES 

56) tap-hi zabar sa-ap-li gur-pi-si zabar at-ta- 
har ta uru za-za-bu-ha at-tum4-mus 

57) [ina] r URu~i ir-si-a a-sa-kan be-dak uru ir-si-a 
ina izi.meS a-sa-rap ma-da-tu sd uru su-u-ra 

58) [alpe] TuduI.mes gestin.mes utul.mes ina 
uru ir-si-a at-ta-har ta uru ir-si-a at-tum*- 
mus ina lib-bi kur kas-ia-ri 

59) [assa]-kan be-dak uru ma-da-ra-an-zu 2 
uru.mes-w sd li-me-tu-su ak-sud gaz.mes- 
M-nu GAz-i~ak saP-[la]- 

60) [su-nu a]-^sa^-ia uru.mes-w/ ina izlmes a-sa- 
rap 6 UD.MES-te ina sa kur kas-ia-ri KUR-e 
dan-ni a.sa 

61) nam-ra-si sd a-na me-teq gis.gigir.mes 
ERiN.HLA.MES-a la GAR-nu kur-w ina ka-la- 
ba-te an.bar ak-kis ina ak-kul-riP( t )[(MES)] 
urudu aq-fquf} 

62) gis.gigir.mes erin.hla.mes u-se-te-qi 
URU.MEs-m sd sid-di hu-U-ia sd sa kur kas- 
a-ri gu 4 .mes udu.mes gestin 

63) at-ta-har kur kaS-ia-ru at-ta-bal-kat 2-te-su 
ana kur na-i-ri at-tar-da ina uru si-gi-su a- 
sa-kan be-dak ta uru si^gP-[su] 

64) at-tumA-mus a-na uru ma-da-ra uru £fc«~ 
nu-ti-su sd m lab-tu-ri dumu tu-pu-si aq-ti-rib 
uru KAL-tf« dan-nis 4 bAd.meS /fl?-[a-d/] 

65) uru a-si-be ta jm-ot gis.tukul. ME^-a flfa«- 
ww-/e ip-la-hu-ma nig.ga.mes-sw-hm bu-sd- 
su-nu Bvuu-su-nu a-na sap-^ru^-[te] 

66) lamhur]-sii-nu a-na su-zu-bu zi.MES-sii-nu «- 
SAR-M-nu gun ma-da- tu lu u-ra-si ugv -sit- nu 
as-kun uru ap-pul aq-qur 

67) [a^a ////e w] kar-me u-ter ta uru ma-da-ra 
at-tum^-mus ana uru tu-us-ha e-tar-ba e.gal 
si uru tu-us-ha it-sa-ri Tgun ma-da^-[tu] 

68) [M kur ni]-ir-du-un anse.kur.ra.mes 
anse.gir.nun.na.mes utul.mes gur-pi-si 

GU4.MES UDU.MES GESTIN.MES //Iff URU fM-MS- 

/ra at-ta-har 

69) [1 swsT] uru.mes-/?/ 5a bad.mes dan-nu-te sd 



52b-63a) I conquered the city Bunnu(...), the 
mighty |/or^] of the city Masula, (and) two cities 
in its environs. I felled with the sword 300 of 
their fighting men, carried off prisoners from 
them, (and) burnt the cities. Moving on from the 
city Matiatu (55) I pitched camp (and) spent the 
night at the city Zazabuha. I received tribute from 
the land Habhu, oxen, sheep, wine, casseroles, a 
bronze bath-tub, bowls, (and) bronze armour. 
Moving on from Zazabuha I pitched camp (and) 
spent the night [in] the city Irsia. I burnt Irsia, I 
received tribute from the city Sura, [oxen], sheep, 
wine, (and) casseroles, in the city Irsia. Moving 
on from Irsia [I] pitched camp (and) spent the 
night within Mount Kasiiari. I conquered the city 
Madaranzu (and) two cities in its environs. I mas- 
sacred them, (60) carried off prisoners from them, 
(and) burnt the cities. For six days within Mount 
Kasiiari, a mighty mountain (and) rugged terrain 
which was unsuitable for my chariotry (and) 
troops, I cut through the mountain with iron axes 
(and) smashed (a way) with copper picks. (Thus) 
was I able to bring forward the chariotry (and) 
troops. (From) the cities which were in the region 
of my road within Mount Kasiiari I received 
oxen, sheep, (and) wine. 



63b-67a) After crossing Mount Kasiiari I went 
down for a second time to the land(s) Nairi. I 
pitched camp (and) spent the night in the city 
Sigisu. Moving on from §ig[isu] I approached the 
city Madara, the fortified city of Labturu, son of 
Tupusu. The city was well fortified; it was sur- 
rounded by four walls. (65) I besieged the city. 
They took fright in face of my mighty weapons 
and [I received] from them property, possessions, 
(and) sons as hostages. I spared their lives (but) 
imposed upon them tribute, taxes, (and) labour- 
ers. I razed (and) destroyed the city (and) turned 
(it) [into] ruin hills. 

67b-69) Moving on from the city Madara I en- 
tered the city Tusha. I consecrated a palace at 
Tusha. I received in Tusha tax (and) tribute [from 
the land N]irdun, horses, mules, casseroles, ar- 
mour, oxen, sheep, (and) wine. I razed, des- 
troyed, (and) turned into ruin hills [60] well- 
fortified cities at the foot of Mount Kasiiari, 
which (were ruled by) Labturu, son of Tupusu. 



59-6D For the reading connecting these lines see Schramm, 
EAK 2 p. 24 to ii 94-95. 62 kas-a-ri is engraved over ia-ri. 



66 li-SAR-su-nu: see the note to A. 0.1 01.1 ii 99. 



260 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101. 19 



gir kur kas-ia-ri sd m lab-tu-ri dumu tu-pu-si 
ap-pul aq-qur ana du 6 u kar-me u-ter 

70) [ina] ^Gis^Jukul-ti as-sur en-/# ta uru tu~ 
us-hi at-tum 4 -mus gis.gigir.mes kal-Jw pit- 
hal-lu sd-ri-su i-si-ia a-se-qe ina ra-ak-su-[te] 

71) id. hal, hal e-te-bir du mu-Si-te ar-te-di ana 
uru pi-^tu^-ra uru dan-nu-ti-su-nu sd uru 
di-ir-ra-a-ia aq-ti-rib uru mar-^sP [dannis\ 

72) 2 bad.mes la-bi ki-ir-hu-su gim u-ba-an KUR-e 
Sd-qi ina a.mes mah.mes sd as-sur en-/a gi-pis 
ERiN.Hi.A.MES-tf u ut-a Sit-mu-^rP [issTSunu] 

73) am-dah-hi-si ina 2 u*-me la-a-am d sd-mas 
na-pa-hi gim d isKUR sd ri-ih-si uGu-sti-nu ds- 
gu-um nab-li uGv-su-nu u-Sd-az-[nin ina 
Sipsi\ r#i da-na-ni 

74) mu-dah-hi-si-a gim an-ze-e vGv-Su-nu i-se-H 
uru ak-ta-sad 8 me Erin.mes mu-dah-hi-si- 
su-nu ina gis.tukul.mes u-Sam-(qit) 
sag.du.mes u-[ne-kis] erin.mes ti.la.mes 

75) ma-^a-du-te ina su u-sab-bi-ta si-ta-te-Su-nu 
ina izi.mes ds-ru-pu sal-la-su-nu DUGuo-ta 
as-lu-la a-si-tu sa ti.la.mes [sd sag].du.mes 

76) * ina^ pu-ut KA.GAL-sti-nu ar-sip 7 <me> 
erin.mes ina pu-ut KA.GAh-M-nu ana zi-qi-bi 
u-za-qi-bi uru ap-pul aq-qur ana du 6 u kar- 
me u-ter lu ba-tu-li-i'su-nu^ 

11) ana ma-aq-lu-te gibil uru ku-u~ f ku^~nu sd 
pi-i ne-re-bi sd KUR-e kur ma-at-nu GAR-nu 
ak-{ta)-sad 1 me Erin.mes ti-du-ki-sti-nu ina 
giS.tukul.mes u-Sam-qit sal-la-[su-nu] ma- 
>a-tti 

78) as-lu-la 40 uru.mes-a/ sa kur di-ir-ra-a-a 
ak-Sud GAZ.MES-su-nu a-duk sal-la-su-nu as- 
lu-la 40 Erin.mes ti.la.mes ina su u-sab-bi-ta 
ruRU^.[MEs]-rnfi 

79) ap-pul aq-qur ina izi.mes gibil me-lam en-H- 
ia VGV-su-nu at-bu-ku ta uru pi-da-ra at- 
tum^-mus a-na uru ar-ba-ki sd kur hab-hi sd 
be-ta~[a-nf\ 

80) at-tar-da ta pa-an me-lam uAN-ti-ia ip-la- 
hu-ma uru.mes-[/i/]-5w-«w sd bad.mes dan- 
nu-ti u-se-ru ana su-zu-ub zi.MEs-su-nu ana 
kur ma-[at-n]a KUR-e dan-ni 

81) e-li-u ar-ki-Su-nu ar-te-di 1 lim lu. erin.mes 
^muq^-tab-li-su-nu ina qe-reb kur-6 mar-si 
u-nap-pi-is us.mes-<sw>-/?« kur-w as-ru-^up 
pag-ri KMES-sii-nu 

82) hur-ru «ri» na-at-ba-ku sd kur-6 u-mal-li 2 
me erin.mes ti.la.me5 ina Su u-sab-bi-ta 
kap-pi-su-nu u-bat-tiq(*) 2 lim Sal-la-su-nu 



1Q-11&) [With] the support of Assur, my lord, I 
moved from the city Tusha, I took with me 
strong chariots, cavalry, (and) crack troops. I 
crossed the Tigris by means of a bridge of rafts. 
Travelling all night I approached the city Pitura, 
the fortified city of the Dirru. The city was [ex- 
ceptionally] difficult; it was surrounded by two 
walls; its citadel was lofty like a mountain peak. 
With the exalted strength of Assur, my lord, 
(with) my massive troops, and (with) my fierce 
battle I fought [with them]. On the second day, 
before sunrise, I thundered against them like the 
god Adad-of-the-Devastation (and) rained down 
flames upon them. [With might] and main my 
combat troops flew against them like the Storm 
Bird. I conquered the city. I felled 800 of their 
combat troops with the sword (and) cut off their 
heads. (75) I captured many soldiers alive. The 
rest of them I burnt, I carried off valuable tribute 
from them. I built a pile of live (men and) [of] 
heads before their gate. 1 impaled on stakes 700 
soldiers before their gate. I razed, destroyed, 
(and) turned into ruin hills the city. I burnt their 
adolescent boys as an offering. 
77b~79a) I conquered the city Kukunu which lies 
at the entrance to the pass of Mount Matnu. I 
felled with the sword 700 of their fighting men. I 
carried off many captives from them. I conquered 
40 cities of the Dirru. I massacred them, carried 
off prisoners from them, (and) captured 40 sol- 
diers alive. I razed, destroyed, (and) burnt the ci- 
ties. I unleashed against them my lordly radiance. 

79b-85a) Moving on from the city Pidara I went 
down to the city Arbakku which is in the interior 
of the land Habhu. They took fright in the face 
of my royal radiance and abandoned their well- 
fortified cities. To save their lives they climbed up 
Mount Matnu, a mighty mountain. I went after 
them. I slew 1,000 of their men-at-arms in the 
rugged mountain, dyed the mountain red with 
their blood, (and) filled the ravines (and) torrents 
of the mountain with their corpses. I captured 200 
soldiers alive (and) cut off their arms. I carried off 
2,000 captives from them. I brought back oxen 
(and) sheep from them without number. I con- 
quered the cities Iiaia (and) Salaniba, fortified ci- 
ties of the land Arbakku. I massacred (and) 



70 sd-ri-su: see the note to A, 0.101.1 ii 53. 70 ra~ak~su~[te]: 
see the note to A.0. 101.1 ii 103. 72 kirhusu ... saqi: cf. 
A. 0.101.1 ii 105 and the note. 76 7 <me>: see the note to 



A. 0.101.1 ii 109. 78 '40': see the note to A.0. 101.1 ii 111. 
79 pi-da-ra: see the note to A.0. 101. 1 ii 112. 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0,101.19 



261 



83) aS-lu-la gu 4 .mes udu se-e-ni-Su-nu ana la 
me-na u-te-ra uru i-ia-ia uru sa-la-ni-be 
uRU.MES-m dan-nu-ie Sd kur ar-ba-ak-ki ak- 
Sud 

84) GAZMEl-Su-nu a-duk Sai-la-su«su»-nu as-lu-la 
2 me 50 uru.mes-w Sd bad.mes dan-nu-ii sd 
kur na-i-ri ap-pul lu aq-qur ana du 6 u kar- 
me 

85) u-ter gis e-sa(*)~di KUR-ti-Su-nu e-si-di 
se.um.me u gis.in.nu.mes ina uru tu-us-ha 
at-bu-uk m am-ma-ba-a^-li dumu za-ma-a-ni 

86) lu.gal.mes-5w«nu» ib-bal-ki-tu-ma gaz-su 
ana tu-ru gi-me-li sd m am-mi-pa-a^-li a-lik ta 
pa-an na-mur-at gis.tukul.mes-Zc Sur-ba-at 

87) EN-ti-ia e-du-ru-ma 40 gis.gigir.mes ra-ki-su 

Hal-lu-Up-tU ERIN.MES ANSE.KUR.RA.MES 4 ME 

1 Su-Si anse.kur.ra.mes LAL-at gis ni-ri-rSu^ 

88) T2"! GUN KU.BABBAR 2 GUN KU.GI. MES 1 ME 
GUN AN.NA.MES 2 ME GUN ZABAR(*) «3 ME 
GUN ZABAR» 3 ME GUN AN. BAR 1 LIM 
UTUL.MES ZABAR 2 LIM kap-pl ZABAR 

89) sa-ap-li a-ga-na-a-te sd zabar 1 lim tug lu- 
bul-te bir-me gis.gada.mes bansur.mes 
gis.na5.mes gis ne-ma-ta-a-te zu.mes ku.gi 
uh-hu-zu-te 

90) ni-sir-te e.gal-H-Su 2 uu gu 4 .mes 5 lim 
udu.mes nin-sw a-di na-du-ni-Sd ma- } a-di 
munus.dumu gal.mes-5W ta na-du-ni-Si-na- 
ma ma-* a-di am-hur 

91) m bur-ra~ma~a'nu en hi-i(-tf a-ku-su Kus-iw 
bad Sd uru si-na-bu u-hal-lip m i-la-a~nu ses- 
Su a-na r LU^ na-si-ku-te dS-kun 

92) 2 ma.na ku.gi 13(?) ma.na ku.babbar 1 lim 
udu.mes 2 lim se.pad.lim ma-da-tu 

mu \m$.Y.k[M-Sam-m\a ina ugu-5w aS-kun uru 
si-na-bu uru ti-i-du bi-ra-a-te sa 

93) md Sul-ma-nu-SAG man kur aS-Sur nun a-lik 
iGi-ia ana kur na-i-ri u-Sd-as-bi-tu-ni sd kur 
a-ru-mu ina dan-na-ni e-ki-mu-ni a-na 

94) ra-me-ni-ia u-ut-te-ra LU.MES-e kur as-sur-a- 
ia Sd ina kur na-i-ri bi-ra-te Sd as-sur u-kal- 
lu-u-ni Sd kur a-ru-mu 

95) ik-bu-su-Su-nu-ni vRv.UES-ni-Su-nu 
E.m.A.MES-Su-nu na-tu(*)-te(*) u-sd-as-bi-^ta^ 
Sub-tu ne-eh-tu u-Se-Si-ib-Su-nu 1 lim 5 TmeI 

96) ERiN.Hi,A.MES-dtf ah-la-me-e kur ar-ma-a-ia 
Sd m am-mi-pa-a>-li dumu za-ma-a-ni a-su-ha 
a-na kur aS-Sur ub-la gis e-sa-di kur na-i-ri 



carried off prisoners from them. I razed, des- 
troyed, (and) turned into ruin hills 250 well- 
fortified cities of the land(s) Nairi. I reaped the 
harvest of their land (and) stored the barley and 
straw in the city TuSha. 



85b-97) The nobles of Amme-ba^lT, a man of Blt- 
Zamani, rebelled and killed him. I marched to 
avenge Amme-ba^lT. They took fright before the 
brilliance of my weapons (and) awe of my domin- 
ion (and) I received 40 harnessed chariots, equip- 
ment for troops (and) horses, 460 harness-trained 
horses, two talents of silver, two talents of gold, 
100 talents of tin, 200 talents of bronze, 300 
talents of iron, 1,000 bronze casseroles, 2,000 
bronze receptacles, bowls, bronze containers, 
1,000 linen garments with multi-coloured trim, 
dishes, chests, couches of ivory (and) decorated 
with gold, (90) the treasure of his palace — (also) 
2,000 oxen, 5,000 sheep, his sister with her rich 
dowry, (and) the daughters of his nobles with 
their rich dowries. I flayed Bur-Ramanu, Ihe 
guilty man, (and) draped his skin over the wall of 
the city Sinabu. I appointed Ilanu, his brother, to 
the position of sheikh. I imposed upon him as an- 
nual tribute two minas of gold, thirteen minas of 
silver, 1,000 sheep, (and) 2,000 (measures) of bar- 
ley. The cities Sinabu (and) TTdu — fortresses 
which Shalmaneser (11), king of Assyria, a prince 
who preceded me, had garrisoned on (the border 
of) the land(s) Nairi (and) which the Aramaeans 
had captured by force — I repossessed. (95) I 
resettled in their abandoned cities (and) houses 
Assyrians who had held fortresses of Assyria in 
the land(s) Nairi (and) whom the Aramaeans had 
subdued. I placed them in a peaceful abode. I 
uprooted 1,500 troops of the ff/?/<™w-Aramaeans 
belonging to Amme-ba>ll, a man of Bit-Zamam, 
(and) brought (them) to Assyria. I reaped the har- 
vest of the lands(s) Nairi (and) stored (it) for the 
sustenance of my land in the cities Tusha, 
Damdammusa, Sinabu, (and) Tldu. 



86 Sur-ba-at: see the note to A.0. 101.1 ii 78. 88 Regarding 
the last half of the line see the note to A. 0.101.1 ii 122. 
89 bansur.meS gi§,na 5 .mes: see the note to A. 0.1 01.1 ii 123. 
92 *13(?)': the numeral might be ( 3\ 92 se.pad.lim: for 

se.pad see Borger, RLA 3 p. 310a; von Soden, AHw p. 1222b. 



92 MV.rns.KA[u-sam-m)a = sattisamma: cf. A. 0.87.1 ii 94 
and see Borger, BiOr 28 (1971) p, 18a (to i 8'). 95 na-fu-te: 
text has mx-at-ia. See the note to A. 0.101.1 ii 10. Cf. 
Schramm, EAK 2 p. 34; J. Lewy, HUCA 27 (1956) p. 49 
n. 197; Borger, BiOr 22 (1965) p. 166a. 



262 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101. 19 



97) e-si-di ina uru tii-us-ha ina uru dam am - 
dam-mu-si ina uru si-na-bu ina uru ti-i-di 
ana a.mes kur- /at at-bu-ku 

98) uru.mes-/?/ stf kur ni-ir-du-un kur lu-lu-ta 
uru di-ir-ra kur ag-gu-nu kur uHi-ba kur 
ar-ba-ki kur ni-ir-be ak-sud GAZ-su-nu gaz 

99) $al-ia-su-nu as-lu-la urv .ME$-ni-su-nu ap-pul 
aq-qur ana du 6 w kar-me u-ter al-ku ku-du- 
ru lu u~ra-a-si ugu kur na-i-ri as-kun 

100) lu.gar-ww s# ra-me-ni-ia ucu-su-nu as-kun 
iR.MES-?e up-pu-sii na-mur-ra(*)-at 
Gis.TUKUL.MES-/tf ra-su-ba-at EN-ti-ia ugu 
kur na-i-ri at-bu-ku 

101) ma-da-tu sd kur sub-re-e ku.babbar 

KU.GLME ZABAR AN.NA AN. BAR gUr-pi-si 
UTUL.ME§ GU 4 .MES UDU.MES ANSE.KUR.RA.MES 



102) uru dam am -dam-mu-sa at-ta-har ina ta-ia-ar- 
ti-a sd ta kur na-i-ri uru su-u-ra sd kur 
ha-ni-gal-bat ak-ta-sad 

103) 9 me erin.mes ti-{du)-ki-{su)-nu ina 
gis.tukul u-sam-qit 2 lim saNa-su-nu as-lu- 
ia uru su-u-ra a-na ra-me-ni-ia a-sab-ta 



98- 102a) I conquered the cities of the lands 
Nirdun, Luluta, the city Dirra, the lands Aggunu, 
UUiba, Arbakku, (and) Nirbu. 1 massacred their 
(inhabitants), carried off captives from them, 
(and) razed, destroyed, (and) turned into ruin hills 
their cities. I imposed upon the land(s) Nairi feu- 
dal duties, corvee, (and) labourers. (100) I ap- 
pointed over them governors of my own choos- 
ing. They entered (lit. 'performed') servitude. I 
unleashed over the land(s) Nairi the brilliance of 
my weapons (and) the awesome terror of my do- 
minion. I received (in) the city Damdammusa the 
tribute of the land Subru, silver, gold, bronze, 
tin, iron, armour, casseroles, oxen, sheep, (and) 
horses. 

102b- 103) On my return from the land(s) Nairi I 
conquered the city SOra of the land Hanigalbat. I 
felled with the sword 900 of their fighting men; I 
carried off 2,000 prisoners from them. I took the 
city Sura for myself. 



20 



This text is engraved on a number of stone stele fragments discovered 
in Babil, a village in southeastern Turkey near the Syrian border. The 
fragments are now in the Adana museum where Hawkins examined 
them and collated the inscription. The present edition relies upon the 
authoritative publication of Hawkins. Kessler (see the bibliography) 
has remarked that Lehmann-Haupt mentioned a fragment which 
seems to have subsequently disappeared. 

The text begins (lines l-14a) with an invocation of deities which can 
be restored on analogy with the introduction to the Nimrud Monolith 
(A. 0.101. 17) and related passages. It then continues with the name, ti- 
tles, and genealogy of Ashurnasirpal, a passage parallel to A. 0.1 01.1 
i 18b-34 from which extensive restorations have been made. The 
remainder of the text is missing but must have narrated a campaign 
along the Upper Tigris in the area of modern Babil. 



100 iR.MEs-f? up-pu-sii: sec the note to A. 0.101. 1 iii 125-26. 
102 ha-ni-gal-bai: written over an erasure. Cf. King, AKA 



p. 242 n. 1. 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101. 20 
BIBLIOGRAPHY 



263 



1906 Lehmann-Haupt, Mat. pp. 19-22 and pi. I (photo, study) 
1969 Arnaud, RHA 27/84-85 pp. 41-49 (edition) 
1969 Hawkins, AnSt 19 pp. 111-20 (copy, edition) 

1973 Schramm, KAK 2 pp. 21 and 35 (study) 



1976 Grayson, ARI 2 ci 12 (translation) 

1980 Kessler, Nordmesopotamien pp. 35-37 (study) 

1982 Borker-Klahn, Bildstelen nos. 133-34 (study) 



TEXT 



1) [ d assur belu rabu sar g]im-rat dingir.[mes 
rabuti] 

2) [ d anu sar d i-g]i-gi u [ d anunnaki ( d hel matati)] 

3) [ d enlil si-i\-ru a-bu dingir.[mes (banu kul- 
lati)] 

4) [ d e]-a man z[u.ab be! nemeqi hasTsi] 

5) [ d sfn e]r-su man f~a~^-[ge-e saqu namriri] 

6) [ d adad] ges-ru su-[tu-ru bel hegalli] 

7) [ d sd\-mas di.kud an-J>i [u erseti muma^ir 
gimri\ 

8) [ d AM]AR.uTu ap-kal ^[bel tereti] 

9) [ d ninurta] qar-rad d NUN.GAL.MES u [ d anun- 
naki] 

10) [ d ]u,GUR git-ma-lu man tam-ha-r[i d nusku 
nasi hatti eiii] 

11) [ilu] mul-ta(*)-Iu d Ni[N.nL hirti d enli[\ 

12) [ummi ///"gal], mes u inanna sag-?/ [same u 
erseti sa paras] 

13) [qar-du\-te suk-lu-lat dingir.mes gal. [mes 
mu^Tmu sJmati] 

14) [mu\-sar-bu-u man-// [assur-nasir-apli rubu 
nadu] 

15) [pa]-lih dingir.mes gal.mes u-[Mm-gal-iu 
ekdu kasid] 

16) [uruJ.uru hur-M-ni pat gim-ri-[sunu sar 
bele] 

17) [mu-[\a-it ^ek^-s[u-te apir salummate] 

18) [la adiru tuqunti ursanu tizqaru la padu\ 

19) [murib anunte sar kal malkl bel bsle] 

20) [utullu] man MAN.MEs-n/ rfi-[si-/?w na^du 
nibit d ninurta qardi] 

2 1 ) [kasus] dingir. mes gal. mes mu- [ter gimilti 
sarru sa ina tukulti] 



1-1 3a) [God Assur, the great lord, king of] all the 
[great] gods; [god Anu, king of the Ig]igu and 
[Anunnaku gods; (lord of the lands) god Enlil], 
exalted one, father of the gods, [(creator of all); 
god E]a, king of the [apsu, lord of wisdom (and) 
understanding; (5) god Sin], wise one, king of the 
lunar disk, [lofty luminary; god Adad], the excep- 
tionally strong, [lord of abundance; god Sa]mas, 
judge of heaven [and underworld, commander of 
all; god] Marduk, sage, [lord] god [of oracles; 
god Ninurta], warrior of the Igigu and [Anun- 
naku gods; (10) god] Nergal, perfect one, king of 
battle; [god Nusku, bearer of the holy sceptre], 
circumspect [god]; goddess Ni[nlil, spouse of the 
god Enlil, mother of the great gods]; goddess 
Istar, foremost in [heaven and underworld, who] 
is consummate in [the canons of combat]; 

13b-40a) great gods, [who decree the destinies 
(and)] make great [the] sovereignty of [Ashur- 
nasirpal, attentive prince], (15) worshipper of the 
great gods, [ferocious dragon, conqueror of cities] 
(and) the entire highlands, [king of lords], con- 
troller of the obstinate, [crowned with splendour, 
fearless in battle, lofty (and) merciless hero, who 
stirs up strife, king of all princes, lord of lords, 
(20) chief herdsman], king of kings, [attentive 
purification priest, designate of the warrior god 
Ninurta, destructive weapon of] the great gods, 
[avenger, the king who has always acted] justly 
[with the support of Assur and the god Samas], 
the gods who help him [and cut down like marsh 
reeds fortified mountains] and princes hostile [to 



1 Restored from A.0. 101.17 i 1 and cf. the note to A.0. 100.1 
line 1. 2 See the note to A.0, 100.1 line 2. 3 Restored from 
A. 0.100.1 line 3; A.0.101.17 i 8-9; A.0. 101. 47 line 2; Michel, 
WO 1 (1947-52) p. 456 i 2; and Layard, ICC 87 lines 3-5. 
4 [ A e\-a man z[u.abJ: restored from A.0. 101.17 i 3 and cf. the 
note to A.0. 100.1 line 4. 4 be! nemeqi hasJsh restored from 
A.0.101.17 i 4 and cf. the note to A.0. 100.1 line 4. 5 saqu 
namftri: restored from A.0.101.17 i 4-5 and see the note to 
that passage. 6 bel hegalli: restored from A.0. 101. 47 line 4 
and cf, the note to A.0. 100.1 line 6. 7 muma^ir gimri: 
restored from A.0.101.17 i 9 and cf. the note to A.0.100.1 



line 7. 8 bet tereti: restored from A.0.101.17 i 5 and cf. the 
note to A.0.100.1 line 8. 9 Restored from A.0.100.1 line 9 
and cf. the note to that line. 11 [ilu] mul-ta-lu: restored from 
A.0.101.17 i 7 and cf. the note to A.0.100.1 line 11. The sign 
ta actually looks like ru. See Hawkins' note. 12 [ummi ill 
gal]. mes: restored from A.0.101.17 i 7-8 and cf. the note to 
A.0.100.1 line 12. 12-13 d iNANNA ... Suk-lu-lat: restored from 
A.0.101.17 i 10 and cf. the note to A.0.100.1 line 13. 
13-14 dingir.meS ... aSSur-nSsir-apli: restored from 
A.0. 101. 47 lines 5-7 and A.0.101.17 i 11. 



264 



Ashurnasirpal n A. 0.101. 20 



[assur u d samas] dingir.mes tik-li-su [me]-se- 

[ris ittallakuma] 

[sadani sap-su]-te u mal-ki kur.me[s-sw kima 

qani api uhassisu] 

\kui\-lat KUR.KUR.MES-5W-WW cL-na [sepesu 

useknisa] 

[zanin] nidba.mes a-na [ilT rabuti rubu] 

[ke]-e-nu sd a-na su-te-[sur pars! ekurrat 

matlsu] 

[pit~qu]-du ka-ia-na [sa epset qatisu] 

r«n na-dan zi-bi-[su ill rabuti sa same] 

[w] Ki-te i-ra-mu-ma sanga-[s« ina ekurrati 

ana daris u]- 

ktn-nu [gis].tukul.mes-5w-/iw ez-zu-te [ana 

sirikte belutTsu] 

is-m-ku M-lum-ma-at gis.[tukul.mes-5w 

melam belutTsu] 

ruGifi man.mes-' ~nP sd kib-rat [arbaH 

usarrihusu] 

kur.mes-[(w/)] as-sur pat gim~ri-[su~nu eliS u 

saplis istannanuma] 

gun [u ma]-^da^-ta ^\jQ\j^-\$u-nu ukinnu 

kasid aiiabut assur] 

man dan-nu man kur as~sur [apil tukulti- 

ninurta issak assur sa kullat z&insu] 

i-ni-\ru] ina ga-[si-si urettu pagrT gerisu] 

dumu.dumu sd 10-erin.tah [sakkanak ilT 

rabuti sa sikipti] 

la ma-gi-[ri-su iltakkanuma] 

i-pe-lu gim-ra [liblibbi sa assur-dan sa 

mahazT] 

u-pdt-^tu^-u [ukinnu isreti ina umesuma] 

ina pi-i dingir.mes [rabuti sarrutl belutT 

kussutT usa sarraku] 

be-la-ku na~da-[ku gesraku kabtaku 

surruhaku asaredaku] 

ur-M-na-ku [qarradaku labbaku u zikaraku] 

m as~sur-FAB-A man [dannu sar mat assur nibit 

d sm] 

mi-ig-ri [ d anim namad d adad kaskas Hi 

anaku] 

gis.tukul la p[a-du-u musamqit mat 

nakrutTSu anaku] 

man te-[ J u-u ...] 



him (and) subdued under him] all their lands, (25) 
[provider] of offerings for [the great gods, legiti- 
mate prince], to whom is perpetually [entrusted] 
the proper administration [of the rites of the tem- 
ples of his land, whose deeds and] offerings [the 
great gods of heaven and] underworld love so that 
they (30) established [forever his] priesthood [in 
the temples] , granted [to his dominion] their fierce 
weapons, (and) [made him more marvellous] than 
(any of) the kings of the [four] quarters with 
respect to the splendour of [his weapons (and) the 
radiance of his dominion, (he who) has always 
contested with] all enemies of Assur [above and 
below and imposed] upon [them] tribute [and tax, 
conqueror of the foes of Assur], (35) strong king, 
king of Assyria; [son of TukultT-Ninurta (n), 
vice-regent of Assur, who] defeated [all his ene- 
mies (and) impaled the corpses of his enemies] on 
posts, grandson of Adad-nararT (n), [appointee of 
the great gods, who always achieved the defeat of 
those] insubmissive to him and (thereby) became 
lord of all, [offspring of Assur-dan (n) who] (40) 
opened [towns (and) founded shrines]: 



40b-47) [At that time my nobility, my 
sovereignty, my dominion, (and) my power came 
forth] at the command of the [great] gods; [I am 
king], I am lord, I am praiseworthy, [I am ex- 
alted, I am important, I am magnificent, I am 
foremost], I am a hero, [I am a warrior, I am a 
lion, and I am virile]; Ashurnasirpal, [strong] 
king, [king of Assyria, designate of the god Sin], 
(45) favourite of [the god Anu, loved one of the 
god Adad (who is) almighty among the gods, I], 
the merciless weapon [which lays low lands hostile 
to him, I], the king, capable [in battle, ...] 
Lacuna 



Lacuna 



33 kur,mes-[(wI)] : i n the space no sign is actually visible. 



Ashurnasirpal n A . . 1 1 . 2 1 



265 



21 



The remains of an annalistic text are preserved on two clay tablet 
fragments found at Assur. When only one fragment was available it 
was thought that the broken text might be ascribed to Adad-nararl n 
with the possibility, however, that it could be of any king from 
Assur-dan n to Ashurnasirpal n. The discovery of a duplicate (exem- 
plar 1) now provides evidence which makes it much more probable 
that the king is Ashurnasirpal n. 



CATALOGUE 





Museum 


Ass 


ASSur 


Dimensions 


Lines 




Ex. 


number 


number 


provenance 


(cm) 


preserved 


cpn 


1 


VAT 9752 


2551 


Southern stair room, hB4iv 


11,7x3.7 + 


l'-20' 


c 


2 


VAT 9782 


4533e + m 


NW facade of Assur temple court- 
yard, hD3v; Pedersen, ASsur temple 
library and archive, Nl 


9.8x6.2 + 


2'- 19' 


c 



COMMENTARY 



An ascription to Asn. ii is probable for two reasons, 
the place-names mentioned and certain significant 
phrases. As to the place-names, the River Harmis (line 
10') occurs only in the annals of Asn. n (A.0. 101.1 
iii 2). Barzania (line 16') may be identical with 
Barzanistun (A. 0.101.1 iii 104) and cf. A.0.101.22 line 
3'. The reading of the GN in line IT is uncertain but 
one wonders about Malhi/anu (A. 0.101.19 line 33). In 
ARI 2 p. 80 n. 321 I suggested Iahanu as a reading for 
another GN (line 7'). This GN occurs both in the annals 
of Assur-dan n (A. 0.98.1 line 23) and Asn. n 
(A.0.101.1 iii 71 and A. 0.101.1 iii 78). But there are 
several objections and to those 1 already noted in 



ARI 2 there is now the clear reference to the River 
Harmis which is not in the same area at all as Iahanu. 
The place-name Dikun (line 16') is otherwise unattested. 
As to the significant phrases which argue strongly in 
favour of Asn. ii, in line 14' one can restore with rea- 
sonable confidence a form of me nuppulu, a phrase at- 
tested only for Asn. n (cf. CAD 7 [I/J] p. 154b). The 
word mundahsu (line 4') is attested in Assyrian royal in- 
scriptions beginning with Asn. n. Curiously the phrase 
lisanu buttuqu (line 14') seems to be attested only here 
although other verbs for mutilation (e.g. nakasu) are 
used with lisanu and buttuqu is used of cutting off vari- 
ous other body parts. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 no. 88 (ex. 2, copy) 

1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§397 and 399 (ex. 2, translation) 

1935 Seidmann, MAOG 9/3 p. 7 (ex. 2, study) 

1967 Borger, HKL 1 p. 473 (ex. 2, study) 



1972 Grayson, JNES 31 p. 217a (ex. 2, study) 

1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 3 and 8 (exs. 1-2, study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 xcvin 6 (translation) 

1986 Pedersen, Archives 2 p. 24 no. 79 (ex. 2, provenance) 



TEXT 



Lacuna 

V) [...] adunixx [...] 

2') [... £r]in.mes.hi.a.mes x [...] x fub(l) an(ip 

3') [... u]-se-ri-da-$u-nu-t[e(l) ...] GAz.MEs-su-nu 
thi.a^.mIes] 



Lacuna 

1-5') [...] troops [... I] brought them down [... 1 
inflicted] upon them a major defeat [...] their 
[possessions (and)] their flocks [I carried off. As 
to] their combat troops, [I cut off] their hands [... 
(x + )] 200 of their fighting men [... I] destroyed. 



266 

4') 

5') 



[,..]-su-nu udu se-m-M-nu x [ 
s[i-su\~nu rit-ti-su-nu 

[... (X + )] 2 ME ERIN.MES ti-du-ki-SU-HU X [...] 

r«i-[/2e]-/?/7 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101. 21 
mun-d]ah- 



6') [... ma-d\a-tu set MAN.MES-m kur.kur.mes 

kur.me[s-«]/ am-hur m ir-bi-bu 
7') [• • . ]- r Aar(?)~i-a-«/ s# uru dan-nu-ti-su [...] 
8') [... it-t]i-kil-ma Ki-ia lu ib-bal-kit ina qi-bit 

as-s[ur\ 
9') [...] t'ei-si-ir-su uru-su a-na na-al-ban hi-ri- 

sa ih-ru-us 6 uru. me [§]-/!/ 
10') [... iiysal-bi URu.MES-m set si-di id har-mis sd 

kiJta^-su a-na hu-ub-t[a-a-n]i 
11') [...] x-su-nu udu se-ni-su-nu u-te^-ra a-na 

uru mal-X'l. „-h\a(l)-a-ni uru dan-nu-ti-su- 

nu [...] 
12') [... Arma d is]KUR 5a' gir.bal(*) vgv-su-hu ds- 

gu-um GAZ.MES-su-nu [hiJ.TaI.meS a-c/wA: 5a/- 

la-su-nu n[ig.su.mes-5w-/?w] 
13') [... ti]-se-er-su 1 me 74 lu.erin.mes 

tlla.Tmes />ia su(?)~i-[/a asdar x ma toM/ w- 

sam-q}it 12 a-ku-us Km-MBS-M-nu [(...)] 
14') [x Tnesunu u-na-ap\-pil eme.mes-sw-aw w-tor- 

ft'<7 x [...] 1 me 53 gu.mes-sw-«« u-bat-[tiq ...] 
15') [...]-sid u-sar-di 20 x [...]-sw a-wa zi-qi-pi u- 

za-q\i-ip ...] 

16') [...] x KUR-e dan-ni 5 ak-[...] uru bar-za-ni-a 

uru di-ku-un [...] 
17') [...] mar-si-su-nu x [... a]p-pul a-qur [...] 

18') [...] x s/tf&' na 4 x [... ti\-ka!-!u-[u-ni(7) ...] 
19') [...Hii(?)-w6 a-/?[a(?) ...] x [...] 
20') [...]xx[...] 
Lacuna 



6'-15') [...] the tribute of the kings of lands (and) 
mountains I received. Irbibu [... of the city 
...h]anu, which was his fortified city, [...] trusted 
[in his own strength] and rebelled against me. By 
the command of the god As[sur» my lord, I 
marched against him (and)] besieged him. Around 
his city he had dug a moat. (10') I surrounded it 
with six redoubts [...] the cities on the banks of 
the River Harmis, downstream from it, I plun- 
dered. I carried off their [possessions (and)] their 
flocks. [I marched] to the city Mal[(...)h]anu, 
their fortified city, [...]. I thundered [like the god 
Ad]ad, the devastator, against them (and) inflicted 
upon them a major defeat, [I carried off] their 
booty, possessions [and flocks ... I] let him go 
free. [I captured] alive 174 soldiers. [N I] felled 
[with the sword], twelve I flayed of their skins, [N 
I] blinded (and) cut out their tongues, [...], 153 I 
beheaded (lit. 'cut off their necks'), [...] I caused 
[their blood] to flow, 20 [...] 1 impaled on stakes 



16-17') [...], a mighty mountain, five [...] the city 
Barzania, the city Dikun [... I carried off] their 
herds [...] I ravaged, destroyed [...] 



18'-20') [...] 
Lacuna 



stone [... which] they held [...] 



22 



This fragmentary text, on a piece of clay tablet from Assur, is clearly 
part of an annalistic text of one of the kings from Assur-dan n to 
Ashurnasirpal n, and of these monarchs Ashurnasirpal n appears the 
most probable. 



9'-10' Cf. A.0.99.2 lines 54-55 and 63. 12M (ex. 2 broken) 
gir.bal = rihsu: text has gir.bul which must be an error since 



Adadsa rihsi/rahisu is well attested in texts of Asn. n. I know 
of no logogram gIr-bul. 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101. 22 



267 



COMMENTARY 



An ascription to Asn. n is suggested by the GNs. In 
line 8' uru DU6-/e(*)-e might be read Tille = Til-uli (see 
Grayson, BiOr 33 [1976] p. 144), a city attested only 
beginning with texts of Asn. n (A.0. 101.1 ii 87; 
A. 0.101. 17 iv 1; A. 0.101. 19 lines 35 and 37). In line 3' 
uru bar-za-ni-is(*)-tu-[(un)] appears otherwise only in a 
text of Asn. ii (A. 0.101.1 iii 104 and cC A. 0.101. 21 line 
16'). The city Kahat is attested only in texts of TN. o 



(A.0.100.5 line 117 and A. 0.100. 9 line 5) among texts 
in this volume. The tablet fragment (VAT 10944 = Ass 
4428) measures 9.7x6.2+ cm and was found in the 
northern part of the Assur temple courtyard, hD3v. It 
belongs to the collection which Pedersen describes as 
the Assur temple library and archive, Nl. The inscrip- 
tion has been collated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 no. 87 (copy) 
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§397-98 (translation) 
1935 Seidmann, MAOG 9/3 p. 7 n. 1 (study) 
1961-62 Dossin, AAAS 11/12 p. 201 (study) 
1967 Borger, HKL 1 p. 473 (study) 



1972 Grayson, JNES 31 p. 217 (study) 

1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 7-8 (study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 ci 71 (translation) 

1986 Pedersen, Archives 2 p. 22 no. 50 (provenance) 



TEXT 



Lacuna 

10 [...] xsd ta vtar-sD m [...] 

2') [...] fsa-lami mu sd m Gi5.*M*K/-tf-r A (?)~i-[...] 

3') [... n]a-i-ri a-Iik uru bar-za-ni-is(*)-tu-[(un) 

4') [... NIG.S]u.MES-5W-A?tt NIG.GA.MES-SW-rtW 

GVt.MES-su-nu udu [senisunu ...] 
5') [...] kar-me li-ier sag.du muq-tab-l[hsti-nu 

6') [...] sd kur.kur na-i-ri anse.kur.ra.mes 

anse.[mes ...] 
7) [„.]-f~(f\-ni ina izi gibil ap-pul a-qur ana DU6 

[u karme liter] 



8') 


[... 


9') 


[••• 


10') 


[.. 


11') 


[•■ 




su- 


12') 


[•■ 


13') 


[••• 


Lacuna 



*]-bi-ru uru D\j 6 -le(*)-e it-ta-bal~ku-t[u ... 
u\-se-li-ti a-na uru ka-ha-at u-se-[li-u ... 
.] x is-tu uru ni-nu-a at-tu-mu$fo> [...] 
. sal-l\a~su-nu NiG.su.MES-sii-«« gu 4 .mes- 
-nu udu s[e-ni-su-nu ...] 
.]-r//(?) ar^-ki-sil ir-ta-tu gaz.m[es ...] 
.] u-te^-ru-ni [...] 



Lacuna 

Y-T) which from the time of [...] the statue with 
the name of Tig!ath-pil[eser .... To the lands 
N]airi I marched. The city Barzanistuf(un) / con- 
quered ... I carried off] their [property], posses- 
sions, oxen, sheep, [... (and)] turned (it) into ruin 
hills. The heads of [their] warriors [I cut off ...] 
of the lands Nairi, horses, mules, [...] I burnt, 
ravaged, destroyed, (and) [turned] into ruin hills. 



8-13') [...] the city Tille rebelled [... A garrison at 
...] they stationed. At the city Kahat they sta- 
tioned [a garrison ...]. Setting out from Nineveh 
the River [Tigris I crossed, / conquered the city ... 
I carried off] their booty, possessions, oxen, 
sheep, [...] they pursued him. [I massacred] many 
of them. [...] brought back 
Lacuna 



2' The traces certainly support a reading TaT but a form of 
TN.'s name is still possible. Cf. A.0. 101.1 i 104-105. 3' is: 
text has sid. See Grayson, JNES 31 (1972) p. 218b. 4' udu 
[smsunu]: see Meissner, OLZ 26 (1923) 159. 7 [...]-r a \-ni: 



Luckenbill restored Barzani (also he read this in line 3'). 
8' [...]-bi-ru\ this could be the end of a GN or, as Seidmann 
noted, of the eponymy Likberu (Adn. n). 8' le: text has se. 
See Grayson, JNFS 31 (1972) p. 220b. 12' ir-ta-tu: from redul 



268 



Ashurnasirpal n A.0.101.23 



23 



This text, the so-called Standard Inscription, was engraved together 
with scenes on hundreds of huge stone reliefs which lined the walls of 
the North West Palace at Calah, the same text being repeated on each 
slab, with some variation. A parallel text is included as part of most 
other long inscriptions of Ashurnasirpal, including A. 0.101,1 (see the 
commentary to that text for details). Such slavish copying shows con- 
siderable lack of imagination on the part of the royal scribes. While 
the text is straightforward, the original provenance of each object is 
not. But in recent years the research of a few art historians and ar- 
chaeologists has made great advances in revealing the original posi- 
tions of the slabs in the various rooms of the palace (see the commen- 
tary). 

The text begins with the king's name and titles (lines l-5a). This is 
followed by a grammatically awkward temporal clause containing epi- 
thets and a general geographic description of the king's conquests 
(lines 5b-14a). The text concludes with the building of Calah and its 
palace (lines 14b-22). Among the numerous exemplars, there are vari- 
ations of which some are quite significant. Instead of 'to the land 
Urartu' (line 9) many exemplars have 'to the interior of the land Nirib' 
and de Filippi has cogently argued that those exemplars with Urartu 
were written later in the reign. Paley labels the inscriptions with Nirib 
Type A' and those with Urartu Type B'. Other major variants are 
given in the notes to individual lines. Minor variants are ignored since 
it would be impractical to list all the variants from hundreds of exem- 
plars. 

Careful scrutiny of the numerous objects upon which this text is 
engraved has dispelled a major misconception about variants. It is ob- 
vious that the scribes assigned the task of engraving the text on each 
object were allotted a certain space on the relief and that this space 
was the same on each accompanying slab so that they would match 
visually. Many scribes found it impossible to fit the entire text into the 
allotted space but they were not allowed to exceed the limit nor, obvi- 
ously, could they erase the stone and start again. Thus there are many 
exemplars with, respectively, only lines 1-21, 1-20, 1-19, 1-18, 1-17, 
1-16, 1-15, 1-14, 1-13, 1-12, 1-11, 1-10, 1-9, or 1-8. Shorter ver- 
sions are not known to me. Often the scribe was forced to stop in 
mid-sentence. The scribe was not allowed (or did not wish) to continue 
the text on the next slab; the text on each slab begins with line 1. This 
fact makes attempts to relate the version of the text found on a given 
slab to a particular room very doubtful. 



CATALOGUE 



Ex. 



Museum/Excavation 
number 



Key 

reference 



Albany 1 

Aleppo, private possession 

Amherst 1 + Minneapolis 1 
Amherst 2 
Amherst 3 



Meuszyriski, Arch. Anz. p. 431 

Lidzbarski, Ephemeris fur Semitische and 

Epigraphik 3 (1909) pp. 184-85 

Meuzyriski, Bagh, For. 2 pp. 60-61 H-33 

Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 pp. 39-40 S-7 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For, 2 p. 68 L- 17 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101. 23 



269 



Ex. 



Museum/Excavation 
number 



Key 

reference 



6 


Amherst 4 + Hartford 1917.83 




7 


AO 19.845 




8 


AO 19.846 




9 


AO 19.847 




10 


AO 19.848 + Bombay 8 




11 


AO 19.851 




12 


Ash 1982,224 




13 


(deleted) 




14 


BCM 588 '65 




15 


BM 90760 (1979-12-20,338) 




16 


BM 98062 + Dublin 




17 


BM 98063 




18 


BM 98064 




19 


BM 102400 




20 


BM 102487 + Copenhagen AS 1 




21 


BM 108836(1914-4-7,2) 




22 


BM 118804 




23 


BM 118875 




24 


BM 118906 




25 


BM 118930 




26 


BM 124530 




27 


BM 124531 




28 


BM 124532+124533 




29 


BM 124534+124535 




30 


BM 124536+124537 




31 


BM 124538+124539 




32 


BM 124540+ 124541+ in siiu 




33 


BM 124542+ 124543 + in situ 




34 


BM 124544+124545 




35 


BM 124546+124547 




36 


BM 124548+124549 




37 


BM 124550+ 135736 + Genoa 1 + IB 15 
Mechitharisten (Vienna) + Nimrud 20 


+ 


38 


BM 124551 + 124552 




39 


BM 124553+ 124554 + K 8543 




40 


BM 124555+124556 




41 


BM 124557+124558 




42 


BM 124559 




43 


BM 124560 + FM (Cambridge) 2 




44 


BM 124562 




45 


BM 124563 (see ex. 203) 




46 


BM 124564 




47 


BM 124565 




48 


BM 124566 




49 


BM 124567 




50 


BM', 124568 




51 


BM 124569 




52 


BM 124575 




53 


BM 124576 




54 


BM 124577 




55 


BM 124579 




56 


BM 124581 + ROM 939.11.2 




57 


BM 124584 




58 


BM 124585 




59 


BM 124586 




60 


BM 139983(1983-1-1,344) 




61 


BM 139984(1983-1-1,345) 




62 


BM 139999(1983-1-1,351) 




63 


Bombay 2 + Nimrud 69-7 1 + 78-79 




64 


Bombay 3 




65 


Bombay VAM 77 




66 


Bowdoin 487 




67 


Bowdoin 489 




68 


Bowdoin 1860. 1 + Montreal 64.EA.3 + 
Hartford 1955.101 




69 


Bowdoin 1860.5 




70 


Bristol H-794 





Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 60 H-32 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 61 H-b-2 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 29 C-4 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 57 H-6 

Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 62 Z-6 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 33 D-2 

Meuszyriski, Bagh, For. 2 p. 25 ('Ash. 2') B-32 

Van Soldt, Oudheidkundige Mededelingen uit het Rijksmuseum 

van Oudheden te Leiden 63 (1982) pp. 48-49 

George, Iraq 41 (1979) p. 123 

Unpublished 

Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 pp. 9-10 1-3 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 129 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 129 

Meuszyriski, Arch. Anz. p. 448 

Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 pp. 17-18 1-17 

Unpublished 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 131 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 131 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 129 

Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 pp. 84-85 D-9 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 128 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 128 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 130 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 130 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 130 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 130 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 21 B-ll 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 21 B- 10 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 130 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 130 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 130 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 pp. 20-21 B-6 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 130 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 130 and 

cf. Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 84 B-4 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 130 

Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 77 

WFL-19 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 130 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 24 B-30 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 128 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 128 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 128 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 129 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 129 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 129 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p, 129 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 129 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 129 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 129 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 129 

Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 76 WFL-14 

Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 pp. 16-17 1-16 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 129 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 129 

de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977) p. 129 

Unpublished 

Unpublished 

Unpublished 

Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 46 S-29 

Paley, Ashur-nasir-pal p. 59 

Gadd, Stones, pp. 231-32 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 60 H-30 

Meuszyriski, Arch. Anz. p. 438 

Paley, Ashur-nasir-pal pp. 54-55 

Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 77 WFL-16 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 85 F-14c 



270 



Ashurnasirpal ii A.0. 101.23 





Museum/Excavation 


Ex. 


number 


71 


Bristol H-795 


72 


Bristol H-796 


73 


Brooklyn 55.145 


74 


Brooklyn 55.147 


75 


Brooklyn 55.148 


76 


Brooklyn 55.153 


77 


Brooklyn 55.154 


78 


Brooklyn 55.155 


79 


Brooklyn 55.156 


80 


Burlington 1 


81 


Cincinnati L 1962.14 


82 


Copenhagen AS 3 + St. Louis 1 


83 


Copenhagen 1723 + Nimrud 25-28 


84 


Dresden 19 


85 


Dresden 21 


86 


Dresden 22 


87 


Edinburgh 1 


88 


FM (Cambridge) E45-1927 


89 


GE 1 


90 


GE 2 + Leiden B 1939/2.1 


91 


GE 3 


92 


Glasgow 28/35 + MMA 32. 143. 1 1 + Nimrud 29 


93 


Hanover 1/2 


94 


Hanover 3 


95 


Hanover 4 


96 


Hanover 5 


97 


Hanover 6 


98 


Hanover 7 


99 


Hanover 


100 


Hanover 8 + MMA 3 1.72.1 


101 


IB 14989 


102 


IM 


103 


IM-t- Vatican 10 


104 


Istanbul 4 


105 


Istanbul 5 


106 


Istanbul 6 


107 


Istanbul 4649 


108 


Istanbul, squeeze 


109 


K 8887 


110 


Kansas 1 


111 


LA M. 7 1.73.1 


112 


LA M. 71.73. 3a 


113 


LA M. 71.73. 3b 


114 


Layard 


115 


Layard 


116 


Layard 


117 


Layard 


118 


Layard 


119 


LBAF 


120 


Lisbon 118 


121 


LA 66.4 (Newcastle 1)+ Nimrud 32 


122 


LA 66.4 (Newcastle 2) 


123 


LA 66.4 (Newcastle 3) 


124 


LA 66.4 (Newcastle 4) 


125 


Lyon 531 


126 


Manchester VII-A-8 + Nimrud 61 


127 


MFAB 35.731 


128 


MFAB 35.753 


129 


MFAB 81.56 


130 


Middlebury 1 


131 


MMA 31.72.2 


132 


MMA 31.72,3 


133 


MMA 32.143,4 


134 


MMA 32.143.6 


135 


MMA 32.143.7 


136 


MMA 32.143.8 


137 


Mosul 3 


138 


Mosul 



Key 

reference 



Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 56 H-2 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 56 H-l 

Paley and Soboiewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 75 WFL-5 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 pp. 70-71 L-35 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For, 2 p. 71 L-36 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 58 H-14 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 57 H-5 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For, 2 p. 57 H-4 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For, 2 p. 37 F-6 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For, 2 p. 74 N-5 

Unpublished 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 68 L-18 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 29 C-7 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 48 G-30 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 22 B-16 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 38 F-9 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 48 G-29 

Paley, Ashur-nasir-pai pp. 52 and 90 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 49 G-31 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 67 and 

Paley and Soboiewski, Bagh. For. 10 pp. 85-86 L-6 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 61 H-34 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 29 C-8 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 pp. 45-46 G-ll 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 67 L-l 1 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 45 G-9 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 61 H-35 

Paley and Soboiewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 75 WFL-3 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 59 H-23 

Stearns, AfO Beih. 15 p. 33 and pi. 32 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 67 and 

Paley and Soboiewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 86 L-7 

Paley, Ashur-nasir-pal p. 58 

Paley, Ashur-nasir-pal p. 73 

Paley and Soboiewski, Bagh. For. 10 pp. 10-11 1-4 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 30C-11 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 50 G-e-2 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 pp. 49-50 G-e-2 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 50 G-c-4 

Bezold, ZK 1 (1884) pp. 269-70 n. 1 

Bezold, Cat. 3 p. 969 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 67 L-10 

Unpublished 

Unpublished 

Unpublished 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 24 B-29 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 30 C-c 1 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 30 C-c-2 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 30 C-c- 3 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 30 C-c-4 

Grayson, Ladders pp. 123-25 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 pp. 57-58 H- 10 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 38 F- 16 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 60 H-31 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 61 H-b-1 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 66 LI -2 

Ley, RT 17 (1895) pp. 55-56 and 199, pi. after p. 96 

Paley and Soboiewski, Bagh. For. 10 pp. 44-45 S-26 

Paley and Soboiewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 73 WFL-2 

Meuszyriski, Arch. Anz. p. 436 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 75 N-8 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 67 L-8 

Paley and Soboiewski, Bagh. For. 10 pp. 48-49 S-d-1 

Paley and Soboiewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 41 S-ll 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 45 G-8 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 45 G-7 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 50 G-d-2 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 30 C-b-2 

Paley and Soboiewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 78 WFL-24 

Paley and Soboiewski, Bagh. For. 10 pp. 12-13 1-8 



Ashurnasirpal ii A.O.101.23 



271 





Museum/Excavation 


Ex. 


number 


139 


Munich 3 


140 


Munich 5 


141 


Munich 7 + Nimrud 6 


142 


Newark 82152a-b 


143 


Nimrud 24 + VA938 


144 


Nimrud 30 + 3 1 + 33 + Williamstown 2 


145 


Nimrud 34 


146 


Nimrud 35 + 36 


147 


Nimrud 62 


148 


Nimrud 63-68 + 77 + 1934 


149 


Nimrud 81-82 


150 


Nimrud 85 


151 


Nimrud 86 


152 


O270 


153 


272 


154 


273 


155 


274 


156 


275 


157 


277 


158 


Fillet 21 


159 


Fillet XXI 


160 


Sotheby's 


161 


Stockholm 856 


162 


SF 3972 


163 


UM 29-21-1 


164 


VA 939a 


165 


VA 939b 


166 


VA 939c 


167 


VA940 


168 


VA942 


169 


VA 943 


170 


VA944 


171 


VA 945 


172 


VA 946 


173 


VA 947 


174 


VA 948a 


175 


VA 948b 


176 


VA951 


177 


VA952 


178 


VA959 


179 


VA 3863 


180 


WAG 21.8 


181 


Williamstown 1 


182 


Worcester 1930.32 


183 


YBC 2445 


184 


Zurich 1910 


185-87 


Zurich 1911-13 


188 


In situ + Amherst 5 + Magdalen + Nimrud 41 + 




YBC 1854.3 + 4 + 5 


189 


Insitu + AO 19.849 + 22. 198 + BM 98061 + 




Detroit 47.181 + Nimrud 42 + 43 + 45 


190 


In situ + AO 19.868 + Bombay F8 


191 


In situ + Ash 1950,241 + Copenhagen AS 2 




+ IM 


192 


In situ + Ash 1982,225 (1850) + Bombay F9 (3) 




+ Nimrud 48 


193 


In situ + Bern 12.2.63 


194 


In situ + BM 102401 


195 


In situ + BM 108833 


196 


In situ + BM 118803 


197 


In situ + BM 1 1 8874 + Chicago OI 


198 


In situ + BM 118876+118877 


199 


In situ + BM 11 8921 + Bombay F10 + 




Lausanne (Sotheby's) + Nimrud 49 


200 


In situ + BM 118926+118927 


201 


In situ + BM 118928 + Nimrud 7-8 


202 


In situ + BM 124561 


203 


In situ + BM 124563 (see ex. 45) 


204 


In situ + BM 124574 + Bombay 9+IM (3 pieces) 


205 


In situ + BM 124578 



Key 

reference 



Meuszyriski, Bagh. For, 2 p. 67 L-5 

Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 64 Z-b-2 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 pp. 56-57 H-3 

Unpublished 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 24 B-26a 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 pp. 36-37 F- 2 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 70 L-34 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 70 L-33 

Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 45 S-27 

Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 pp. 45-46 S-28 

Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 81 WJ-1 

Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 74 WFL-8 

Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 76 WFL-12 

Meuszyriski, Arch. Anz. p. 439 



Meuszyriski, 
Meuszyriski, 
Meuszyriski, 
Meuszyriski, 
Meuszyriski, 



.439 
, 439 
,439 
, 439 
. 439 



10 p. 48 S-c-3 

-2 



, Arch. Anz. p. 

, Arch. Anz. p. 

, Arch. Anz. p. 

, Arch. Anz. p. 

, Arch. Anz. p. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 28 C- 
Paley, Ashur-nasir-pal p. 59 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 76 N-I5 
Sigrist and Vuk, Franciscanum pp. 45-59 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 74 N-3 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 46 G-14 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 46 G- 15 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 46 G- 16 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 36 F-l 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 pp. 59-60 H-27 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 30 C-I3 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For, 10 pp. 47-48 S-b-1 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 48 S-b-2 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 pp. 75-76 N-12 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 76 N-13 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 76 N- 16 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 76 N- 17 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 60 H-29 
Meuszyriski, Arch. Anz. p. 434 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 76 WFL-13 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 85 L-4 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For, 2 p. 47 G- 18 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 73 WFL-1 
Meuszyriski, Bagh, For. 2 p. 76 N-19 
Unpublished 

Asher-Greve, Genien und Krieger pp. 12-15 
Asher-Greve, Genien und Krieger pp. 15-26 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 pp. 24-25 1-26 

Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 pp. 23-24 1-24 

Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 pp. 20-21 1-20 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 pp. 18-19 1-18 

Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 pp. 27-28 1-29 



Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 75 N-7 

Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 42 S-18 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 68 L- 16 

Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For 

Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For 

Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For 

Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For 



10 p. 48 S-c-4 
10 pp. 60-61 Z-l 
10 p. 61 Z-2 
10 pp. 22-23 1-23 



Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 46 G-13 
Meus/yriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 48 G-25 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh, For, 10 p. 64 Z-a I 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For, 10 pp. 38-39 S-3 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh, For, 10 pp. 62-63 Z-8 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 69 L-20 



272 



Ashurnasirpal n A. 0.101. 23 



Museum/Excavation 



Ex. 


number 




206 


[n situ + BM 124580 + Houston 80.53 
t Sandon Hall 2) + Nimrud 40 




207 


n silu+BM 124582 + IM (5 frgms.) 




208 


In situ + BM 124583 + Bryn Athyn 09.SP.1549 
+ Istanbul 22 + Nimrud 46 




209 


In situ + BM 135 156 + Nimrud 38 




210 


n situ + Bombay 1 




211 


[n situ + Bowdoin 1860-2 




212 


n situ + Bowdoin 1860.4 (490) 




213 


[n situ + British Rail + Hamburg 1965,101 
+ Nimrud 58-59a-b 




214 


n situ + Brooklyn 55.146 




215 


[n situ + Brooklyn 55.149 




216 


n situ + Brooklyn 55.150 




217 


[n situ + Brooklyn 55.151 




218 


[n situ + Brooklyn 55.152 




219 


n situ + Bowdoin 491.2 




220 


[n situ + Chicago A 1 + Nimrud 55-57 




221 


En situ + Christ Church 1 




222 


In situ + Cleveland 43.246 




223 


[n situ + Copenhagen 836 




224 


n situ + Copenhagen 836a 




225 


In situ + Dresden 20 




226 


[n situ + FM (Cambridge) E1-1908 + IM 




227 


n situ + FM (Cambridge) E2-1908 + MMA 32.143. 


12 


228 


n situ + FM (Cambridge) E3-1942 




229 


n situ + GE 4 + 5 + MMA 32.143.14 
\ Nimrud 53 + Warsaw 193335 




230 


nsitu + IM 28143 




231 


n situ + Istanbul 7037+ IM 29059 




232 


n situ + IM + Santa Barbara 




233 


In situ + IM + Norfolk 56.22 




234 


n situ + Istanbul 7036 




235 


n situ + Kimbell 




236 


n situ + Kimbell 




237 


n situ + MM A 17. 190.2077 + 2078 




238 


nsitu + MMA 17.190.2079 




239 


nsitu f-MMA 17.190.2080*2081 




240 


nsitu + MMA 17.190.2082 




241 


In situ + MMA 32.143.3 




242 


n situ + Munich 1 




243 


n situ + Munich 2 




244 


n situ + Munich 4 




245 


n situ + New York + Tokyo 




246 


n situ + Nimrud 1 




247 


n situ + Nimrud 3-5 




248 


n situ + Nimrud 11-17 




249 


n situ + Nimrud 18-19 + 278 




250 


n situ + Nimrud 21-22 




251 


n situ + Nimrud 44 + Rochester 
H. 10 + Vatican 9 




252 


n situ + Nimrud 47 + 5 1 




253 


[n situ + Nimrud 50 + Norfolk 56.49.1a 




254 


[n situ + Nimrud 52 + Ottawa 2918 (ROM 950.6.1) 




255 


In situ + Nimrud 54 + 80 + 89a-d 




256 


In situ + Nimrud 60 + 73-76 




257 


[n situ 




258 


In situ + Nimrud 88 + YBC 1854.1 




259 


In situ + O 271 




260 


n situ + Princeton 1 




261 


n situ + VA 941 




262 


n situ + VA 949 




263 


[n situ \- VA 950 




264 


n situ + VA 8747 




265 


n situ + Virginia 




266 


[n situ + WAG 21.9 




267 


[n situ + YBC 1854. 2a-b 




268 


n situ 




269 


n situ 




270 


[n situ 





Key 

reference 



Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 22 1-22 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 22 B^ 15 

Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 pp. 25-26 1-27 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 pp. 74-75 N-6 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 22 B- 13 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 42 S-17 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 53 T-6 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 pp. 43-44 S-23 



Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 pp 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 

Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 pp 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 
Reade, BiOr 41 (1984)484 
Reade, BiOr 41 (1984)484 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh, 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 pp 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 



For. 10 p. 24 1-25 
For. 10 p. 41 S-12 
For. 10 p. 41 S-13 

For. 10 p. 53 T-7 
For. 10 pp. 53-54 T-8 
22 B-14 

For. 10 pp. 40-41 S-10 
58 H-12 

For. 10 p. 39 S-6 
62 H-d-2 
77 P-4 

For. 10 p. 52 T-2 
For. 10 p. 9 1-2 
For. 10 pp. 8-9 1-1 
. 21-22 B-12 
For. 10 pp. 26-27 1-28 

34 E 4 
61-62 H-c-1 
47 G-19 

For. 10 p. 84C-10 
77 P-3 



Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 pp 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 pp 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 



For. 10 pp. 46-47 S-a-1 
For. 10 p. 38 S-2 
For. 10 p. 47S-a-2 
For. 10 p. 53 T-5 
For. 10 p. 28 1-30 
For. 10 p. 61 Z-3 
For. 10 p. 63 Z-9 
For. 10 pp. 41-42 S-15 
For. 10 pp. 15-16 1-15 
60 H-28 
62 H-d-1 
. 44-45 G-5 
47 G-20 

23 B-21 
For. 10 pp. 19-20 1-19 

For. 10 p. 15 1-14 
For. 10 p. 12 1-7 
For. 10 pp. 21-22 1-21 
For. 10 p. 40 S-9 
For. 10 p. 44 S-24 
For. 10 p. 74 WFL-6 
For. 10 p. 40S-8 
For. 10 p. 38 S-l 

23-24 B-24 

38-39 F-17 
For. 10 p. 14 1-12 
For. 10 pp. 14-15 1-13 
34 E 3 

For. 10 p. 41 S-14 
77P-2 
For. 10 p. 39 S-4 

24 B-25 

24 B-28 

25 B-31 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101. 23 



273 



Ex. 



Museum /Excavation 
number 



Key 

reference 



271 ] 


n situ 


272 1 


n situ 


273 1 


n situ 


274 ] 


n situ 


275 ] 


n situ 


276 ] 


n situ 


277 ] 


n situ 


278 ] 


n situ 


279 1 


n situ 


280 I 


n situ 


281 


n situ 


282 ] 


n situ 


283 1 


n situ 


284 ] 


n situ 


285 


n situ 


286 ] 


n situ 


287 J 


n situ 


288 


In situ 


289 


n situ 


290 


n situ 


291 ] 


n situ 


292 ] 


n situ 


293 


n situ 


294 ] 


[n situ 


295 


[n situ 


296 


n situ 


297 


n situ 


298 


[n situ 


299 


[n situ 


300 


[n situ 


301 


[n situ + IM 29053 


302 


n situ 


303 


[n situ 


304 


[n situ 


305 


n situ 


306 


[n situ 


307 


[n situ 


308 


[n situ 


309 


n situ 


310 


n situ 


311 


n situ 


312 


n situ 


313 


n situ 


314 


n situ 


315 


n situ 


316 


\n situ 


317 


m situ (2 pieces) 


318 


!n situ 


319 


m situ 


320 


in situ 


321 


!n situ 


322 


!n situ 


323 


In situ 


324 


In situ 


325 


[n situ 


326 


[n situ 


327 


n situ 


328 


[n situ 


329 


n situ 


330 


n situ 


331 


n situ 


332 


n situ 


333 


n situ 


334 


In situ 


335 


[n situ 


336 


En situ 


337 


In situ 


338 


In situ 


339 


[n situ 


340 


.n situ 



Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 
Meuszyriski, Bagh, For. 
Meuszynski, Bagh. For. 
Meuszynski, Bagh. For, 
Meuszynski, Bagh. For. 
Meuszynski, Bagh. For, 
Meuszynski, Bagh. For. 
Meuszynski, Bagh, For. 
Meuszynski, Bagh. For. 
Meuszynski, Bagh. For. 
Meuszynski, Bagh. For. 
Meuszynski, Bagh. For, 
Meuszynski, Bagh. For, 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For, 
Meuszynski, Bagh. For, 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For, 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For, 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For, 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For, 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For, 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For, 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For, 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh, For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh, For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Palcy and Sobolewski, 
Paley and Sobolewski, 
Paley and Sobolewski, 
Paley and Sobolewski, 
Paley and Sobolewski, 
Paley and Sobolewski, 
Paley and Sobolewski, 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For, 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh, For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For 



.2 p. 


25 B-b-3 


.2 p. 


25 B-b-4 


.2 p. 


29C-5 


.2 p. 


30C-10 


.2 p. 


30 C-b-1 


. 2pp 


. 32-33 D-l 


.2 p. 


33 D-3 


.2 p. 


33 D-4 


.2 P . 


33 D 5 


.2 p. 


33 D-6 


.2 p. 


33 D-8 


.2 p. 


33 D-d-3 


.2 p. 


33 D-d-4 


.2 p. 


34 E-5 


.2 p. 


34 e-c-3 


.2 p. 


34 e-c-4 


.2 p. 


37F-5 


.2 p. 


38 F~12 


.2 p. 


38F-13 


.2 p. 


38 F~14 


.2 p. 


38 F-15 


.2 p. 


44G-1 


.2 p. 


47 G-17 


.2 p. 


47 G-21 


.2 p. 


47 G-22 


.2 p. 


47 G-23 


. 2 pp. 47-48 G-24 


.2 p. 


48 G-26 


.2 p. 


49 G-a-3 


.2 p. 


49 G-a-4 


.2 p. 


49 G-c-1 


.2 p. 


50 G-e-3 


.2 p. 


51 G-e-4 


.2 p. 


58H-11 


.2 p. 


58 H-15 


.2 p. 


58 H-16 


. 2 pp. 58-59 H-17 


.2 p. 


59 H-17a 


.2 p. 


59H-18 


.2 p. 


59 H-19 


.2 p. 


59 H-20 


.2 p. 


59 H-21 


.2 p. 


59 H-22 


.2 p. 


59 H-24 


.2 p. 


62 H-c-3 


.2 p. 


62 H-c-4 


Bagh 


. For. 10 p. 11 1-5 


Bagh 


, For. 10 pp. 11-12 1-6 


Bagh 


. For. 10 p. 13 1-9 


Bagh 


. For. 10 p. 13 1-10 


Bagh 


. For. 10 pp. 13-14 1-11 


Bagh 


. For. 10 p. 28 1-31 


Bagh 


. For. 10 pp. 28-29 1-32 


.2 p. 


67 L-9 


.2 p. 


68 L-14 


.2 p. 


68 L-15 


.2 p. 


69 L-19 


.2 p. 


69L-21 + 22 


.2 p. 


69 L-23 


-.2 p. 


69 L-24 


-.2 p. 


69 L-25 


-.2 p. 


69 L-26 


-.2 p. 


69 L-27 


-.2 p. 


69 L-28 


-.2 p. 


69 L-29 


-.2 p. 


69 L-30 


.2 p. 


70L-31 


-■ 2p 


70 L-32 


'■2p 


74N-2 


'■2p 


74N-4 



274 



Ashurnasirpal ii A.0.101.23 





Museum/Excavation 


Ex. 


number 


341 


In situ 


342 


In situ 


343 


In situ 


344 


In situ 


345 


In situ 


346 


In situ 


347 


In situ 


348 


In situ 


349 


In situ 


350 


In situ 


351 


In situ 


352 


In situ 


353 


In situ 


354 


In situ 


355 


In situ 


356-406 


In situ 



Key 

re f ci c nee 



Meuszyriski, Bagh. For, 2 p. 75 N-9 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 75 N-10 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 76 N-14a 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 76 N 14 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 76 N- 18 
Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 p. 77 P-l 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 39 S-5 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 pp. 42-43 S-19 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 43 S-20 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 43 S-2I 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 43 S-22 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 44 S-25 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 p. 49 S-d-2 
Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 pp. 63-64 Z-10 
Paley, JANES 19 (1987 [1990]) pp. 135-47 
Unpublished 



COMMENTARY 



The master text is based on the master text in the edi- 
tion by de Filippi, Assur 1/7 (1977), which in turn 
depended upon the BM exs. The line numbering follows 
that used by Layard and King (and de Filippi) in order 
to facilitate cross-references. 

The catalogue and bibliography require some expla- 
nation. While hundreds of exs. of this text are now 
known, they do not vary significantly from one another 
other than the major vars. already mentioned in the in- 
troduction. The enormous task of sorting out the 
numerous reliefs which bear all or part of this text and 
identifying the provenances has been undertaken by ar- 
chaeologists and art historians, notably Meuszyriski, 
Paley, Reade, and Sobolewski, and is beyond the limits 
of this edition. In the bibliography I have included the 
works of these scholars, although they are not usually 
primarily concerned with the text. I have added 'ob- 
jects' as opposed to 'text* in parentheses after such en- 
tries to give some guidance to the reader. I also do not 
give a full bibliography but only the most important or 



more recent references. 

In the catalogue I have listed only the 
museum/excavation no. and the 'key* publication. By 
'key' I usually mean the most recent discussion in print 
(where earlier bibliography and other information can 
be found). The exs. are listed in the following order: 

1) alphabetically according to museum/excavation no.; 

2) in situ + ... alphabetically as in 1; 3) in situ objects, 
alphabetically and numerically according to the rooms 
in the North West Palace as reconstructed by 
Meuszyhski, Paley, and Sobolewski; 4) late additions. 
It should be noted that in this list the plus sign includes 
cases where objects do not join physically (or for prac- 
tical reasons cannot be tested for joins) but good evi- 
dence has been given for placing them together. This is 
in contrast to the normal practice in this volume (and 
series) of using the plus sign in parentheses ( + ) to indi- 
cate such cases. For obvious reasons no scores are given 
for this text. Most exs. have been collated either against 
the original or from photos. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1851 Layard, ICC pis. 1-11 (text) 

1902 King, AKA pp. 212-21 (text) 

1907 Le Gac, Asn. pp. 152-70 (text) 

1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§485-89 (text, translation) 

1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 39-42 (text) 

1976 Grayson, AR1 2 ci 13 (text, translation) 

1976 Meuszyriski, Arch. Anz. (objects) 

1976 Paley, Ashur-nasir-pal (objects, text) 

1977 de Filippi, Assur 1/7 pp. 123-69 (text) 



1980 Asher-Greve, Genien und Krieger pp. 12-30 (objects, 
text) 

1981 Meuszyriski, Bagh. For. 2 (objects) 
1981 Reade, Iraq 43 pp. 145-56 (objects) 
1981 Sobolewski, ZA 71 pp. 248-73 (objects) 

1983 Winter, Essays Wilkinson pp. 15-32 (objects, text) 
1985 Reade, Iraq 47 pp. 203-214 (objects, text) 
1987 Paley and Sobolewski, Bagh. For. 10 (objects, text) 
1989 Porter, Assyrian Bas-Reliefs at the Bowdoin College 
Museum of Art (objects, text) 



Ashurnasirpal n A. 0.1 01. 23 



275 



TEXT 



1) E.GAL m a5-5Wr-PAB-A SID aS-SUr ni-Sit d BAD u 

d MAS na-ra-am d a-nim u d da~gan ka-su-us 

DINGIR.MES GAL.MES MAN dan-nu MAN SU MAN 

kur as-Sur a tukul-mas man GAL-e man 
dan-ni man §u 

2) man kur as-sur a 10-erin,tah man GAL-e 
man dan-ni man su man kur as-sur-ma et4u 
qar-du sd ina gis Jukul-ti as-sur en-sw 
DU.DU-ku-ma ina maI-ki.ME§ sd kib-rat 4-ta 
sd-nin-su la-a tuku-w lu.sipa 

3) tab-ra-te la a-di-ru gis.lal e-du-u gap-su sd 
ma-hi-ra la-a tuku-w man mu-sak-nis la 
kan-su-te-su sd nap-har kis-sat un.mes i-pe-Iu 
nita dan-nu mu-kab-bi-is 

4) gu a-a-bi-su da-a-is kul-lat kur.mes mu-pa- 
ri-ru ki-is-ri mul-tar-hi man sd ina gis. tukul-ti 

DINGIR.MES GAL.MES EN.MES-SW DU.DU-k-ma 

kur. kur.mes uv-si-na su-su KUR-ud hur-sd- 
ni 

5) T>t-su-nu i-pe-lu-ma bi-lat-su-nu im-hu-ru 
sa-bit li-i-ti sd-kin li-i-te ugu DV-si-na 
kur. kur.mes e-nu-ma 

6) as-sur en na-bu-u uu-ia mu-sar-bu-u man-I/- 
a Gis.TUKUL-fw la pa-da-a a-na i-da-at EN-ti-a 
lu-u it-muh erin.hi.a.mes kur lu-ul-lu-me-e 
dagal.mes 

7) ina qe-reb tam-ha-ri ina gis.tukul.mes hi u- 
sam-qit ina re-su-te sd d sd~ma$ u d iSKUR 
dingir.meS tik-li-a erin.hi.a.mes kur, kur 
na~i~ri kur hab-hi kur $u~ba~re-e u kur ni- 

rib GIM d ISKUR 

8) ra-hi-si uov-su-nu ds-gu-um man sd ta e- 
ber-tan id.hal.hal a-di kur lab-na-na u 
a.ab.ba GAL-te kur la-qe-e ana si-hir-ti-sd 
kur su-hi a-di uru ra-pi-qi ana gir.ii-sw u- 
sek-ni-sd 

9) ta sag e-ni id su-ub-na-at a-di kur u-ra-ar-ti 
su-sw kur-w d ta kur ne-re-be sd kur kir-ru- 
ri a-di kur gil-za-ni ta e-ber-tan id za-ba 

KI.TA 

10) a-di URU.nue-ba-a-ri sd el-la-an kur za-ban 
ta VKV.T>Ve-sd-ab-ta-a-ni a-di uru.du 6 -&7'- 
za-ab-da-a-ni uru hi-ri-mu uru ha-ru-tu kur 
bi-ra-te 

11) sd kur kar-du-ni-ds ana mi-is-ri kur-at u-ter 



l-5a) (Property of) the palace of Ashurnasirpal, 
vice-regent of Assur, chosen of the gods Enlil and 
Ninurta, beloved of the gods Anu and Dagan, 
destructive weapon of the great gods, strong king, 
king of the universe, king of Assyria, son of 
TukultT-Ninurta (n), great king, strong king, king 
of the universe, king of Assyria, son of Adad- 
naraff (n) (who was) also great king, strong king, 
king of the universe, (and) king of Assyria; vali- 
ant man who acts with the support of Assur, his 
lord, and has no rival among the princes of the 
four quarters, marvellous shepherd, fearless in 
battle, mighty flood-tide which has no opponent, 
the king who subdues those insubordinate to him, 
he who rules all peoples, strong male who treads 
upon the necks of his foes, trampler of all ene- 
mies, he who breaks up the forces of the rebelli- 
ous, the king who acts with the support of the 
great gods, his lords, and has conquered all lands, 
gained dominion over all the highlands and re- 
ceived their tribute, capturer of hostages, he who 
is victorious over all countries; 
5b-12a) When Assur, the lord who called me by 
name (and) made my sovereignty supreme, placed 
his merciless weapon in my lordly arms, I felled 
with the sword the extensive troops of the 
Lullumu in battle. With the help of the gods 
Samas and Adad, the gods my supporters, I thun- 
dered like the god Adad, the devastator, against 
the troops of the lands Nairi, Habhu, the Subaru, 
and the land Nirbu. The king who subdued (the 
territory stretching) from the opposite bank of the 
Tigris to Mount Lebanon and the Great Sea, the 
entire land Laqu (and) the land Suhu including 
the city Rapiqu; he conquered from the source of 
the River Subnat to the land Urartu. I brought 
within the boundaries of my land (the territory 
stretching) from the passes of Mount Kirruru to 
the land Gilzanu, from the opposite bank of the 
Lower Zab (10) to the city Tll-Bari which is 
upstream from the land Zaban, from the city TT1- 
sa-Abtani to the city Tll-sa-Zabdani, the cities 
Hirimu, Harutu, (which are) fortresses of 
Kardunias. I accounted (the people) from the 
passes of Mount Babitu to Mount Hasmar as 



1 ni-sit d BAD u d MAS 'chosen of the gods Enlil and Ninurta': 
vars. have 'chosen of the gods Enlil and Assur'. 1 man su = 
mr kissati 'king of the universe': omitted in some exs. 2 man 
GAL-e man dan-ni man su = sarri rabe Sarri danni sar kissati 
'great king, strong king, king of the universe': omitted in some 
exs, 8 a-di kur lab~na~na u a.ab.ba GAi-te 'to Mount 
Lebanon and the Great Sea': for vars. in parallel passages see 



the note to A. 0.101.1 iii 121. 9 a-di kur u-ra-ar-ti: 'to the 

land Urartu'. Many parallel passages have instead 'to the 
interior of the land Nirib'. See the note to A. 0.101.1 iii 122. 
li ta UR\).DV(>-sd~ab-ta-a-ni a-di uru.du 6 -sd-za-ab-da-a-ni 
'from the city Ttl-sa-Abtani to the city Tll-sa-Zabdani': for 
vars. in parallel passages see the note to A, 0,1 01.1 iii 123-24. 
11 kur ba-bi-te 'Mount Babitu': A. 0.101.1 iii 124 (see the 



276 



Ashurnasirpal n A. 0.101. 23 



ta kur ne-reb M kur ba-bi-te a-di kur has- 
mar a-na un.mes KVR-ia am-nu ina 
kur.kur.mes Sd a-pe-lu-Si-na-ni lu.gar-wm- 
te-ia al-ta-kan 

12) ur-du-ti u-pu-Su m aS-Sur-?AB-A nun-i/ na-a-du 
pa-lfh dingir.mes gal.mes u-Sum-gal-lu ek-du 
ka-Sid uru. uru u hur-Sd-ni pat gim-ri-Su-nu 
man EN.MES-e mu-la-it 

13) ek-su-te a-pi-ir M-lum-ma-te la a-di-ru 
gis.lal ur-Sd-nu la pa-du-u mu-rib a-nun-te 
man ia-na-da-a-te lu.sipa sa-lu-lu ub.mes 
man Sd qi-bit ka-sw uS-har-ma-tu kur.mes-^ 

14) u a,ab.ba.mes Sd ina qi-it-ru-ub bn-H-Su 
man.mes-w ek-du-te la pa-du-te ta si-it 

d Sam-si a-di e-reb a Sam-Si pa-a I -en u-Sd-dS- 
kin uru kal-hu 

15) mah-ra-a Sd md Sul-ma-nu-% ag man kur aS-Sur 
nun a-lik pa-ni-a bjj-uS uru Su-ti e-na-ah-ma 
is-lal uru Sii-ti ana eS-Su-te ab-ni un.mes su- 
// su-ia Sd kur.kur.mes 

16) Sd a-pe-tu-si-na-ni sd kur su-hi kur la-qe-e 
ana si-hir-ti-Sd uru sir-qu sd ne-ber-ti 

id. a. rad kur za-mu-a ana pat gim-ri-Sd 
KURA-a-di-ni u kur hat-te 

17) u sd m lu-bar-na kur pa-ti-na-a-a al-qa-a ina 
Fib-bi u-Sd-as-bit du 6 la-be-ru lu u-na-ki-ir a- 
di ugu a.mes lu U'Sd-pil 1 me 20 tik-pi ina 
mus-pa-li 

18) lu u-ta-bi e.gal gis e-re-ni e.gal gis sur.min 
e.gal gis dap-ra-ni e.gal gis.tug.mes e.gal 
gis mes-kan-ni e.gal gis bu-ut-ni u gis tar- 
pi-H 

19) a-na Su-bat MAN-ti-a ana mul-ta-a>-it EN-ti-a 
sd da-ra-te ina lib-bi ad-di u-ma-am 
KUR.MES-e u a.ab.ba.mes Sd na 4 pi-li KU-e 

20) u na 4 pa-ru-te dv-uS ina KA.MES-sa u-Se-zi-iz 
u-si-im-Si u-Sar-rih-Si si-kdt kar-ri zabar.mes 
al-me-si gis.ig.mes gis e-re-ni gis. sur.min 

21) gis dap-ra-ni gis mes-kan-ni ina KA.MES-Sd 
u-re-ti ku.babbar.mes ku.gi.mes an.na.mes 
zabar.mes an.bar.mes sv-ti sv-ia Sd 
kur.kur.mes 

22) sd a-pe-lu-Si-na-ni a-na ma-a^-diS al-qa-a ina 
lib-bi u-kin 



people of my land. In the lands over which I 
gained dominion I always appointed my gover- 
nors. They entered (lit. 'performed') servitude. 

12b-14a) Ashurnasirpal, attentive prince, 

worshipper of the great gods, ferocious dragon, 
conqueror of cities and the entire highlands, king 
of lords, encircler of the obstinate, crowned with 
splendour, fearless in battle, merciless hero, he 
who stirs up strife, praiseworthy king, shepherd, 
protection of the (four) quarters, the king whose 
command disintegrates mountains and seas, the 
one who by his lordly conflict has brought under 
one authority ferocious (and) merciless kings from 
east to west: 

14b-22) The ancient city Calah which Shal- 
maneser, king of Assyria, a prince who preceded 
me, had built — this city had become dilapidated; 
it lay dormant. I rebuilt this city. I took people 
which I had conquered from the lands over which 
I had gained dominion, from the land Suhu, 
(from) the entire land of Laqu, (from) the city 
Sirqu which is at the crossing of the Euphrates, 
(from) the entire land of Zamua, from Blt-Adini 
and the land Hatti and from Lubarna, the Patinu. 
I settled (them) therein. I cleared away the old 
ruin hill (and) dug down to water level. I sank 
(the foundation pit) down to a depth of 120 layers 
of brick. I founded therein a palace of cedar, 
cypress, dapranu-junipei , boxwood, meskannu- 
wood, terebinth, and tamarisk as my royal 
residence (and) for my lordly leisure for eternity. 
I made (replicas of) beasts of mountains and seas 
in white limestone (20) and parfi/w-alabaster (and) 
stationed (them) at its doors. I decorated it in a 
splendid fashion; I surrounded it with knobbed 
nails of bronze. I hung doors of cedar, cypress, 
dapranu-)\xmptr , (and) meskannu-wood in its 
doorways. I took in great quantities and put 
therein silver, gold, tin, bronze, iron, booty from 
the lands over which I gained dominion. 



note) has uru 'city 1 for kur 'Mount', 12 ur-du-ti u-pu-su 
They entered servitude'. Many parallel passages add kudurru 
emessunuti '(and) 1 Imposed upon them corvee'. See the note 



to A. 0.101.1 ili 125-26. 14 ina qi-it-ru-ub ~EN-ti-M *by his 
lordly conflict': see the note to A. 0.101.2 lines 41-42. 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101. 24 



277 



24 



In the middle of the last century Hormuzd Rassam found several 
pieces of black stone with remains of reliefs and inscriptions at Calah. 
These pieces were parts of an obelisk, now called the Rassam Obelisk, 
of Ashurnasirpal, and recently members of the Department of 
Western Asiatic Antiquities at the British Museum have reconstructed 
the obelisk and published (see Reade) a thorough and excellent study 
of it. The pieces were found in a structure called the 'Central Building' 
and Reade has presented detailed arguments for the probable original 
position of the obelisk. It was deliberately broken up in ancient times, 
presumably with the intention to manufacture building blocks. 

The reconstruction of the obelisk shows that it originally had scenes 
in relief in a series of registers and panels with accompanying inscrip- 
tions. It appears that the whole series had a single theme, the presen- 
tation by numerous subject peoples of tribute to Ashurnasirpal. The 
inscriptions consisted of a version of the Standard Inscription 
(A.0.101.23), traces of which (lines 7-8) remain and are edited here, 
and then a sequence of captions, the preserved portions of which are 
edited as A.0.101. 71-78. As to the date of the obelisk, enough of the 
version of the Standard Inscription is preserved to show that it men- 
tioned Mount Lebanon and thus the text dates to the latter part of 
AshurnasirpaPs reign (see the note to A. 0.101.1 iii 121). Since one 
caption (A. 0.101.71) was left blank, it is clear that the engraving of 
the obelisk was never completed. Fragments of an obelisk similar to 
the Rassam Obelisk, and which may be ascribed to Ashurnasirpal n, 
have been found at Assur (A. 0.1 01. 1004). 



COMMENTARY 



The main museum number is BM 118800 and to this 
BM 90925 and BM 132013 have been joined. Note that 
ND 3219, contrary to former belief, does not belong to 



this obelisk. It is impossible to establish the original di- 
mensions of the object. For further details see Reade. 
The inscriptions have been collated. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1897 Rassam, Asshur pp. 11-12 (provenance) 

1907 Le Gac, Asn. pp. 207-209 (copy) 

1936 Gadd, Stones pp. 128-29 and pi. 6 (photo, study) 

1962 Barnett and Falkner, Tigl. pp. 1-7 (provenance) 



1969 Pritchard, ANEP 2 pi. 290 fig. 350 (photo) 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 ci 70 (study) 

1980 Reade (and Walker), Iraq 42 pp. 1-22 (photo, edition) 

1982 Borker-Klahn, Bildstelen no. 138 (photo, study) 



TEXT 



Lacuna 

1') [lu] li-Sam-qit ina re-^su^-te sd d sd-mas u 

[adad Hani tikMa £rin.hi.a].mes 
20 [matati n]a~i-ri kur hab-hi kur su-ba-re-e u 

[mat nirib kima adad rahisi] 



l'-3') See A.0.101.23 lines 7-8. 



278 Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101.24 

3') [uG]u-su-nu ds-gu-um man sd ta e~ber-t[an 

idiqlat adi sade lab-n]a-na 
Lacuna 



25 



This text is known only from a squeeze of a stone object from Calah 
referred to by Le Gac. The squeeze has been destroyed (see the intro- 
duction to A. 0.101.1). Le Gac says it duplicated A. 0.101.23 lines 1-5 
(ending with ugu vu-si-na kur.kur.mes 'over all countries'). After 
omitting the next several lines it had lines 14 (beginning with uru kal- 
hu mah-ra-a 'the ancient city Calah') to 22, the end of A. 0.101.23. No 
edition can be given on the basis of the scant information provided by 
Le Gac. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1907 Le Gac, Asn. p. 165 E.89 (study) 1976 Grayson, ARI 2 ci 13b (study) 

1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 43 (study) 



26 



This text is engraved on several stone tablets found at various sites. 
The beginning (lines l-58a), which is a parallel to a passage in 
A.0.101.1 (iii 113b-136), has the names, titles, and genealogy of the 
king and a general geographic description of his conquests (also cf. 
A.0. 101.54). Note that this text has 'to the city Carchemish of the land 
HattF (line 22) instead of 'to Mount Lebanon and the Great Sea' and 
thus it must have an earlier date than many of the texts of 
Ashurnasirpal (see the note to A.0.101.1 iii 121). This same parallel 
passage continues with a narrative concerning the construction of 
Calah. 

The text then has (lines 58b-64a) a description of the erection and 
decoration of the North West Palace, a passage which has a parallel in 
A.0.101.23 (lines 18-21). Our text has an additional passage (lines 
64b-72) adding more details about the decoration of the palace, a 
statement that the inscription was deposited in the wall (of the palace, 
not the city), and concludes with blessings and curses. Some exemplars 
(2-5) omit the blessings and curses, as do several of AshurnasirpaPs 
texts, a phenomenon which is discussed in the introduction to 
A.0.101.19. 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0,101. 26 
CATALOGUE 



279 





Museum 


Excavation 




Dimensions 


Lines 




Ex. 


number 


number 


Provenance 


(cm) 


preserved 


cpn 


1 


BM 90868 


- 


Calah 


76x51 


1-72 


c 


2 


BM 90867 


— 


Calah 


52x39 


l-67a 

ending with u-kfn 


c 


3 


BM 909 15 


- 


Calah 


_ 


As ex. 2 


c 


4 


Ash 1951.61 


ND816 


Calah, NE corner 
(DD) of NW palace, 
covering grave 


45x37.5 


As ex. 2 


c 


5 


Australia 


ND 1121 


Calah, east wall 
(B) of NW palace, 
on floor 


49x37 


As ex. 2 


p 


6 


IM 55745 


ND817 


As ex. 4 


53x41.8 


- 


n 


7 


IM 60498 


ND 6232 


Fort Shalm., NE 26 


- 


- 


n 


8 


- 


ND 6233 


As ex. 7 


- 


- 


n 


9 


IM 60635 


ND 6234 


As ex. 7 


- 


- 


n 


10 


- 


ND 6235 


As ex. 7 


66x42 


- 


n 


11 


- 


ND 6236 


As ex. 7 


- 


- 


n 


12 


Rm 1086+1087 + 
1088( + )1089 


— 


Imgur-Enlil, 
temple 'No. 1' 


22x30 


2b-28 


c 


13 


IM 


ND201 


Calah, Governor's 
Palace outside 
southern wall 


10.5x9.2 + 


31b-3S» 54b-58 


c 


14 


Durham 


- 


_ 


- 


41a-48 


P 


15 


Rm 1090 


- 


As ex. 12 


- 


41b-46 


c 


16 


BM 115631 
(Rm 2,607) 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


n 



COMMENTARY 



There is some uncertainty about the identification of 
some of the exemplars with this text. All of the com- 
plete exs. which could be collated (1-5) were found at 
Calah and two (4-5), at least, specifically in the North 
West Palace. Several stone tablets with this text 
(exs. 7-11) apparently complete were found at Fort 
Shalmaneser propped up against a wall. Two very frag- 
mentary exs. (12 and 15) are said to have been found 
together at Imgur-Enlil (Balawat) but one of them (15) 
has remains of the description of work at Calah. A 
third fragment of an inscribed stone, Rm 1091, was 
found with exs. 12 and 15 but the inscription is illegi- 
ble. 

Ex. 5 is in the Australian Institute of Archaeology, 



Melbourne, and I am grateful to Dr. David W. Searle 
for sending me excellent photos of it. Ex. 14 is in the 
Oriental Museum, University of Durham, and I am 
grateful to Dr. John Ruffle for sending me an excellent 
photo of it. 

It has been impossible to collate several exs. (see the 
catalogue) and therefore no scores can be provided. 
Note that ex. 2 has a number of scribal errors. K 8543 
is not an ex. of this text (so Schramm and Grayson) but 
has been joined by me to ex. 39 (BM 124553 + ) of 
A. 0.101. 23. ND 820 is also not an ex. of this text (cf. 
Wiseman and Kinnier Wilson, Iraq 13 [1951] p. 119, 
Grayson, ARI 2 ci 14, and see A. 0.101.8). 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1902 King, AKA pp. 177-88 (exs. 1-3, copy, edition) 
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§507-513 (exs. 1-3, translation) 

1950 Wiseman, Iraq 12 p. 187 (ex. 13, provenance) 

1951 Wiseman and Kinnier Wilson, Iraq 13 p. 118 (exs. 4, 6» 
provenance) 

1952 Wiseman, Iraq 14 p. 66 (ex. 5, provenance) 

1966 Mallowan, Nimrud 1 pp. 114-15 (exs. 4, 6, provenance); 



2 p. 395 and n. 39 (exs. 7-11, provenance) 
1967 Borger, HKL 1 p. 218 (study) 
1973 Postgate, Governor's Palace pp. 211-12 and pi. 74 no. 

217 (ex. 13, copy, edition) 
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 43-44 (study) 
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 ci 14 (exs. 1-16, translation) 



280 



Ashurnasirpal n A. 0.101. 26 
TEXT 



1) m aS-SUr-PAB-A MAN GAL-W MAN ddtl-llU MAN SU 

man kur as-sur 

2) A TUKUL-MAS MAN GAL-W MAN dan-HU MAN SU 

man kur aS-sur a 10-£rin.tAh 

3) MAN GAL-U MAN dafl-HU MAN §U MAN KUR as- 

§ur~ma ef-lu qar-du 

4) sd ina GisJukul-ti as-sur en-su DU.DU-^w-ma 
ina mal-ki.MES 

5) sd kib-rat 4-ta sd-nin-su la i-su-u lu.sipa 

6) tab-ra-te la-di-ru gis.lal e-du-u gap-su 

7) sd ma-hi-ra la i-su-u man mu-sd-ak-ni-is 

8) la-a kan-su-te-su sd nap-har kis-sat un.mes /- 
pe-lu 

9) nita dan-nu mu-kab-bi-is gtj a-a-bi-su da-i-is 

10) kul-lat kur.mes mu-pa-ri-ru ki-is-ri mul-tar-hi 

11) sd ina gis Jukul-ti dingir.mes gal.mes en-su 

E>U.T>U-ku-ma KUR.KUR.MES-/e 

12) DV-si-na su-su KUR-ud hur-sd-ni T>u-su-nu i- 
pe-lu-ma 

13) bi-lat-su-nu im-hu-ru sa-bit li-i-ti GAR-in 

14) li-i-te ugu nu-si-na kur. kur.mes-^ e-nu-ma 
as-sur en 

15) na-bu-u MU-ia mu-sar-bu-u UAN-ti-a 

GIS.TUKUL-SW 

16) la pa-da-a a-na i-da-at EN-ti-a lu-u it-muh 

17) ERiN.Hi.A.MES-a/ kur lu-ul-lu-me-e 
dagal.mes ina qe-reb tam-ha-ri 

18) ina gis.tukul.mes lu u-Sam-qit ina re-su-te sd 
d sd-ma$ u d i§KUR 

19) dingir.me§ tik-li-ia ±RiNMLA,MES-at kur. kur 
na-i-ri kur hab-hi 

20) kur su-ba-re-e u kur ni-ir-be gim d iSKUR ra- 
hi-si 

21) UGU-su-nu ds-gu-um man sd ta e-ber-ta-an 

fD.IDIGNA 

22) a-di uru kar-ga-mis sd kur hat-te kur la- 
qe-e ana si-hir-ti-sd kur su-hi a-di 

23) uru ra-pi-qi a-na gir.ii.mes-sw u-sek-ni-sd ta 
sag e-ni id su-ub-na-at 

24) a-c// kur ni-ir-bi sd bi-ta-ni su-su KUR-ud ta 
kur ne-re-be 

25) iw kur kir-ru-ri a-di kur gil-za-a-ni ta e- 
ber-ta-an id za-Zw 

26) ki.ta a-rf/ URU.DUe-6a-a-n sa el-la-an uru 

27) a-tf/ uru.du e-sd- m za-ab-da-ni u URU.DUs-sd- 
ab-ta-ni uru hi-ri-mu 

28) uru ha-ru-tu kur bi-ra-a-te sd kur kar-du- 
ni-sd a-na mi-is-ri 



1 -14a) Ashurnasirpal, great king, strong king, 
king of the universe, king of Assyria, son of 
TukultT-Ninurta (n), great king, strong king, king 
of the universe, king of Assyria, son of Adad- 
nlran (n) (who was) also great king, strong king, 
king of the universe, king of Assyria; valiant man 
who acts with the support of Assur, his lord, and 
(5) has no rival among the princes of the four 
quarters, marvellous shepherd, fearless in battle, 
mighty flood-tide which has no opponent, the 
king who subdues those insubordinate to him, 
who rules all peoples, strong male, who treads 
upon the necks of his foes, trampler of (10) all 
enemies, the one who breaks up the forces of the 
rebellious, he who acts with the support of the 
great gods, his lords, and has conquered all lands, 
gained dominion over all the highlands and re- 
ceived their tribute, capturer of hostages, he who 
is victorious over all lands: 

14b-32a) When Assur, the lord who called my 
name (and) who makes my sovereignty supreme, 
placed his merciless weapon in my lordly arms, I 
felled with the sword the extensive troops of the 
Lullumu in battle. With the help of the gods 
Samas and Adad, the gods my supporters, I thun- 
dered (20) like the god Adad, the devastator, 
against the troops of the lands Nairi, Habhu, the 
Subaru, and the land Nirbu. The king who sub- 
dued (the territory stretching) from the opposite 
bank of the Tigris to the city Carchemish of the 
land Hatti, the entire land Laqu, (and) the land 
Suhu including the city Rapiqu: he conquered 
from the source of the River Subnat to the inte- 
rior of the land Nirbu. I brought within the boun- 
daries of my land (the territory stretching) from 
the passes (25) of Mount Kirruru to the land 
Gilzanu, from the opposite bank of the Lower 
Zab to the city TTl-Bari which is upstream from 
the city Zaban, to the cities Tll-sa-Zabdani and 
Tll-sa-Abtani, the cities Hirimu, Harutu, (which 
are) fortresses of Kardunias. I accounted (the peo- 
ple) from the pass of the city Babitu to Mount 
Hasmar (30) as people of my land. In the lands 
over which I gained dominion I always appointed 
my governors. They entered (lit. 'performed') ser- 
vitude (and) I imposed upon them corvee. 



26.4 has kur 'land* instead of uru 'city* before Zaban, 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101. 26 



281 



KVR-ia li-ter ta kur ne-re-be sd uru ba-bi-te 

a-di kur haS-mar 

a-na un.mes kur -ia am-nu ina 

KUR.KUR.MEs-te sd a-pe-Iu-si-na-ni 

LU.GAR-nu-te-ia al-ta-kan ur-du-ti u-pu-su 

ku-diir-ru 

e-me-su-nu-ti m as-sur-PAB-A nun na-a-du pa- 

lih DINGIR.MES GAL.MES 

u-sum-gal-lu ek-du ka-sid uru. uru u hur-sd- 

ni pat gim-ri-su-nu man en.mes 

mu-la-it ek-su-te tiz-qa-ru la pa-du-u mu-rib 

a-nun-te man du mal-ki.UEl 

man MAN.MES-n/ i-Si-pu na-a^-du ni-bit d MAs 

qar-di ka-su-us dingir.mes gal.mes 

man sd ina Gis.tukul-ti as-sur u d MAS 

dingir.mes tik-li-M me-sd-ris DU.Du-^-ma 

kur.mes sap-su-te u mal-ki.MES lu.kur.mes- 

SU kul-lat KUR.KUR.MES-SW-rtW 

a-na gir.ii-.sw u-sek-ni-sd lu.kur.mes-«/ as- 
sur an.ta u ki.ta 

is-ta-na-nu-ma gun u ma-da-tu VGv-su-nu u- 
ki-nu 

m as-sur-PAB~A man dan-nu ni-bit d 30 me-gir 
d a-nim na-mad d iSKUR 
kas-kas dingir.mes gis.tukul la pa-du-u 
mu-u-sam-qii kur kur.mes-£w ana-ku 
man le^u-ti qab-li sd-gis uru. uru u hur-sd-ni 
a-sd-red tuq-ma-te 
man kib-rat 4-ta mu-ne-er a-a-bi-su 
KUR.KUR.MES-/e dan-na-te 
hur-sd-ni ek-su-te man.mes-/?/ ek-du-te la pa- 
du-te ta si-it 

d sam-si a-di e-reb d sam-si ana GiR.ii.MEs-/a 
u-sek-ni-sd pa-a 

\-en u-sd-ds-kin uru kal-hu mah-ra-a sd 
md sul-ma-nu-$AG 

man kur as-sur nun-w a-lik pa-ni-ia du-sw 
uru su-u e-na-ah-ma 

is-lal a-na du 6 u kar-me gur uru su-u ana 
es-su-te ab-ni un.mes 

ki-sit-ti sv-ia sd kur. kur.mes sd a-pe-lu-si- 
na-ni sd kur su-hi 

kur la-qe-e ana si-hir-ti-sd kur sir-qu sd ne- 
ber-ti 

id. a. rad kur za-mu-a ana pat gim-ri-sd sa 
KUR.E-a-di-ni u kur hat-te 
u sd m li-bur-na kur pa-ti-na-a-a al-qa-a ina 
lib-bi u-sd-as-bii 

in-tu ta id za-ba an.ta ah-ra-a id pa-ti- 
he. gal 



32b-46a) Ashurnasirpal, attentive prince, wor- 
shipper of the great gods, ferocious dragon, con- 
queror of cities and the entire highlands, king of 
lords, encircler of the obstinate, lofty (and) merci- 
less, he who stirs up strife, king of all princes, 
(35) king of kings, attentive purification priest, 
designate of the warrior god Ninurta, destructive 
weapon of the great gods, the king who has al- 
ways acted justly with the support of Assur and 
the god Ninurta the gods who help him and sub- 
dued the fortified mountains and the kings hostile 
to him, all their lands, (he who) has always con- 
tested with the enemies of Assur above and below 
and imposed upon them tribute and tax; (40) 
Ashurnasirpal, strong king, designate of the god 
Sin, favourite of the god Anu, loved one of the 
god Adad (who is) almighty among the gods, the 
merciless weapon which lays low lands hostile to 
him, I, the king, capable in battle, vanquisher of 
cities and highlands, foremost in battle, king of 
the four quarters, the one who defeats his ene- 
mies, I have subdued (and) brought under one au- 
thority fortified lands, dangerous highlands, (and) 
merciless fierce kings from east to west. 



46b-58a) The ancient city Calah which Shal- 
maneser, king of Assyria, a prince who preceded 
me, had built — this city had become dilapidated; 
it lay dormant (and) had turned into ruin hills. 1 
rebuilt this city. I took people which I had con- 
quered from the lands over which I had gained 
dominion, from the land Suhu, (50) (from) the 
entire land Laqu, (from) the land Sirqu which is 
at the crossing of the Euphrates, (from) the entire 
land of Zamua, from the land Blt-Adini and the 
land Hatti and from Lubarna (Liburna), the Pa- 
tinu. I settled them therein. I dug out a canal 
from the Upper Zab (and) called it Patti-hegalli. 1 
planted orchards in its environs. I offered fruit of 
every kind (and) (55) wine to Assur, my lord, and 
the temples of my land. I cleared away the old 



50.2-5 have uru 'city* instead of kur 'land' before Sirqu. 
51.4 omits kur land* before bit-adini. 53.2, 4 pa-ti-HE.NVNi 



see the note to A.0.101.1 iii 135. 



282 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0. 101.26 



54) uu-sd ab-bi giS.kiru.mes ina li-me-tu-sd az- 

qup GURUN.MES DU.A.BI 

55) GESTIN.MES Q-HQ CtS-SUr EN-tf U E.KUR.MES 

KUR-a bal du 6 la-be-ru 

56) lu-ii u-na-kiri a-di ugu a.mes lu u-sd-pil 1 me 
20 tik-pi 

57) ana mus-pa-li u-ta-bi bad-su ana es-su-te ar- 
sip ta uru 4 -sw a-di gaba-dib-bi-su 

58) ar-sip u-sak-lil e.gal gis e-re-ni gis.sur.min 
gis ddp-ra-ni 

59) gis. tug gis mes-kan-ni e.gal gis bu-ut-ni u 
gis tar-pi-H a-na su-bat 

60) MAN-ti-a a-na mul-ta-a?-it hN-ti-a ina lib-bi 
ad-di 

61) u-ma-am kur.mes u a.ab.ba.mes sd pi-li 
BABBAR-e u na 4 pa-ru-te 

62) ina ka-M u-sd-zi-iz u-si-im u-sar-rih si-kat 
kar-ri 

63) zabar al-me-si gis.ig.mes gis e-re-ni 
gis.sur.min gis ddp-ra-ni 

64) gis mes-kan-ni ina KA-sd u-re-te 
gis.gu.za.mes gis.esi gis. tug gis.bansur.mes 

65) zu.mes uh-hu-za-te ku.babbar.mes ku.gi.mes 

AN.NA.MES ZABAR. ME§ 

66) an.bar.mes kur-// lu-ia sd kur.kur.mes sd 
a-pe-iu-si-na-ni a-na ma-a^-dis 

67) al-qa-a ina tib-bi ti-kin na-ra-a sar ina bad- 
M GAR-nu nun egir 

68) an-hu-su lu-ud-dis-si mu sar ana ki-sw lu-ter 
as-sur en gal-w 

69) d iNANNA be-lat murub 4 u me sud i-sem-me 
mu-na-kir 7 Mu-a 

70) as-sur u d MAS ez-zi-is iik-kal-mu-su man-sw 
lis-ki-pu gis . gu . ZA-SU 

71) li-ki-mu-su ina igi kur.mes-sw kdm-me-si lu- 
seio-si-bu-su 

72) mu-5W numun-5w ina kur Iu-zak 



ruin hill (and) dug down to water level; I sank 
(the foundation pit) down to a depth of 120 layers 
of brick. I built its wall anew. I built (and) com- 
pleted it from top to bottom. 



58b-67a) I founded therein a palace of cedar, 
cypress, dapranu-jumper, boxwood, meskannu- 
wood, terebinth, and tamarisk as my royal res- 
idence (60) (and) for my lordly leisure. (I made 
replicas of) beasts of mountains and seas in white 
limestone and parwta-alabaster (and) stationed 
(them) at its doors. I decorated it in a splendid 
fashion; I surrounded it with knobbed nails of 
bronze. I hung doors of cedar, cypress, dapranu- 
juniper, (and) meskannu-wood in its doorways. I 
took in great quantities and put therein thrones of 
ebony (and) boxwood, dishes (65) decorated with 
ivory, silver, gold, tin, bronze, iron, booty from 
the lands over which I gained dominion. I in- 
scribed (this) monumental inscription (and) depos- 
ited (it) in its wall. 



67b-69a) May a later prince restore its weakened 
(portions). May he restore my inscribed name to 
its place. (Then) the god Assur, the great lord, 
(and) the goddess Istar, mistress of battle and 
conflict, will listen to his prayers. 
69b-72) As for the one who removes my name: 
may Assur and the god Ninurta glare at him an- 
grily, overthrow his sovereignty, take away from 
him his throne, make him sit in bonds before his 
enemies, (and) destroy his name (and) his seed 
from the land. 



27 



This text is known only from a squeeze of a stone object from Calah 
referred to by Le Gac. The squeeze has been destroyed (see the intro- 
duction to A.0.101.1). Le Gac says it duplicated A. 0.101. 23 lines 1-13 
(ending with mu-la-it ek-su-te 'encircler of the obstinate') and then 
A.0.101.1 iii 127-28 (ending with nv.i>v-ku-ma 'has always acted'). It 
was a close parallel, then, of A.0.10L26. No edition can be given on 
the basis of the scant information provided by Le Gac. 



1907 Le Gac, Asn. p. 165 E.24 (study) 
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 43 (study) 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101. 27 
BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 ci 13a (study) 



283 



28 



This text is engraved on the obverse of two stone monumental lions 
found at the entrance to the temple of the goddess Sarrat-niphi in 
Calah by Layard. A different text is inscribed on the reverse and it is 
edited as A. 0.101. 32. The beginning of the present text (col. i) is a 
dedication to that goddess followed by royal titles, and this passage is 
very much like the beginning of A. 0.101.1, except there the dedication 
is to Ninurta. There follows a long passage (ii 1 - iv 13), parallel to 
A. 0.101.1 iii 114-25, which describes the king's conquests in a general 
geographic way. The text then has a narrative of the construction of 
Calah (v 1-6) which is parallel to A.0. 101.1 iii 132-34. To put it 
another way, these two passages are an abbreviated version of the 
Standard Inscription (A.0.101.23). The text continues with details 
(v 7-16) about the construction of various temples at Calah (cf. 
A. 0.101.29 lines 13'-23' and A.0.101.30 lines 53-77) and blessings. 

The phrase 'to the source of the Tigris' (iv 3) instead of 'to the inte- 
rior of the land Nirib' or 'to the land Urartu', or other variants found 
in various texts of Ashurnasirpal, helps to provide a relative chronol- 
ogy within the reign for this text (see the note to A. 0.101.1 iii 122). 



COMMENTARY 



One of the stone lions was removed from the site by 
Layard and is now in the British Museum (BM 118895 
= old no. 96) where the inscription (ex. 1) could be 
collated. The other was reburied by Layard, once again 
excavated and reburied by Mallowan a hundred years 
later, and yet again unearthed and removed to the 
Mosul Museum in recent times. Since the inscription 
(ex. 2) on the latter monument has not been collated, 
no scores are given in this edition. The inscription pub- 



lished in 2 R pi. 66 is a conflation of exs. 1 and 2 (cf. 
King, AKA p. 206 n. 1). The squeeze 'E.100' from a 
lion 'different' from ex. 1 (see Le Gac, Asn. p. xvm) is 
probably from our ex. 2. Thus in col. v I have used 

Le Gac's E.100 to restore broken portions in ex. 1 as 
outlined in the notes. 

The reading of the name of this goddess as Sarrat- 
niphi (not Belat-mati) was proposed by me in ARI 2 
p. 168 n. 757. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1902 King, AKA pp. 206-208 {ex. 1, copy, edition) 

1907 Le Gac, Asn. pp. 181-86 (ex. 1, copy) 

1914 Budge, Sculptures pi. vi (ex. 1, photo) 

1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§521-24 (ex. 1, translation) 

1936 Gadd, Stones pp. 126-27 (exs. 1-2, provenance) 



1953 von Soden, SAHG pp. 259-60 (ex. 1, translation) 
1966 Mallowan, Nimrud 1 p. 92 (ex. 2, provenance) 
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 44-45 (ex. 1, study) 

1975 Postgate, Iraq 37 pp. 58-59 (ex. 2, study) 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 ci 15 (exs. 1-2, translation) 



284 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101. 28 
TEXT 



Col. i 

1) a-Tia d GASAN-KUR NIN GAL-// SAG-// AN-e KI- 

tim ^sar-rat du~i dingir.mes ge-ser-tu sd [ina 
e.kur.me]s si-kir-sd dugud 

2) ina d iNANNA.MES su-tu-rat nah-ni-sa zi-mu 
nam-ru sd gim d rsd-matP ta-li-me-sd kip-pa-at 
AN-e [ersetim] mit-ha-ri[s\ ta-hi-ta 

3) le-^a-at d a-nun-na-ki bu-kur-ti d a-nim sur-bu- 
ut dingir.mes ma-li-kdt PAP.MEs-sa a-li-kdt 
mah-r\i d\a-li-hat [ta]-ma-a-te 

4) mu-na-ri-ta-at hur-sd-ni ur-sd-na-at 
d NUN,GAL.MES be-lcit murub 4 u me sd ba-lu-sd 
ina e-sdr-ra ^sip-tu uP i-i~ma~i-ga-ru-ma 

5) mu-sal-qa-at li-i-ti mu-sam-sa-at ^anP-mar 
llb-bi AGA-at ki-na-te se-ma-at ik-ri-bi le-qa- 
at un-ni-ni 

6) ma-hi-rat tes-li-te d iNANNA ne-bu-tu git-mal- 
tu su-tu-ur-tu sd AN-e Ki-tim ta-hi-ta ina kib- 
i raP kur.kur.mes DV-si-na na-bu-u 



7) mu -sd qa-i-sat ti.la.mes dingir-*/a?j reme-ni-ti 
sd qur-bu-sd dug.ga a-sib-at uru kal-hi nin- 
ia m as-sur-fFAB-A~i man su man la M-na-an 
man kul-lat 

8) ^kib-raP 4-ta d sam-su kis-sat un.mes ni-sit 
d BAD u d MAs na-ra-am ^ d a^-nim d da-gan 

9) ka-su-us dingir.mes gal.mes sah-tu 

10) na-ra-^anP sk-ki nun-w 

11) me-gir-^kP sd sanga-s« 

12) ruGtfi DiNGiR-//-/:/ GAL-r/fi 

13) ri-tcP-bu-u 

14) rtui-sar-rsP-[du] 
Col. ii 

1) BALA-5W et-iu 

2) qar-du sd ina gis. tukul-ti 

3) as-sur en-sw vu.nu-ku-ma 

4) ina ^mal-kP.UES sd kib-rat 

5) 4-r/a"i sd-nin-sii 

6) la-a tuk-w lu.sipa 

7) tab-ra-a-te la a-di-ru 

8) gis.lal e-du-u gap-sii 

9) sd ma-hi-ra la-a tuk-w 

10) man mu-sak-nis la-a kan-su-te-su 

11) sd nap-har 
Col. iii 

1) kiS'Sat u[n].me§ i-pe-lu TnIta dan^-nu mu- 
ka-bi-is 



1 l-7a) To the goddess Sarrat-niphi, great mis- 
tress, foremost in heaven (and) underworld, queen 
of all gods, strong one, whose weighty command 
is respected [in the temples], whose form is sur- 
passing among the goddesses, shining countenance 
who like the god Samas her sibling thoroughly in- 
spects the circumference of heaven (and) [un- 
derworld], most capable of the Anunnaku gods, 
offspring of the god Anu, supreme among the 
gods, counsellor of her brothers, leader, the one 
who stirs up the seas (and) shakes the highlands, 
heroine of the Igigu gods, mistress of conflict and 
battle, without whom a judgment is not approved 
in Esarra, (i 5) the one who causes the achieve- 
ment of victory (and) brings success, lover of rec- 
titude, the one who heeds prayers, receives peti- 
tions, (and) accepts supplications, the goddess 
Istar, radiant, perfect, supreme, who inspects 
heaven (and) underworld, whose name is called in 
the regions of all lands, bestower of life, the com- 
passionate goddess to whom it is good to pray, 
the one who dwells in the city Calah, my mistress; 
i 7b - iii 8a) Ashurnasirpal, unrivalled king of the 
universe, king of all the four quarters, sun(god) 
of all people, chosen of the gods Enlil and 
Ninurta, beloved of the gods Anu (and) Dagan, 
destructive weapon of the great gods, the pious, 
(ilO) beloved of your heart, prince, your favour- 
ite, whose priesthood is pleasing to your great 
divinity (and) (ii 1) whose reign you established; 
valiant man who acts with the support of Assur, 
his lord, and has no rival among the princes of 
the (ii 5) four quarters, marvellous shepherd, fear- 
less in battle, mighty flood-tide which has no op- 
ponent, (ii 10) the king who subdues those insub- 
ordinate to him, who (iii 1) rules all peoples, 
strong male, who treads upon the necks of his 
foes, trampler of all enemies, the one who breaks 
up the forces of the rebellious, the king who acts 
with the support of the great gods and (iii 5) has 
conquered all lands, gained dominion over all the 
highlands and received their tribute, capturer of 
hostages, he who is victorious over all lands: 



i 1 sag-// = restiti: see the note to A.0.100.1 line 13. 



Ashurnasirpal n A. 0.101.28 



285 



2) gu a-a-bi-su da-i-is ^kul-laO kur.mes mu- 
pa-ri-ru 

3) ki-is-ri mul-tar-hi Tman sd ina Gis^.tukul-ti 

4) dingir.[mes] gal.mes ^it-tal-la-ku^-ma 

KUR. KUR.MES 

5) DV-si-n[a] sv-^su KUR-ud hur-sd^-ni vt-su-nu 

6) /-r pe^-lu-ma ^bi-lat-su-nu^ im-hu-ru 

7) sa-^biO li-^i-tO Sd-kin HP-i-te 

8) ' ugu i Dv-si-na kur. kur.mes e-nu-ma as-sur 

EN 

9) n\a-b\u-u ' mu '-/at ' mu-saf^-bu-u man-//- /a 

10) gis. I"tukul-5w1 la-a ^pa-da-cP a-na i-da-at 
EN-ti-ia 

11) lu-[u i\t-muh t^rin.hi.a.mes kur i lu-ul-lu- 
me-e 

12) dag[al].mes ina \qe\-reb [tamhari ina] 
gis.tukul.Tmes - ! 

13) r/ w i u~sam-q[it ina r]e~su-te sd d sd-mas 

14) r w n d isKUR dingir.m[es (\ik-li-ia 
15-?) (traces) 

Col. iv 

1) kur su-hi a-di kur ra-pi-qi a-na rGiR.ii.ME5- 



u-sek-ni-sd is-tu sag e-ni id ^su-ub-na-aO 

a-di sag e-w sa id idigna su-s« ^kur-ucP 

is-tu kur ne-er-be sd kur kir-ru-ri a-di kur 

g/7-za-w 

/5-fw e-ber-ta-an id za-ia ki.ta a-tf/ 

URU.DU6-6a-G-/*/ 5a el-la-an uru za-ban is-tu 

URV.DVe-sd-ab-ta-a-ni a-di URU.DUe-sa-za- 

a&-cfa-</w> 

uru hi-ri-mu uru ha-ru-tu kur bi-ra-a-te 

sd kur kar-du-ni-ds a-na mi-si-ri KUR-/a 
10) w'-ter ta kur ne-er-be sd kur Z?a-i 6/-te~i a-tf/ 
) kur has-mar a-na un.mes KUR-a am-n[u ina] 

kur. kur.mes 
12) sd a-pe-iu-shna-a-ni Lu,GAR-/m.MES-a 

) al-ta-kan ur-du-ti u-^pu^-su 
Col. v 

uru kal-hu mah-ra-a sd md sul-ma-nu-SAG man 

kur as-sur nun a-//& pa-ni-ia 

du-w5 uru 5w-w e-na-ah~ma is-lai uru 5«-m 

ana es-su-te ab-ni un.mes 

ki-sit-ti sv-ia sd kur. kur.mes sd a-pe-lu-si- 

na-ni kur su-hi kur la-qe-e 

a-na si-hfr-ti-M uru sir-qu sd e-ber-ti id pw- 

kur za-mu-a ana pat gim-ri-sd KUR.E-a-di-mi 
u kur //af-te 5a' m lu-bar-na kur pa-ti-na-a-a 
al-qa-a ina lib-bi u-sd-as-bit du 6 ia-be-ru lu 
u-na-ki-ir a-di ugu a.mes 



7) lu u-sd-pil 1 me 20 tik-pi ina mus-pa-li lu u- 

ta-bi E d BAD U d MAS 



iii 8b - iv 13) When Assur, the lord who called 
my name (and) who makes my sovereignty 
supreme, placed (iii 10) his merciless weapon in 
my lordly arms, I felled with the sword the exten- 
sive troops of the Lullumu in battle. With the 
help of the gods Sama§ and Adad, the gods my 
supporters, [I thundered like the god Adad, the 
devastator, against the troops of the lands Nairi, 
Habhu, the Subaru, and the land Niribu. The 
king who] subdued [(the territory stretching) from 
the opposite bank of the Tigris to ..., the entire 
land Laqu, (and)] (iv 1) the land Suhu including 
the land Rapiqu: he conquered from the source of 
the River Subnat to the source of the Tigris. I 
brought within the boundaries of my land (the 
territory stretching) from the passes of Mount 
Kirruru to the land Gilzanu, (iv 5) from the oppo- 
site bank of the Lower Zab to the city TTl-Ban 
which is upstream from the city Zaban, from the 
city Tll-sa-Abtani to the city Trl-sa-Zabdani, ihe 
cities Hirimu, Harutu, (which are) fortresses of 
Kardunias. I accounted (the people) (iv 10) from 
the passes of Mount Babitu to Mount Hasmar as 
people of my land. [In] the lands over which I 
gained dominion 1 always appointed my gover- 
nors. They entered (lit. 'performed') servitude. 



v l-7a) The ancient city Calah which Shal- 
maneser, king of Assyria, a prince who preceded 
me, had built — this city had become dilapidated; 
it lay dormant. I built this city anew. I took peo- 
ple which I had conquered from the lands over 
which I had gained dominion, from the land 
Suhu, (from) the entire land Laqu, (from) the city 
Sirqu which is at the crossing of the Euphrates, 
(from) the entire land of Zamua, from the lands 
Bit-Adini and Hatti, (and) from Lubarna, the 
Patinu. I settled (them) therein. I cleared away 
the old ruin hill (and) dug down to water level; I 
sank (the foundation pit) down to a depth of 120 
layers of brick. 

v 7b-13a) I founded therein the temple of the 
deities Enlil and Ninurta, the temple of the deities 



286 



Ashurnasirpal ii A.0.101.28 



8) 
9) 
10) 



e d e-a u d dam-kUna e d isKUR u d sa-la e d 30 e 
d gu-la 

E d GASAN-KUR E.KUR-fl/ DING1R.MES GAL.MES 

ina qe-reb-su lu-u ad-di u-si-im 

li-sar-rih gis.ur.mes gis.eren ugu-M u-kin 

gis.ig.mes giS.eren DU-wi [si]~kdt ka[r-h] 

1 1) zabar u-re-ki-is ina KA.MES~$i~na u-re-eUte 
u- ma-am zabar el-^lP 

12) Du-rwiH ina e ^na-ma^-ri-si-na u~sd-zi-iz 
ur.mah.mes na 4 pi-li BABBAR-e i"na 4 pa-ru- 

13) Tdu-w5 ind^ ka.mes-sw-/z« ti-M-zi-iz nun-w 
egir-w //iflf man.meS-ah dumu.mes-/^ sa a?-swr 

14) a-na lu.sipa-w/ kur fls-swr i-na-bu-su an-hu- 
ut e.kur su-^a-ti ud-difi Mv-ka ki mu-zc 

15) /«a Ki-su-nu ^gurT as-sur en nun-m 
d r~iNANNA gasan"! murub 4 u m£ [ina tahazf\- 
sd man.mes-w 

16) a-sar taq-ru-ub-te am-mar [UbbTsu u]-sam~ 
su-su 



Ea and Damkina, the temple of the deities Adad 
and §ala, the temple of the god Sin, the temple of 
the goddess Gula, (and) the temple of the goddess 
Sarrat-niphi, temples of the great gods, (v 10) I 
decorated (them) in a splendid fashion. I installed 
over them (lit. 'it') cedar beams (and) made cedar 
doors, I fastened (them) with bronze knobbed 
nails (and) hung (them) in their doorways. I made 
(replicas of) beasts in shining bronze (and) sta- 
tioned (them) in their towers. I made (replicas of) 
lions in white limestone (and) /?#rwta-alabaster 
(and) stationed (them) at their doors, 
v 13b- 16) O later prince among the kings of my 
sons whom Assur will name for the shepherdship 
of Assyria: restore the weakened (portions) of this 
temple; write your name with mine (and) return 
(my inscriptions) to their places so that Assur, the 
lord, the prince, (and) the goddess Istar, mistress 
of battle and conflict, [in wars] with kings on the 
battlefield will cause him to achieve success. 



29 



This text, known only from a squeeze (now destroyed — see the intro- 
duction to A. 0.1 01.1) published by Le Gac, no doubt originally came 
from Calah. The type of object upon which it was inscribed is un- 
known. The text is very fragmentary but can be restored from parallel 
passages in other texts, particularly A.0.101.28. Only part of the last 
line of the introduction is preserved (line 1'); this is an invocation of a 
god (not a goddess — note the masculine forms rem-w and sk-ka in 
lines T and 4' respectively) whose name is not preserved. It then has 
the name, titles, and general conquests of Ashurnasirpal (lines 2-8') 
followed by a description of the building of Calah (lines 9-17'). The 
text concludes (lines 18-25') with blessings and curses. 



1907 Le Gac, Asn. pp. 195-96 (copy) 
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 45-46 (study) 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 ci 16 (translation) 



v 8.1 [gu-la]: restored from Le Gac's E.100. v 9.1 [u-si]-im: 
restored from Le Gac's E.100. v 10.1 u-[kin ... uv-uS si]-kdt 
ka[r-ri]: restored from Le Gac's E.100. Instead of sikkat karri 
'knobbed nails' parallels (A. 0.1 01. 30 line 63 and A. 0.101. 50 
line 30) have meseri 'bands*, v 11.1 u-re-[et-te ... zabar]: 
restored from Le Gac*s E.100. v 12.1 [na 4 pi-li babbar-?]: 



restored from Le Gac's E.100. v 13.1 [ina man.meS-/*/ ... as- 
sur): restored from Le Gac's E.100. v 14.1 [an-hu-ut ... mu- 
ia\: restored from Le Gac's E.100. v 15.1 [murub 4 ... 
man.meS-/?/]: restored from Le Gac's E.100. v 16.1 [u-sam-su- 

su}: restored from Le Gac's E.100. 



Ashurnasirpal n A.0.101.29 
TEXT 



287 



Lacuna 


1') 


[- 


.] REM-M [...] 


2') 




.] man la sd-na-an [...] 


3') 




.] d MAs na-ra-am [...] 


4') 




.] na-ra-am &k-ka nun [...] 


5') 




.] tu-sar-si-du bala-Su et-[lu ...] 


6') 




.] siPA-ti kvr-su ra-bis ib-[...] 


7') 




. man]-// en-// kis-sii-ti sd [...] 


8') 




.] le-^a-a-ku er-sd-ku [...] 



9') [.. 


10') [.. 


11') [•■ 


12') [.. 


13') [.. 


14') [.. 


15') [.. 


16') [.. 


17') [.. 



180 
19') [ 
20') 
21') 

22') 
23') 



.] kur as-sur nun-w a-lik pa-[ni-a ..„] 

. ab-ri\i(l) un.mes ki-sit-ti [,..] 

. $i-hir]-ti-rscP sd uru [...] 

.] ma-a-du-te kur hat-ta [...] 

.] e d BAD u d nin-urta e [...] 

.] e d 30 u d gu-la [...] 

.] u-sar-ri-ih gis.[ur.mes ...] 

.] dv-us ina [me]-sir [siparri .,.] 

.] ina su-me-[li(l) (x)] u-[sd-zi-iz{*!) ....] 



..] ar-ku-ii ina man.mes-^/ | 
..] an-h[u-u\t e.kur.mes [.. 
. . ] a-na ds-r[i] -su-nu [. . . ] 
..] a-sar taq-[ru-ub]-ti [...] 
..] an-nu ki-i-nu [i]-pal-[su 
..] a-na pa-an e.kur-^w [... 



24') [...] sd-ni-^ma^ i-sd-ka-nu [...] 

25') [...] d INANNA NIN MURUB 4 U ME [. 

Lacuna(?) 



Lacuna 

Y) the compassionate [god to whom it is good to 
pray ...]; 

2-8') [Ashurnasirpal], unrivalled king [of the 
universe, king of all the four quarters, sun(god) 
of all people, chosen of the gods Enlil and] 
Ninurta, beloved of [the gods Anu (and) Dagan, 
destructive weapon of the great gods, the pious], 
beloved of your heart, prince, [your favourite, 
whose priesthood is pleasing to your great divinity 
(and)] (5 f ) whose reign you established, [valiant] 
man [...] shepherdship of his land ... [...] my 
[sovereignty], my dominion, (and) my power 
which [...] I am capable, I am wise, [...]: 
9-170 [The ancient city Calah which Shalman- 
eser, king of] Assyria, a prince who preceded [me, 
had built — this city had become dilapidated; it 
lay dormant. I rebuilt this city. I took] people 
which I had conquered [from the lands over 
which I had gained dominion, from the land 
Suhu, (from) the] entire [land of Laqu], from the 
city [Sirqu which is at the crossing of the 
Euphrates ...] many, the land Hatti [...I founded 
therein] the temple of the deities Enlil and 
Ninurta, the temple of [the deities Ea and 
Damkina, the temple of the deities Adad and 
Sala], the temple of the god Sin and the goddess 
Gula [... I decorated (them)] (15') in a splendid 
fashion. [I installed over them cedar] beams (and) 
made [cedar doors. I fastened (them)] with 
[bronze] bands [and hung them in their doorways. 
(...) 1 made ... and] erected [them to the right 
and] left [at the doorways (...)] 
18'-230 O later [prince] among the kings [my sons 
whom Assur will name for the shepherdship of 
Assyria: restore] the weakened (portions) of the 
temples; [write your name with mine (200 (and) 
return (my inscriptions)] to their places [so that 
Assur ... in wars with kings] on the battlefield 
[will cause him to achieve success ...] will answer 
a firm yes [...] before his temple [...] 
24'-250 [(As for the one who erases my inscrip- 
tion ...)] puts it in another place [...: may ...] the 
goddess Istar, mistress of battle and conflict [...] 
Lacuna(?) 



r For possible restorations see A.0. 101.1 i 9 and for REM-ii 
see the note to that line. 2'-5' For possible restorations see 
A.0.101.28 i 7b - ii 1. 7 Cf. A.0.101.1 i 31. 9'-21' For 



possible restorations see A.0.101.28 v 1-16. 16' See the note 
to A.0.101.28 v 10. 24' Cf. A.O.101.38 line 41. 



288 



Ashurnasirpal n A.0.101.30 



30 



This unique text is engraved on a large stone slab found in the North 
West Palace at Calah by a British expedition led by Mallowan. The 
text is unique because it gives the menu for the lavish banquet cele- 
brating the dedication of the palace. The first part of the text (lines 
1-19) is an abbreviated version of the Standard Inscription 
(A.0.101.23) with the chronologically significant variant 'to the land 
Urartu' instead of 'to the interior of the land Nirib' (see the note to 
A.0. 101.1 iii 122). The text goes on (lines 20-77) to describe the erec- 
tion of the palace and various temples at Calah and gives a detailed 
list of the names of the different species of trees imported and planted 
by Ashurnasirpal. Two further passages, which have parallels in other 
inscriptions (lines 78-101), concern the reconstruction of the land in 
general and hunting exploits respectively (see the introduction to 
A. 0.87.1). Finally (lines 102-54), there is the lengthy list of the vast 
quantity of food and drink consumed by the tens of thousands of 
guests invited to the banquet. 



COMMENTARY 



The stone slab is in the Mosul Museum (ND 1104) and 
was collated by Postgate, The object was discovered in 
Room EA of the North West Palace and measures 
104.5x128 cm. The text is inscribed in four columns, 
the first on the obverse, cols, ii and iii on the reverse, 
and col. iv on the left side: i = lines 1-52, ii = lines 



53-94, iii = lines 95-137, iv = lines 138-54. 

In this text it should be noted that only one palace is 
discussed and that the word e.gal = ekailu which ap- 
pears before each of various woods named means 'a 
part, wing' of the entire structure. See the introduction 
to A.0.87.L 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



Iraq 14 pp. 24-44 and pis. ii-vi (photo, copy, 
Assyria (London) pp. 



1952 Wiseman 

edition) 
1963 J. Laessete, People of Ancient 

103-106 (translation) 
1966 Mallowan, Nimrud 1 pp. 57-73 (provenance, study) 
1968 Brinkman, PKB pp. 186-87 and 391 n. 2188 (study) 



1969 Oppenheim, ANET 3 pp. 558-60 (translation) 

1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 36-39 (study) 

1973 Postgate, Governor's Palace pp. 238-40 (study) 

1976 Grayson, ARI 2 ci 17 (translation) 

1982 Borker-Klahn, Bildstelen no. 137 (photo, study) 



TEXT 



1) 
2) 

3) 

4) 
5) 



E.GAL 

d 



n a$-sur-PAB-A sid as-sur ni-sit d BAD u 



mas na-ra-am a-nim 
u d da-gan ka-su-us dingir.mes gal.mes man 
dan-nu man s[u sar ku]r as-sur a tukul-mas 

MAN GAL-e 

man d[an-n]i man su man kur aS-Sur a 10- 

ERIN.TAH MAN GAL-e MAN dari-ni MAN SU MAN 

kur as-sur-ma et-lu qar-du 
sd ina \G\lA\ukul-ti as-sur en-su du.du-Atw- 
ma ina mal-ki.MES sd kit-rat A-ta sd-nin-su 
ia-a tuk-m [lu].sipa tab-ra-a-te la a-di-ru 
gis.lal e-du-u 



l-20a) (Property of) the palace of Ashurnasirpal, 
vice-regent of Assur, chosen of the gods Enlil and 
Ninurta, beloved of the gods Anu and Dagan, 
destructive weapon of the great gods, strong king, 
king of the universe, [king of] Assyria, son of 
Tukultl-Ninurta (ii), great king, strong king, king 
of the universe, king of Assyria, son of Adad- 
nararl (ii) (who was) also great king, strong king, 
king of the universe, (and) king of Assyria; vali- 
ant man who acts with the support of Assur, his 
lord, and has no rival among the princes of the 
four quarters, (5) marvellous shepherd, fearless in 



Ashurnasirpal ii A. 0.101.30 



289 



gap-su sd ma-h[i-r\a la-a tuk-w man mu-sak- 

ni-is la kan-su-te 

sd nap-har kis-sat un.mes i-pe-lu man sd ina 

GIS Juklll-ti DINGIR.MES GAL.MES 

EN.MES-SW DU.I>V-ku-ma KUR.KUR.MES D[u]- 

si-na sv-su KVR-ud hur-sd-ni 

nv-M-nu i-pe-lu-ma bi-lat-su-nu i[m]-hu-ru 

so-bit li-i-ti 

sd-km li-i-te ugu DV-si-na kur.kur.mes man 

sd ta e-ber-tan 

id.hal.hal a-di kur lab-na-na u a.ab.ba 

gal- ft" kur la-qe-e 

ana si-hir-ti-sd kur su-hi a-di uru ra-pi-qi 

ana GiR.n.MES-sw 

u-sek-ni-sd ta sag e-ni id su-ub-na-at a-di 

kur u-ra-ar-ti su-s« KUR-ud ta kur ne-re-be 

sd kur kir-ru-ri 

a-di kur gil-za-ni ta e-ber-tan id za-6a 

k[lt]a a-di uRU.mj 6 -ba-a-ri 

sd el-la-an kur za-ban ta URU.DU 6 -5a-a6-ta- 

ff-m a-di uru.du 6 - 

M-za-ab-da-a-ni uru hi-ri-mu uru ha-ru-tu 

kur bi-ra-a-te 

sd kur kar-du-ni-ds ana mi-is-ri KUR-/a u-te-er 

ta kur ne-re-be sd uru ba-bi-te a-di kur 

has-mar a-na un.mes 

KUR-/tf am-nu as-sur en gal-w /«« w-ie 

IGLH.MES-5W e-mu-ra-ni-ma 

mal-ku-ti kis-su-ti ina ka-su ku e-g m as-sur- 

PAB-A 

man sa ta-na-ta-su da-na-nu ina hi-sa-at iib- 

bi-ia 

SO d i-a MAN ZU.AB WZ-A2W DAGAL-/W NIG.BA-rt/ 

uru kal-hu ana es-su-te as-bat du<, la-he-ru 

u-na-kin 

a-di ugu a.mes u-sd-pil ta ugu a.mes a-«a 

e-le-na 1 me 20 //£-/?/ tam-la-a 

ti-mal-li &mal gis.ttjg.meS 6. gal gis mes- 
kan-ni it gal gis e-re-ni t, gal gi§ sur-mi-ni 

i.GAL 

gis bu-uf-ni e.gal gis tar-pi- 7 e.gal gis me- 

e/z-n 8 e. gal.mes a-na mu-sab MAN-ti-ia 

a-na muI-ta-H-it BN-ti-ia ina qe-reb-sd ad-di 

u-si-im u-sar-rih gis.ig.mes 

gis e-re-ni gis sur-mi-ni gis ddp-ra-ni 

gis.tug.mes gis mes-kan-ni ina me-sir zabar 

u-re-kis ina KA.MES-si-na u-re-ti si-kdt kar-ri 

zabar al-me-si-na 

ta-na-ti qar-du-ti-a nfcfi pi-rik hur-sd-ni 

kur.kur.mes u a.ab.ba.mes at-tal-la-ku 

ki-sit-tu sd kur.kur.mes vu-si-na ina za-gi- 



battle, mighty flood-tide which has no opponent, 
the king who subdues those insubordinate (to 
him), he who rules all peoples, the king who acts 
with the support of the great gods, his lords, and 
has conquered all lands, gained dominion over all 
the highlands and received their tribute, capturer 
of hostages, (10) he who is victorious over all 
countries, the king who subdued (the territory 
stretching) from the opposite bank of the Tigris 
to Mount Lebanon and the Great Sea, the entire 
land of Laqu, (and) the land Suhu including the 
city Rapiqu; he conquered from the source of the 
River Subnat to the land Urartu; I brought within 
the boundaries of my land (the territory stretch- 
ing) from the passes of Mount Kirruru (15) to the 
land Gilzanu, from the opposite bank of the 
Lower Zab to the city Trl-Bari which is upstream 
from the land Zaban, from the city Til-sa-Abtani 
to the city Tll-sa-Zabdani, the cities Hirimu, 
Harutu, (which are) fortresses of Kardunias; I ac- 
counted (the people) from the pass of the city 
Babitu to Mount Hasmar as people of my land; 



20b-36a) Assur, the great lord, cast his eyes upon 
me and my authority (and) my power came forth 
by his holy command. Ashurnasirpal, the king 
whose strength is praiseworthy, with my cunning 
which the god Ea, king of the apsu f extensively 
wise, gave to me, the city Calah I took in hand 
for renovation. I cleared away the old rui